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  • 401.
    Hetemi, Ermal
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.). UPM Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain.
    Mere, J. O.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Exploring mechanisms underlying lock-in in large infrastructure projects: A management perspective2017In: CENTERIS 2017 - International Conference on ENTERprise Information Systems / ProjMAN 2017 - International Conference on Project MANagement / HCist 2017 - International Conference on Health and Social Care Information Systems and Technologies, CENTERIS/ProjMAN/HCist 2017, Elsevier, 2017, Vol. 121, p. 681-691Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research in large scale infrastructure projects have argued that the overall project performance is subject to lock-in, yet this is little understood empirically and more research is needed. Recently studies reported that lock-in can occur both at the decision-making level and at the project execution level respectively. The underlying patterns influencing project scope transformation, due to evolving expectations and/or stakeholder's perspective and the occurrence of lock-in influence in project performance. This paper explores the relationship between project scope and lock-in within large infrastructure projects in the context of cost over-run. Based on empirical data from 20 High Speed Rail (HSR) projects in Spain with multinational sets of actors, and anchored in the Management of Project (MoP) paradigm, the paper shows that a holistic perspective is essential for successful outcome. Methodologically, the paper uses data mining and a case study approach to explore mechanisms that underlie lock-in in relation with scope demarcation - tracked through contract change. It suggests that an investigation of lock-in in relationship to scope demarcation and through the lens of path dependence contributes to the understanding of cost over-run emergence. Preliminary findings highlight contract type and its content to have a great influence in cost over-run.

  • 402.
    Ho, Cynthia Sin Tian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Banking and Finance.
    Berggren, Björn
    The Influence of Bank Branch Closure on Entrepreneurship Sustainability2018In: The Influence of Bank Branch Closure on Entrepreneurship Sustainability, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the influence of bank branch closure on new firm formation in Sweden, with a panel database that captures the geographical locations of all the Swedish bank branches from 2000 to 2013. Using spatial econometric analysis at a municipal level, we show that bank proximity to firms is vital for entrepreneurship to thrive and sustain in Sweden. From the Fixed-Effects spatial models, the increase in distance to the banks due to bank branch closure is shown to affect new firm formation negatively. The further a firm is located away from the bank, the higher the monitoring cost is for the banks. The increase in distance also results in an increase in information asymmetries because of the banks’ eroded ability to collect soft information about the borrower firm. Due to high risks associated with the lack of information and uncertainty, banks might not be as willing to loan money to a distant firm compared to a nearby firm. Furthermore, the presence of neighbourhood spillover effects is evidenced through the Moran’s I statistics, which means that the omission of spatial effects in the analysis would have resulted in biased estimates.

  • 403.
    Ho, Cynthia Sin Tian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Banking and Finance.
    Wilhelmsson, MatsKTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Building and Real Estate Economics.
    Does Proximity to banks bridge the financial and entrepreneurial gaps?2019Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on location theory, the local relationships between new firm formation and its potential determinants are explored in 290 municipalities across Sweden. From the geographically weighted regression (GWR) model in 2013, mostly positive relationships with new firm formation are shown for firm density, human capital level, industry diversification level and percentage of immigrants living in the area. Mostly negative relationships are shown for weighted mean distance to the nearest bank branches, establishment size, unemployment rate, industry specialization. Spatially constrained multivariate clustering is also applied to group municipalities with similar conditions. Implications of the GWR modelling and cluster analysis are then discussed.

  • 404.
    Hodgson, Damian
    et al.
    Manchester Business School.
    Canonico, Paolo
    University of Naples.
    Case, Peter
    University of the West of England.
    Cicmil, Svetlana
    University of the West of England.
    De Nito, Ernesto
    Università degli Studi "Magna Græcia" di Catanzaro.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    All on a promise: Critical studies of projects and project management: Call for papers2010Other (Other academic)
  • 405.
    Hodgson, Damian E
    et al.
    Alliance Manchester Business School.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Cicmil, Svetlana
    University of the West of England.
    The politics of projects in technology-intensive work2016In: New technology, work and employment, ISSN 0268-1072, E-ISSN 1468-005X, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 1-3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 406.
    Hodgson, Damian
    et al.
    Manchester Business School.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Cicmil, Svetlana
    University of the West of England.
    The politics of projects in technology-intensive work: Special issue call for papers in New Technology, Work and Employment2014Other (Refereed)
  • 407.
    Hohenthal, Jukka
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet, Företagsekonomiska institutionen.
    Lindbergh, Jessica
    International Experience and the Recognition of Business Opportunities in Foreign Markets: A study of SME’s International Experiences and Location Choice2005In: Managing opportunity development in business networks / [ed] Johanson, J and Hadjikani, A, Palgrave Macmillan, 2005Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 408.
    Hohmann, Carlo
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Telenium – Gaining Knowledge in the German IT Market: Chances and Risks. A Case Study.2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 409.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Making Inclusion Work. Experiences from Academia Around the World2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 151-152Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Responding to growing international political interest in the potential of carbon capture and storage (CCS) to contribute to climate change mitigation, multiple CCS demonstration projects of various scales are emerging globally. A fully integrated power-plant with CCS has not yet been demonstrated at scale, and acknowledgement of the scale of learning that still must occur for the technology to advance toward deployment has resulted in calls from multiple constituents for more CCS demonstration projects. Among these demonstration projects, expectations for learning and knowledge-sharing structures vary considerably and attention to different approaches to facilitate learning has been minimal. Through a comparison of the structure, framing and socio-political context of three different CCS demonstration projects, this paper explores the complexity of social learning associated with demonstration projects. Variety in expectations of the demonstration projects’ objectives, learning processes, information sharing mechanisms, public engagement initiatives, financing and collaborative partnerships are highlighted. The comparison shows that multiple factors influence the learning in CCS demonstration projects, including the process of building support for the project, the governance context and the framing of the project justification. This comparative analysis highlights the importance of integrating careful consideration of framing and social learning into CCS demonstration project planning.

  • 410.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Höök, Pia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Linghag, Sophie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management. Karlstads universitet.
    Regnö, Klara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Wahl, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Könsmärkta villkor styr synen på kvinnligt och manligt chefskap2013In: Leda mot det nya: En forskningsantologi om chefskap och innovation / [ed] Martin Kreuger, Lucia Crevani, Kristina Larsen, Stockholm: Vinnova , 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 411.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Tienari, J.
    ’This is just the way it is’: Executive search and gendered careers2015In: Handbook of Gendered Careers in Management: Getting In, Getting On, Getting Out, Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd. , 2015, p. 123-139Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 412.
    Holmquist, Carin
    et al.
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Lindgren, Monica
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Why opposites attract: On the problems of dichotomisation in research2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 413.
    Holzle, Katharina
    et al.
    Univ Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany..
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Visscher, Klaasjan
    Univ Twente, Enschede, Netherlands..
    Editorial2019In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 3-4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 414.
    Hugnell, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Machine Design.
    Kaulio, Matti
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Uppvall, Lars
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Plattform för virtuellt företagande2004Report (Other academic)
  • 415.
    Hungria-Garcia, Rosane
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Real Estate and Construction Management.
    Lind, Hans
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Real Estate and Construction Management.
    Karlsson, Björn
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Real Estate and Construction Management.
    Property yields as tools for valuation and analysis2004Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This project was started in order to get an overview of conceptual problems, measurement problems, theories of determinants of yields, the use of yields in different contexts and how the actors on the Swedish market looked upon yields. Important issues discussed in the report is the need for:

    - Conceptual clarity: A number of different yield terms exist on the market and it is very important to be clear about how the specific terms are defined.

    - Operational clarity: There are measurement problems both concerning rental incomes, operating and maintenance costs and property values. This means that reported yields can be “manipulated” by choosing suitable operationalisations and pushing estimations of uncertain factors in directions that are favourable to the actor in question.

    - Specify the purpose for which the yield should be used. The most important distinction is between using yields/income returns for valuation purposes and using yields as benchmarks or bubble indicators. In the first case various types of normalization of the net operating income can be rational. In the second case it is important that the figure reflects “actual” incomes and costs, and that the concept is standardized and in such a way that the room for manipulation is small.

    - A clear view about how yields/income returns should develop according to different theories, e.g how the relate to the real return on other investments, inflation levels, risks and expectations about the development of the net operating income. Theories can always be questioned but they give a framework that are helpful in getting a perspective on what is happening on a specific market, and evaluate e.g. if property prices develop in a way that could be a bubble on the market.

  • 416.
    Ingvarsson, Caroline
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    What's Next?: Organising Complex Product Development with Lean2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An everyday question asked during complex product development work is, ‘What to do next’? Not just because the development in itself is advanced and integrated, but also because it is planned and performed in large organisations, in difficult projects, and across organisational lines. There have been different approaches to try and reduce the difficulty of having to organise complex product development, primarily through using different kinds of management models. One such model is Lean product development which has become one of the most used management models within product development organisations.

    Like in other management research fields, Lean product development still struggles with understanding and describing social interactions; even though their importance has been widely acknowledged. To address this shortcoming, I have adopted a framework: knowing-in-practice and shown how it applies to complex product development.

    The purpose of this thesis is to explore organising Lean product development as knowing-in-practice by asking: How flow and value are practiced in complex product development work? Fow and value - as constituting concepts for Lean - have been explored using a literature review, which revealed their current interpretations as they apply to complex product development. Though the use of knowing-in-practice an analytical and epistemological framework, four practices and underlying action patterns where identified. These patterns organised complex product development work, while practising also produced flow and value in the work it organised.

    This has shown that understanding flow and value are situated and produced as a form of outcome from talk. The results indicate that the de-contextualized and overly generalised descriptions that have prevailed in the Lean product development field do not adequacy capture the concepts of flow and value. In the presented practices both the importance of organising complex work through talk is made evident, as well as the situatedness of flows and value. As recursive patterns of action, the practices are what, in this study, is made repeatedly in organizing product development, where everything else is seldom the same. The only constant in organising complex product development work is the continuous question of “What’s next?”.

  • 417.
    Jamal, Waqar
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Guidelines to an ingredient branding strategy for Space Production AB: A study of the key issues and risks involved in the formulation of such a strategy2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Strategy undeniably plays a vital role in a company’s progress. Ingredient Branding is a relatively new concept which Swedish companies have not incorporated as a formal strategy. Space Production AB is the leading event management company in Sweden which wants to analyze whether this strategy is viable in the current scenario. In order to access this, I interviewed fifteen potential clients at three different events giving an idea of how they perceived quality specifically and how their company policy was towards it in general. I then benchmarked Space Production AB against five companies that have successfully implemented this strategy. The whole procedure led to the result that ingredient branding is viable in certain scenarios and the strategy would change on basis of the strength of the host brand. Similarly emphasis on technologies advances would be necessary to ensure an edge with the competitors. If correctly implemented, Swedish companies such as Space Production AB could also be in league with such success stories.

  • 418.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Management and control of a project-based industrial business: - a balance between structure and insecurity?2010In: Projektvärlden : en tidning från svenskt projektforum, ISSN 1652-3016, Vol. 2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 419.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Management and control of a project-based industrial business: a balance between structure and insecurity?2010In: Bonniers Projektledarhanbok, Bonnier , 2010Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 420.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Management and control of several IT projects in parallell: a choice between creativity and flexibility or structure?2010In: Bonniers projektledarhandbok, Bonnier , 2010Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 421.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Organisering av projektbaserade företag: Ledning, styrning och genomförande av projektbaserad industriell verksamhet2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on the management and organizing of project-based companies, and the purpose is to enhance the understanding of multi-project management. The main part of the research and literature on project-based organizations has too narrow focus, since it is mainly interested in how to handle the difficulties that arise when executing a multi-project portfolio. Multi-project management is also often dominated by the thought of effectiveness and rationality through the use of project portfolio management methods and tools, which makes resource allocation and project priority the number one issue.

    Therefore, the profound theoretical ambition with this thesis is to complement the literature on project-based organizations with an empirically based understanding, inspired by organizing theory, for both research on, and practical execution of, multi-project management from a project-as-practice perspective. The thesis is based on case studies of two different project-based industrial companies, and the main methods for the empirical fieldwork were interviews and observations.

    The need for an organizing perspective on industrial organizations’ management and control of their project-based business originates from the importance of managing the need for organizational cooperation that arises because of the increased amount of temporary organizing procedures in a project-based company. This study sheds light on several important aspects for management and organizing of the special dynamics that characterize project-based organizations. One aspect is how the organizing of a project-based business demands a kind of insecurity-management, actions and activities aiming to balance the need for structure with the need for situated management. Another aspect is the importance of integrating the management and organizing of the multi-project business on a top management level.

  • 422.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Organizational design of project-based firms.2011In: Back to the future / [ed] Luca Gnahn, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 423.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    The importance of strategic aspects with PPM for NPD portfolios2011In: IAMOT 2011 - International Association for Management of Technology: Technology and the Global Challanges: Security, Energy, Water, and the Environment / [ed] Dr. Yasser Hosni, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 424.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Hammarström, Maria
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Service in practice: The role and responsibility of first-line managers in technical consultancy companies2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 425.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Improvising in multi-project settings2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 426.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Linde, Anneli
    Umeå Handelshögskola.
    Multi-project management: A gigantic spillekins2008In: Projektvärlden, Svenskt Projektforums branschtidning, ISSN 1652-3016Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 427.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Linde, Anneli
    Umeå Handelshögskola.
    Multi-project organizing from the perspective of the Project Management Office2009In: Nordic academy of Management: Business as usual, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 428. Jerbrant, Anna
    et al.
    Miterev, Maxim
    Engwall, Mats
    Integrating strategic aspects with project portfolio management: Exploring different ways to deal with organizational dependencies2014In: 1st ANNUAL EDIM PhD CONFERENCE: Research Challenges in Contemporary Management Engineering, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dominant part of project portfolio management literature is focused on standardized project management methods for planning, prioritizing, and resource allocation. Comprehensively addressing the resource dependency challenge, the mainstream literature overlooks other types of project dependencies, namely, technological and organizational dependencies. Arguing that a more comprehensive understanding of the dependencies is necessary, we explore how they can be dealt with when integrating the strategic aspects in the project portfolio management. The comparative case study of two different multi-project settings reveals that in both contexts a combination of vertical and horizontal communication mechanisms was used in order to enhance the strategic alignment. At the same time, principal mechanisms in the combinations were different. In the first case, a departmental head ensured the vertical connection to strategy and a PMO head enhanced the horizontal connections. In the second case, program steering groups both communicated the strategy and represented arenas for political negotiation. In turn, program managers further contributed to resolving organizational dependencies. The aim of this paper is to contribute to an improved understanding of different ways in which strategic aspects can be integrated with portfolio management, by exploring different ways to deal with the organizational dependencies.

  • 429.
    Jocevski, Milan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Arvidsson, Niklas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Exploring the growth challenge of mobile payment platforms: A business model perspective2019In: Electronic Commerce Research and Applications, ISSN 1567-4223, E-ISSN 1873-7846, article id 100908Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The power of platform business models has grown as our economies become increasingly digital, but how companies address the challenge of platform growth to achieve a critical mass of users remains unclear. In this study, we take a business model (BM) perspective to understand how mobile payment platform providers go about addressing such a challenge. We studied how mobile payment providers engaged in innovation of their business models, and thus identified three pertaining aspects: rethinking the relationship management with retailers, creating partnerships with other actors in the payment ecosystem to complement and deliver the proposed value, and integrating and using front-end mobile technology. Furthermore, our study suggests that mobile payment providers need to adapt their role within the ecosystem to scale the platform, and that it will depend on their choice of scope of geographic availability. Finally, we suggest that mutual adaptation of BMs of platform-associated actors leads to improved diffusion of the platform offer, which also hints at the need for researchers to revisit innovation diffusion and technology adoption theories by acknowledging the importance of the BM of the offer side of technology.

  • 430.
    Jocevski, Milan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Going digital: Business model innovation in omni-channel retailing2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last ten years, digital technologies have had immense effect on the way we live and work, on organizational forms, and on industrial trends. These effects have not left retail industries and their various actors untouched, but have rather forced them to adapt to the changing environment. At the same time, the digital age has brought new organizations that have leveraged ubiquitous Internet access and the pervasive adoption of smartphones which created new, previously non-existent mobile-based services. With these changes emerged the phenomenon of retail digitalization, a process of ongoing change through the integration of digital, primarily mobile, technologies into retailing.

    Although the depicted transformation offers multifaceted opportunities for advancing organizational growth, it also represents fundamental challenges to our understanding of the dynamics of organizational change, intertwined with changes at both higher (inter-organizational) and lower (intra-organizational) levels. In particular, this thesis addresses the business model innovation efforts of retailers across different industry segments, as well as those of mobile payment providers as key partners of retailers in the complex and increasingly networked empirical context. Through the exploratory case-based research, this thesis makes three contributions. The first relates to the contribution to retailing literature by employing a business model perspective to emphasize particularly important aspects of the emerging transition to omni-channel retailing that allows the customer to engage with a retailer whenever and however they wish to. These are seamless and experiential shopping as a new value proposition, the use of technology-mediated interfaces to enhance customer experience, integrated data analytics as a potential source of competitive advantage, and the importance of partnerships for successful value delivery. Secondly, this thesis contributes to the emerging discussions on the dynamics of business models by providing empirical findings of the business model innovation process. Finally, this thesis suggests that a business model should be seen as a relational aggregator at a network level, i.e. a device to explain the interconnectedness of companies in the digital age, and highlights the need for a network-oriented view of business model innovations in such an environment.

  • 431.
    Jocevski, Milan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    The blurring lines of physical and digital spaces: business model innovation in retailManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional retail practices are under stress as retailers ponder various ways of setting a sustainable omni-channel model. A significant challenge in their endeavor relates to the blurring lines of physical and digital worlds. Therefore, the study analyzes three Swedish retailers’ exploratory efforts of alternative physical retail spaces. In doing so, the study suggests five key innovation areas to revamp the retail store: the role of sales assistants, in-store technology, leveraging a mobile channel, data analytics, and collaborations. In addition, physical retail space is put forward as an aggregation hub that connects various retailer-customer interaction points across physical and digital spaces.

  • 432.
    Jocevski, Milan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Arvidsson, Niklas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Ghezzi, Antonio
    Interconnected business models: Present debates and future agenda2019In: Journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study seeks to provide a review of the emergent literature in order to advance the current understanding of the business model (BM) concept in a context in which more than one actor is actively involved in the development and delivery of a joint offer based on information and communication technologies.

    The paper employs a systematic literature review approach. The review is based on 25 systematically-selected publications published from 2000 to 2018 and retrieved from bibliographic databases and through a process of snowballing.

    The authors found several alternative conceptualizations of a BM at a network level, which highlighted different elements as core components. Based on this, our findings suggest the literature has a fragmented view of what the BM concept entails at a network level, and of which actors are relevant. Conversely, there is a consensus that a single-firm view is inadequate for describing and studying joint value architectures due to its inability to consider all involved actors and their activities and resources. Therefore, a network-oriented view, as a relational aggregator, is a possible way forward.

    The study contributes to the current understanding of a BM concept at a network level and suggests three viewpoints from which to interpret value architectures at different levels of analysis: single-firm view, dyadic-level view, and network-oriented view. Furthermore, the authors highlight several gaps to be studied and provide avenues for future research opportunities for scholars.

  • 433.
    Johansson, Petter
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    A Silent Revolution: The Swedish Transition towards Heat Pumps, 1970-20152017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, more than half of all Swedish single-family houses have an installed heat pump and more heat is supplied by heat pumps in Sweden than in any other nation. Despite the enormous impact of heat pumps on the Swedish energy system, the transition towards their use has gone relatively unnoticed. Hence the title of this thesis, ‘A silent revolution’.

    This thesis provides an in-depth study of the Swedish transition towards heat pumps and how Swedish industries contributed to it. It approaches the topic from the perspective of value networks and ‘coopetition’, combined with the concept of complementarities. This approach has been inspired by the work of Verna Allee (2009) and Erik Dahmén (1991). In this thesis, value networks are networks of actors surrounding a specific business model, coopetition is used to describe the relationships between actors (as both competitive and cooperative), and the concept of complementarities is used to analyze the dynamics between synergistic elements and value networks in Sweden’s heat pump sector and energy system.

    Based on this approach, the thesis explains how a durable web of relations and interdependencies between complementarities has developed within the heat pump sector and the energy system in Sweden, and between the two, during the country’s transition to widespread use of heat pumps.

    Interest in heat pumps arose in Sweden and other parts of Europe during the 1970s. The Swedish energy system had been caught between international oil crises and national political mobilisation against nuclear power expansion. In this period of negative transformation pressure, the heat pump appeared as a promising alternative that could mitigate the use of oil and electricity for heating. In the 1970s, an early Swedish heat pump industry formed together with a growing heat pump market. A large number of diverse actors became involved in the Swedish heat pump sector, and the intense coopetition dynamics relating to heat pumps following the 1970s oil crisis contributed to durable connections between complementarities during the early stages of the transition.

    The 1980s saw a rapid expansion of large heat pumps in Swedish district heating facilities. In the mid-1980s, however, oil prices dropped back to their previous low levels. This change, combined with other factors, such as lifted subsidies and higher interest rates, created a crisis for Swedish heat pump industry. The industry underwent a 10-year period of low sales of small heat pumps and the market for large heat pumps died out and never returned. Nevertheless, several connections between heat pump–related complementarities remained in Sweden after the mid-1980s. In conjunction with value network reconfigurations, changes in company ownerships and governmental industry support, these complementarities helped the Swedish heat pump sector to maintain both production and service capacity.

    Due to developments that took place largely outside the heat pump manufacturing sector, by the mid-1990s it became possible for the struggling Swedish industry to offer more reliable and standardised heat pumps to the Swedish home heating market. During the years after 1995, the Swedish heat pump market grew to become the biggest in Europe. The industry’s early development and growth gave Swedish companies a comparative advantage over its European competitors, with the result that the manufacturing of heat pumps remained concentrated to Swedish-based manufacturing facilities even after the Swedish heat pump industry became internationalised after 2005. As of 2015, Sweden had the greatest amount of heat production from heat pumps per capita of any European nation, and many heat pump markets in other European countries are 10 to 20 years behind the Swedish market in development.

    This thesis shows how the Swedish heat pump industry has co-evolved with the market and how developments in the industry contributed towards causing the transition to heat pumps to occur so early in Sweden relative to other European markets. It also shows that coopetition dynamics in a socio-technical transition change with the emergence and characteristics of structural tensions between complementarities, which has implications for the strategic management of external relations and partnerships during socio-technical transitions. It further argues that the combination of the value network, coopetition, and complementarity concepts can be conceptualised for descriptive and exploratory studies on the role of firms and industries in socio-technical transitions, thereby offering a complement to existing dominant frameworks in the area of transition studies. 

  • 434.
    Johansson, Petter
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Introducing a socio-technical analysis framework: Analysing the Swedish heat pump development in four steps2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 435.
    Johansson, Petter
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Value network dynamics in sustainability transitions: The role of industry incumbents in the Swedish heat pump transition2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a value network dynamics (VND) approach to transition studies and an application of this approach to the case of the Swedish heat pump transition. The aim with this paper is to advance our understanding on the changing roles of industry incumbents in socio-technical transitions.

    The VND approach aggregates actors into value networks surrounding focal business models, which form meso-entities between firm-level actors and entire industries, and maps firm-level dynamics and business model transitions during socio-technical system transitions.

    Mapping the heat pump value network dynamics in Sweden from the 1970s and onwards show that cooperation between actors and across value networks were high in the early formative periods and during periods of external pressure, and that the overall structure stability of the value networks increased over time.

    The results also show that the role of the involved heat pump incumbents have changed during the transition period. Some incumbents played important roles in early periods but lost all influence on the transition in latter periods. Other incumbents went from actively engaged in heat pump transition activities to actively counteracting the same type of activities.

    Incumbents have also played active roles in transitioning and refining heat pump business models and value networks together with other actors, such as new entrants, governmental agencies and incumbents in other areas. Value network reconfigurations have not only constituted an adaption to external changes in the short term, but also a way for involved actors to influence the transition trajectories in the long term.

  • 436.
    Johansson, Petter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Fors, Per
    Malin, Olovsson
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    A wider perspective on research utilisation at technical universities in Sweden2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an ongoing discussion concerning how academic research is utilized in industry and society and how this can be measured and encouraged through performance based resource allocation. In Sweden, this discussion also concerns the professor’s privilege, meaning that much of the utilization activity can occur without the knowl-edge of the administration and management of their universities.This study has been conducted with the aim of get-ting an insight into and describing the research utiliza-tion activity at technical universities in Sweden. The study has been conducted through interviews with researchers at 20 different research divisions in the field of energy at two universities in the Stockholm region.The study shows that there is an overall high level of collaborative aand entrepreneurial activity in the divisions, but that large variations are evident. The dif-ferences between the research divisions’ potential and willingness to utilize research in industry and society depend both on technological conditions and personal preferences. Divisions that lack high levels of indus-trial collaborations and entrepreneurial activity have shown higher levels of collaborations with governmental agencies.The results also show that performance indicators such as patents and business start-ups do not apply well to all research divisions. These indicators only reflect commercialization aspects and therefore only show part of the utilization activity for certain types of research divisions.

  • 437.
    Johansson, Petter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Martin, Vendel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Marketing and Entrepreneurship.
    Cali, Nuur
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    The transition towards solar power; business as usual or a new role for incumbent grid operators?2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, there has been a steady increase of ‘solar prosumers’, i.e. electricity consumers that have become producers of electricity using small scale solar Photovoltaic (PV) systems. In several countries, this development is underpinned by various policy enticement schemes with the goal of mitigating climate change in addition to the individual motivations of the prosumers including the attainment of self-sufficiency and independence from conventional electricity supply. For the continued expansion of solar PV systems, grid operators – also called distribution system operators (DSOs) – have been identified as key intermediary actors for the development and implementation of new services and business models that help balance variable surplus electricity from solar prosumers and facilitate a continued expansion of solar PV systems. However, the operations of DSOs are tightly regulated and the room of manoeuvre of DSOs is limited. At the same time, electricity grids are not equipped to handle the expansion of variable and distributed energy resources. Are DSOs currently transitioning into a new widened role in electric power systems which facilitates continued increase in solar prosumers? Or are they hindered by their path dependency and the stability of current socio-technical systems in which they are embedded? Based on an empirical study of the Swedish energy system, this paper presents a description of the socio-technical electricity distribution system and current developments and system tensions from the point-of-view of DSOs in Sweden. The paper builds on a dataset of 175 local and regional DSOs together with semi-structured interviews with eight DSOs in Sweden. The results show that path dependency of DSOs is a major factor and as such the transition of the role of local DSOs is likely to be a slow process. Despite ongoing discussions on the changing role of DSOs in Sweden, so far it has resulted in few concrete measures and DSOs typically apply a business-as-usual approach towards challenges with expansion of solar PVs, i.e. investing in increased transmission capacity. A changed role for DSOs could have the effect of more efficient expansion of distributed solar PV systems if it underpins DSOs’ abilities to develop new system services. But such a change in role is hindered by current institutional settings as well as a lack in capacities and capabilities to develop new system services among a majority of the DSOs. To speed up the transition of local DSOs would require changes in current legislations together with efforts to stimulate innovation and learning processes of DSOs within current electricity systems.

  • 438.
    Johnson, Pontus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Iacob, M. E.
    Välja, Margus
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Van Sinderen, M.
    Magnusson, C.
    Ladhe, T.
    Business model risk analysis: Predicting the probability of business network profitability2013In: Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing, 2013, p. 118-130Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the design phase of business collaboration, it is desirable to be able to predict the profitability of the business-to-be. Therefore, techniques to assess qualities such as costs, revenues, risks, and profitability have been previously proposed. However, they do not allow the modeler to properly manage uncertainty with respect to the design of the considered business collaboration. In many real collaboration projects today, uncertainty regarding the business' present or future characteristics is so significant that ignoring it becomes problematic. In this paper, we propose an approach based on the Predictive, Probabilistic Architecture Modeling Framework (P2AMF), capable of advanced and probabilistically sound reasoning about profitability risks. The P2AMF-based approach for profitability risk prediction is also based on the e3-value modeling language and on the Object Constraint Language (OCL). The paper introduces the prediction and modeling approach, and a supporting software tool. The use of the approach is illustrated by means of a case.

  • 439.
    Jonsson, Daniel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Gårdsverk i Skåne2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    45 metre high, 45 kW wind turbines are small enough to be considered small-scale wind power under Swedish regulations (requiring only a simple building permit), but powerful enough to significantly reduce the energy bill for a large farm.

    Several actors on the market have identified this business opportunity, and there seems to be an interest from potential customers. But how well does this new type of turbine align with municipal planning goals? Is it possible to get permits for them?

    In this thesis, the conditions for building these turbines in all 33 municpipalities in the county of Scania in southern Sweden are discussed. After an initial investment appraisal, wind, landscape and market conditions are discussed to determine where one might want to erect these turbines.

    Then, focus is shifted towards where it would possible to get a permit. The comprehensive plans of the municipalities are compared to the permits they have granted. This is supplemented by interviews where possible.

    Finally, everything is compiled and a few distinct areas emerge. The forest in the north­eastern parts of the county makes the turbines unprofitable. With a few exceptions, the southern part of the county is an excellent place to market these turbines while the political question seems to remain open in the northwest.

  • 440.
    Jovanovic, Marin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.). Universidad Politécnica de Madrid.
    Hunters and Farmers: Unpacking the Silo Syndrome of Product-Service Business UnitsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrial firms are increasingly servitizing their offerings by bundling products and services into solutions. This paper argues that a critical factor in the success of servitization is to structurally separate service and product business units. Yet, an integration that is close fitting and cross functional is also required since two businesses share resources and knowledge to a marked degree. This study explores the concept of functional ‘silos’ using pragmatic knowledge boundaries since they constrain the flow of knowledge between business units and contribute to the alienation of the units. Anchored in the empirical study of 10 subsidiaries of a major capital equipment provider, the findings of this study suggest that the product-service business unit silos are driven by the following alienation devices: the pricing process, the sales process, the installed-base factors, and the measurement process. On the other hand, this study identifies two important collaboration devices in the context of servitization: a unified market approach and long-term customer orientation. First of all, senior leaders need to formulate a business unit strategy that is aligned with the corporate strategy and to put in place overarching performance metrics that will dictate priorities and resolve any situations where businesses are seen to act in opportunistic ways. Second, when senior leaders identify the long-term benefit of the customer as a key driver for the firm and transparently present the product and service options to the customer, knowledge flows between business units are enhanced.

  • 441.
    Jovanovic, Marin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.). Universidad Politécnica de Madrid.
    Navigating Manufacturing Firms to Service-led Business Models2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis tackles an increasingly popular phenomenon – servitization of manufacturing – a growth opportunity for industrial firms through a service-led business model. However, implementing a servitization strategy in industrial firms triggers multifaceted challenges and requires further research.The thesis builds on extensive studies of world leading multinational capital equipment manufacturers that develop a successful service business model.

    The dissertation builds on three closely interconnected studies. The first study is an in-depth exploratory case study of a Swedish industrial firm by cross-comparing two servitization initiatives—one that was highly successful, and one that was less so. The second study juxtaposes 10 worldwide subsidiaries of the same Swedish industrial firm to compare and contrast how the servitization process unfolded. This study focuses on the management of service capability development, as well as the management of emerging tensions between the product business units and service business units. The third study extends the research scope by analyzing four industrial firms that successfully developed advanced services (e.g. outcome-based contracts).

    This thesis contributes to the servitization literature and business model literature by demarcating three business model archetypes for industrial firms: product business model, service business models and outcome business model. This thesis unpacks the content of the business model elements that underpins business model archetypes as well as the configuration and the relationship between the business model elements.

  • 442.
    Jovanovic, Marin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management. Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain; ESADE Business School.
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Matching Service Offerings and Product Operations: A Key to Servitization Success2016In: Research technology management, ISSN 0895-6308, E-ISSN 1930-0166, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 29-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many manufacturers are moving to servitization, but making that move successfully requires considering the underlying business logic of a division or product. Differences in existing conditions, such as product characteristics or other business attributes, may determine success in transition to a services-based business model and create challenges for a firm moving, for instance, from a spare-parts model to advanced service contracts. Our study pinpoints a number of key product attributes that define how far a company can move up the service ladder. The findings suggest that the Power-by-the-Hour model pioneered by Rolls-Royce suits products that constitute critical ancillary input to, and not essential elements of, customers' core processes; that require low initial investments relative to high total costs of ownership; that are used in controllable operating environments with measurable performance requirements; and that are associated with high risk and high costs in the event of failure. Further, the service delivery system must be integrated and orchestrated to be product-specific-that is, aligned with the function and operating conditions of the product in use.

  • 443.
    Jovanovic, Marin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.). Universidad Politécnica de Madrid.
    Visnjic, Ivanka
    ESADE Business School.
    Wiengarten, Frank
    ESADE Business School.
    One step at a time: Sequence and Dynamics of Service Capability Configuration in Product FirmsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the process of service capability base development in manufacturing firms. While scholars mostly studied capabilities in isolation we argue that it seems to be important to assess how service capabilities are interrelated as well as how a firm orchestrate their development and deployment. Study cross-compare 10 national subsidiaries of one capital equipment manufacturer to explore the effectiveness of their service capability base development processes. Results suggest that successful organizations opt for a sequential development of three service capability clusters, which we subsequently label the ‘presence’ (first), ‘progress’ (second) and ‘process’ cluster (third). Furthermore, our cases suggest that less successful organizations either fail to fully develop one or more of these capability clusters; they develop them simultaneously or in a different sequence. The understanding of the process may assist the decision makers to prioritize activities and gradually invest in service business.

  • 444.
    Kajko-Mattsson, Mira
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Karim, R.
    Mirjamdotter, A.
    Essential components of e-maintenance2011In: International Journal of Performability Engineering, ISSN 0973-1318, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 555-571Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many intellectual, societal, business and technological forces are continuously pushing forward the frontiers of science. When combined, they provide an umbrella for generating new fields and exploring new grounds. One such a new field is e-Maintenance. e-Maintenance addresses new needs and provides various benefits in form of increased availability, reduced lifecycle cost and increased customer value. However, it suffers from lack of a commonly defined basis supporting the existence of e-Maintenance and determining the essential components inherent in the e-Maintenance domain. In this paper, we suggest an initial set of components that serve as the groundwork of the e-Maintenance universe. The set outlines ten initial components. These are definition, business,organization, product,service,methodology,technology,information,customer,and education and training. The paper also suggests a definition of e-Maintenance, places eMaintenance in the context of other e-Domains, and elicits e-Maintenance intellectual opportunities and challenges to be met by both the academia and industry.

  • 445.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Conceptualizing artificial intelligence: A general purpose technology in innovation systems2018In: R&D Management Conference, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are many signs indicating that artificial intelligence – reproduction of the cognitive functions that humans have such as learning and problem solving by machines– has been spreading among various industries. However, from a scholarly point of view, how artificial intelligence can be theoretically conceptualized still remains a challenging task. In this paper, we propose that artificial can be conceptualized as general purpose technology – a technology which opens up new opportunities rather than offering complete final solutions. Based on literature on the technological innovation systems and general purpose technologies, we support our proposition with a qualitative case study on artificial intelligence in Sweden. Drawing on the results of the case study, we derive implications for research on innovation systems as well as practitioners and policymakers.

  • 446.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Hidalgo, Antonio
    Business Model Challenge: Learnings from a Local Solar Company in Germany2014In: Ist European Doctorate in Industrial Management conference, 2014, p. 23-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 447.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Sriwannawit Lundberg, Pranpreya
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Diffusion of Innovations2016In: A Dynamic Mind: Perspectives on Industrial Dynamics in Honour of Staffan Laestadius / [ed] Pär Blomkvist; Petter Johansson, Stockholm: Division of Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics , 2016, p. 151-176Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do innovations diffuse in societies and organizations? It is an interesting yet a complex question to answer. In order to shed some lights on this fundamental question, this book chapter provides the foundations of diffusion of innovations theory along with two empirical cases.

    The theory is discussed through a three-component model of diffusion: innovation, sources and adopters. It mainly builds upon the seminal work of the well-known sociologist and communication scholar, Everett Rogers (1962).

    The empirical cases are based on diffusion of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. The first case is about off-grid solar PV systems in Bangladesh, while the second case is about on-grid solar PV systems in Germany.Overall, the differences and similarities between the two case studies in developing and developed countries let us explain how the characteristics of innovation, sources and adopters affect the diffusion of innovations.

  • 448.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Bättre fly än illa fäkta: En studie av project overload i tre multiprojektmiljöer2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 449.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Small talk and heavy metal2009In: Feelings and Business: Essays in Honor of Claes Gustafsson / [ed] Marcus Lindahl & Alf Rehn, Santérus Förlag, 2009, p. 75-86Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 450.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    What next?: An empirical study on project overload and the need for strategies in a multi project context2007Conference paper (Other academic)
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