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  • 451.
    Wadensten, Axel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Schoenahl Pedersén, Valérie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Innovationsförmåga – Teams uppfattning av sina styrkoroch kritiska gap2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    To be competitive, firms must constantly introduce new and better products and services. Thus itis crucial for firms to create an organization in which both incremental and radical innovationsoccur. In an organizational context, innovation capability refers to the capability to integrate thekey resources and capabilities of the organization in a way that stimulates innovation in products,services and processes. Consequently, firms must support the underlying processes and practicesthat aim at improving the innovation capability. To provide the necessary support for innovationactivities, firms must also consider the conditions of each specific team, as the support neededdepends on the situation in the respective teams.This study was performed as a Master thesis project at The Royal Institute of Technology. It isbased on an empirical study performed at a large Swedish firm during 2012. The purpose of thestudy was to investigate and map how teams within the firm perceive their innovation capability.The sample consisted of around 200 respondents in 13 different teams. The teams were from twodifferent product units, and were located in five different countries. To collect data about theteams included in the survey, a web-based survey tool was developed. In the survey, respondentsgot to choose three capabilities they perceived as strengths of the team, and three they perceivedas gaps critical to address. Complementary interviews were also held with members of thestudied teams to further discuss the survey results. By using this approach, the perceivedstrengths and critical gaps of each team was identified.The results show that at an overall level there are great similarities between the different teams,as some capabilities were perceived as top three strengths in a majority of the teams. Looking atthe critical gaps the responses were more evenly distributed, although some capabilities stillscored significantly higher than others. No major differences were found between differentproduct units or countries. One important finding was that within each team, there were greatdifferences in how the team members perceived their team’s strengths and critical gaps. Thisimplicates that the teams need to become more consistent on these issues, as an effective changework depends on a mutual understanding of the needs of the team.

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    Innovation Capabilities
  • 452. Wall, K.
    et al.
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Students innovating for Emerging Markets2010Other (Other academic)
  • 453.
    Wallin, Johanna
    et al.
    Funktionella produkter, Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Enabling Product-Service System development using creative workshops: experiences from industry cases2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 454.
    Warmington-Lundström, Jon
    et al.
    Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Laurenti, Rafael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Reviewing circular economy rebound effects: The case of online peer-to-peer boat sharing2020In: Resources, Conservation and Recycling, ISSN 0921-3449, E-ISSN 1879-0658, Vol. 5, article id 100028Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Renting instead of buying new products may be seen as the most efficient strategies of the circular economy. However, changes in the consumption inevitably liberates or binds scarce production or consumption factors such as raw materials, money and time which can potentially limit the potential to save resources. This phenomenon is known as environmental rebound effect and is currently under-researched in the context of resource sharing. This paper reviews the magnitude and tendency of environmental rebound effects of peer-to-peer boat sharing platform using a double-spending model (i.e. for lessors as well lessees). We found that environmental rebound effect was experienced by every lessee surveyed (n = 104) and in one-third of lessors (n = 29). 60 % of lessees experienced a rebound of over 20 %, losing one-fifth of the potential reductions in emissions through subsequent consumption behaviour enabled by the economic savings created by sharing resources. International air travel and increases in personal use of the boat were the biggest contributing factors towards environmental rebound effect. Users that increased consumption in these ways experienced a backfire effect in which their annual emissions actually increased. This backfire was experienced by 29 % of lessees with the worst scenario increasing emissions by a factor of over eight. We found statistically significant differences in the rebound of lessors and lessees. Greater awareness and non-economic mechanisms (such as symbolic rewards, information provision and nudging) tailored for lessors and lessees are needed to help prevent the likelihood of occurrence and the magnitude of environmental rebound effects from sharing resources.

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  • 455.
    Wassberg, Karolina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Suurwee, Lovisa
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Digitala hjälpmedel förpersoner med diabetes: Användarinvolvering i produktutvecklingsprocessen och värdet av ett digitalt hjälpmedel för slutanvändaren2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today's healthcare is becoming increasingly digital, indicating that companies in medical technology are frequently confronted with changes due to new technology and innovations. To find new and creative solutions, it is becoming increasingly common for companies to choose to involve users in the product development process. The digital transition can create great opportunities for people who use digital aids for medical purposes. The purpose of the report is to investigate how the end user can be integrated into the product development process of a digital aid for diabetics. The intention is also to increase the understanding of the user's experience of a digital treatment method and its impact on mental and physical health. The work began with creating a theoretical basis through a literature study. This was done to gain knowledge about product development, user involvement, diabetes, and the connection mental illness has to diabetes. Then seven semi-structured interviews were conducted. Two respondents from two different companies were interviewed, one is developing a digital aid and the other had manufacture done that is available on the market. One person from a diabetes association was interviewed, four people with diabetes and a senior consultant physician who is a specialist in diabetes. Based on the interviews, themes were identified according to which the results are designed; product development, user involvement, mental illness and the benefits and challenges of a digital aid. The results were analyzed and compared against the theory, after which conclusions could be drawn about each theme. Conclusions regarding user involvement is that both companies believe that there are more advantages than disadvantages. The companies have chosen to involve users at different stages during the product development process, for different purposes and degrees. The contact with users is obtained with the help of their social network, digital platforms and direct feedback on the product when it’s on the market. The study also shows that a digital aid has made it possible to avoid large changes in blood sugar levels because the methods are increasingly automatic. Digital aids have many positive effects, the most important one is the feeling of freedom. Performance in physical activity is affected by varying levels and this can be avoided to some extent with a more developed aid. Mental health is also supported with a digital aid as people with diabetes don’t have to constantly think about their blood sugar levels, which makes everyday life easier. 

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  • 456. Westin, Alexandra
    et al.
    Kalmykova, Yuliya
    Rosado, Leonardo
    Oliveira, Felipe
    Laurenti, Rafael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Rydberg, Tomas
    Combining material flow analysis with life cycle assessment to identify environmental hotspots of urban consumption2019In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 226, p. 526-539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the global environmental impacts of local consumption is an area of growing interest among policymakers and consumers. By knowing what products comprise urban consumption “hotspots,” municipalities and consumers alike could take deliberate actions to target and discourage consumption of high-impact products. In this paper, a new method for identifying environmental hotspots of consumption is presented. The main methodological advances are the following: i) material flow analysis of urban areas and life cycle assessment are combined; ii) a 16-year time-series of urban consumption data is used for selection of the most suitable representative products and for trend analysis; iii) representative products are selected systematically from consumption data of 1000 product types; iv) representative products are scaled up to represent consumption of the product groups; v) hotspots are identified by simultaneously evaluating six environmental impacts - acidification, climate change, eutrophication (marine and freshwater), photochemical ozone formation, and resource use; vi) for the case study, hotspots are connected to the city's profiles. The method was applied to the Swedish cities Stockholm, Gothenburg and Malmo and to Sweden in total. Electronics is a hotspot for all the studied areas and all the studied impacts and should be a prioritized product group for action. Fuel is a hotspot shared by all the areas while vehicles is a hotspot in Gothenburg. Meat is a nationwide hotspot, but not for the cities investigated. Gothenburg and Stockholm could collaborate to find effective measures for their common hotspot machinery. Thus, the method can be used to identify hotspots and find which product types could be part of national versus local programs.

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  • 457.
    Wikström, Anders
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden and Mälardalen University.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Building innovation capabilities in established organizations - an innovation management system perpective2021Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 458.
    Zhang, Xuefeng
    et al.
    School of Economics and Management, Anhui Polytechnic University, Wuhu, People’s Republic of China.
    Qian, Chen
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product Innovation Technology.
    Towards an understanding of the decision process of solvers’ participation in crowdsourcing contests for problem solving2021In: Behavior and Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, E-ISSN 1362-3001, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
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    fulltext
  • 459. Zika-Viktorsson, A.
    et al.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Project competence in product development2005In: Research in Engineering Design, ISSN 0934-9839, E-ISSN 1435-6066, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 193-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents and discusses the individual competence particularly required to work in project-organized product development. Individual competence encompasses the knowledge, skills and abilities to deal with issues related to organizational, social and technological factors involved in projects. The purpose has been to explore the competence required for project members at the operational level, and to explore the conditions for developing such competence. The study is based on a qualitative approach, with interviews as the tool for data collection. The study group comprised 54 respondents working in RTD departments within five large Swedish manufacturing companies. The findings reveal the need for project co-workers to be skilled in both practical and psychosocial aspects of co-ordination, time planning and control. The findings of the study demonstrate the importance of being able to cope with prescribed as well as unpredictable processes. They also indicate the effect of time on experience transfer.

  • 460.
    Zika-Viktorsson, Annika
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Interorganisatorisk samverkan kring samhällsutmaningar och digitala lösningar: En studie av programmet Digital Demo Stockholm2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Interorganisatorisk samverkan enligt trippelhelixmodellen är ett sätt att möta komplexa samhällsutmaningar och att lösa problem. Komplexiteten i problemen ställer krav på samverkan mellan behovsägare och experter samt med de som har de resurser som krävs för att lösningar ska förverkligas. Rapporten presenterar en studie av interorganisatorisk samverkan i programmet Digital Demo Stockholm (DDS). Det är ett program som genomförs av KTH tillsammans med partners från näringsliv och offentlig sektor och som arbetar för att möta samhällsutmaningar i Stockholmsregionen. Inom programmet bedrivs forsknings- och innovationsprojekt som tar fram digitala lösningar och demonstratorer. Programmet bygger på långsiktigt partnerskap mellan Stockholms stad, Stockholms Läns Landsting, KTH, ABB, Ericsson, Skanska, Scania, Vattenfall och Telia. På sikt ska programmet leda till ett samhälle som är hållbart och attraktivt och att Stockholm år 2040 är ”världens smartaste stad”. Resultaten baseras på intervjuer med initiativtagare till programmet och projektledare för demoprojekten samt på enkäter till medarbetare i demoprojekten och ledamöter i programmets rådsfunktioner. Studien är kvalitativ och alla utsagor och svar har analyserats med en kvalitativ ansats. Frågorna i studien rör deltagarnas inställning till programmet och till arbetet på den övergripande programnivån liksom i demoprojekten. Studien undersöker och beskriver deltagares uppfattning om DDS. Syftet har inte varit att utvärdera programmets olika delar utan att med en explorativ ansats beskriva vad som uppfattas som viktiga försättningar för samverkan. En viktig förutsättning är det engagemang som präglat arbetet i programmet och som delvis har en koppling till möjligheten att arbeta för samhällsnytta och organisatoriska innovationer. En annan är ett ledarskap som är agilt, entreprenöriellt och sammanhållande. De krav som ställs på att driva ett initiativ som DDS liknar de som ”start-up-verksamheter” ställer på drift och ledning. För att komma framåt krävs anpassning samtidigt med stora mått av uthållighet, en mångfald av kompetenser och utveckling på programmets samtliga nivåer.

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  • 461. Öhrwall Rönnbäck, A
    et al.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Developing Integrated Product and Service Offerings: A Comparison Between Large and Small Manufacturing Firms’ Business2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 462.
    Ölundh, Gunilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    How Do Functional Sales Affect Product Development and Environmental Performance?2003In: Proceeding of ICED ´03 / [ed] Folkeson, A.; Gralen, K.; Norell, M.; Sellgren, U., 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 463.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, Anna
    Linköping University.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    Linköping University.
    Managing Innovation Processes for a Business-Driven Collaborative Network to Export Total Technical Solutions2008In: Proceedings of the 1st ISPIM Innovation Symposium: Managing Innovation in a Connected World, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a large need of environmental solutions at developing countries, where a network of small firms, e.g. in Sweden, have much opportunity for their business. This paper discusses, from both theoretical and from practical aspects, the high degree of complexity that needs to be managed when small firms export environmental-technology innovation to emerging markets. Especially, it deals with how a network of firms should manage its innovation processes. Based on the review of some 50 literature, the paper explains the methodologies adopted in an on-going project to study these issues. Discussions include differences with development of an integration of products/services within a single firm.

  • 464.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Functional sales as a further approach to Environmental Product Development – case study2001Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 465.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Funktionsförsäljning och produkters miljöaspekter – en studie i tre svenska tillverkningsföretag: Rapport 52342002Report (Refereed)
  • 466.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Setting Environmental Targets in Product Development so that they Really Matter2009In: Proccedings of ICED 09, International Conference on Engineering Design / [ed] Norell Bergendahl, M.; Grimheden, M.; Leifer, L.; Skogstad, P.; Lindemann, U., 2009, p. 35-46Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An important factor for reaching environmental improvements in product development is to have relevant environmental targets that actually influence the product development process. In this paper are four procedures of setting environmental targets for product development projects identified, described and analyzed based on studies in three large companies operating in different industries. The different procedures have their own advantages and disadvantages and some of them can be combined within a company. The aim is to illustrate procedures of setting environmental targets early on and show different procedures of setting the environmental targets at a strategic level and how the way of setting environmental targets early on influences the product development process. This paper has a strong empirical connection.

  • 467.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Tingström, Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Managing Radical Innovation and Environmental Challenges: Development of a Dry Capacitor at ABB2008In: European Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1460-1060, E-ISSN 1758-7115, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 182-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the driving forces for taking environmental considerations to a higher level in a project involving radical innovation.

    Design/methodology/approach – This qualitative case study is based on ten in-depth interviews with respondents from the development team for the DryQ project at ABB.

    Findings – In order to achieve substantial environmental benefits, radical product development is essential. Radical product development has attributes that differ from those of incremental product development. It is important that these differences be acknowledged when preparing to manage environmental challenges in development projects. In radical product development, environmental considerations should be taken into account very early on, at the strategic level of the design process.  Setting challenging environmental targets and rewarding environmental improvements was crucial to the outcome of the project presented in this paper.

    Research limitations/implications – The research presented here describes one case in one manufacturing company. Readers can, however, learn from this case and apply the insights gained to their own research or use the findings to promote new thinking in their own organisation.

    Practical implications – Suggestions are made about how to manage environmental considerations in radical product development.

    Originality/value – Few studies combine ecodesign and radical innovation theories, as is done here. Yet this is not a theoretical paper but an industry-based study of eco-innovation, from which researchers and practitioners can learn.

78910 451 - 467 of 467
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