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  • 51.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Nature’s lovers: Design and Authorship in the 18th century landscape garden2007In: Architecture and authorship / [ed] Tim Anstey, Katja Grillner, Rolf Hughes, London: Black Dog Publishing, 2007Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    När arkitektur är arkitektur är arkitektur konst2001In: Det transparenta huset: Om glas och ljus i konst och arkitektur ... / [ed] Tomas Lauri, Stockholm: Statens konstråd , 2001Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 53.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Reflective depth on the surface of reality: thesis project1995Book (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    The primacy of perplexion: working architecture through a distracted order of experience : part I - fictional reality in search...1995In: Nordisk arkitekturforskning, Vol. 1995 (8:1), s. 55-67 : ill.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    The primacy of perplexion: working architecture through a distracted order of experience : part II - fictional selves in search...1995In: Nordisk arkitekturforskning, Vol. 1995 (8:2), s. 85-107 . ill.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 56.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Tomaskyrkan i Vällingby: en analys av Peter Celsings byggnad : proseminarieuppsats i Konstvetenskap vid Stockholms universite...1992Book (Other academic)
  • 57.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    UR Samtiden - Humanisterna och framtidssamhället [Elektronisk resurs]: Kan humanisterna förändra samhället?2011Other (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Grillner, Katja
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Glembrandt, PerWallenstein, Sven-Olov
    Startpunkter: experimentell forskning inom arkitektur och design = Beginnings : experimental research in architecture and design2005Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    01.AKAD – EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH IN ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN – BEGINNINGS is the first in a series of publications from AKAD, which aim to provoke, promote and discuss new and critically experimental research by architecture and design. This first book is structured around four themes arising from projects initiated within AKAD with financial support from the Swedish Research Council. It includes critical essays and presentations of experimental design and writing projects. The contributors are architects, designers and scholars based in Sweden, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Ireland, Italy, Switzerland, UK, and USA.

  • 59.
    Grillner, Katja
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Vall, Sara
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Samtal om ’28 rum’: En katalog över nutida Slussens rumsliga potential2010In: Röster från Slussen / [ed] Adam Bergholm, Stockholm: A5 Press , 2010, p. 104-119Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Hur planerar vi för framtiden? Med vilka verktyg kan vi påverka hur staden utvecklas? Detta är några av de frågor Sara Vall behandlar i sitt examensarbete från Arkitekturskolan, KTH, där hon har studerat Slussen och den debatt som pågått i snart 30 år om vad platsen ska bli i framtiden. I sitt arbete har hon kartlagt det upplevda Slussen och det faktiska Slussen, och upptäckt att de flesta stockholmare inte känner till att betongkonstruktionen, känd som Slussen, består av ett stort antal rum med olika verksamheter. Syftet med undersökningen har varit att skapa verktyg för den fortsatta diskussionen om Slussens framtid. Genom att i katalogform presentera 28 rum med olika förutsättningar, visar projektet på platsens potential att redan idag förvandlas till den levande mötesplats som vi drömmer om att den ska bli i framtiden. Med katalogen i handen ställs frågan på sin spets, vem har makten över planeringen och framförallt vad får spridandet av den här typen av information för konsekvenser? I den här texten diskuterar nyutexaminerade arkitekten Sara Vall sitt projekt tillsammans med Katja Grillner, Professor i Kritiska Studier i Arkitektur på KTH.

  • 60.
    Hietala, Jan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Beslutet om Slussen påverkar hela regionen2012In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, Vol. 2012-03-19Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The present debate on the interchange Slussen from the 1930s in central Stockholm lacks of visions. The discussion has a site-specific dimension, but at the same time also a regional and national dimension, and both discussions need to be conducted simultaneously. What is needed is an analysis of the Stockholm region and the country’s infrastructural problems.

  • 61.
    Hietala, Jan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Eat Work Rest: The Exhibition2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Eat Work Rest is a project about an artist’s private and public spheres.  The artist Prince Eugen of Sweden, Duke of Närke (1865-1947) is set in focus.  The prince’s life, as all other artists’, was separated in a private and a public sphere, and perhaps even more evidently so in his case due to his birth.  The difference between the private and the public cut through the prince’s work as an artist, his social life, his official tasks and even in what was served in his home the palatial villa Waldemarsudde on the sea just outside the city centre of Stockholm.

      The project Eat Work Rest, consisting of a book and an exhibition, originates from a few sentences 1st curator Göran Söderlund at Prince Eugen’s Waldemarsudde uttered early on the New Year of 2009.  We were in his office in the villa. He told that they – the management of the palace – had harboured plans to re-make the Prince’s study on the ground floor for some time.  He said it almost as if en passant.  The book includes texts by Charlotte Birnbaum, Power Ekroth and Christina Wistman.

      To give some understanding of the context, it should be mentioned that the interiors of three private chambers in the palace are missing since 1947, and of several guest rooms.  These were removed, all according to the provisions of the Prince’s will.

     The exhibition consists of an installation piece, an associative reconstruction of the vanished study on the first floor and the Prince’s bedchamber, emptied from their original contents soon after the Prince’s death 1947.  The chambers are re-constructed as moving digital images based on C.G. Rosenberg’s pictures of 1947, and excerpts from the documentary ‘A Summer Day at Waldemarsudde’, shot by Lennart Bernadotte in 1943, in form of back-projections on silver screen walls, which makes it possible for a viewer to experience the imagery from the inside too.  The projections are 3 x 4 m and the installation covers an area of some 500 m2.  I recognise both these colleagues as contributors to the final result, in a inter-textual sense.

      Objects and furniture essential for the original rooms, are on lone from Stopalo AB Stockholm.  These furniture are set in new unorthodox positions not unlike large assemblages.  In the room Eat we meet a kitchen table, some dining room chairs from the 18th century, a couple of pheasants, an egg-box and an IKEA lamp from the 1970.  In the room Work we find a desk from the 18th century, and early 19th century lamp and rake for a tennis court.  In the room Rest we find a pair of riding boots, a gentleman’s hat-box, a chair, an electrified chandelier, and an finally a 18th century cast iron dolphin.  The objects were presented on 18th century rugs.

     

  • 62.
    Hietala, Jan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Inconclusive Evidence: Spatial Gender Politics at Strawberry Hill 1747-582013Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 63.
    Hietala, Jan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Strawberry Hill: The First Bourgeois Collection2011In: Eat Work Rest: an artproject / [ed] Jan Hietala, Exercishallen Norr , 2011, 1, p. 25-33Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The groundbreaking aspects of the collection of curiosities accumulated at the villa Strawberry Hill, built in 1748-77, have been suggested in the past. However, even if the innovative importance of the collection as such has been recognised, the inevitable conclusion has not been drawn: it is the first bourgeois collection of any significance.

  • 64.
    Hogenboom, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Any-Space-Whatever: The Public Sphere of the Seattle Central Library2018In: Architecture in Effect: Volume 1: Rethinking the Social in Architecture: Making Effects / [ed] Sten Gromark, Jennifer Mack, Roemer van Toorn, Barcelona: ACTAR, 2018, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 334-363Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 65.
    Hällgren, Nina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture. Konstfack.
    Urban sound design - can we talk about it?2012In: SoundEffects, ISSN 1904-500X, E-ISSN 1904-500X, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 36-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article intends to critically discuss noise-mapping as the predominant method for evalu- ation, communication and maintenance of urban acoustic space, as performed in a majority of urban spatial practices today. Discussing the common strategy for handling environmental sounds raises specific questions: How is it possible to extend the current way of managing urban acoustic space, and why should we do that? How can the integration of quantitative and qualitative methods for analysing urban acoustic space act as a complement to existing methods? Interdisciplinary strategies are required which directly focus upon the perspective and needs of design practitioners in architecture and urban planning. The article will also present an example of such an explorative strategy within the scope of the PhD project Urban Sound Design – methods for qualitative sound analysis, a practice-based project within the field of artistic research.

  • 66.
    Ioannidis, Konstantinos
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Designing the Edge: An Inquiry into the Psychospatial Nature of Meaning in the Architecture of the Urban Waterfront2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The initial goal of this effort is to develop a discussion on urban design process and thinking that acknowledges the needs of places with meaning in the design of the urban waterfront. The thesis addresses the fact that the problematic of the coastal formulation is intricate, comprising not only aspects related to the spatial organization and design of its domain but also shared properties originated by the presence and movement of the perceiving subject in the area.

    In this framework, the research attempts to provide an understanding of the main relationships that the subject cultivates inside the coastal space and to offer a broader spatial reading of its narrative function. On the hypothesis that this function is susceptible of interpretation, the thesis develops an interest in examining the effects of the psychospatial nature of meaning on the design and experience of the urban edge, for to interpret a narrative spatial construct is to specify its meaning.

    To explore the issue of waterfront places that speak of the subject, the research conceives the coastal space as a field of mediated parameters that pertain to three crucial operational premises: the symbolic function of the urban space near the water, the meaning behind the coastal form, and the engagement of the perceiving subject in the conscious or reflexive appropriation of the waterfront setting. These premises, traced as psychophysiological spaces, determine the intermediary, the integrative, and the expressive discourses for the development of places with meaning near the water. Through them, the thesis attempts a reading of the coastal domain based upon the material interpretation of the meanings and messages associated with the immediate experience of the onset of water‐born notions, concepts, and images.

    Writing about the dialectics between the psychospatial inquiry and the spatial experience of the edge, this thesis suggests that, contrary to the established preconception, the psychology of human‐edge relations submits the perceiving subject to the conception of the coastal form and shape.

  • 67.
    Karami, Sepideh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    A Performative Critical Practice of Architecture2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 68.
    Karami, Sepideh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Aesthetics of Agonism and Informal Action of The Others2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Karami, Sepideh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Al-Croquis: Lieutenant Fontaine2017Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This exposition emerged in response to the question of how to engage critically with institutions via various methods of interruption. Al-Croquis is a parody of the mainstream architecture journal El-Croquis. It is a fictitious journal born from a proposal rejected by the editors of El-Croquis, but that nevertheless found a way to continue an institutional existence. This issue, dedicated to the prison, introduces Lieutenant Fontaine, the main character of Robert Bresson’s movie A Man Escaped, as a protagonist of interrupting architecture. Fontaine escapes from the Nazi’s Montluc prison, and his escape plan is investigated as a work of architecture, interrupting the institution of the prison. Appointing the role of architecture to a prisoner who escapes, and studying his applied tools and methods through the lens of architecture work, is a way to expand architecture beyond its disciplinary limits and to develop minor modes of architectural practice. In line with such an expansion, the issue also approaches the prison through various perspectives by means of critical and artistic contributions from guest contributors. 

    The self-published journal of architecture, Al-Croquis, and a poster was exhibited at ArkDes exhibition space, as part of the Making Effect exhibition 14-17 September 2017.

  • 70.
    Karami, Sepideh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Black Lungs2019In: VIS Nordic Journal for Artistic Research, ISSN 2003-024X, Vol. 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ultimate act of taking risk in life lays in the proximity to death. When a risk being taken is prone to fail, failure can potentially become the failure to live. These risky moments involve decisions, dreams, imaginings that motivate one to take action. The motivation is strong enough to push one to a fragile border between death and life. In this exposition, I situate the discussion of risk in coal mines, investigating the work of coal miners as a craft through which they develop subversive modes of labour. The story in this exposition starts millions of years ago and gives a fictional geological history of Earth, where the formation of coal plays an important role in the planet’s evolution; coal becomes the political summary of Earth, where various moments of risk lead us down into a coal mine. Through a vertical structure poised on the edge of death and life, and by means of writing and drawing, risk is experimented with using concepts such as imprecision, the materiality of darkness, and the fragility of working with such materiality.

  • 71.
    Karami, Sepideh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Critical Inhabitation: Interruption and Performative Criticality2018In: After Effects: Theories and Methodologies in Architectural Research / [ed] Hélène Frichot and Gunnar Sandin, Barcelona/ New York: ACTAR, 2018, p. 300-311Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 72.
    Karami, Sepideh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    De/Ascending: Torre David, The Second Episode of Ballard's High-Rise2015In: Lo-Res: Architectural Theory, Politics, and Criticism, ISSN 2002-0260, Vol. 1, p. 80-89Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 73.
    Karami, Sepideh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Fragile and Violent: Tactics of Interruption2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    “Its cramped space forces each individual intrigue to connect immediately to politics. The individual concern thus becomes all the more necessary, indispensable, magnified, because a whole other story is vibrating within it.” – Gilles Deleuze, ‘Kafka: Toward a Minor Literature’

     

    The story in this presentation commences from the mess, blood, dirt, love that splash on and pollute the neat glossy pages of mainstream architectural representation, texts and images. An odor that tears down the rendered sections of an unbuilt architectural space. A monstrous voice that interrupts the words of professionalism. The story includes but is not limited to feminism. It breaks from mainstream feminism to politics of care and love. It’s about amateurism. The story is about counter-hegemonic practices in architecture that moves along Chantal Mouffe’s ‘strategies of engagement’[1], but goes awry to tactics of interruption; practices that produce temporal critical alternatives, and thereby disrupt the existing orders and fixed meanings. The performers in this practice are the uninvited, the excluded, the parts that have no part, those who don’t fit into any predefined categories. In the form of ‘minor architecture’ (Stoner/Bloomer), interrupting practices take place in the shadows of ‘major architecture’ (Tafuri) and create situations for the ‘encounter of incompatibilities’ (Rancière) such as fragility and violence. This story examines the encounter of such incompatibilities through practices of interruption.

    [1] Mouffe. Ch. 2015. Artistic Strategies in Politics and Political Strategies in Art. In: Malzacher, F. Truth Is Concrete: A Handbook for Artistic Strategies in Real Politics. Berlin: SternbergPress. P.

  • 74.
    Karami, Sepideh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Getting out of Balance: An Encounter Between Architecture and Circus2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 75.
    Karami, Sepideh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    In Search of Utopia in The Silent Rebellion2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 76.
    Karami, Sepideh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Interrupt2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 77.
    Karami, Sepideh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Interrupting Architecture.2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 78.
    Karami, Sepideh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Interruption as Dissident Gesture2016In: RUUKKU Studies in Artistic Research, ISSN 0080-5319, E-ISSN 2056-5917, Vol. 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this exposition I investigate the tactics of interruption as methods of engaging with the institution through artistic research and approaches. This is developed by drawing upon Jacques Rancière's concept of ‘dissensus', Chantal Mouffe's ‘strategy of engagement' and Michel de Certeau's idea of 'tactics'. Art as a dissensual activity turns artistic research into a dissident research that can serve to question academic consensus rather than conforming to its established structure. Interruption becomes a dissenting gesture. I use a fictional and fictitious publication as a tool to 'interrupt' institutions. In this fictitious publication, I have borrowed Lieutenant Fontaine from Robert Bresson's movie, ‘A Man Escaped', and have introduced him as a protagonist of 'interrupting architecture', investigating his escape plan as an activity of 'architecting'. The journey of this publication goes through two short architectural narrations of two places: a prison (as discipline) and a library (as dominant discourse). These two narrations are combined with three formulae: amateur, fiction, misperformance or disloyalty; each acts as certain characteristics of dissidence. Together, these aim to raise the question: How do tactics of interruption contribute to dissensus in academia?

  • 79.
    Karami, Sepideh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Interruption: Writing a Dissident Architecture2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Interruption: Writing a Dissident Architecture makes a contribution to the fields of writing architecture and dissident architecture. Concerned with developing an ethos of criticality from within, it presents a series of performative writing experiments that are situated in politically charged architectural sites, from public spaces, to institutions, to domestic spaces. My aim is to ask how a dissident architecture could be produced through the practice of writing, specifically by offering an account of the performative acts of various characters who are introduced in the thesis, and who critically inhabit existing architectural sites, interrupt the spatial power relations of those sites, and who thereby construct 'performing grounds'.

    Writing architecture is developed in this thesis not as writing about architecture, but aims instead to write it, to make it. Writing dissident architecture writes with multiple voices, with many authors, not all of whom are welcomed. It offers significant approaches to a political and critical understanding of architecture. Where architecture in this thesis is understood both as a material structure and as a disciplinary framework in which power can become oppressive, writing architecture, on the other hand, is developed as a ‘minor’ practice that can act upon existing sites, interrupting their ‘major’ power relations. Interruption, developed as a tactic, is what activates architecture to become a performing ground for the act of dissidence. 

    Formulated as a journey the three main parts of the thesis deal with three interrupting tactics: Pause, Cut and Fo(o)l+d, which are applied in relation to three different kinds of political site: 1) spaces of appearance or the spectacle; 2) disciplined spaces understood as sites of impossibility; 3) domestic spaces as displaced loci of subversive political actions. The Pause uses stillness and refusal as a mode of interruption. The Cut interrupts the material and structural continuity of established institutions and creates cracks in those systems. The Fo(o)l+d interrupts surveillance and control by folding in and out of private and public spaces. By introducing a quasi-fictional character to each site, who performs through one of the three tactics of interruption, a performing ground is constructed. Writing architecture forwards this journey across specific sites through which the figure of the dissident emerges.

     

     

     

     

     

  • 80.
    Karami, Sepideh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Pause: A Device for Troubling Routines2015In: Drawing On, ISSN 2059-9978, no 1, p. 75-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pause is a technique for troubling routines, a tactical device for change capable of disturbing established flows. Where urban public spaces are concerned, a pause is a device, an act however tiny that unsettles the balance or order of those spaces, bringing about a moment of dysfunction in which an individual is liberated for an unspecified duration. While the dominant power is busy ‘fixing’ this pause, alternatives can emerge. In this paper taking on the voice of a fictional character, I investigate the ins and outs of pause through the case of the Standing Man of the Occupy Gezi movement in Turkey (2013). The pause of Standing Man is used as a concept to rethink the architectural profession. Drawing on Lefebvre theory of ‘moment’, pause is discussed as an event destined to fail. This inevitable failure of the pause makes the moment of failure intense and tragic. In this way duration matters, and one of the contributions that architectural practice could make in working with pause would be to work with this duration – and to expand it.

    To study further how architecture can contribute to the idea of pause, a case of the unfinished building in Tehran during the 1979 revolution is discussed in relation to the Standing Man. The discussion is built up around the infrastructural nature of pauses, the importance of body politics to the idea of pause as a device and the post-production of space by means of occupation. In this regard, reflecting on the work of architecture, there might be a need for pause in the architectural profession itself, in its attitude to ‘completing’ the world.

    The narrator in this paper, an architect who participated in the 1979 revolution, examines the pause of the Standing Man through an architectural lens while watching a video of the event on YouTube. The argument is built up through a lecture on the subject, a discussion with a group of architecture students, and through snippets of nostalgic daydreaming and introverted contemplation. The flashbacks, the lecture, the movie and the train of thoughts interrupt one another, creating moments of pause in the narration. 

  • 81.
    Karami, Sepideh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Pause: Unmapping Method2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 82.
    Karami, Sepideh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Pause: Unmapping Method2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 83.
    Karami, Sepideh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Revolution as the Moment of Silence2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 84.
    Karami, Sepideh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Risk in the City. Västerås Conversation. Västerås Museum. 12 Nov 20152015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 85.
    Karami, Sepideh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Scenography of Fooling2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 86.
    Karami, Sepideh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Stories We Can't Tell2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Writing architecture is not writing about architecture, but writing it, making it. It is to create new grounds, sites of actions, and construct characters who build these grounds and change them by inhabiting them critically and performatively. By situating writing in contexts where direct ways of expression are impossible, I investigate how dissident writing can circumvent the bans of an oppressive power by inventing an Aesopian language. Dissident writing is to write with multiple voices and many authors – not all of whom are welcome. To develop a tactic of writing with unwelcome co-authors, i.e. writing with the dominant power, but against it, is what dissidence could bring into writing architecture. In this way, writing dissident architecture deals with two main questions. One is: how to tell a story we cannot tell? And the other: how can this struggle with an impossible narration create a dissident architecture? To investigate these questions, in this text domestic spaces of houses are considered as a key example of performing grounds for dissidents. By going through an experiment of writing situated in the spaces of a demolished house, I discuss how the construction of dissident characters who perform in the house and the application of different genres and experimental writings complicate the house and bring on the writing of a dissident architecture.

  • 87.
    Karami, Sepideh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Stories we can’t tell: On writing dissident architecture2019In: Text: Journal of the Australian Association of Writing Programs, ISSN 1327-9556, E-ISSN 1327-9556, no 55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Writing architecture is not writingaboutarchitecture, but writing it, making it. It is to create new grounds, sites of actions, and construct characters who build these grounds and change them by inhabiting them critically and performatively. By situating writing in contexts where direct ways of expression are impossible, I investigate how dissident writing can circumvent the bans of an oppressive power by inventing an Aesopian language. Dissident writing is to write with multiple voices and many authors – not all of whom are welcome. To develop a tactic of writing with unwelcome co-authors, i.e. writing with the dominant power, but against it, is what dissidence could bring into writing architecture. In this way, writing dissident architecture deals with two main questions. One is: how to tell a story we cannot tell? And the other: how can this struggle with an impossible narration create a dissident architecture? To investigate these questions, in this text domestic spaces of houses are considered as a key example of performing grounds for dissidents. By going through an experiment of writing situated in the spaces of a demolished house, I discuss how the construction of dissident characters who perform in the house and the application of different genres and experimental writings complicate the house and bring on the writing of a dissident architecture.

  • 88.
    Karami, Sepideh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Tactical Writing: Interrupting the Dominant Language2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In my contribution I experiment with what I would call tactical writing that works with the performative potential of writing. Here writing is not a tool of representation but production of space or event. I work with it as a tactic of interruption; to interrupt the object of the study and thereby produce a new alternative. Through this mode of tactical writing, and by using methods of re-writing, exhaustion, joke and looking away, I would like to produce a new architecture space from an already existing and established one. I would like to present this proposal as a performance wherein these ideas are re-enacted in the moment of performance.

  • 89.
    Karami, Sepideh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Unchoreographed Dance: City and Revolutionary Aesthetics2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 90.
    Karami, Sepideh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Writing at the Time of Revolution2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 91.
    Karami, Sepideh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Writing Dissident Architecture2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 92.
    Karami, Sepideh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Your Proposal Doesn’t Fit in Our Editorial Line: Constructing a Dissident Researcher. 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I discuss the possibility of and the necessity for dissident researchers in academia. I investigate the strategies of interruption as methods of engaging with the institution through artistic research and approaches. Art as a dissensual activity turns artistic research into a dissident research that can serve to question academic consensus rather than conforming to its established structure.

    In order to construct a dissident researcher, I go through three short architectural narrations of three places: a prison (as discipline), a school of architecture (as artistic research) and a library (as dominant discourse). These three narrations are combined with three formulae: amateur, fiction, misperformance or disloyalty; each acts as certain characteristics of dissidence that are pertinent to an ongoing micro-project explained here. Together, these aim to raise the question: How does perceiving artistic research as dissident research modify conventional evaluation systems and set up new evaluating strategies based on politics of dissidence? 

  • 93.
    Marcus, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Barthel, Stephan
    Stockholm University.
    Colding, Johan
    Royal Swedish Academy of the Sciences .
    Erixon, Hanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    Stockholm University.
    Grahn, Sara
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Architectural Technologies.
    Torsvall, Jonas
    Kärsten, Carl
    Q-book Albano 4: Sustainability2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report is the result of a collaboration between The Stockholm Resilience Centre at Stockholm University, The School of Architecture at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm and the Architectural firm KIT also based in Stockholm. It explores and discusses strategies for integrating novel social-ecological research within the planning and urban design practices aiming to delineate principles for an integrated and comprehensive social-ecological urban design practice. As focal case and example works the Albano campus area in Stockholm, with a strategic location at the crossroads between the three major universities in Stockholm as well as its inner city and the National City Park, the latter adressing the contested issue of expanding the university and city inside a large urban park of national interest. Taken together this critical location in a most informative way highlights several of the potentials and challenges that the contemporary planning and urban design fields are facing today.

    Q-book Albano 4 originated from the work by a inter- and transdisciplinary research team, in their effort to challenge existing development plans for the expansion of the Stockholm University campus over an area inside the National Urban Park. While the existing plans lacked a clear engagement with novel findings from research and design theory, and while the campus expansion was to be placed within a park with important biodiversity and cultural heritage, the team took upon them to articulate an alternative vision based on contemporary international and local research. Consequently, the team offered an alternative vision for the area, in contrast to the plans that the City had been offered by other architects and planners.

    Furthermore, through presenting this vision at an international academic conference open to the public, the real-estate developer Akademiska hus, a body within the Swedish state that manages university campuses across the country, making them one of the largest developers of their kind in the world, showed an interest and urged the team to develop their suggestion further. Through this support, time was given to deepen the principles of social-ecological urban design and to further develop the alternative vision for how the Albano area could be developed according to these principles. This included workshops with experts, and stakeholder meetings with civil society organizations.

    The alternative vision, in this process developed into this illustrated report that effectively joins theories of resilience, social-ecological systems and ecosystem services with theories of spatial analysis, urban morphology and design methodology, translating this new body of knowledge into principles and elements of social-ecological urban design, using the Albano site as case study.

     

  • 94.
    Marcus, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Colding, Johan
    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.
    Barthel, Stephan
    Stockholm University.
    Erixon, Hanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Utveckla Valhallavägen till Stockholms gröna bredband2012Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 95.
    Mattsson, Helena
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Out of the Ivory Tower: The Independent Group and Popular Culture2014In: Konsthistorisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0023-3609, E-ISSN 1651-2294, Vol. 83, no 4, p. 342-345Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 96.
    Nobel, Andreas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture. Konstfack.
    Dimmer på Upplysningen: text, form och formgivning2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The main part of the dissertation is a text. The other is an exhibition mainly presenting a bow-lathe and some furniture designed and produced in that bow lathe. Interior- and furniture design are disciplines in which sensory qualities are important. Within these disciplines there are well established methods and languages for developing these qualities. However, such development has rarely been achieved through the medium of text. Sensory qualities tend to be ignored in highly textualized knowledge environments. Within education textualized knowledge is often valued higher than forms of knowledge developed through other medias than text. This situation has led to a dichotomized perception of knowledge where textualized knowledge attained through writing and conceptualizing, is valued higher than knowledge developed through physical work. The thesis argues that this hierarchical view on different forms of knowledge also has an influence on the practical profession of the designer, manifest in the paradoxical situation where the form aspects of design is neglected and over shadowed by various forms of textualized knowledge. The central research question posed in the text part is: Which adverse effects might an increasing emphasis on textualized theory have on the design practices? The questions are highlighted from perspectives such as; epistemology, tradition, history and power.

    The central research question in the exhibition part examines if any possible negative effects on design resulting from the above mentioned scenario, may be prevented through engaging in a highly physical and non-conceptual design- process? The purpose of the exhibition part is to introduce methods and design that may provide the impetus for further development in the fields of design. The bow lathe is presented as an example of a productive tool for the development of relevant contemporary design.

  • 97.
    Pech, Christina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    ARARAT: Architecture between Utopia and Dystopia2012In: Proceedings of the 2nd international conference of the European architectural history network, / [ed] Hilde Heynen & Janina Gosseye, Bryssel, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 98.
    Runting, Helen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Material conversations: autonomy, performativity and being between in urban planning2009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis addresses the question of how it might be possible to articulate an understanding of urban planning practice which is at once reflective and transformative. The aim of the work is to develop a range of alternate conceptualisations of planning practice, drawn from ideas developed within critical theory, sociology, art, architectural theory and architectural design practice, from which to consider the possibilities of both talking about and practising urban planning differently.

    As  starting point in that broader inquiry, this thesis proposes a sense of “dislocation” within the experience, conceptualisation and articulation of planning practice, the result of strategies of dissociation and disciplinary defence, predicated upon an emphasis of the break between modernism and post modernism, between practice and theory, and between plan and process. It is posed that these positions, expressed within contemporary planning theory, have in turn made it difficult to place planning practice with respect to temporality, spatiality, other disciplines and its publics. 

    Turning to architecture, exploration of positions which adopt the in-between, the interdisciplinary, the critical, the pragmatic, the projective and the performative as their basis for practice have been fundamental to the development of the arguments of the work. Through this thesis it is argued that urban planning needs to initiate a new debate about practice, and that it might use a discussion of interdisciplinarity, reflectivity, criticality, futurity and materiality in order to develop a politics of engagement, at both subjective and disciplinary levels.

  • 99.
    Runting, Helen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Welcome to The Promenade City: A Gentrifictional Cartography of Stockholm in the Postindustrial Age'2015In: Architecture and Culture, ISSN 2050-7828, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 397-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As we enter the age of cognitive capitalism and immaterial labor, postindustrial cities like Stockholm, Sweden, are witnessing both the emergence of a post-regulatory planning policy climate and the concomitant transfer of responsibilities for design regulation and housing provision from the municipality to distributed networks of producer-consumers. As governments effectively withdraw from direct engagement in city building efforts, new divisions of labor and new forms of control thus become apparent. This essay considers the implications of these shifts by addressing the “gentrifictions” through which they operate. Deploying notions of “chora” and “container technologies” as they have been developed through the feminist scholarship of Luce Irigaray and Zoë Sofia, we ultimately advocate a radical rethinking of our relation to the unobtrusive ‘environments’ that facilitate our (compulsorily productive) experiences of the city and our participation in real-estate games of occupation and exchange.

  • 100.
    Runting, Helen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Torisson, Fredrik
    Lund University, Sweden.
    YES Boss! The 8 house: Towards a projective critique2015In: Drawing On, ISSN 2059-9978, Vol. 1, p. 127-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Writing of postmodernism, Fredric Jameson locates the (postmodern) desire for architecture in its image. Alloy- like, the architecture of the early twenty-first century amalgamates image and material structure and in so doing sprawls simultaneously across the spaces of media and the city. From concept diagram to post-occupancy photograph, the building is now both preceded and augmented by a distributed array of high-resolution images. A brand from the moment of inception, the “distributed form” of the contemporary architectural project in fact seems carefully designed to facilitate its on-going dissemination. It is this relation – that of architecture to its image – which this essay critically addresses, exploring what it is that such projects actually project, and how we might – as architects and critics – critically engage with that content. 

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