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  • 301.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Athabasca University, Canada.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Emotional presence in a relationship of inquiry: The case of one-to-one online math coaching2016In: Online Learning, ISSN 1092-8235, Vol. 20, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emotions have been confirmed to be a critical component of the process of learning. In the online Community of Inquiry theoretical framework, and the recently suggested online Relationship of Inquiry framework, emotions are considered a subsection of social presence. In this study, the concept of emotional presence is examined. This examination occurs within the Relationship of Inquiry framework, developed to analyze one-to-one online coaching. A survey of online coaches and a transcript coding procedure from the online coaching service Math Coach provide the data for the study. The results indicate that a Relationship of Inquiry framework consisting of cognitive, social, teaching, and emotional presence enhances the exploration of one-to-one online coaching settings. The interpretation of these results identifies emotional presence as an essential and distinct part of one-to-one online math coaching.

  • 302.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Examining a learning-driven relationship of inquiry: Discerning emotional presence in online math coaching2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores emotional presence in a student-student online coaching setting. In this learner-driven, online exchange, students enrolled in a teaching program assist K-12 math students using an online relationship of inquiry model. Adapted from the online community of inquiry model, one-to-one online interaction is studied for multiple types of online presence and, in particular, the existence and possible effect of emotional presence. Preliminary findings identify that emotional presence exists as a separate experience in the online coaching exchange, but scores lower than other types of presence.

  • 303.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik. Athabasca University.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Online Coaching as a Relationship of Inquiry: Mathematics, online help, and emotional presence2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Math Coach program provides help with mathematics using online coaching. In the program, communication using text-based CMC with additional whiteboard capacity is used. Students range from sixth to ninth year of compulsory school, and upper secondary school (aged 12–19). Coaches are enrolled from students at teacher training colleges. Stenbom et al. (2012) introduced a framework for analyzing online coaching, the Relationship of Inquiry. That framework is a modification of the well-researched and verified theoretical framework the online Community of Inquiry (Garrison et al., 2000, 2001). Survey data and transcript analysis indicates that emotional presence is a natural part of a four-element framework for analysis of one-to-one online coaching. Abbreviations, special words and symbols, such as emoticons, are used regularly as an instrument to enhance the visibility between the coach and coachee. It serves as a replacement for face-to-face non-verbal communication. Also, sharing of emotions and moods between two individuals as people and about the coaching activity are common.

    This presentation will review the proposed framework for online coaching consisting of cognitive, social, teaching and emotional presence. A special focus will be on the role emotion may play in such environments. Beyond discussion of theory, implications for practice and training of online coaches will be discussed in an interactive session with guided dialogue. 

  • 304.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    How to setup a student-student online coaching project at teacher education in Sweden2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mathcoach (www.mattecoach.se) and Swedishcoach (www.svenskacoach.se) offers K-12 students help with their homework in Swedish for immigrants and mathematics online. The coaches are all students at teacher education. We will present how we work with the projects at four Swedish universities and inspire you to start your own netcoach project.

  • 305.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media technology and interaction design, MID.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media technology and interaction design, MID.
    Student-Student Online Coaching as a Relationship of Inquiry: An Exploratory Study from the Coach Perspective2012In: Journal of asynchronous learning networks, ISSN 1939-5256, E-ISSN 1092-8235, Vol. 16, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are comparatively few studies on one-to-one tutoring in online settings, even though it has been found to be an effective model. This paper explores student-student online coaching from the coach perspective. The empirical case is the project Math Coach, where K-12 students are coached by teacher students using instant messaging. This research is an adaptation of the community of inquiry model to an online coaching setting, which we refer to as a relationship of inquiry. The adapted model was used to gain a better understanding of the practice of online coaching by exploring the extent to which cognitive, social, and teaching presence exist in this case of online coaching. A relationship of inquiry survey was distributed to and answered by all active coaches (n=41). The adapted cognitive, social and teaching presence measures achieved an acceptable level of reliability. Differences between three presences, and their respective sub-categories, demonstrate a unique pattern of interaction between coaches and coachees in the online coaching environment. Findings suggest the online inquiry model fits as well for a relationship of inquiry as it does for a community of inquiry. The model provides valuable information for better understanding of online coaching.

  • 306.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik. Athabasca University.
    The relationship of Inquiry – a framework for design and analysis of online coaching2014In: NGL 2014: Next Generation Learning Conference, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation introduces the Relationship of Inquiry framework. It is a theoretical framework for design and analysis of online coaching, a one-to-one inquiry-based online learning activity. The video introduces the framework. During the seminar we will discuss this framework with data from an online coaching program called Math Coach.

  • 307.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Technology for learning.
    Jansson, Malin
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Technology for learning.
    Hulkko, Annelie
    KTH.
    Revising the Community of Inquiry framework for the analysis of one-to-one online learning relationships2016In: International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, ISSN 1492-3831, E-ISSN 1492-3831, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 36-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In online learning research, the theoretical Community of Inquiry framework has been used extensively to analyze processes of inquiry among learners and instructors within a community. This paper examines a special case of community of inquiry consisting of only one learner and one instructor. Together they engage in an online coaching discourse to form a relationship of inquiry. Within these relationships, coachees pass through processes of practical inquiry process while a coach supports the process. In this study, a framework and coding scheme were developed for use in a transcript coding procedure including 3,109 messages from an online coaching case in math for k‑12 students. It is found that the elements of cognitive, teaching, and social presence, as well as the newly proposed emotional presence, which outlines a community of inquiry, comprise an effective structure for the analysis of one-to-one online coaching environments. The findings of this exploratory study suggest that a Relationship of Inquiry framework has the potential to support development of one-to-one online learning.

  • 308.
    Svärdh, Joakim
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Measuring long-term effects of a school improvement initiative2013Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing demand for studies applying quantitative methods to large-scale data sets for the purpose of evaluating the effects of educational reforms (UVK, 2010). In this thesis the statistical method, Propensity Score Analysis (PSA), is presented and explored in the evaluating context of an extensive educational initiative within science and technology education; the Science and Technology for All-program (NTA). The research question put forward reads; under what conditions are PSA-analyses a useful method when measuring the effects from a school improvement initiative in S & T?

    The study considers the use of PSA when looking for long-term effects that could be measured, what to take into consideration to be able to measure this, and how this could be done. The baseline references (outcome variables) used in order to measure/evaluate the long-term effects from the studied program is students’ achievements in the national test (score and grades) and their grades in year 9. Some findings revealed regarding the object of study (long-term effects from using NTA) are also presented.

    The PSA method is found to be a useful tool that makes it possible to create artificial control groups when experimental studies are impossible or inappropriate; which is often the case in school education research. The method opens up for making use of the rich source of registry data gathered by authorities. PSA proves reliable and relatively insensitive to the effects of covariates and heterogeneous effecter if the number of samples is large enough. The use of PSA (or other statistical methods) also makes it possible to measure outcomes several years after treatment. There are issues of concern when using PSA. One is the obvious demand for organized collection of measurement data. Another issue of concern is the choice of outcome variables. In this study the chosen outcome variables (pupils’ score and grading in national tests and grades in year 9) open up for discussions regarding aspects that might not be reflected/measured in national tests and/or teachers’ grading. Findings regarding the long-term effects from using NTA) show significantly positive effects in physics on test scores (average increase 16.5%) and test grades, but not in biology and chemistry. In this study no significant effects are found for course grades. PSA approach has proved to be a reliable method. There is however a limitation in terms of the method's ability to capture more subtle aspects of learning. A combination of quantitative and qualitative approach when studying long-term effects from educational intervention is therefore suggested.

  • 309.
    Svärdh, Joakim
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    To use or not to use a teacher support programManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 310.
    Söderback, Jörgen
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Technology for learning.
    Öberg, Lena-Maria
    Mid Sweden University.
    Using distributed Scrum for supporting online community: A qualitative descriptive study of students’ perceptions2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 311.
    Söderlind, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Geschwind, Lars
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    More students of better quality?: Effects of a mathematics and physics aptitude test on student performance2017In: European Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 0304-3797, E-ISSN 1469-5898, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines whether subject-specific admission tests may allow Swedish higher education institutions to admit better-performing students. The performance of students admitted via a mathematics and physics aptitude test was reviewed with a focus on activity, retention, and credits earned, and the results were compared with students admitted in traditional ways, such as secondary school grade point averages (GPA). The results show that the students admitted in the test quota show a higher activity rate as well as a higher retention rate than most other students, but that they are not as successful as the GPA quota students in acquiring their intended credits. It is concluded that subject-specific admission tests seem to entail higher student motivation and that they therefore may be a valuable instrument to supplement traditional admission instruments. The observed differences in the study have generated a number of hypotheses that would need further study to fully understand the merits of different admission instruments.

  • 312.
    Thunberg, Hans
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Mathematics (Div.).
    Filipsson, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Mathematics (Div.).
    Cronhjort, Mikael
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Gymnasiets mål och högskolans förväntningar2006In: Nämnaren : tidskrift för matematikundervisning, ISSN 0348-2723, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 10-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 313.
    Turesson, Jesper
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Kunskapssynen i teknikämnetskursplan2017Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The technology subject in Swedish elementary school has been criticised for not taking into

    account the pupils interests and experiences. Furthermore, the teaching is often not based

    on the curriculum and there is a lack of consensus among the teacher on what should be

    taught and what the subject stands for. Regarding the latter, studies have shown that

    philosophical discussions on the definition of technology are not common within technology

    teaching and learning, which can have consequences when a common set of criteria are set

    up to be used for assessment and grade setting. This study examines how technology and

    technological knowledge can be defined and how these concepts are reflected in the

    curriculum. Based on a systematic literature review of former studies in this area, an

    analysis of the curriculum is performed. The result show that even if there is a lack of

    philosophical discussions in the curriculum on what technological knowledge means, traces

    of this type of knowledge can be found. As an example the technology subject is

    characterised by the technical development projects that the pupils are supposed to carry

    out, and in these projects they get the opportunity to develop the so called technological

    science knowledge by systematically testing and re-testing their ideas.

  • 314. Vaughan, Norm
    et al.
    Armatas, Christine
    Jing Zhou, Laura
    Jansen Van Vuuren, Marieta
    Stenbom, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Brown, Mark
    MacDonald, David
    Blended Learning From Design To Evaluation: International Case Studies Of Evidence-Based Practice2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Laumakis, Graham and Dziuban (2009) suggest “the impact of blended learning is potentially monumental – permanently changing how students interact with higher education” (p.23). This panel presentation will highlight the rationale, benefits, challenges, strategies, and “lessons learned” from five international faculty development initiatives for blended learning.

  • 315. Vaughan, Norman D.
    et al.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Athabasca University, Canada.
    Garrison, Randy
    Teaching in Blended Learning Environments: Creating and Sustaining Communities of Inquiry2013Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching in Blended Learning Environments provides a coherent framework in which to explore the transformative concept of blended learning. Blended learning can be defined as the organic integration of thoughtfully selected and complementary face-to-face and online approaches and technologies. A direct result of the transformative innovation of virtual communication and online learning communities, blended learning environments have created new ways for teachers and students to engage, interact, and collaborate. The authors argue that this new learning environment necessitates significant role adjustments for instructors and generates a need to understand the aspects of teaching presence required of deep and meaningful learning outcomes.

    Built upon the theoretical framework of the Community of Inquiry – the premise that higher education is both a collaborative and individually constructivist learning experience – the authors present seven principles that provide a valuable set of tools for harnessing the opportunities for teaching and learning available through technology. Focusing on teaching practices related to the design, facilitation, direction and assessment of blended learning experiences, Teaching in Blended Learning Environments addresses the growing demand for improved teaching in higher education.

  • 316. Vaughan, Norman
    et al.
    Reali, Aline
    Stenbom, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Jansen Van Vuuren, Marieta
    MacDonald, David
    Blended Learning from Design to Evaluation: International Case Studies of Evidence-Based Practice2017In: Online Learning, ISSN 2472-5730, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 103-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study compares and contrasts four international faculty development programs for blended learning in order to understand the benefits, challenges, lessons learned, and recommendations from such initiatives. The benefits identified for faculty members, who participated in these programs, were that they became more reflective of their teaching practice and began to make a role adjustment from being a content provider to a designer and facilitator of learning for students. The biggest challenge appeared to be a lack of common institutional definition and understanding of blended learning as well as a lack of time and resources to support faculty in the redesign of their courses. With regards to lessons learned, each program emphasized the need for all institutional stakeholders to be involved in supporting the initiative and that blended learning does not simply imply adding digital technologies to an existing face-to-face course. The key recommendation from this study is that a faculty development program for blended learning needs to be clearly aligned with the institution’s vision and mission.

  • 317.
    Weurlander, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Organisation and leadership.
    Cronhjort, Mikael
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Filipsson, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.).
    Engineering students’ experiences of interactive teaching in calculus2017In: Higher Education Research and Development, ISSN 0729-4360, E-ISSN 1469-8366, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 852-865Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study reports on an educational development initiative where peer instruction was used instead of traditional lectures in a calculus course for first-year engineering students. The aim of the study was to explore students’ experiences of this method. Data were collected by means of an open-ended questionnaire on two occasions: early and late in the course. The data were analyzed with an inductive content analysis. The findings comprise three qualitatively different ways to experience the interactive teaching method in calculus: (1) enthusiasm, (2) nuanced skepticism and (3) aversion. The categories differed regarding emotional reactions to the teaching, experiences of learning, conceptions of teaching and learning, and experiences of meaningfulness. Many students expressed enthusiasm for learning with peer instruction and noted that the method gave both teachers and students feedback on what students have difficulties with. These students perceived that they were responsible for their own learning. Other students experienced that peer instruction had some advantages and disadvantages, and preferred a mix between traditional lectures and peer instruction sessions. They seemed to believe that teachers and students share responsibility for learning. Some students expressed an aversion for peer instruction and the method seemed to challenge their beliefs of how teaching and learning is best conducted. Our study illustrates that educational development initiatives, even though based on research on student learning, do not benefit all students. One of the major obstacles seems to be that students’ underlying beliefs regarding teaching and learning may be counterproductive to the ideas behind the educational initiative. We suggest that beliefs regarding teaching and learning need to be addressed when introducing new teaching and learning methods.

  • 318.
    Weurlander, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Lindqvist, Henrik
    Linköpings universitet.
    Lönn, Annalena
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Broberger, Eva
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Seeberger, Astrid
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Hult, Håkan
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Thornberg, Robert
    Linköpings universitet.
    Wernerson, Annika
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Osäkerhet och otillräcklighet: Studenters upplevelser i känslomässigt starka situationer under VFU2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 319.
    Weurlander, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Lönn, Annalena
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Hult, Håkan
    Linköpings universitet och Karolinska Institutet.
    Thornberg, Robert
    Linköpings universitet.
    Wernerson, Annika
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Medical students’ feelings of inadequacy during clinical practice2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The clinical environment is complex and unpredictable. Students meet and interact with both patients and health care professionals. It is inevitable for medical students to experience potentially emotional challenging situations during their clinical education; they meet patients in vulnerable situations, they witness suffering and sometimes death. How do they handle these situations? The present study explores medical students’ experiences of emotionally challenging situations during clinical practice and how they handle these situations.Summary of Work: Data were collected from medical students by focus group interviews and written reflections where students were asked about their experiences of emotionally challenging situations during clinical training. Students in their third (n=8) and fifth year (n=6) participated in interviews, and 25 written reflections were included. Grounded theory was used to analyze data.Summary of Results: Students’ main concern was found to be feelings of inadequacy. Students in the middle of their education were mainly concerned with fear of not having the knowledge and skills they felt they need in their practical clinical work. Students at the end of their education were more concerned with fear of not being able to handle situations that demands emotional aspects, such as delivering difficult diagnosis or dealing with angry or disappointed patients or relatives.Discussion: The students struggled to find a balance between closeness and professional distance.Their ways of dealing with these feelings were to talk to peers and relatives, close in time to the incident. In some situations, often concerning medical matters, supervisors that they felt confidence in were a support.Conclusion: Students experience a range of emotionally challenging situation during their clinical education. These situations caused students to feel fear of being insufficiently prepared for their future professional role. Support from trusted peers or supervisors to handle these situations were important for coping constructively.Take Home Messages: Many students need support from trusted persons to handle experiences during clinical practice.

  • 320.
    Weurlander, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Nieminen, Juha
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Bolander Laksov, Klara
    Stockholms universitet.
    Making horizons explicit: Experiences from using a tool for self-assessment of supervisory practice2017Conference paper (Refereed)
4567 301 - 320 of 320
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