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  • 301.
    Malvius, Diana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Bergsjö, Dag
    Norell, Margareta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Use of measurements for information system introductions2009In: DETC 2008: PROCEEDINGS OF THE ASME INTERNATIONAL DESIGN ENGINEERING TECHNICAL CONFERENCES AND COMPUTERS AND INFORMATIONAL IN ENGINEERING CONFERENCE, VOL 3, PTS A AND B - 28TH COMPUTERS AND INFORMATION IN ENGINEERING CONFERENCE, NEW YORK: AMER SOC MECHANICAL ENGINEERS , 2009, p. 1319-1326Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Methods, or more correctly a lack of methods, for measuring information systems (IS) introductions are discussed in this paper. Industry practice when it comes to IS investment evaluation methods is reported on based on findings from nine in-depth interviews with IS/IT experts from automotive companies, IS suppliers and IS consultancy firms. It is suggested that identified and existing methods can be divided into three groups, namely: subjective estimations, economic measurements, and convenient measurements. It is concluded that no complete or reliable method for measuring the success of IS introductions are recognized within studied companies or reviewed literature. It is argued that IS introductions, being a costly investment to most companies, should be evaluated in order to obtain improved company and IS user value and to better justify the investment.

  • 302.
    Malvius, Diana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ivarsson, Martin
    Bergsjö, Dag
    Increasing performance in complex product development through structured information and cross-functional collaboration2010In: ASME INTERNATIONAL DESIGN ENGINEERING TECHNICAL CONFERENCES AND COMPUTERS AND INFORMATION IN ENGINEERING CONFERENCE, PROCEEDINGS, VOL 2, PTS A AND B, NEW YORK: AMER SOC MECHANICAL ENGINEERS , 2010, p. 1043-1050Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A joint comparison between two separate case studies is presented in this paper. The studies targeted an original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and a selected software supplier to the OEM. Two different measuring methods based on a quantitative and a qualitative approach were used in the compared studies. These two different perspectives are integrated by cross analysis and triangulation into a synthetic understanding of what problems are in common for the two companies and how these interrelate. The studies, with focus on information management issues aimed at identifying improvement areas for performance in product development. It is concluded that factors like cross-functional collaboration and information structure were targeted as areas for critical improvement in both case studies.

  • 303. Martini, Antonella
    et al.
    Gastaldi, Luca
    Corso, Mariano
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Laugen, Björge Timenes
    Continuously innovating the study of continuous innovation: from actionable knowledge to universal theory in continuous innovation research2012In: International Journal of Technology Management, ISSN 0267-5730, E-ISSN 1741-5276, Vol. 60, no 3-4, p. 157-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whereas there is a wealth of contributions on the topic of continuous innovation (CI) in firms, there is still a clear need for works addressing how the existing knowledge on combining various types of innovation with operational excellence and strategic flexibility in a fruitful manner. Any attempt to generate actionable knowledge about CI that at the same time lives up to the traditional academic requirements of rigor and relevance poses significant challenges to researchers, calling for a more comprehensive and multi-faceted methodological approach, attending to multiple evaluation criteria and possible revisions of research roles and processes. This paper aims to recommend how to produce CI actionable knowledge and to take the first steps in progressing from this form of knowledge to a universal theory of CI. In doing so, the paper calls for a 'continuous innovation' in the way CI research is accomplished, and aims at proposing some key building blocks and evaluation criteria of a basic framework able to overcome the pre-paradigmatic stage in which CI research seems to be stuck. Moreover, it presents four papers from the International CINet Conference held in 2007 Goteborg (SE) and one from the 2010 Zurich.

  • 304. Mascia, D.
    et al.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Cicchetti, A.
    Network Prominence and Innovation: An Empirical Analysis of Corporate-Backed Biotech Spin-Offs2005In: Innovation: Management, Policy & Practice, ISSN 1447-9338, E-ISSN 2204-0226, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 7-22Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 305. Mascia, Daniele
    et al.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats G.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Organizing Ideation, Creativity and Innovation: The Role of Social Networks2012In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 458-459Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 306. Mascia, Daniele
    et al.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The Role of Social Networks in Organizing Ideation, Creativity and Innovation: An Introduction2015In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 102-108Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 307.
    Mascia, Daniele
    et al.
    University of Bologna, Dept. Management.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Di Vincenzo, Fausto
    D'Annunzio University of Chieti–Pescara, Dept. Economics.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Exploring the role of homophily in innovation jam: A case study2016In: Proceedings of the 17th Continuous Innovation Network Conference, Torino, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper social networks analysis techniques and regression model are used to conduct an exploratory analysis on how homophily influences ideation activity in an organizational ideation jam. A business unit within a Sweden-based global company has been selected in order to investigate our research question. Our findings document that self-organized ideation networks exhibit a tendency towards collaborative homophily, expressed in terms of similarity in participants’ attributes. Specifically, we found that most active people in posting ideas are also the most active in commenting on the ideas contributed by others. In addition, our results highlight that gender and belonging to the same organizational unit have an impact on the activity to post ideas and comments during the jam. Our results provide valuable input for innovation theory and for the management of ideation jams within organizations.

  • 308. Matsen, D.
    et al.
    Sakao, T.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Comparison of Design Research on Manufacturing Firms Moving Towards2007In: Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Engineering Design (ICED07), 2007, p. 771-772Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 309. Matzen, D.
    et al.
    Sakao, T.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Comparison of design research on manufacturing firms moving towards services2007In: Proceedings of ICED 2007, the 16th International Conference on Engineering Design, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corresponding to a steadily advancing integration of products and service operations in the manufacturing industry, a number of research groups within the design community are working with issues of integrated product and service development. Although closely related, the evolving groups focus on different research dimensions, and thus the terminologies and concepts used in research contributions are not fully compatible. This research attempts to promote and support an evolving collaboration between the different research groups within the design community, by analysing and comparing the key contribution areas of three of the existing groups, namely the groups of Integrated Product and Service Engineering, Service/Product Engineering and Product/Service-System development. A review of the groups' research contributions is carried out and the main characteristics' of their research is compared. Furthermore a comparative table of concepts and terms used in the contributions of the three groups in compiled. Based on this comparison, 3 focal research dimensions are identified: the product lifecycle dimension, the customer lifecycle dimension and the provider lifecycle dimension. Finally the research domains' linkages to other related research domains outside the design community are identified.

  • 310. Mendez, L.
    et al.
    Lopez, L.
    Ayala, Claudia
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Towards an OSS Adoption Business Impact Assessment: A goal-oriented approach2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 311.
    Mohapatra, Avantika
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Designing for AI: A collaborative framework to bridge the gap between designers and data scientists, and enabling designers to create human-centered AI products and services2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Emerging advances in the realm of Artificial Intelligence (AI) have had a tremendous impact on various fields around us and society as a whole. As technologies continue to evolve, so will the role of designers when it comes to using AI. It has the potential to be the next tool designers use to create human-centered products and services. To truly understand AI and harness its capabilities, it is crucial to demystify the term and its inner workings. This thesis is explorative research to shed light on collaborative intelligence and how designers can harness the capabilities of AI. It further explores how to integrate the principles of design and AI to create AI-driven products and services. In addition to background research conducted on both design and AI, the importance of both these fields’ intersection was also researched upon. The project followed the Double Diamond design process principles, consisting of four phases: discover, define, develop, and deliver. This process was then used again to design a framework that bridges the gap between AI & design principles. This research aimed to explore how designers could use AI to develop new products and services. The project resulted in a framework that guides designers on how to get acclimated to AI and uses a specific set of principles to design for AI. It contains concepts necessary to understand the different aspects of AI and aims to build a common language amongst all AI practitioners. The framework also serves as a basic outline of a workshop that provides various design methods that AI practitioners can use to ideate AI-driven solutions.

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  • 312. Mongelli, L.
    et al.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Continue or break with the past?: On the role of competence leveraging in periods of technological substitution2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 313.
    Nilsson, Mats
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Fryxell Westerberg, Annika
    Wadell, Carl
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Borg, Jörgen
    Grip strengthening glove to improve hand function in patients with neuromuscular disorders: A feasibility studyIn: Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1743-0003Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 314.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Exploring problem finding in a medical device company2012In: Measuring Business Excellence, ISSN 1368-3047, E-ISSN 1758-8057, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 66-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the implementation and use of a systematic and collaborative approach for environmental scanning in a medical device company aiming to identify opportunities for both incremental and radical innovation. The study seeks to address the present gap in research on challenges associated with achieving a balance between exploration and exploitation on a micro level. Design/methodology/approach: The implementation and use of a systematic and collaborative approach for environmental scanning to support the identification and analysis of opportunities for radical and incremental innovation and its related challenges is described and analyzed. Experiences and observations from a single case study, conducted in an R&D organization in an international medical device company during two years forms the basis for the study. During 2009-2011 an empirical investigation at an R&D unit composed of 200 employees at a Swedish site in an international medical device company, known as a market and pioneering leader was conducted. A qualitative evaluation and analysis was utilized using the gathering of relevant data from specified documents and surveys, compilation of databases in use for external information search, observations during formal meetings and semi-structured interviews with individuals representing different departments and hierarchical levels to collect substantive and relevant data. Findings: The study points to the importance of balancing the degree of formalization in the process in order to motivate different individuals and to create learning and innovation outcomes. Research limitations/implications: The study contributes to the body of innovation management literature by providing empirical data on how companies are organizing work to systematically acquire and use information about events and trends in the external environment defined as environmental scanning as means for building innovation capabilities in practice. Practical implications: The selection of direction and scope of search, the design and implementation of the scanning process and IT tool, the mechanisms needed to integrate different hierarchical levels and functions to identify new ideas and strategy implications are found to be factors critical to manage. Originality/value: This study provides rich multi-level longitudinal empirical data and addresses the current gap in research on challenges associated with achieving a balance between exploration and exploitation on a micro level. It specifically contributes to the need to better understand how firms build capabilities to identify opportunities and problems in the early phases of product innovation when aiming to generate both radical and incremental innovations.

  • 315.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Making innovation everyone´s business: Using routines and controls2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary high-technology companies are under pressure to deliver short-term profits and to serve the market demands for future innovative solutions. An increased interest for alternative innovations such as new services or business models to be recognized in parallel to new technologies results in that companies are increasingly attempting to engage all their employees in innovation. This requires attention to what ways of working need to be changed in order to better support employees in pursuing both induced and autonomous initiatives i.e. to realize ideas that are aligned to and those that deviate from a company´s existing strategy and operational models. A key challenge is related to understanding how to develop organizational routines; how to make use of management controls to support both types of initiatives despite their different needs and, make the changes in routines and controls become accepted throughout the organization. Surprisingly few studies deal with understanding how managers or assigned employees in companies go about to address these issues.

    The overall purpose of this thesis is to increase knowledge on how innovation capabilities are built when involving a broad base of employees in innovation in large and mature organizations. More specifically, this thesis seeks to understand what characterizes organizational routines and what are the consequences from using different types of management controls supporting employees in pursuing both induced and autonomous initiatives. The thesis is made up of four qualitative studies that explore how a planned effort to deliberately involve a broad base of employees in innovation is performed and experienced by actors representing different hierarchical levels and functions in two large and world-leading high-technology companies.

    The research shows how involving employees in innovation can be made possible through a conscious and creative design and usage of routines and controls. The thesis shows that an upper management call for an increased number of induced and autonomous initiatives results in the use of diverse approaches to achieve this goal even within the same organization due to personal beliefs and experiences of what innovation needs and due to a bias towards either personnel or action management controls. Further, a strong focus on developing organizational routines to initiate innovation was observed at the expense of routines for selection and development of new initiatives. The studies show also that the outcome is dominated by incremental process improvements and the underlying reason to this result is discussed in this thesis.

    Four characteristics were identified that distinguish organizational routines used in settings successfully supporting employees in pursuing both induced and autonomous initiatives : i) routines targeting selection, development and retention in an innovation process, ii) routines were frequently used and were somewhat linked to other routines, iii) routines to support resource owners and/or customers to come in direct contact with innovators to evaluate and develop new ideas in an atmosphere characterized by a mix of playfulness and seriousness were developed and finally iv) a combination of personnel and actions controls were used. Implications for innovation management, organizational routine and management control research are discussed.

    Finally, a re-thinking and re-design of the performance management is suggested, taking into consideration the potential in using measurement and goal setting to provide effective means to support both induced and autonomous initiatives. The studies showed that the use of performance measurement can act as a trigger for managers to take actions. In addition, the thesis identified the value in improving the understanding of how result controls, specifically goals, can be formulated and used to stimulate different types of innovative behaviors.

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    Thesis
  • 316.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Anna
    Sandvik Coromant.
    Developing radical innovations: Introducing Tangibility, Tolerance and Tightness2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates what actions can be taken in order to support the development

    of radical innovations. The contribution adds to our understanding of how radical

    innovation projects develops over time and what and how managerial actions can be

    taken in order to support this development. Six radical innovation projects from two

    different empirical settings have been investigated though semi-structured interviews

    and the use of a project journey mapping technique allowing for a combination of both

    narrative and critical incident data collection. The data was analyzed in Nvivo. The

    results revealed three different flows of activities for radical innovation projects that

    iteratively and interactively took place over time from the emergence of the idea to

    commercialization, namely: (1) the configuration of the product system, (2) the

    understanding of customer value and (3) the experimentation of understanding of how

    to monetizing value form radical innovation projects. Three mechanisms in order to

    manage these flows are presented: (1) making the radical innovation and its potential

    more tangible, (2) creating a tolerance for the uncertainties and ambiguities related to

    the innovation during its development in the organization and (3) handling the

    management control tightness of the project in order for it to make it to the

    commercialization. Two main practical implications of the results are discussed. First

    of all, organizations that aim to develop radical innovations need to understand and

    support the three different flows of activities early on and what it implies in terms of

    competences needed and resources allocated. Second, the presented mechanisms

    provide distinct examples of actions that can be taken in order to support the

    development flows of radical innovations.

  • 317.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Management controls and ambidexterity2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 318.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager Stier, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ingels, Astrid
    KTH.
    Sannerud, Ylva
    KTH.
    Involving Users in the Development of Digital Business Platforms2022In: 29TH IPDMC: INNOVATION AND PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT CONFERENCE: INNOVATION IN THE ERA OF CLIMATE CHANGE, 2022Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper aims to examine how users come into play in developing a digital business platform. User involvement in a successful Swedish digital transaction platform serving buyers and sellers of secondhand items is investigated using interviews and observations. The study contributes to user involvement literature and the emergent literature on digital platforms as socio-technical systems by showing how digital platforms attend to what we refer to as active and passive user involvement. The findings highlight the importance of investing in personal user relationships and spending significant time and effort to learn from data collected through several tools and sources. The paper also questions the traditional product development process and its emphasis on front-loading. It discusses back-loading, i.e., time and effort spent postlaunch, as an alternative approach to meet the platform's need for agility and speed and continuous improvement and updates.

  • 319.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Malmberg, Patrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    In Search of Problems Worth Solving - Exploring the Management of External Knowledge to Build Innovation Capabilities in a Medical Device Company2012In: IFKAD - KCWS 2012: 7th International Forum On Knowledge Asset Dynamics, 5th Knowledge Cities World Summit: Knowledge, Innovation And Sustainability: Integrating Micro & Macro Perspectives / [ed] Schiuma, G; Spender, JC; Yigitcanlar, T, 2012, p. 2455-2487Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - In this paper, the implementation and use of a systematic and collaborative approach for environmental scanning to support the identification and analysis of opportunities for radical and incremental innovation is described and analysed. Experiences and observations from a single case study, conducted in an R&D organization in an international medical device company during two years forms the basis for the study. The study contributes to the body of innovation management literature by providing empirical data on how companies are organizing work to systematically acquire and use information about events and trends in the external environment defined as environmental scanning as means for building innovation capabilities in practice. Design/methodology/approach - During 2009-2011 an empirical investigation at an R&D unit composed of 200 employees at a Swedish site in an international medical device company, known as a market and pioneering leader was conducted. A qualitative evaluation and analysis was utilized using the gathering of relevant data from specified documents and surveys, compilation of databases in use for external information search, observations during formal meetings and semi-structured interviews with individuals representing different departments and hierarchical levels to collect substantive and relevant data. Originality/value - This study provide rich multi-level longitudinal empirical data and addresses the current gap in research on how firms are working to create new knowledge improve based on external information and knowledge as means to build innovation capabilities in practice. It specifically contributes to the need to better understand how firms build capabilities to identify opportunities and problems in the early phases of product innovation when aiming to generate both radical and incremental innovations. Practical implications - The selection of direction and scope of search, the design and implementation of the scanning process and IT tools, the mechanisms needed to integrate different hierarchical levels and functions to identify new ideas and strategy implications are found to be factors critical to manage. The result from the study points to the importance of balancing the degree of formalization in the process in order to motivate different individuals and to create learning and innovation outcomes.

  • 320.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    DESIGN for TEACHER TRAINING - To FACILITATE STUDENT TEAMS WORKING with REAL-LIFE SUSTAINABILITY CHALLENGES2020In: Proceedings of the Design Society: DESIGN Conference, Cambridge University Press (CUP) , 2020, p. 1785-1794Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study is to contribute to the knowledge on how to develop students' skills and capabilities required when addressing complex societal challenges in practice. In this paper we are investigating the design and implementation of a teacher training module focusing on improving teacher's ability to facilitate students' teams learning and collaboration skills. The feedback and learning from the design and implementation of the module at universities in Botswana, Kenya and Sweden is presented and discussed in this paper.

  • 321.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Creating organizational routines to foster innovation2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 322.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Exploring the Use of Innovation Performance Measurement to Build Innovation Capability in a Medical Device Company2014In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 183-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to increase their innovation capability, many organizations make the effort to actively change their R&D working practices. In parallel, measurement is an important issue with regard to managing innovation. In this paper, innovation management and measurement theory are combined with empirical investigations of experiences of using measurement as a support to the development of innovation capability in practice. The paper reports results from analysis of measurement data and a semi-structured interview study, encompassing 19 interviews with managers and engineers involved in the current change activities of the case company. The study reveals that various innovation measurement mechanisms are used in different departments in the R&D organization, reflecting the diverse views of what constitutes innovation that dominate in each group, as well as the group's level of involvement in the on-going building of innovation capability - from heavily involved (innovation leaders) to attentiveness from a distance (innovation laggards and progress evaluators). This, together with challenges related to identifying relevant metrics to support both incremental and radical innovation and managing existing reward and goal-setting systems, is seen to have implications on the capability development in the organization requiring attention to how innovation measurement is designed, implemented and used in practice.

  • 323.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Manage To Measure And Measure To Manage: Experiences From Using Performance Measurement In The Early Phases Of Product Innovation2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 324.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Selecting and developing organizational routines to support innovationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Creating conditions conducive to innovation requires companies to consider a broad range of aspects and not the least identifying and implementing new processes and routines. The purpose of this paper is to address what innovation routines are selected and developed in a company with the ambition to involve a broad base of its employees in innovation. It investigates the similarities and differences of organizational routines selected in four different units in a large global R&D organization and analyses reasons to and consequences of these differences. The study shows that how innovation is regarded in an organization will play an important role, that addressing innovation as a process is critical and that the conflicts emerging when people strive to create new routines that largely deviate from normal operations can become a valuable source for innovation capabilities. By combining innovation management research with recent organizational routines literature this paper is able to identify some interesting patterns both when it comes to how innovation routines are selected and developed and when it comes to what routine characteristics can be more or less effectively combined to support innovation. The study aims to contribute to the emerging literature exploring intra-organizational evolution of ideas and routines.

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  • 325.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh-Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Magnus P.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Innovating every day: making innovation everyone´s businessManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the efforts of a large company when assigning everyone in the organization to work with innovation, and its implication on managing radical and incremental innovation. The analysis rests on an interview investigation within a global high-technology company with 31 managers in different contexts. These managers have been identified as top performers on innovation in an employee survey conducted in the organization. The study illustrates how a large mature organization has involved a broad base of its employees in innovation, emphasizing that innovation is a daily effort and the actions performed in different parts of the organization. The results reveal that it is feasible to both empower people in the organization by having a bottom-up approach supporting daily incremental innovation and combine this with more systematic approaches for managing and enabling radical innovation.

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  • 326.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Samuelsson, Mikael
    Graduate School of Business, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Meyer, Camille
    Graduate School of Business, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Social entrepreneurs’ use of spatial bricolage to create frugal innovation in a divided urban setting2022In: Africa Journal of Management, ISSN 2332-2373, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 298-323Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 327.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Inducing radical innovation or innovation management as usual2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 328.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Shibwabo Kasamani, B.
    Hede Mortensen, Julia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Stevanovic, D.
    Wanyang, M.
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Papalambros, P. Y.
    Challenges and Opportunities for Enabling Mutual Learning and Collaboration in Design and Innovation for Sustainable Development in Africa and Beyond2022In: Proceedings of the Design Society, Cambridge University Press , 2022, Vol. 2, p. 1071-1080Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global collaboration and mutual learning in design are put forth as means to address the UN SDGs. This paper draws upon experiences in the Design Society's AFRICA-DESIGN initiative to build a network of design academics and practitioners based in Africa with a focus on design for sustainable development. We identify education and social sustainability as particular opportunities and challenges, highlighting the critical element of mutual learning in the collaboration process.

  • 329.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Wallin, Johanna
    Benaim, Andre
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Berntsson, Richard
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Re-thinking Innovation Measurement to Manage Innovation-Related Dichotomies in Practice2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 330.
    Noralm, Yasa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Taki, Noor
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Mojligheter och utmaningar med produktplattformar2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Att kunna leva upp till de flesta kunders behov samtidigt som att vara i framkanten av dagens snabba teknikutveckling med effektiva tillverkningsmetoder där pengar och resurser sparas kan upplevas som väldigt utmanande. Företag strävar efter metoder som kan uppfylla alla de tre ovannämnda faktorerna. En metod som är ganska intressant inom ämnet kallas för produktplattformar. Produktplattformar är något som används inom olika industrier och för olika slutprodukter som bilar, verktyg, generatorer, grävmaskiner, surfplattor och många andra produkter. Användningen av produktplattformar innebär att produkter deriveras från en gemensam uppsättning av komponenter och tillverkningsprocesser. Produktplattformar kan alltså ses som en divergent metod vad gäller skapandet av produkter och värde till kunden. Avsikten är att etablera en skalbarhet och bandbredd genom en gemensamhet bland en uppsättning produkter.

    Med produktplattformar strävar man att uppnå produktvariation med så lite spendering av resurser som möjligt. På grund av dessa anledningar är produktplattformar relevant att ta hänsyn till från ett effektiviseringsperspektiv. Avsikten med detta arbete är att undersöka hur applikationen av produktplattformsbaserade produkter skiljer sig i olika företag och dessutom vilka eventuella möjligheter och utmaningar som uppkommer som konsekvens av plattformsarbetet. Syftet med arbetet är att analysera och belysa de nämnda delarna av ämnet för att öka förståelsen av produktplattformar. Mer specifikt behandlar denna studie vilka möjligheter och utmaningar som uppkommer vid användandet av produktplattformar i produktutvecklingsprocessen.

    Studien inleds med en litteratursökning om produktplattformar för att etablera en teoretisk grund att utgå ifrån. Sedan presenteras en kvalitativ studie i form av intervjuer med olika produktutvecklande företag som använder sig av produktplattformar. Intervjuerna ger en inblick i hur produktplattformar används i praktiken och utgör sedan en empiri att jämföra med den teoretiska datan som etablerats. Dessutom utförs en analys av den empiriska datan som återkopplar till den presenterade litteraturstudien. På sådant sätt utgör analysen en jämförelse av teorin och praktiken (empirin) så att slutsatser kan dras om vilka möjligheter och utmaningar som skapas med produktplattformar.

    Analyserna av resultaten jämför de kvalitativa studierna med den etablerade teorin där utmaningarna och möjligheterna med produktplattformar i näringslivet identifieras. Därefter diskuteras det även om varför resultatet blev som det blev och författarnas reflektioner av analysen. Slutligen sammanställs de slutsatser som kunde dras från den utförda studien. Slutsatserna som dragits med avseende på möjligheter är att resurser besparas, ett bredare kundspann skapas och att produktstödet förenklas. Slutsatserna med avseende på utmaningar visade sig vara hanteringen av entydigheten i ett projekt, kommunikationen och koordineringen mellan team, trade-off mellan bandbredd och skalbarhet av plattformen. Dessutom även ändringar i kundkrav, snabb utveckling av teknik och yttre parters påverkan som till exempel ett tillverkningsföretag som förser komponenter till en plattform.

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  • 331.
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    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
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    Genusperspektiv i teknisk forskning1996In: Genusperspektiv i forskningen, Stockholm: Norstedts , 1996, 26Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 334.
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    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Integration: a core skill in a university of its time1998In: Science, Technology and Society, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 1998Chapter in book (Refereed)
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    Managing Integrated Product Development2002In: NordDesign, Copenhagen  2002, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
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    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Managing Integrated Product Development1999In: Critical Enthusiasm / [ed] N. H. Mortensen, J. Sigurjónsson, 1999Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 337.
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Stöd för produktutveckling i samverkan1992Book (Refereed)
  • 338.
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The use of DFM, FMEA, and OFD as tools for concurrent engineering in product development processes1993In: proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED 1993, vol 2, The Hague, the Netherlands, 1993Conference paper (Refereed)
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    Design for Competition: Swedish DFX experiences1996In: Design for X: Concurrent Engineering Imperatives / [ed] G. Q. Huang, Chapman, Hall, 1996Chapter in book (Refereed)
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    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
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    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Kaulio, Matti
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Odenrick, Pär
    Olsson, Annika
    Så skapar du det innovativa företaget2008In: Innovationsföråga: Innovation capability / [ed] Olsson A., Stockholm: PIEp , 2008, p. 18-39Chapter in book (Other academic)
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    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Grimheden, MartinKTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.Leifer, LarrySkogstad, P.Badke-Schaub, P.
    Proceedings of ICED'09, Volume 9, Human Behavior in Design2009Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
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    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
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    Proceedings of ICED'09, Volume 10, Design Education and Life-long Learning2009Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
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    Proceedings of ICED'09, Volume 2, Design Theory and Research Methodology2009Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
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