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  • 301.
    Friberg, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Frydén, Lars
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Bodin, L-G
    Sundberg, Johan
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Performance rules for computer controlled performance of contemporary keyboard music1987In: STL-QPSR, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 079-085Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 302.
    Friberg, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Sundberg, Johan
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Frydén, Lars
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Preferred quantities of expressive variation in music performance1989In: STL-QPSR, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 053-062Article in journal (Other academic)
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    fulltext
  • 303.
    Friberg, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Sundström, Andreas
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Preferred swing ratio in jazz as a function of tempo1997In: TMH-QPSR, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 019-027Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In jazz music it is common to perform consecutive eighth notes with an alternating duration pattern of long-short. The exact duration ratio (the swing ratio) of the long-short pattern has been largely unknown. The first experiment describes measurements of the swing ratio in the ride cymbal from well-known jazz recordings. The second experiment was a production task where subjects adjusted the swing ratio of a computer generated performance to a preferred value. Both these experiments show that the swing ratio varies approximately linearly with tempo. The swing ratio can be as high as 3.5:1 at comparatively slow tempi around 120 bpm. When the tempo is fast the swing ratio reaches 1:1, that is, the eighth notes are performed evenly. The duration of the short note in the long-short pattern is approximately constant (≅ 100 ms) for medium to fast tempi.

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  • 304.
    Friis, Jakob Ege
    et al.
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Biol & Chem Engn, Hangovej 2, DK-8200 Aarhus N, Denmark..
    Brons, Kaare
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Biol & Chem Engn, Hangovej 2, DK-8200 Aarhus N, Denmark..
    Salmi, Zakaria
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Chem, Langelandsgade 140, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark..
    Shimizu, Kyoko
    SACHEM Japan GK, 5-6-27 Mizuhai, Higashiosaka, Osaka 5780921, Japan..
    Subbiahdoss, Guruprakash
    Aarhus Univ, Interdisciplinary Nanosci Ctr, Gustav Wieds Vej 14, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark..
    Holm, Allan Hjarbaek
    Grundfos Holding AS, Poul Due Jensens Vej 7, DK-8850 Bjerringbro, Denmark..
    Santos, Olga
    Alfa Laval Lund AB, Mat & Chem Ctr, POB 74, SE-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Pedersen, Steen Uttrup
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Chem, Langelandsgade 140, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.;Aarhus Univ, Interdisciplinary Nanosci Ctr, Gustav Wieds Vej 14, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark..
    Meyer, Rikke Louise
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Biosci, Ny Munkegade 116, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.;Aarhus Univ, Interdisciplinary Nanosci Ctr, Gustav Wieds Vej 14, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark..
    Daasbjerg, Kim
    KTH. Aarhus Univ, Dept Chem, Langelandsgade 140, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.;Aarhus Univ, Interdisciplinary Nanosci Ctr, Gustav Wieds Vej 14, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Appl Phys Chem, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden.;Carbon Dioxide Activat Ctr, Gustav Wieds Vej 14, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark..
    Iruthayaraj, Joseph
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Biol & Chem Engn, Hangovej 2, DK-8200 Aarhus N, Denmark.;Aarhus Univ, Interdisciplinary Nanosci Ctr, Gustav Wieds Vej 14, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.;Carbon Dioxide Activat Ctr, Gustav Wieds Vej 14, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark..
    Hydrophilic Polymer Brush Layers on Stainless Steel Using Multilayered ATRP Initiator Layer2016In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 8, no 44, p. 30616-30627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thin polymer coatings (in tens of nanometers to a micron thick) are desired on industrial surfaces such as stainless steel. In this thickness range coatings are difficult to produce using conventional methods. In this context, surface-initiated controlled polymerization method can offer a promising tool to produce thin polymer coatings via bottom-up approach. Furthermore, the industrial surfaces are chemically heterogeneous and exhibit surface features in the form of grain boundaries and grain surfaces. Therefore, the thin coatings must be equally effective on both the grain surfaces and the grain boundary regions. This study illustrates a novel "periodic rejuvenation of surface initiation" process using surface-initiated ATRP technique to amplify the graft density of poly(oligoethylene glycol)methacrylate (POEGMA) brush layers on stainless steel 316L surface. The optimized conditions demonstrate a controlled, macroscopically homogeneous, and stable POEGMA brush layer covering both the grain surface and the grain boundary region. Various relevant parameters-surface cleaning methods, controllability of thickness, graft density, homogeneity and stability-were studied using techniques such as ellipsometer, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray, surface zeta potential, and infrared reflection-adsorption spectroscopy.

  • 305. Fu, L.
    et al.
    Ma, J.
    Chen, Y.
    Larsson, Rasmus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH). School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 200240, China.
    Zhao, J.
    Automatic Detection of Lung Nodules Using 3D Deep Convolutional Neural Networks2019In: Journal of Shanghai Jiaotong University (Science), ISSN 1007-1172, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 517-523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Accurate early diagnosis is critical in increasing the 5-year survival rate of lung cancer, so the efficient and accurate detection of lung nodules, the potential precursors to lung cancer, is paramount. In this paper, a computer-aided lung nodule detection system using 3D deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) is developed. The first multi-scale 11-layer 3D fully convolutional neural network (FCN) is used for screening all lung nodule candidates. Considering relative small sizes of lung nodules and limited memory, the input of the FCN consists of 3D image patches rather than of whole images. The candidates are further classified in the second CNN to get the final result. The proposed method achieves high performance in the LUNA16 challenge and demonstrates the effectiveness of using 3D deep CNNs for lung nodule detection. 

  • 306.
    Ganguli, Sagar
    et al.
    Department of Chemistry—Ångström, Uppsala University, 75120, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Zhao, Ziwen
    Department of Chemistry—Ångström, Uppsala University, 75120, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Parlak, Onur
    KTH, Centres, Center for the Advancement of Integrated Medical and Engineering Sciences, AIMES. Department of Medicine Solna, Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institute, 17176, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hattori, Yocefu
    Department of Chemistry—Ångström, Uppsala University, 75120, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jacinto, S.
    Department of Chemistry—Ångström, Uppsala University, 75120, Uppsala, Sweden; Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, 01224, Warsaw, Poland.
    Sekretareva, Alina
    Department of Chemistry—Ångström, Uppsala University, 75120, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nano-Impact Single-Entity Electrochemistry Enables Plasmon-Enhanced Electrocatalysis**2023In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 62, no 25, article id e202302394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plasmon-enhanced electrocatalysis (PEEC), based on a combination of localized surface plasmon resonance excitation and an electrochemical bias applied to a plasmonic material, can result in improved electrical-to-chemical energy conversion compared to conventional electrocatalysis. Here, we demonstrate the advantages of nano-impact single-entity electrochemistry (SEE) for investigating the intrinsic activity of plasmonic catalysts at the single-particle level using glucose electrooxidation and oxygen reduction on gold nanoparticles as model reactions. We show that in conventional ensemble measurements, plasmonic effects have minimal impact on photocurrents. We suggest that this is due to the continuous equilibration of the Fermi level (EF) of the deposited gold nanoparticles with the EF of the working electrode, leading to fast neutralization of hot carriers by the measuring circuit. The photocurrents detected in the ensemble measurements are primarily caused by photo-induced heating of the supporting electrode material. In SEE, the EF of suspended gold nanoparticles is unaffected by the working electrode potential. As a result, plasmonic effects are the dominant source of photocurrents under SEE experimental conditions.

  • 307. Gao, X.
    et al.
    Wei, P.
    Xie, Y.
    Zhang, S.
    Niu, Z.
    Lou, Y.
    Yang, Xiaohu
    KTH.
    Jin, L.
    Yan, Jerry
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Energy Processes.
    Experimental investigation of the cubic thermal energy storage unit with coil tubes2017In: Energy Procedia, Elsevier Ltd , 2017, p. 3709-3714Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presented experimental investigations on the thermal performance of a thermal energy storage (TES) unit with coil tubes. A designed test rig was built and the melting heat transfer characteristics (melting front and temperature distribution) inside the TES unit were examined. The effects of charging flow rate on the overall phase change process were examined. The results showed that natural convection accelerated the thermal energy transport in the melt phase in the top region, but weakened the heat transfer in the bottom region; this resulted in the unmelt PCM at the bottom. The melting heat transfer was overall enhanced by the increase in inlet flow rate, indicating that the full charging time can be shortened by a larger flow rate.

  • 308.
    Gao, Ying
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. Co-Innovation Center of Efficient Processing and Utilization of Forest Resources, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing 210037, China.
    Yang, Xuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. Key Laboratory of Biomass Chemical Engineering of Ministry of Education, College of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, P. R. China; Institute of Zhejiang University─Quzhou, Quzhou 324000, P. R. China.
    Garemark, Jonas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Olsson, Richard
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Dai, Hongqi
    Co-Innovation Center of Efficient Processing and Utilization of Forest Resources, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing 210037, China.
    Ram, Farsa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Li, Yuanyuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Gradience Free Nanoinsertion of Fe3O4 into Wood for Enhanced Hydrovoltaic Energy Harvesting2023In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, E-ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 11, no 30, p. 11099-11109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrovoltaic energy harvesting offers the potential to utilize enormous water energy for sustainable energy systems. Here, we report the utilization and tailoring of an intrinsic anisotropic 3D continuous microchannel structure from native wood for efficient hydrovoltaic energy harvesting by Fe3O4 nanoparticle insertion. Acetone-assisted precursor infiltration ensures the homogenous distribution of Fe ions for gradience-free Fe3O4 nanoparticle formation in wood. The Fe3O4/wood nanocomposites result in an open-circuit voltage of 63 mV and a power density of ∼52 μW/m2 (∼165 times higher than the original wood) under ambient conditions. The output voltage and power density are further increased to 1 V and ∼743 μW/m2 under 3 suns solar irradiation. The enhancement could be attributed to the increase of surface charge, nanoporosity, and photothermal effect from Fe3O4. The device exhibits a stable voltage of ∼1 V for 30 h (3 cycles of 10 h) showing good long-term stability. The methodology offers the potential for hierarchical organic-inorganic nanocomposite design for scalable and efficient ambient energy harvesting.

  • 309.
    Gao, Yonghao
    et al.
    Shijiazhuang Tiedao Univ, Dept Math & Phys, Shijiazhuang 050043, Hebei, Peoples R China.;Shijiazhuang Tiedao Univ, Inst Appl Phys, Shijiazhuang 050043, Hebei, Peoples R China..
    Cui, Jianpo
    Shijiazhuang Tiedao Univ, Dept Math & Phys, Shijiazhuang 050043, Hebei, Peoples R China.;Shijiazhuang Tiedao Univ, Inst Appl Phys, Shijiazhuang 050043, Hebei, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Yanzhao
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics. Shijiazhuang Tiedao Univ, Dept Math & Phys, Shijiazhuang 050043, Hebei, Peoples R China.;Shijiazhuang Tiedao Univ, Inst Appl Phys, Shijiazhuang 050043, Hebei, Peoples R China.;China Inst Atom Energy, POB 275 10, Beijing 102413, Peoples R China..
    Gu, Jianzhong
    China Inst Atom Energy, POB 275 10, Beijing 102413, Peoples R China..
    Cluster radioactivity of neutron-deficient nuclei in trans-tin region2020In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The possibility of cluster radioactivity (CR) of the neutron-deficient nuclei in the trans-tin region is explored by using the effective liquid drop model (ELDM), generalized liquid drop model (GLDM), and several sets of analytic formulas. It is found that the minimal half-lives are at N-d=50 (N-d is the neutron number of the daughter nucleus) for the same kind cluster emission because of the Q value (released energy) shell effect at N-d=50. Meanwhile, it is shown that the half-lives of alpha -like (A(e)=4n, Z(e)=N-e. Z(e) and N-e are the charge number and neutron number of the emitted cluster, respectively.) cluster emissions leading to the isotopes with Z(d)=50 (Z(d) is the proton number of the daughter nucleus) are easier to measure than those of non-alpha -like (A(e)=4n+2) cases due to the large Q values in alpha -like cluster emission processes. Finally, some alpha -like CR half-lives of the N-d=50 nuclei and their neighbours are predicted, which are useful for searching for the new CR in future experiments.

  • 310.
    Garcia, Enrique Rozas
    et al.
    Department of Physics, Gothenburg University, 41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hofmann, Johannes
    Nordita SU; Department of Physics, Gothenburg University, 41296 Gothenburg.
    Fluctuation corrections to Lifshitz tails in disordered systems2024In: Physical review. E, ISSN 2470-0045, E-ISSN 2470-0053, Vol. 109, no 3, article id L032103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quenched disorder in semiconductors induces localized electronic states at the band edge, which manifest as an exponential tail in the density of states. For large impurity densities, this tail takes a universal Lifshitz form that is characterized by short-ranged potential fluctuations. We provide both analytical expressions and numerical values for the Lifshitz tail of a parabolic conduction band including its exact fluctuation prefactor. Our analysis is based on a replica field integral approach, where the leading exponential scaling of the tail is determined by an instanton profile and fluctuations around the instanton determine the subleading preexponential factor. This factor contains the determinant of a fluctuation operator, and we avoid a full computation of its spectrum by using a Gel'fand-Yaglom formalism, which provides a concise general derivation of fluctuation corrections in disorder problems. We provide a revised result for the disorder band tail in two dimensions.

  • 311.
    García-Gallego, Sandra
    et al.
    University of Cambridge, UK.
    Bernardes, Gonçalo J.L.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Carbon-monoxide-releasing molecules for the delivery of therapeutic co in vivo2014In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 53, no 37, p. 9712-9721Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of carbon-monoxide-releasing molecules (CORMs) as pharmaceutical agents represents an attractive and safer alternative to administration of gaseous CO. Most CORMs developed to date are transition-metal carbonyl complexes. Although such CORMs have showed promising results in the treatment of a number of animal models of disease, they still lack the necessary attributes for clinical development. Described in this Minireview are the methods used for CORM selection, to date, and how new insights into the reactivity of metal-carbonyl complexes in vivo, together with advances in methods for live-cell CO detection, are driving the design and synthesis of new CORMs, CORMs that will enable controlled CO release in vivo in a spatial and temporal manner without affecting oxygen transport by hemoglobin.

  • 312. Garg, M.
    et al.
    Apostolopoulou-Kalkavoura, V.
    Linares, M.
    Kaldéus, Tahani
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Bergström, Lennart
    Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Svante Arrhenius väg 16C, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden;Wallenberg Wood Science Center, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Teknikringen 56-58, 100 44, Stockholm, Sweden. .
    Zozoulenko, I.
    Moisture uptake in nanocellulose: the effects of relative humidity, temperature and degree of crystallinity2021In: Cellulose, ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 28, no 14, p. 9007-9021Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Foams made from cellulose nanomaterials are highly porous and possess excellent mechanical and thermal insulation properties. However, the moisture uptake and hygroscopic properties of these materials need to be better understood for their use in biomedical and bioelectronics applications, in humidity sensing and thermal insulation. In this work, we present a combination of hybrid Grand Canonical Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics simulations and experimental measurements to investigate the moisture uptake within nanocellulose foams. To explore the effect of surface modification on moisture uptake we used two types of celluloses, namely TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibrils and carboxymethylated cellulose nanofibrils. We find that the moisture uptake in both the cellulose nanomaterials increases with increasing relative humidity (RH) and decreases with increasing temperature, which is explained using the basic thermodynamic principles. The measured and calculated moisture uptake in amorphous cellulose (for a given RH or temperature) is higher as compared to crystalline cellulose with TEMPO- and CM-modified surfaces. The high water uptake of amorphous cellulose films is related to the formation of water-filled pores with increasing RH. The microscopic insight of water uptake in nanocellulose provided in this study can assist the design and fabrication of high-performance cellulose materials with improved properties for thermal insulation in humid climates or packaging of water sensitive goods. Graphic abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.]

  • 313. Gaur, Sarthak
    et al.
    Johansson, Sandra
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE).
    Mohammad, Faruq
    Kumar, Challa S. S. R.
    Spivey, James J.
    Catalytic Activity of Titania-Supported Core-Shell Fe3O4@Au NanoCatalysts for CO Oxidation2012In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 116, no 42, p. 22319-22326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In continuation of our previous work (J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2010, 1(20), 3141 and J. Phys. Chem. C 2010, 114 (45), 19194), Fe3O4@Au core-shell types of nanoparticles were prepared by coating superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONS; similar to 4.9 nm) with a thin layer of gold (similar to 0.5 nm) and supported on microporous TiO2. To remove the ligands attached to nanoparticles, the catalyst was treated at 200, 300, 400, and 500 degrees C in either (a) a reducing atmosphere with H-2/Ar or (b) an oxidizing atmosphere with O-2/He. The synthesized nanoparticles and freshly prepared catalysts were characterized by HRTEM, which revealed that the size of the Fe3O4@Au nanoparticles was 5.34 +/- 0.71 nm and that of Fe3O4@Au/TiO2 was 5.96 +/- 0.71 nm. Fresh and pretreated programmed reduction, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. To test the activity of Fe3O4@Au/TiO2 catalysts, CO oxidation was performed over catalysts from 30 to 500 degrees C. Results showed that the catalyst treated with H-2/Ar at 500 degrees C had a lower light-off temperature and the highest CO conversion (similar to 68%) at 300 degrees C; however, such a treatment also resulted in catalyst sintering, leading to a net increase in particle size to 7.87 +/- 1.59 nm. The higher catalytic activity of the catalyst treated with H-2 at 500 degrees C can be attributed to the copresence of Fe-0 and Au-0 in the catalyst, the complete removal of organic ligands from the catalyst surface, and possibly the synergistic interaction between Au and Fe.

  • 314. Gedda, C.
    et al.
    Hydén, H.
    Voss, C.
    KTH. VBB, SWECO, Sweden.
    Heat storage in aquifers2013In: Subsurface Space: Environmental Protection Low Cost Storage Energy Savings, Elsevier, 2013, Vol. 2, p. 609-613Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Effiecient utilization of solar energy and industrial waste heat requires heat storage facilities. Such facilities can be provided in groundwater aquifers. Two aquifer heat storage projects currently being carried out in Sweden are presented.

  • 315.
    Geng, Shiyu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. Luleå Univ Technol, Div Mat Sci, Dept Engn Sci & Math, SE-97187 Luleå, Sweden.
    Yao, Kun
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå Univ Technol, Div Mat Sci, Dept Engn Sci & Math, SE-97187 Luleå, Sweden.;Univ Oulu, Fibre & Particle Engn, FI-90014 Oulu, Finland..
    High-Strength, High-Toughness Aligned Polymer-Based Nanocomposite Reinforced with Ultralow Weight Fraction of Functionalized Nanocellulose2018In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 19, no 10, p. 4075-4083Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multifunctional lightweight, flexible, yet strong polymer-based nanocomposites are highly desired for specific applications. However, the control of orientation and dispersion of reinforcing nanoparticles and the optimization of the interfacial interaction still pose substantial challenges in nanocellulose-reinforced polymer composites. In this study, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-grafted cellulose nanofibers have demonstrated much better dispersion in a poly(lactic acid) (PLA) matrix as compared to unmodified nanocellulose. Through a uniaxial drawing method, aligned PLA/nanocellulose nanocomposites with high strength, high toughness, and unique optical behavior can be obtained. With the incorporation of 0.1 wt % of the PEG-grafted cellulose nanofibers in PLA, the ultimate strength of the aligned nanocomposite reaches 343 MPa, which is significantly higher than that of other aligned PLA-based nanocomposites reported previously. Moreover, its ultimate strength and toughness are enhanced by 39% and 70%, respectively, as compared to the aligned nanocomposite reinforced with unmodified cellulose nanofibers. In addition, the aligned nanocomposite film is highly transparent and possesses an anisotropic light scattering effect, revealing its significant potential for optical applications.

  • 316.
    Ghosh, Nilanshu
    et al.
    KTH.
    Mothilal Bhagavathy, S.
    Thakur, Jagruti
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Accelerating electric vehicle adoption: techno-economic assessment to modify existing fuel stations with fast charging infrastructure2022In: Clean Technologies and Environmental Policy, ISSN 1618-954X, E-ISSN 1618-9558, Vol. 24, no 10, p. 3033-3046Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the increasing electric vehicle (EV) penetration, there arises an immediate need for charging infrastructure. In the future, the electrification of transportation will reduce the requirement of existing fuel stations, thereby rendering them obsolete. However, they are best suited to cater to the charging demand of EVs as the drivers are accustomed to the locations and the incremental cost of providing this service will be lower. In this paper, we propose a novel methodology to assess the techno-economic feasibility of retrofitting an existing fuel station with EV charging infrastructure also known as Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE). To further enhance the value proposition, the potential of integrating Battery Energy Storage System (BESS) with EV charging infrastructure, which results in the reduction of grid connection costs, is studied. The sustainability of the proposed system is improved with additional onsite Photovoltaic (PV) generation. The proposed methodology is implemented for the UK as a case study. The configurations in this study are designed based on the technical considerations involved in retrofitting a typical fuel station as a fast charging facility for EVs. From the results, it is observed that the configurations with 4 EVSE, 1 BESS, and 8 h of operation and the configuration with 4 EVSE, 1 BESS, and 1 PV system for 8 h of operation are economically viable. The abovementioned configurations are the most economically feasible configurations in terms of the Net Present Value (NPV), Internal Rate of Return (IRR) and the Discounted Payback Period (DPP) amongst the other configurations considered in this study. The proposed methodology indicates that though the connection cost is the dominant factor affecting the feasibility, the use of BESS with or without PV can reduce the connection cost by almost 90% depending on the capacity of BESS. The methodology acts as a decision support tool to select a techno-economically feasible configuration of EVSE, BESS, and PV. Graphical abstract:

  • 317.
    Ghovanloo, Mohammad-Reza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Simon Fraser Univ, Dept Biomed Physiol & Kinesiol, Burnaby, BC, Canada.;Xenon Pharmaceut, Dept Cellular & Mol Biol, Burnaby, BC, Canada..
    Choudhury, Koushik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bandaru, Tagore S.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Fouda, Mohamed A.
    Simon Fraser Univ, Dept Biomed Physiol & Kinesiol, Burnaby, BC, Canada.;Alexandria Univ, Dept Pharmacol & Toxicol, Alexandria, Egypt..
    Rayani, Kaveh
    Simon Fraser Univ, Dept Biomed Physiol & Kinesiol, Burnaby, BC, Canada..
    Rusinova, Radda
    Weill Cornell Med, Dept Physiol & Biophys, New York, NY USA..
    Phaterpekar, Tejas
    Simon Fraser Univ, Dept Mol Biol & Biochem Phys, Burnaby, BC, Canada..
    Nelkenbrecher, Karen
    Xenon Pharmaceut, Dept Cellular & Mol Biol, Burnaby, BC, Canada..
    Watkins, Abeline R.
    Simon Fraser Univ, Dept Biomed Physiol & Kinesiol, Burnaby, BC, Canada..
    Poburko, Damon
    Simon Fraser Univ, Dept Biomed Physiol & Kinesiol, Burnaby, BC, Canada..
    Thewalt, Jenifer
    Simon Fraser Univ, Dept Mol Biol & Biochem Phys, Burnaby, BC, Canada..
    Andersen, Olaf S.
    Weill Cornell Med, Dept Physiol & Biophys, New York, NY USA..
    Delemotte, Lucie
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Goodchild, Samuel J.
    Xenon Pharmaceut, Dept Cellular & Mol Biol, Burnaby, BC, Canada..
    Ruben, Peter C.
    Simon Fraser Univ, Dept Biomed Physiol & Kinesiol, Burnaby, BC, Canada..
    Cannabidiol inhibits the skeletal muscle Nav1.4 by blocking its pore and by altering membrane elasticity2021In: The Journal of General Physiology, ISSN 0022-1295, E-ISSN 1540-7748, Vol. 153, no 5, article id e202012701Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is the primary nonpsychotropic phytocannabinoid found in Cannabis sativa, which has been proposed to be therapeutic against many conditions, including muscle spasms. Among its putative targets are voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs), which have been implicated in many conditions. We investigated the effects of CBD on Nav1.4, the skeletal muscle Nav subtype. We explored direct effects, involving physical block of the Nav pore, as well as indirect effects, involving modulation of membrane elasticity that contributes to Nav inhibition. MD simulations revealed CBD's localization inside the membrane and effects on bilayer properties. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) confirmed these results, showing CBD localizing below membrane headgroups. To determine the functional implications of these findings, we used a gramicidinbased fluorescence assay to show that CBD alters membrane elasticity or thickness, which could alter Nav function through bilayer-mediated regulation. Site-directed mutagenesis in the vicinity of the Nav1.4 pore revealed that removing the local anesthetic binding site with F1586A reduces the block of INa by CBD. Altering the fenestrations in the bilayer-spanning domain with Nav1.4-WWWW blocked CBD access from the membrane into the Nav1.4 pore (as judged by MD). The stabilization of inactivation, however, persisted in WWWW, which we ascribe to CBD-induced changes in membrane elasticity. To investigate the potential therapeutic value of CBD against Nav1.4 channelopathies, we used a pathogenic Nav1.4 variant, P1158S, which causes myotonia and periodic paralysis. CBD reduces excitability in both wild-type and the P1158S variant. Our in vitro and in silico results suggest that CBD may have therapeutic value against Nav1.4 hyperexcitability.

  • 318.
    Giorgini, L. T.
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Nordita SU.
    Lim, S. H.
    Stockholm Univ, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Moon, W.
    Stockholm Univ, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Dept Math, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wettlaufer, John
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA. Stockholm Univ, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Yale Univ, New Haven, CT 06520 USA..
    Precursors to rare events in stochastic resonance2020In: Europhysics letters, ISSN 0295-5075, E-ISSN 1286-4854, Vol. 129, no 4, article id 40003Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In stochastic resonance, a periodically forced Brownian particle in a double-well potential jumps between minima at rare increments, the prediction of which poses a major theoretical challenge. Here, we use a path-integral method to find a precursor to these transitions by determining the most probable (or "optimal") space-time path of a particle. We characterize the optimal path using a direct comparison principle between the Langevin and Hamiltonian dynamical descriptions, allowing us to express the jump condition in terms of the accumulation of noise around the stable periodic path. In consequence, as a system approaches a rare event these fluctuations approach one of the deterministic minimizers, thereby providing a precursor for predicting a stochastic transition. We demonstrate the method numerically, which allows us to determine whether a state is following a stable periodic path or will experience an incipient jump with a high probability. The vast range of systems that exhibit stochastic resonance behavior insures broad relevance of our framework, which allows one to extract precursor fluctuations from data. open access editor's choice Copyright

  • 319.
    Gode, Peter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Jannasch, Patric
    Polymer Science and Engineering, Lund University.
    Johansson, M.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Karlsson, Lina E.
    Polymer Science and Engineering, Lund University.
    Lindbergh, Göran
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Sandquist, D.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    A novel sulfonated dendritic polymer as the acidic component in proton conducting membranes2006In: Solid State Ionics, ISSN 0167-2738, E-ISSN 1872-7689, Vol. 177, no 7-8, p. 787-794Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study involves the synthesis of sulfonated poly(3-ethyl-3-(hydroxymethyl)oxetane), sPTMPO, by end-capping the hydroxy-groups in the PTMPO with 1,4-butane sultone. A series of the polymer with different degrees of substitution was investigated. Furthermore, the subsequent use of the sulfonated PTMPO as the acidic component in proton conducting membranes was explored. The membranes were prepared by either a) mixing the partly sulfonated PTMPO with hexamethoxymethyl melamine (HMMM) to form cross-links by ether formation between the methylol groups on HMMM and the remaining hydroxyl groups on the hyperbranched polyether or b) using the sulfonated polyether in conjunction with a pyridine functionalised polysulfone, PSU-pyridine, to produce acid-base blend membranes. Membrane properties such as proton conductivity, water uptake and mechanical properties are discussed.

  • 320.
    Gomis-Fons, Joaquin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Centre for Advanced BioProduction by Continuous Processing, AdBIOPRO. ept. of Chemical Engineering, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Andersson, N.
    Nilsson, Bernt
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Centre for Advanced BioProduction by Continuous Processing, AdBIOPRO. Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Optimization study on periodic counter-current chromatography integrated in a monoclonal antibody downstream process2020In: Journal of Chromatography A, ISSN 0021-9673, E-ISSN 1873-3778, Vol. 1621, article id 461055Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An optimization study of an integrated periodic counter-current chromatography (PCC) process in a monoclonal antibody (mAb) downstream process at lab scale, is presented in this paper. The optimization was based on a mechanistic model of the breakthrough curve in the protein-A capture step. Productivity and resin utilization were the objective functions, while yield during the loading of the capture column was set as a constraint. Different integration approaches were considered, and the effect of the feed concentration, yield and the protein-A resin was studied. The breakthrough curve and the length of the product recovery, which depended on the integration approach, determined the process scheduling. Several optimal Pareto solutions were obtained. At 0.5 mg mL−1 and 99% yield, a maximum productivity of 0.38 mg mL−1 min−1 with a resin utilization of 60% was obtained. On the other hand, the maximum resin utilization was 95% with a productivity of 0.10 mg mL−1 min−1. Due to the constraint of the process scheduling, a lower productivity could be achieved in the integration approaches with higher recovery time, which was more remarkable at higher concentrations. Therefore, it was shown that a holistic approach, where all the purification steps are considered in the process optimization, is needed to design a PCC in a downstream process.

  • 321.
    Gomis-Fons, Joaquin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Centre for Advanced BioProduction by Continuous Processing, AdBIOPRO. Lund Univ, Dept Chem Engn, POB 124, SE-21100 Lund, Sweden..
    Yamanee-Nolin, Mikael
    Lund Univ, Dept Chem Engn, POB 124, SE-21100 Lund, Sweden..
    Andersson, Niklas
    Lund Univ, Dept Chem Engn, POB 124, SE-21100 Lund, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Bernt
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Centre for Advanced BioProduction by Continuous Processing, AdBIOPRO. Lund Univ, Dept Chem Engn, POB 124, SE-21100 Lund, Sweden..
    Optimal loading flow rate trajectory in monoclonal antibody capture chromatography2021In: Journal of Chromatography A, ISSN 0021-9673, E-ISSN 1873-3778, Vol. 1635, article id 461760Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we determined the optimal flow rate trajectory during the loading phase of a mAb capture column. For this purpose, a multi-objective function was used, consisting of productivity and resin utilization. Several general types of trajectories were considered, and the optimal Pareto points were obtained for all of them. In particular, the presented trajectories include a constant-flow loading process as a nominal approach, a stepwise trajectory, and a linear trajectory. Selected trajectories were then applied in experiments with the state-of-the-art protein A resin mAb Select PrismA (TM), running in batch mode on a standard single-column chromatography setup, and using both a purified mAb solution as well as a clarified supernatant. The results show that this simple approach, programming the volumetric flow rate according to either of the explored strategies, can improve the process economics by increasing productivity by up to 12% and resin utilization by up to 9% compared to a constant-flow process, while obtaining a yield higher than 99%. The productivity values were similar to the ones obtained in a multi column continuous process, and ranged from 0.23 to 0.35 mg/min/mL resin. Additionally, it is shown that a model calibration carried out at constant flow can be applied in the simulation and optimization of flow trajectories. The selected processes were scaled up to pilot scale and simulated to prove that even higher productivity and resin utilization can be achieved at larger scales, and therefore confirm that the trajectories are generalizable across process scales for this resin.

  • 322.
    Gong, Xiaowen
    et al.
    Auburn University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Auburn, AL, USA.
    Huang, Kaibin
    The University of Hong Kong, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Pokfulam, Hong Kong.
    Chen, Mingzhe
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Fischione, Carlo
    University of Miami, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Miami, FL, USA, 33146.
    Zhang, Jun
    The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Sai Kung, Hong Kong.
    Choi, Wan
    Seoul National University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Seoul, South Korea.
    Guest Editorial Special Section on Distributed Edge Learning in Wireless Networks2023In: IEEE Open Journal of the Communications Society, E-ISSN 2644-125X, Vol. 4, p. 2729-2732Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 323.
    Gonzalez-Garcia, Sara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. CRETUS Institute, Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, 15782, Spain.
    Almeida, Fernando
    Grp Da Cunha, Carral 15175, Spain.;Univ Santiago de Compostela, Fac Sci, Dept Analyt Chem, Lugo 27002, Spain..
    Teresa Moreira, Maria
    Univ Santiago de Compostela, CRETUS Inst, Dept Chem Engn, Sch Engn, Santiago De Compostela 15782, Spain..
    Brandao, Miguel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Evaluating the environmental profiles of winter wheat rotation systems under different management strategies2021In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 770, article id 145270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change poses a remarkable challenge to global food security, for which wheat is one of the main staple agricultural commodities. The cultivation of different varieties of winter wheat in Galicia (commercial and native) under rotation systems with potato, maize and oilseed rape was evaluated from an environmental point of view. The general approach of this study included the gathering of the inventory data of the different crops, the quantification of their environmental impacts and economic benefits, to identify the best land management system. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) was used as environmental tool. The environmental profiles of each rotation system were reported in terms of nine impact categories. Crop rotations were analysed both per hectare and per is an element of of gross margin, so that the information can be relevant to land-management decisions. Preference ranks were established based on an environmental normalized score for both units. The results suggest that arable operations contribute decisively to the environmental profile of the rotations. The avoided mineral fertilization processes, the carbon storage in the soil when returning straw to the field, as well as the electricity production clearly influence the environmental impact of the rotations. Scenarios that include native wheat under organic management are always the environmentally preferred ones while the preferred alternate crop depends on the reference unit. Concerning the margin gross, scenarios including the native variety report the highest profits, being the potato the preferred alternate crop. Further assessment needs to be undertaken to identify differences in the results of different ways of conducting LCA, i.e. attributional vs consequential approaches.

  • 324.
    Gorlov, Mikhail
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Lindborg, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Karlsson, Karl Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Tian, Haining
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Optimization of dye-sensitized solar cells based on organic dyes2010In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 239Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 325.
    Grahn, Pontus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electric Power and Energy Systems.
    Briggner, Viktor
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electric Power and Energy Systems.
    Johansson, Linus
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electric Power and Energy Systems.
    Babazadeh, Davood
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electric Power and Energy Systems.
    Nordström, Lars
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electric Power and Energy Systems.
    Centralized Versus Distributed State Estimation for Hybrid AC/HVDC Grid2017In: IEEE International Conference on Innovative Smart Grid Technologies, (ISGT Europe 2017), IEEE conference proceedings, 2017, p. 2222-2227Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The need of transmission grid expansion has drawn the attention towards high voltage DC (HVDC) as a solution.This brings new challenges for power system control application such as state estimation that are originally designed for AC power system. This papers studies centralized and distributed architecturesfor hybrid AC/HVDC state estimator (SE). Furthermore, the benefit of having bad data detection (BDD) and deploying phasor measurement units (PMU) in the state estimation are investigated. The method used for the SE is the weighted least square (WLS) method. The SE will be developed based on the power grid model ’The CIGRE B4 DC Grid Test System’. Theresults of the tests show that the addition of BDD and PMU improved the error of the estimated values. Furthermore the distributed architecture offered slightly less accurate AC values than the centralized.

  • 326.
    Grandell, J.
    KTH.
    Mathematical Aspects on the Variation of air Pollutant Concentrations2020In: Probability Theory and Mathematical Statistics: Proceedings of the Fourth Vilnius Conference, De Gruyter , 2020, p. 509-512Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 327.
    Grieco, William J.
    et al.
    KTH. Gardenia Ventures LLC, Royal Institute of Technology, Univ. of Michigan, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Javan, Adam
    KTH. Gardenia Ventures LLC, Royal Institute of Technology, Univ. of Michigan, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Making smarter clean-tech investments2010In: Chemical engineering progress, ISSN 0360-7275, E-ISSN 1945-0710, Vol. 106, no 10, p. 38-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The high-quality due diligence, carried out by carefully chosen teams with the right expertise, can help to inform investors about a company's ability to innovate, and succeed in the viable technologies market. A company's technology proposals and its operational competency are key areas of concern in clean-tech sector. Many clean-tech ventures are trying to compete with heavily commoditized, and in some cases heavily regulated, industries. The cost of production is the key metric that determines commercial viability. Some firms in the biofuels sector have been focusing only on microalgae lipid content, oil yield, or carbon dioxide uptake in reactor designs that are not economically viable and few companies have correctly used economic viability. The due diligence team must include science, engineering and business experts who have extensive experience in developing, building and operating large-scale manufacturing systems.

  • 328.
    Guccini, Valentina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Carlson, Annika
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Yu, Shun
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindbergh, Göran
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Lindström, Rakel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Salazar-Alvarez, German
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden .
    Highly proton conductive membranes based on carboxylated cellulose nanofibres and their performance in proton exchange membrane fuel cells2019In: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, ISSN 2050-7488, E-ISSN 2050-7496, Vol. 7, no 43, p. 25032-25039Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The performance of thin carboxylated cellulose nanofiber-based (CNF) membranes as proton exchange membranes in fuel cells has been measured in situ as a function of CNF surface charge density (600 and 1550 μmol g−1), counterion (H+ or Na+), membrane thickness and fuel cell relative humidity (RH 55 to 95%). The structural evolution of the membranes as a function of RH, as measured by Small Angle X-ray Scattering, shows that water channels are formed only above 75% RH. The amount of absorbed water was shown to depend on the membrane surface charge and counter ions (H+ or Na+). The high affinity of CNF for water and the high aspect ratio of the nanofibers, together with a well-defined and homogenous membrane structure, ensures a proton conductivity exceeding 1 mS cm−1 at 30 °C between 65 and 95% RH. This is two orders of magnitude larger than previously reported values for cellulose materials and only one order of magnitude lower than Nafion 212. Moreover, the CNF membranes are characterized by a lower hydrogen crossover than Nafion, despite being ≈30% thinner. Thanks to their environmental compatibility and promising fuel cell performance the CNF membranes should be considered for new generation proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  • 329.
    Gudmundson, Peter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.), Solid Mechanics (Div.).
    Fredriksson, Per
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.), Solid Mechanics (Div.).
    Interface conditions in strain gradient plasticity theories2005In: Interface conditions in strain gradient plasticity theories, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 330.
    Gunarathne, Duleeka
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Energy and Furnace Technology.
    Cuvilas, Carlos
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Energy and Furnace Technology.
    Li, Jun
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Energy and Furnace Technology.
    Weihong, Yang
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Energy and Furnace Technology.
    Blasiak, Wlodzimierz
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Energy and Furnace Technology.
    BIOMASS PRETREATMENT FOR LARGE PERCENTAGE BIOMASS CO-FIRING2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the target of reducing net GHG emissions from coal fired power plants, biomass co-firing in such plants is becoming more and more attractive option among other thermal applications of biomass such as combustion, gasification and pyrolysis. Not only CO2, but effective reduction of SOx and NOx emissions can also be expected with this low cost, sustainable and renewable energy option. However, the economic feasibility of such process largely depends on the cost of biomass acquisition and transportation. Therefore, local availability of large quantities of biomass is important for more economic co-firing. Since always this is not the case, pretreatment of biomass to increase energy density is another way to make biomass economical for long distance transportation. Pretreatment also broaden the usage of biomass sources (eg. wet and waste biomass), reduce the moisture content make it hydrophobic reducing drying energy demand, ease to comminute into small particles creating it more economical source for co-firing. Further, as a result of pretreatment, combustion and electricity generation efficiencies will be improved due to increased heating value of pretreated biomass. Therefore, enhancement of biomass properties is advisable not only to improve its inferior characteristics as well as to make it as suitable alternative for fossil fuels. In this paper, the technologies of biomass pretreatment for thermal application, such as physical and thermochemical pretreatments were reviewed. The upgrading processes of biomass including steam explosion, torrefaction and hydrothermal carbonization-HTC were described based on the HHV, adiabatic flame temperature, fouling tendency and emissions. Furthermore, a case study using severely torrified biomass for large percentage co-firing with coal is discussed.

  • 331.
    Guo, Boyang
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Vanga, Sudarsana Reddy
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lopez-Lorenzo, Ximena
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Saenz-Mendez, Patricia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ericsson, Sara Rönnblad
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fang, Yuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Ye, Xinchen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Schriever, Karen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bäckström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Biundo, Antonino
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Zubarev, Roman A.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Division of Physiological Chemistry I, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, SE-171 77, Sweden; Department of Pharmacological and Technological Chemistry, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow, 119146, Russian Federation.
    Furo, Istvan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Syrén, Per-Olof
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Conformational Selection in Biocatalytic Plastic Degradation by PETase2022In: ACS Catalysis, ISSN 2155-5435, E-ISSN 2155-5435, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 3397-3409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the steric effects imposed by bulky polymers, the formation of catalytically competent enzyme and substrate conformations is critical in the biodegradation of plastics. In poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), the backbone adopts different conformations, gauche and trans, coexisting to different extents in amorphous and crystalline regions. However, which conformation is susceptible to biodegradation and the extent of enzyme and substrate conformational changes required for expedient catalysis remain poorly understood. To overcome this obstacle, we utilized molecular dynamics simulations, docking, and enzyme engineering in concert with high-resolution microscopy imaging and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to demonstrate the importance of conformational selection in biocatalytic plastic hydrolysis. Our results demonstrate how single-amino acid substitutions in Ideonella sakaiensis PETase can alter its conformational landscape, significantly affecting the relative abundance of productive ground-state structures ready to bind discrete substrate conformers. We experimentally show how an enzyme binds to plastic and provide a model for key residues involved in the recognition of gauche and trans conformations supported by in silico simulations. We demonstrate how enzyme engineering can be used to create a trans-selective variant, resulting in higher activity when combined with an all-trans PET-derived oligomeric substrate, stemming from both increased accessibility and conformational preference. Our work cements the importance of matching enzyme and substrate conformations in plastic hydrolysis, and we show that also the noncanonical trans conformation in PET is conducive for degradation. Understanding the contribution of enzyme and substrate conformations to biocatalytic plastic degradation could facilitate the generation of designer enzymes with increased performance.

  • 332.
    Guo, Junfei
    et al.
    Xi An Jiao Tong Univ, Sch Human Settlements & Civil Engn, Inst Bldg Environm & Sustainabil Technol, Xian 710049, Peoples R China..
    Liu, Zhan
    Qingdao Univ Sci & Technol, Coll Electromech Engn, Qingdao 266061, Peoples R China..
    Du, Zhao
    Xi An Jiao Tong Univ, Sch Human Settlements & Civil Engn, Inst Bldg Environm & Sustainabil Technol, Xian 710049, Peoples R China..
    Yu, Jiabang
    Xi An Jiao Tong Univ, Sch Human Settlements & Civil Engn, Inst Bldg Environm & Sustainabil Technol, Xian 710049, Peoples R China..
    Yang, Xiaohu
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering. Xi An Jiao Tong Univ, Sch Human Settlements & Civil Engn, Inst Bldg Environm & Sustainabil Technol, Xian 710049, Peoples R China.;Mälardalen Univ, Sch Sustainable Dev Soc & Technol, S-72123 Västerås, Sweden..
    Yan, Jinyue
    Mälardalen Univ, Sch Sustainable Dev Soc & Technol, S-72123 Västerås, Sweden..
    Effect of fin-metal foam structure on thermal energy storage: An experimental study2021In: Renewable energy, ISSN 0960-1481, E-ISSN 1879-0682, Vol. 172, p. 57-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal energy storage (TES) has been playing a crucial role in addressing the issue of solving the intermittent and random problems in solar energy utilization. The objective of this study is to squarely address and clarify the contribution of metal fin and foam to enhancing the phase change heat transfer by experiments. A novel hybrid fin-foam tube is proposed and its thermal performance is evaluated by experimentally comparing with other three competing structures including bare, fin, and metal foam tubes. A well-designed test rig is built and the energy storage features for the designed four TES tubes are analyzed by the complete melting time, melting front evolution, temperature variation and uniformity, and the temperature response rate. Results show that the fin-foam hybrid structure outperforms the other competing ones, demonstrating a reduction of 83.35% in complete melting time (compared with the bare tube). The transient temperature response is maximized by 529.1%. As for the single structure, both fins and metal foam can improve conductivity of phase change materials. The metal foam does a good favor to improve the uniformity of the temperature field inside the TES tube, but the fins weakened the uniformity. If the design target is temperature uniformity, adding metal foams other than fins can fulfil the task. (c) 2021 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 333.
    Guo, Qinda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics.
    Endzik, Macie J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Erntsen, Magnus H.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Grubisic-Cabo, Antonija
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics. Univ Groningen, Zernike Inst Adv Mat, NL-9747 AG Groningen, Netherlands..
    Li, Congl
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Chen, Wanyu
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Wang, Yang
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Jernberg, Oscar T.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Efficient low-density grating setup for monochromatization of XUV ultrafast light sources2023In: Optics Express, E-ISSN 1094-4087, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 8914-8926Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultrafast light sources have become an indispensable tool to access and understand transient phenomenon in material science. However, a simple and easy-to-implement method for harmonic selection, with high transmission efficiency and pulse duration conservation, is still a challenge. Here we showcase and compare two approaches for selecting the desired harmonic from a high harmonic generation source while achieving the above goals. The first approach is the combination of extreme ultraviolet spherical mirrors with transmission filters and the second approach uses a normal-incidence spherical grating. Both solutions target timeand angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with photon energies in the 10-20 eV range but are relevant for other experimental techniques as well. The two approaches for harmonic selection are characterized in terms of focusing quality, photon flux, and temporal broadening. It is demonstrated that a focusing grating is able to provide much higher transmission as compared to the mirror+filter approach (3.3 times higher for 10.8 eV and 12.9 times higher for 18.1 eV), with only a slight temporal broadening (6.8% increase) and a somewhat larger spot size (similar to 30% increase). Overall, our study establishes an experimental perspective on the trade-off between a single grating normal incidence monochromator design and the use of filters. As such, it provides a basis for selecting the most appropriate approach in various fields where an easy-to-implement harmonic selection from high harmonic generation is needed.

  • 334.
    Gureya, David
    et al.
    KTH. Univ Lisbon, INIESC ID, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Barreto, Joao
    Univ Lisbon, INIESC ID, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Vlassov, Vladimir
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Generalizing QoS-Aware Memory Bandwidth Allocation to Multi-Socket Cloud Servers2021In: 2021 Ieee 14Th International Conference On Cloud Computing (Cloud 2021) / [ed] Ardagna, CA Chang, C Daminai, E Ranjan, R Wang, Z Ward, R Zhang, J Zhang, W, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) , 2021, p. 551-557Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the problem of QoS-aware resource allocation is not new, novel hardware-based resource allocation mechanisms have recently become available in commodity cloud servers and enabled a new generation of QoS-aware resource allocation approaches. Unfortunately, to the best of our knowledge, existing proposals are by design tailored to single-socket architectures only. In many warehouse scale data centers, dual-socket (or even larger) machines already constitute the largest share of hosts. This paper presents the full design and implementation of BALM, a QoS-aware memory bandwidth allocation technique for multi-socket architectures. BALM combines commodity bandwidth allocation mechanisms originally designed for single-socket with a novel adaptive cross-socket page migration scheme. Our evaluation with a large and dynamic set of real applications co-located on a dual-socket machine shows that BALM can overcome the efficiency limitations of state-of-the-art. BALM delivers substantial throughput gains to bandwidth-intensive best-effort applications, while ensuring marginal SID violation windows to latency-critical applications.

  • 335.
    Gustafsson, Camilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Shirani, Hamid
    Division of Chemistry, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University.
    Konsmo, Audun
    Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Rhen, Dirk
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Linares, Mathieu
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Division of Chemistry, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University.
    Norman, Patrick
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Lindgren, Mikael
    Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Deciphering the electronic transitions of thiophene-based donor-acceptor-donor pentameric ligands utilized for multimodal fluorescence microscopy of protein aggregatesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 336.
    Gustafsson, Linnea
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems. Spiber Technologies AB Roslagstullsbacken 15 Stockholm 114 21 Sweden.
    Kvick, Mathias
    Spiber Technologies AB Roslagstullsbacken 15 Stockholm 114 21 Sweden.
    Åstrand, Carolina
    Spiber Technologies AB Roslagstullsbacken 15 Stockholm 114 21 Sweden.
    Ponsteen, Nienke
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Dorka, Wilhelm Nicolai
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology.
    Hegrová, Veronika
    NenoVision s.r.o Purkyňova 127 Brno‐Medlánky 612 00 The Chezh Republic.
    Svanberg, Sara
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Horák, Josef
    NenoVision s.r.o Purkyňova 127 Brno‐Medlánky 612 00 The Chezh Republic.
    Jansson, Ronnie
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Engineering.
    Hedhammar, My
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology.
    van der Wijngaart, Wouter
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Scalable Production of Monodisperse Bioactive Spider Silk Nanowires2023In: Macromolecular Bioscience, ISSN 1616-5187, E-ISSN 1616-5195, p. 2200450-2200450Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 337.
    Gustafsson, U.
    et al.
    Umea Univ Hosp, Ctr Heart, S-90185 Umea, Sweden..
    Larsson, M.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Bjällmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Lindqvist, P.
    Umea Univ Hosp, Ctr Heart, S-90185 Umea, Sweden..
    Aroch, R.
    Umea Univ Hosp, Ctr Heart, S-90185 Umea, Sweden..
    Haney, M.
    Umea Univ Hosp, Ctr Heart, S-90185 Umea, Sweden..
    Waldenstrom, A.
    Umea Univ Hosp, Ctr Heart, S-90185 Umea, Sweden..
    The rotation axis of the left ventricle in acute myocardial ischemia2010In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 31, p. 862-863Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 338.
    Gustavsson, Lotta H.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Adolfsson, Karin H.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Thermoplastic "All-Cellulose" Composites with Covalently Attached Carbonized Cellulose2020In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 1752-1761Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermoplastic "all-cellulose" composites were synthesized by covalent functionalization of cellulose acetate (CA) with oxidized carbonized cellulose (OCC). The OCC were manufactured via microwave-assisted hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) of cellulose followed by oxidation and dialysis. The OCC were of micrometer-size, had plane morphology and contained a variety of oxygen functionalities, enabling transformation into acyl chlorinated OCC under moderate reaction conditions. The synthesis of OCC-modified CA composites and neat CA were performed in the recyclable ionic liquid 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride. The degree of acetylation and amount of OCC were varied to establish their influence on thermal and physical properties of the composites. The OCC-modified CA composites displayed a notably enhanced film-forming ability, which led to improved optical and mechanical properties compared to neat CA. In addition, it was shown that OCC-modified CA composites can be synthesized from waste products, such as paper tissues. The OCC-modification was demonstrated to be a promising route to transparent and strong thermoplastic "all-cellulose" composites with moderate flexibility.

  • 339.
    Gutierrez, A
    et al.
    Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia.
    Chamorro Vera, Harold Rene
    Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia.
    Jimenez, Jose Fernando
    KTH.
    Hardware-in-the-Loop based SysML for Model and Control Design of Interleaved Boost Converters2014In: 2014 IEEE 15TH WORKSHOP ON CONTROL AND MODELING FOR POWER ELECTRONICS (COMPEL), IEEE, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper outlines the application of the HiLeS-RCP (High Level Specification of Embedded Systems - Rich Client Platform) to model and design controllers of interleaved boost converters using the Systems Modelling Language (SysML). HiLeS-RCP allows the transformation from SysML models to Petri nets for implementation in embedded hardware. As a result, these models based on SysML can be used in Hardware-in-the-Loop (HIL)applications. In addition, the formal transformation from SysML to Petri nets is intended for structural analysis of the designed controllers in order to avoid undesired behaviours after implementation. As a case of study, HiLeS-RCP is used to model and design a supervisory controller for interleaved boost converters. This supervisory controller is implemented in FPGA; furthermore, embedded real time tools are used to evaluate the supervisory controller performance. Finally, experimental results show that the proposed methodology based on SysML and Petri nets is suitable to design controllers for interleaved boost converters.

  • 340.
    Gutierrez, Mauricio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Gezork, Tobias
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Yang, Shu
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Fransson, Torsten H.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Andersson, C.
    Vogt, D. M.
    Forced response analysis of a transonic turbine using a free interface component mode synthesis method2015In: 11th European Conference on Turbomachinery Fluid Dynamics and Thermodynamics, ETC 2015, European Conference on Turbomachinery (ETC) , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessing forced response is crucial during the design phase of turbomachines. Since the analyses are computationally expensive and time-consuming when using full models, Reduced Order Models (ROM) are utilized to decrease the number of Degrees Of Freedom (DOF) and consequently analysis time and cost. The ROM used in the current analysis belongs to the component mode synthesis (CMS) method with a free-interface approach known as Craig-Chang. A transonic high pressure turbine is investigated featuring large ranges of disk and blade dominated modes depending in the Nodal Diameter (ND). The free-interface approach will be assessed in the disk and blade dominated regions with a detailed study of the frequencies and mode shapes. In addition, a forced response analysis within the blade dominated region is evaluated in the paper. Moreover, a study of the amount of modes required in the basis for the reduced order transformation matrix is presented.

  • 341.
    Gvozdic, D M
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics.
    Schlachetzki, A
    Modulation response of V-groove quantum-wire lasers (vol 41, pg 842, 2005)2005In: IEEE Journal of Quantum Electronics, ISSN 0018-9197, E-ISSN 1558-1713, Vol. 41, no 7, p. 1044-1044Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 342. Hacks, S.
    et al.
    Persson, L.
    Hersén, Nicklas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Measuring and achieving test coverage of attack simulations extended version2023In: Software and Systems Modeling, ISSN 1619-1366, E-ISSN 1619-1374, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 31-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing secure and reliable systems is a difficult task. Threat modeling is a process that supports the secure design of systems by easing the understanding of the system’s complexity, as well as identifying and modeling potential threats. These threat models can serve as input for attack simulations, which are used to analyze the behavior of attackers within the system. To ensure the correct functionality of these attack simulations, automated tests are designed that check if an attacker can reach a certain point in the threat model. Currently, there is no way for developers to estimate the degree to which their tests cover the attack simulations and, thus, they cannot determine the quality of their tests. To resolve this shortcoming, we analyze structural testing methods from the software engineering domain and transfer them to the threat modeling domain by following an action design research approach. Further, we develop a first prototype, which is able to assess the test coverage in an automated way and provide a first approach to achieve full coverage. This will enable threat modeler to determine the quality of their tests and, simultaneously, increase the quality of the threat models. 

  • 343.
    Hadinia, B.
    et al.
    Univ Guelph, Dept Phys, Guelph, ON, Canada..
    Garrett, P. E.
    Univ Guelph, Dept Phys, Guelph, ON, Canada..
    Svensson, C. E.
    Univ Guelph, Dept Phys, Guelph, ON, Canada..
    Carroll, R. J.
    Univ Liverpool, Dept Phys, Oliver Lodge Lab, Liverpool, Merseyside, England..
    Page, R. D.
    Univ Liverpool, Dept Phys, Oliver Lodge Lab, Liverpool, Merseyside, England..
    Joss, D. T.
    Univ Liverpool, Dept Phys, Oliver Lodge Lab, Liverpool, Merseyside, England..
    Darby, I. G.
    Univ Liverpool, Dept Phys, Oliver Lodge Lab, Liverpool, Merseyside, England..
    Paul, E. S.
    Univ Liverpool, Dept Phys, Oliver Lodge Lab, Liverpool, Merseyside, England..
    Qi, Chong
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics. Royal Inst Technol, Dept Phys, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Back, Tove
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics. Royal Inst Technol, Dept Phys, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Cederwall, Bo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics. Royal Inst Technol, Dept Phys, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Johnson, A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics. Royal Inst Technol, Dept Phys, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Grahn, T.
    Univ Jyvaskyla, Dept Phys, Jyvaskyla, Finland..
    Greenlees, P. T.
    Univ Jyvaskyla, Dept Phys, Jyvaskyla, Finland..
    Jones, P. M.
    Univ Jyvaskyla, Dept Phys, Jyvaskyla, Finland..
    Julin, R.
    Univ Jyvaskyla, Dept Phys, Jyvaskyla, Finland..
    Ketelhut, S.
    Univ Jyvaskyla, Dept Phys, Jyvaskyla, Finland..
    Leino, M.
    Univ Jyvaskyla, Dept Phys, Jyvaskyla, Finland..
    Rahkila, P.
    Univ Jyvaskyla, Dept Phys, Jyvaskyla, Finland..
    Sandzelius, M.
    Univ Jyvaskyla, Dept Phys, Jyvaskyla, Finland..
    Scholey, C.
    Univ Jyvaskyla, Dept Phys, Jyvaskyla, Finland..
    Uusitalo, J.
    Univ Jyvaskyla, Dept Phys, Jyvaskyla, Finland..
    IN-BEAM gamma-RAY SPECTROSCOPY ABOVE THE HIGH-SPIN ISOMERIC STATE IN Lu-1552013In: CAPTURE GAMMA-RAY SPECTROSCOPY AND RELATED TOPICS / [ed] Garrett, PE Hadinia, B, WORLD SCIENTIFIC PUBL CO PTE LTD , 2013, p. 139-144Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Excited states in Lu-155 have been studied at the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyvaskyla in Finland. The Lu-155 nuclei were populated using the reaction of Ni-58 on (102)pd at a beam energy of 280 MeV. The nuclei of interest were selected using the RITU gas filled recoil separator and the prompt gamma rays belonging to 155Lu were identified using the recoil-decay tagging technique. The gamma-ray transitions de-exciting the excited states above the high-spin isomeric a-decaying state in Lu-155 have been identified. A gamma-ray coincidence analysis shows that the previously reported level scheme for Lu-155 should be revised.

  • 344.
    Haider, Zahra
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wasterlid, Tove
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Div Clin Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Hematol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Spångberg, Linn Deleskog
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Div Clin Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Rabbani, Leily
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Jylha, Cecilia
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Genet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Thorvaldsdottir, Birna
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Skaftason, Aron
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Awier, Hero Nikdin
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Genet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Krstic, Aleksandra
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Genet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gellerbring, Anna
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Lyander, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hägglund, Moa
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Jeggari, Ashwini
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Rassidakis, Georgios
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Lab, Dept Clin Pathol & Canc Diagnost, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sonnevi, Kristina
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Div Clin Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Hematol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sander, Birgitta
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Pathol & Canc Diagnost, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Genet, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Genom Med Ctr Karolinska, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tham, Emma
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Genet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Smedby, Karin E.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Div Clin Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Hematol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Whole-genome informed circulating tumor DNA analysis by multiplex digital PCR for disease monitoring in B-cell lymphomas: a proof-of-concept study2023In: Frontiers in Oncology, E-ISSN 2234-943X, Vol. 13, article id 1176698Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IntroductionAnalyzing liquid biopsies for tumor-specific aberrations can facilitate detection of measurable residual disease (MRD) during treatment and at follow-up. In this study, we assessed the clinical potential of using whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of lymphomas at diagnosis to identify patient-specific structural (SVs) and single nucleotide variants (SNVs) to enable longitudinal, multi-targeted droplet digital PCR analysis (ddPCR) of cell-free DNA (cfDNA). MethodsIn 9 patients with B-cell lymphoma (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma), comprehensive genomic profiling at diagnosis was performed by 30X WGS of paired tumor and normal specimens. Patient-specific multiplex ddPCR (m-ddPCR) assays were designed for simultaneous detection of multiple SNVs, indels and/or SVs, with a detection sensitivity of 0.0025% for SV assays and 0.02% for SNVs/indel assays. M-ddPCR was applied to analyze cfDNA isolated from serially collected plasma at clinically critical timepoints during primary and/or relapse treatment and at follow-up. ResultsA total of 164 SNVs/indels were identified by WGS including 30 variants known to be functionally relevant in lymphoma pathogenesis. The most frequently mutated genes included KMT2D, PIM1, SOCS1 and BCL2. WGS analysis further identified recurrent SVs including t(14;18)(q32;q21) (IGH::BCL2), and t(6;14)(p25;q32) (IGH::IRF4). Plasma analysis at diagnosis showed positive circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) levels in 88% of patients and the ctDNA burden correlated with baseline clinical parameters (LDH and sedimentation rate, p-value <0.01). While clearance of ctDNA levels after primary treatment cycle 1 was observed in 3/6 patients, all patients analyzed at final evaluation of primary treatment showed negative ctDNA, hence correlating with PET-CT imaging. One patient with positive ctDNA at interim also displayed detectable ctDNA (average variant allele frequency (VAF) 6.9%) in the follow-up plasma sample collected 2 years after final evaluation of primary treatment and 25 weeks before clinical manifestation of relapse. ConclusionIn summary, we demonstrate that multi-targeted cfDNA analysis, using a combination of SNVs/indels and SVs candidates identified by WGS analysis, provides a sensitive tool for MRD monitoring and can detect lymphoma relapse earlier than clinical manifestation.

  • 345.
    Hajihoseini, H.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Space and Plasma Physics. Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3, IS-107, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Kateb, M.
    Ingvarsson, S.
    Gudmundsson, J. T.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Space and Plasma Physics. Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3, IS-107, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Effect of substrate bias on properties of HiPIMS deposited vanadium nitride films2018In: Thin Solid Films, ISSN 0040-6090, E-ISSN 1879-2731, Vol. 663, p. 126-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the effect of varying the substrate bias on the morphology, composition, structural, and electrical properties of vanadium nitride films deposited by high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS). The optimum substrate bias is found to be −50 V, which gives the highest film density, the lowest electrical resistivity, and the lowest surface roughness at the highest deposition rate. We demonstrate how increasing the substrate bias voltage leads to a highly textured film. The preferred orientation of the film changes from (111) to (200) as the substrate bias voltage is increased. An X-ray pole scan shows that the (111) plane grows parallel to the SiO2 substrate when the substrate is grounded while it is gradually replaced by the (200) plane as the substrate bias voltage is increased up to −200 V. The lowest electrical resistivity is measured as 48.4 μΩ cm for the VN film deposited under substrate bias of −50 V. This is among the lowest room temperature values that have been reported for a VN film. We found that the nitrogen concentration presents a decline by 6.5 percentage points as the substrate bias is changed from ground to −200 V. 

  • 346.
    Hallberg, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Biotechnology.
    Leitner, C.
    Haltrich, D.
    Divne, Christina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Crystal structure of the 270 kDa homotetrameric lignin-degrading enzyme pyranose 2-oxidase2004In: Journal of Molecular Biology, ISSN 0022-2836, E-ISSN 1089-8638, Vol. 341, no 3, p. 781-796Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pyranose 2-oxidase (P2Ox) is a 270 kDa homotetramer localized preferentially in the hyphal periplasmic space of lignocellulolytic fungi and has a proposed role in lignocellulose degradation to produce the essential co-substrate, hydrogen peroxide, for lignin peroxidases. P2Ox oxidizes D-glucose and other aldopyranoses regioselectively at C2 to the corresponding 2-keto sugars; however, for some substrates, the enzyme also displays specificity for oxidation at C3. The crystal structure of P2Ox from Trametes multicolor has been determined using single anomalous dispersion with mercury as anomalous scatterer. The model was refined at 1.8 Angstrom resolution to R and R-free values of 0.134 and 0.171, respectively. The overall fold of the P2Ox subunit resembles that of members of the glucose-methanol-choline family of long-chain oxidoreductases, featuring a flavin-binding Rossmann domain of class alpha/beta and a substrate-binding subdomain with a six-stranded central beta sheet and three U helices. The homotetramer buries a large internal cavity of roughly 15,000 Angstrom(3), from which the four active sites are accessible. Four solvent channels lead from the surface into the cavity through which substrate must enter before accessing the active site. The present structure shows an acetate molecule bound in the active site with the carboxylate group positioned immediately below the flavin N5 atom, and with one carboxylate oxygen atom interacting with the catalytic residues His548 and Asn593. The entrance to the active site is blocked by a loop (residues 452 to 461) with excellent electron density but elevated temperature factors. We predict that this loop is dynamic and opens to allow substrate entry and exit. In silico docking of D-glucose in the P2Ox active site shows that with the active-site loop in the closed conformation, monosaccharides cannot be accommodated; however, after removing the loop from the model, a tentative set of protein-substrate interactions for beta-D-glucose have been outlined.

  • 347.
    Hallén, Johan
    et al.
    KTH.
    Vanston, R.
    Ruff, D.
    Continuous mobile boration2016In: Nuclear plant journal, ISSN 0892-2055, E-ISSN 2162-6413, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 40-42Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 348.
    Hamilton, Carl
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Why the European Union's EFC directive is failing to deliver interoperability in road user charging, and how it could be achieved simply and effectively2009In: 16th ITS World Congress, World Congress on Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS), 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 349.
    Hammar, C.
    et al.
    KTH.
    Weissglas, P.
    KTH.
    Hot electron polar scattering in InSb1967In: Physica Status Solidi, De Gruyter , 1967, Vol. 24, p. 531-534Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 350.
    Hammar, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Physics.
    Gauthier, Y.
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Physics.
    Göthelid, Mats
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Physics.
    Karlsson, U. O.
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Physics.
    Flodström, S. A.
    Rosengren, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Theoretical Physics.
    Scanning tunnelling microscopy studies of Pt80Fe 20(110)1993In: Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, ISSN 09538984, Vol. 5, no 18, p. 2837-2842Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Results of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) show that two different kinds of surface structures coexist on the (110) surface of Pt 80Fe20. The predominant structure corresponds well to the missing row type (1*2) reconstruction previously observed on, for example Pt(110), whereas the minority domains show a faintly buckled structure with approximately (1*1) geometry. Based on the STM images, the authors propose that the two domains have different surface chemical compositions and correspond to two different metallurgical phases known for the PtFe system at this composition.

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