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  • 51. Frennert, Susanne
    Older People and the Adoption of Innovations: A study of the expectations on the use of social assistive robots and telehealthcare systems2014Other (Other academic)
  • 52.
    Frennert, Susanne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Technology in Health Care.
    Social companion robots in eldercare – who gains and who loses?2013In: Proceeding at ICSR2013 at the workshop on social companion robots, Bristol, UK, October 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 53. Frennert, Susanne
    STS-inspired design to meet the challenges of modern ageing. Welfare technology as a tool to promote user driven innovations or another way to keep older users hostage?2015In: Journal title: Technological Forecasting & Social Change ; DOI information: 10.1016/j.techfore.2014.04.012Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 54. Frennert, Susanne
    et al.
    Kortner, Tobias
    Batko-Klein, Daliah
    Hebesberger, Denise
    Weninger, Markus
    Gisinger, Christoph
    Frennert, Susanne
    Eftring, Hakan
    Antona, Margarita
    Adami, Ilia
    Weiss, Astrid
    Bajones, Markus
    Vincze, Markus
    Results of a real world trial with a mobile social service robot for older adults2016In: 2016 11th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI), IEEE , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 55. Frennert, Susanne
    et al.
    Östlund, B.
    The domestication of robotic vacuum cleaners among seniors2014In: Gerontechnology, Vol. 12, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 56. Frennert, Susanne
    et al.
    Östlund, B.
    Domestication of a telehealthcare system2014In: Gerontechnology, Vol. 13, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Frid, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Interactive sonification of a fluid dance movement: an exploratory study2019In: Journal on Multimodal User Interfaces, ISSN 1783-7677, E-ISSN 1783-8738, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 181-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present three different experiments designed to explore sound properties associated with fluid movement: (1) an experiment in which participants adjusted parameters of a sonification model developed for a fluid dance movement, (2) a vocal sketching experiment in which participants sketched sounds portraying fluid versus nonfluid movements, and (3) a workshop in which participants discussed and selected fluid versus nonfluid sounds. Consistent findings from the three experiments indicated that sounds expressing fluidity generally occupy a lower register and has less high frequency content, as well as a lower bandwidth, than sounds expressing nonfluidity. The ideal sound to express fluidity is continuous, calm, slow, pitched, reminiscent of wind, water or an acoustic musical instrument. The ideal sound to express nonfluidity is harsh, non-continuous, abrupt, dissonant, conceptually associated with metal or wood, unhuman and robotic. Findings presented in this paper can be used as design guidelines for future applications in which the movement property fluidity is to be conveyed through sonification.

  • 58.
    Frid, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sonification of fluidity -
An exploration of perceptual connotations of a particular movement feature2016In: Proceedings of ISon 2016, 5th Interactive Sonification Workshop, Bielefeld, Germany, 2016, p. 11-17Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we conducted two experiments in order to investigate potential strategies for sonification of the expressive movement quality “fluidity” in dance: one perceptual rating experiment (1) in which five different sound models were evaluated on their ability to express fluidity, and one interactive experiment (2) in which participants adjusted parameters for the most fluid sound model in (1) and performed vocal sketching to two video recordings of contemporary dance. Sounds generated in the fluid condition occupied a low register and had darker, more muffled, timbres compared to the non-fluid condition, in which sounds were characterized by a higher spectral centroid and contained more noise. These results were further supported by qualitative data from interviews. The participants conceptualized fluidity as a property related to water, pitched sounds, wind, and continuous flow; non-fluidity had connotations of friction, struggle and effort. The biggest conceptual distinction between fluidity and non-fluidity was the dichotomy of “nature” and “technology”, “natural” and “unnatural”, or even “human” and “unhuman”. We suggest that these distinct connotations should be taken into account in future research focusing on the fluidity quality and its corresponding sonification.

  • 59.
    Frid, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KMH Royal College of Music, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sound Forest - Evaluation of an Accessible Multisensory Music Installation2019In: Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM , 2019, p. 1-12, article id 677Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sound Forest is a music installation consisting of a room with light-emitting interactive strings, vibrating platforms and speakers, situated at the Swedish Museum of Performing Arts. In this paper we present an exploratory study focusing on evaluation of Sound Forest based on picture cards and interviews. Since Sound Forest should be accessible for everyone, regardless age or abilities, we invited children, teens and adults with physical and intellectual disabilities to take part in the evaluation. The main contribution of this work lies in its fndings suggesting that multisensory platforms such as Sound Forest, providing whole-body vibrations, can be used to provide visitors of diferent ages and abilities with similar associations to musical experiences. Interviews also revealed positive responses to haptic feedback in this context. Participants of diferent ages used diferent strategies and bodily modes of interaction in Sound Forest, with activities ranging from running to synchronized music-making and collaborative play.

  • 60.
    Frid, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Moll, Jonas
    Uppsala University.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sallnäs Pysander, Eva-Lotta
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Haptic feedback combined with movement sonification using a friction sound improves task performance in a virtual throwing task2018In: Journal on Multimodal User Interfaces, ISSN 1783-7677, E-ISSN 1783-8738, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 279-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present a study on the effects of auditory- and haptic feedback in a virtual throwing task performed with a point-based haptic device. The main research objective was to investigate if and how task performance and perceived intuitiveness is affected when interactive sonification and/or haptic feedback is used to provide real-time feedback about a movement performed in a 3D virtual environment. Emphasis was put on task solving efficiency and subjective accounts of participants’ experiences of the multimodal interaction in different conditions. The experiment used a within-subjects design in which the participants solved the same task in different conditions: visual-only, visuohaptic, audiovisual and audiovisuohaptic. Two different sound models were implemented and compared. Significantly lower error rates were obtained in the audiovisuohaptic condition involving movement sonification based on a physical model of friction, compared to the visual-only condition. Moreover, a significant increase in perceived intuitiveness was observed for most conditions involving haptic and/or auditory feedback, compared to the visual-only condition. The main finding of this study is that multimodal feedback can not only improve perceived intuitiveness of an interface but that certain combinations of haptic feedback and movement sonification can also contribute with performance-enhancing properties. This highlights the importance of carefully designing feedback combinations for interactive applications.

  • 61.
    Frykholm, Oscar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Nilsson, Marcus
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Groth, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Yngling, Alexander
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Interaction design in a complex context: medical multi-disciplinary team meetings2012In: The 7th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Making Sense Through Design, New York, NY, USA, 2012, p. 341-350Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to improve collaboration on, and visualisation of, patient information in medical multi-disciplinary team meetings, we have developed a system that presents information from different medical systems to be used as a support for the decision process. Based on field studies, we have implemented a high-fidelity prototype on tablet-sized displays, and tested it in a realistic setting. Our evaluation proved that more patient information can efficiently be displayed to all meeting participants, compared to the current situation. Interaction with the information, on the other hand, proved to be a complicated activity that needs careful design considerations; it should ultimately be based on what roles the meeting participants have, and what tasks they should complete. Medical decision-making is a complex area, and conducting interaction design in this area proved complex too. We foresee a great opportunity to improve medical work, by introducing collaborative tools and visualisation of medical data, but it requires that interaction design becomes a natural part of medical work.

  • 62. Galal-Edeen, G. H.
    et al.
    Abdrabou, Y.
    Elgarf, Maha
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Hassan, H. M.
    HCI of Arabia: The challenges of HCI research in Egypt2019In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 55-59Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 63. Goebl, W.
    et al.
    Bresin, R.
    Measurement and reproduction accuracy of computer-controlled grand pianos2003In: Proceedings of SMAC 03, Stockholm Music Acoustics Conference, 2003, Vol. 1, p. 155-158Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 64. Goebl, W.
    et al.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Galembo, A.
    Once again: The perception of piano touch and tone: Can touch audibly change piano sound independently of intensity?2004In: Proceedings of the International Symposium on Musical Acoustics, March 31st to April 3rd 2004 (ISMA2004), Nara, Japan, Nara, Japan: The Acoustical Society of Japan, CD-ROM , 2004, p. 332-335Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study addresses the old question of whether the timbreof isolated piano tones can be audibly varied independentlyof their hammer velocities—only through thetype of touch. A large amount of single piano tones wereplayed with two prototypical types of touch: depressingthe keys with the finger initially resting on the key surface(pressed), and hitting the keys from a certain distanceabove (struck). Musicians were asked to identify the typeof touch of the recorded samples, in a first block with allattack noises before the tone onsets included, in a secondblock without them. Half of the listeners could correctlyidentify significantly more tones than chance in the firstblock (up to 86% accuracy), but no one in block 2. Thosewho heard no difference tended to give struck ratings forlouder tones in both blocks.

  • 65. Goebl, W.
    et al.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Galembo, A.
    Touch and temporal behavior of grand piano actions2005In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 118, no 2, p. 1154-1165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the temporal behavior of grand piano actions from different manufacturers under different touch conditions and dynamic levels. An experimental setup consisting of accelerometers and a calibrated microphone was used to capture key and hammer movements, as well as the sound signal. Five selected keys were played by pianists with two types of touch (pressed touch versus struck touch) over the entire dynamic range. Discrete measurements were extracted from the accelerometer data for each of the over 2300 recorded tones (e.g., finger-key, hammer-string, and key bottom contact times, maximum hammer velocity). Travel times of the hammer (from finger-key to hammer-string) as a function of maximum hammer velocity varied clearly between the two types of touch, but only slightly between pianos. A travel time approximation used in earlier work [Goebl W., (2001). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 110, 563-572] derived from a computer-controlled piano was verified. Constant temporal behavior over type of touch and low compression properties of the parts of the action (reflected in key bottom contact times) were hypothesized to be indicators for instrumental quality.

  • 66.
    Green, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Bogdan, Cristian
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Severinson Eklundh, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    With a new helper comes new tasks mixed-initiative interaction for robot-assisted shopping2009In: IHRCMICA-2009 Improving Human-Robot Communication with Mixed-Initiative and Context-Awareness: Proceedings of the Workshop on Improving Human-Robot Communication with Mixed-Initiative and Context-Awareness co-located with Ro-Man 2009, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the CommRob project1 we are investigating Robot Assisted Shopping. We are considering the effects on usability when allowing for mixed-initiative dialogue. It is noted that when adding a robotic assistant to a scenario that was previously involving only one agent, two new tasks are created: collaborative interaction, and learning an interface. Evaluation of mixed-initiative dialogue becomes complicated because it is not straightforward to separate the overall task performance from the attributes brought by mixed-initiative interaction.

  • 67. Grogan, P. T.
    et al.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan A.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Gaming Methods in Engineering Systems Research2017In: Systems Engineering, ISSN 1098-1241, E-ISSN 1520-6858, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 542-552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent interest in applications of games and gaming methods has stimulated discussion of their use in engineering systems research. Simulation games or gaming simulations are interactive environments which simultaneously model a technical system through simulation and a social system with role-play participants. Their boundary-spanning nature aligns with challenges in engineering systems to consider both technical and social factors in design. This paper outlines a class of gaming methods for research in engineering systems. Key contributions synthesize diverse bodies of literature to classify gaming applications as generating generalizable and contextual knowledge to benefit participants and principals, identify intellectual foundations in related social sciences, and describe the dual purpose of games as a research method for analytical or design science objectives. Conclusions highlight opportunities and challenges for gaming research methods to accommodate social science research in design-centric activities.

  • 68.
    Gullström, Charlie
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Jonsson, Alex (Contributor)
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Handberg, Leif (Contributor)
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Miranda Corranza, Pablo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Lefter, Iulia (Contributor)
    TU Delft.
    Nefs, Harold T (Contributor)
    TU Delft.
    Nyström, Jimmy (Contributor)
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    Nyström, Nicklas (Contributor)
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    Amram, Noam (Contributor)
    LiveU.
    Valli, Seppo (Contributor)
    VTT.
    Kristiansson, Johan (Contributor)
    Ericsson.
    High-fidelity Mock-up Report: Public deliverable D.2.4 from COMPEIT, EU FP7 project2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    COMPEIT is a 3-year EU 7th framework project and focuses on a web-based system for highly interactive, personalised, shared media experiences by developing technologies that A) enrich social connections, B) improve the feeling of being together in one shared space and C) enhance collaboration whilst being separated in time or space. COMPEIT takes the view that Internet-based distribution will transform traditional broadcasting towards higher levels of interactivity and integration with virtual and augmented reality, enabled by advanced web technologies and the proliferation of tangible devices. The project addresses Quality of Experience as a key variable in the experience of media production and consumption systems.

    A first mock-up of the COMPEIT system has been put together. It illustrates technical components from WP 4 (Mediated Presence Components); services from WP 5 (New Media Services); and D3.2 Initial System Specification. It informs further research towards D3.4 First Prototype.

  • 69.
    Gullström, Charlie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Boman, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Analogue Friday 1: Thumbs Up! and Analogue Friday 2: InstaYum!: Impact event and film production2015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    As part of a public dissemination impact activity within the Mediating Presence project of EIT ICT Labs in 2013, partners were invited to a series of Mediated Seminars, seeking to identify valuable trends relating to the future of the media industry in general, and to smart spaces in a particular. The participants reviewed and discussed all the recent publications available via the EIT ICT Labs Web site (www.eitictlabs.eu/publications), as well as a wide range of publicly available reports and white papers. As a result of this process, the idea was put forward to produce four films that would trigger reflection within the research community about the technical development relating to "smart spaces". This represents a new and experimental form of outreach and dissemination for the activity.

    The workshop was successfully concluded, with preliminary drafts for scripts, intended for the creation of four short films, handed over to four different film producers by responsible activity researchers in four different cities (Delft, Helsinki, Luleå, and Stockholm). Tentative versions of three films were screened according to plan at the Espoo SSP Results Day event in December, from which valuable feedback was received, allowing for the first three films to be slightly revised and completed at the end of December. In parallel, the fourth film was realised in two parts and completed at the end of December: Analogue Friday 1 and 2.

  • 70.
    Gullström, Charlie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Handberg, Leif
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Beyond Talking Heads – Presence Design Experiments2013In: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems / [ed] CHI 2013, Paris: ACM Press, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Based on design-driven research and ten years teaching a Masters level course in presence design and production, an interdisciplinary team of researchers present a series of reflections. The topic of mediated presence requires that both teacher and student indulge in theory and practice from a range of disciplines. Over 200 student projects and 20 research installations have been designed and executed over the years, each addressing spatial and temporal strategies for producing presence, along with critical design concepts: how to establish trust in mediated environments and the formation of a tacit communication contract between participants. These will be key aspects for the future of personal video communication.

  • 71.
    Gullström, Charlie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Handberg, Leif
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hauptman, Katherine
    Museum of National Antiquities.
    Svanberg, Fredrik
    Museum of National Antiquity.
    Det medierade museet: Moderna kulturarvsprocesser och medierad tillgänglighet2013In: Mångvetenskapliga möten för ett breddat kulturmiljöarbete: Riksantikvarieämbetets FoU-verksamhet 2006–2010/11 / [ed] Holmström, Marie, Stockholm: Riksantikvarieämbetet, 2013, , p. 25p. 121-134Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes collaborative research at the intersection of media technology, architecture, archaeology and museum studies between The Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) and The National Historical Museum in Stockholm (SHM). The two projects presented are “Mediated presence to cultural heritage environments” and “Modern Heritage Processes and Remote Presence”, which were funded by the Swedish National Heritage Board. The paper addresses the potential for increased public access to cultural heritage sites by means of video-mediated communications and outreach activities. A “Mediated Window” was designed which enabled visitors to remotely experience presence and to interact between two different sites, thus creating an architectural, mediated extension of space. The case studies confirmed that mutual gaze is important to the experience of presence and that a combination of architectural and technical design is required to fully support this experience. Further, the studies showed that a mediated spatial extension, in combination with outdoor public learning activities and participation, can evoke an interest in modern cultural heritage and promote public dialogue in such contexts.

  • 72. Gustavsson, P.
    et al.
    Holm, M.
    Syberfeldt, A.
    Wang, Lihui
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Human-robot collaboration - Towards new metrics for selection of communication technologies2018In: Procedia CIRP, Elsevier, 2018, Vol. 72, p. 123-128Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrial robot manufacturers have in recent years developed collaborative robots and these gains more and more interest within the manufacturing industry. Collaborative robots ensure that humans and robots can work together without the robot being dangerous for the human. However, collaborative robots themselves are not enough to achieve collaboration between a human and a robot; collaboration is only possible if a proper communication between the human and the robot can be achieved. The aim of this paper is to identify and categorize technologies that can be used to enable such communication between a human and an industrial robot.

  • 73. Hansen, K. F.
    et al.
    Bresin, R.
    DJ scratching performance techniques: Analysis and synthesis2003In: Proc. Stockholm Music Acoustics Conference, 2003, Vol. 2, p. 693-696Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scratching is a popular way of making music, turning the DJ into a musician. Normally scratching is done using a vinyl record, a turntable and a mixer. Vinyl manipulation is built up by a number of specialized techniques that have been analysed in a previous study. The present study has two main objectives. First is to better understand and model turntable scratching as performed by DJs. Second is to design a gesture controller for physical sound models, i.e. models of friction sounds. We attached sensors to a DJ equipment set-up. Then a DJ was asked to perform typical scratch gestures both isolated and in a musical context, i.e. as in a real performance. He also was asked to play with different emotions: sad, angry, happy and fearful. A model of the techniques used by the DJ was built based on the analysis of the collected data. The implementation of the model has been done in pd. The Radio Baton, with specially adapted gesture controllers, has been used for controlling the model. The system has been played by professional DJs in concerts.

  • 74.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Analysis of a genuine scratch performance2004In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743, E-ISSN 1611-3349, Vol. 2915, p. 477-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The art form of manipulating vinyl records done by disc jockeys (DJs) is called scratching, and has become very popular since its start in the seventies. Since then turntables are commonly used as expressive musical instruments in several musical genres. This phenomenon has had a serious impact on the instrument-making industry, as the sales of turntables and related equipment have boosted. Despite of this, the acoustics of scratching has been barely studied until now. In this paper, we illustrate the complexity of scratching by measuring the gestures of one DJ during a performance. The analysis of these measurements is important to consider in the design of a scratch model.

  • 75.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Mapping strategies in DJ scratching2006In: Proc. of the Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression, IRCAM , 2006, p. 188-191Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For 30 years Disc Jockeys have been expressing their musical ideas with scratching. Unlike many other popular instruments, the equipment used for scratching is not built as one single unit, and it was not intended to be a musical instrument. This paper gives an overview of how DJs use their turntable, vinyl record and audio mixer in junction to produce scratch music. Their gestural input to the instrument is explained by looking at the mapping principles between the controller parameters and the audio output parameters. Implications are discussed for the design of new interfaces with examples of recent innovations and experiments in the field.

  • 76.
    Hasan, Baha
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Wikander, Jan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Onori, Mauro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Ontological Approach to Share Product Design Semantics for an Assembly2016In: IC3K 2016 - Proceedings of the 8th International Joint Conference on Knowledge Discovery, Knowledge Engineering and Knowledge Management, SciTePress, 2016, p. 104-111Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to facilitate the transfer of product data semantics from Computer Aided Design (CAD) program to assembly process planning (APP) in product life-cycle. In this paper, an approach to capture, share and transfer assembly design semantic data from SolidWorks (SW) CAD software to assembly device (robot Sony SRX series) is proposed. The proposed approach is based, on its first stage, on defining and extracting assembly design semantics from a CAD model using SolidWorks Application Programmable Interface (SW-API). The second stage of the proposed approach includes sharing and integrating the extracted assembly design semantics with assembly robot device by using three-layer ontology structure. In this layered ontology, different types of ontologies are proposed for each layer: general foundation ontology for the first, domain ontologies for the second and application ontology for the third. Each of these layers aids in defining concepts, relations and properties in assembly design domain and APP domain. Ultimately, the proposed ontology will be used to integrate both domains in product-life cycle.

  • 77.
    Helms, Karey
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Leaky Objects: Implicit Information, Unintentional Communication2017In: DIS '17 Companion: Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference Companion Publication on Designing Interactive Systems, ACM Digital Library, 2017, p. 182-186Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces the concept of leaky objects to describe the phenomenon in which shared objects unintentionally reveal implicit information about individual or collective users. This leaking of implicit information changes our individual interactions with objects to through objects, enabling expressive communication and ambiguous speculation. The aim of this paper is raise awareness of this phenomenon through an ongoing autobiographical design probe in which remote interpersonal communication through a connected object is being explored, and raise questions regarding the potential implications for designers.

  • 78.
    Helms, Karey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Brown, Barry
    Stockholm University, DSV.
    Sahlgren, Magnus
    RISE SICS.
    Lampinen, Airi
    Stockholm University, DSV.
    Design Methods to Investigate User Experiences of Artificial Intelligence2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper engages with the challenges of designing "implicit interaction", systems (or system features) in which actions are not actively guided or chosen by users but instead come from inference driven system activity. We discuss the difficulty of designing for such systems and outline three Research through Design approaches we have engaged with - first, creating a design workbook for implicit interaction, second, a workshop on designing with data that subverted the usual relationship with data, and lastly, an exploration of how a computer science notion, “leaky abstraction”, could be in turn misinterpreted to imagine new system uses and activities. Together these design activities outline some inventive new ways of designing User Experiences of Artificial Intelligence. 

  • 79.
    Henriksson, Johannes
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Support systems for material handling in forklifts2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The world is becoming more and more globalized. The transportation and trading of goods across borders are becoming more frequent. All this is putting greater demands on companies dealing with material handling and distribution of supply. Material handling with forklifts is an area which is associated with risk of accidents.  Statistics from both the US and Europe shows that damages to material and personnel is frequent. A certain area that is in need of improvement is the handling of material on high storages. These storages can be as high as 15m. When stacking and picking pallets at those heights it is very hard for the driver to get a good view of the pallet and handle the material in a safe way. There are several support systems available on the market today, to aid drivers with handling material on these heights. The question to be answered in this thesis is, how good are these systems and what systems should be recommended to users of forklifts?

    By the use of a literature study, where both available products on the forklift market as well as support systems from other markets were studied I got a good overview of available technologies. Using this information and methods for product design a number of technical concepts was generated. The concepts were limited to technologies that are available today. Because of that some technologies and concepts were overlooked. Most of the concepts consisted of a camera and a display used in different ways.

    A first evaluation of the concepts was made. Four concepts were chosen to be further evaluated. These four concepts were:

    1. Camera with guide lines
    2. Camera without guide lines
    3. Fork tip camera with guide lines
    4. No Camera. (benchmark)

    The concepts were then evaluated, tested and graded using the five criteria: Time (productivity), Safety, physical ergonomics, Usability and Preferred concept.

    The results showed that the concept consisting of the by TMHE used fork camera (2 above) combined with a new display and guide lines was the best support system.

    The result is fairly reliable because of the many different evaluation techniques used and the fact they all point the same concept. The validity however should be investigated further during a more extensive field test.

  • 80.
    Hesselgren, Mia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Designing for sustainability practices: RE-DO Design Doings, Strategies and Postures2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Tackling current sustainability challenges requires substantial societal and social changes, and many different strategies for their deployment. More people have to choose sustainability practices, such as sustainable mobility practices, but such transitions are not easily accomplished. Everyday life is formed by, on the one hand, available systems of provision and, on the other hand, chosen lifestyles. Design can influence conditions for these systems and lifestyles, and thus enable more people to embrace sustainability practices. However, for this to happen, design practice in itself needs to be reformulated to include everyday practices as design material and address the associated dynamics and complexities.

    This thesis presents suggested reformulations of design as a practice through the RE-DO Design engagements. The suggested design approach is built on three research projects that staged interventions in sustainable mobility practices. Through practicebased design research, and with a design research program, possible reformulations of design practice to create favourable conditions for sustainability practices have been explored. RE-DO Design comprises design doings, strategies and postures, and involves iterative design work in four loops that respectively reconfigure, perform, explore and bridge sustainable proto-practices. Each iteration includes design strategies for these doings and enables opportunities for revisioning and learning in everyday life as well as for decision makers. To realise RE-DO Design, three design postures are suggested: Re-make, Re-value and Re-learn. With these reformulations of design, conditions for sustainability practices can be influenced and designed.

    The thesis discusses RE-DO Design, with the mobility interventions as a basis and with a focus on the three design postures Re-make, Re-value and Re-learn. The aim is to contribute to developing and reformulating design as a practice in order for it to play an important part in sustainability transitions.

  • 81.
    Heyman, Susanna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Visualizing Financial Futures2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on financial decision aids, systems designed to help people make financial decisions, is sparse. Previous research has often focused on the theoretical soundness of the advice that the systems provide.The original contribution of this doctoral thesis is a set of empirical studies of how non-expert people understand the advice provided by financial decision aids. Since every piece of advice must be interpreted by a receiver, the accuracy of the advice can be corrupted along the way if the receiver does not understand complicated terminology, probabilistic reasoning, or abstract concepts.The design concept resulting from the studies visualizes a unique combination of short-term and long-term variables that are usually treated as separate and not interacting with each other; loans and amortizations, insurance, retirement saving, and consumption. The aim is to visualize the consequences of different decisions and possible adverse events in terms of their effect on the user’s future consumption, rather than abstract numbers detached from the user’s lived experience.The design concept was tested and evaluated by personal finance experts and professional financial advisors, as well as students and people without financial education, who represented the target users of the system. Results indicate that the system has a learning curve, but that once users understand how to read the graph, they find it more informative than conventional financial planning tools.

  • 82. Hiraga, Rumi
    et al.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Speech Transmission and Music Acoustics.
    Hirata, Keiji
    Katayose, Haruhiro
    Rencon 2004: Turing Test for Musical Expression2004In: Proceedings of the 4th international conference on New interfaces for musical expression / [ed] Lyons, Michael J., Hamamatsu, Shizuoka, Japan: National University of Singapore , 2004, p. 120-123Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rencon is an annual international event that started in 2002.It has roles of (1) pursuing evaluation methods for systemswhose output includes subjective issues, and (2) providinga forum for researches of several fields related to musicalexpression. In the past, Rencon was held as a workshop associated with a musical contest that provided a forum forpresenting and discussing the latest research in automaticperformance rendering. This year we introduce new evaluation methods of performance expression to Rencon: a TuringTest and a Gnirut Test, which is a reverse Turing Test, forperformance expression. We have opened a section of thecontests to any instruments and genre of music, includingsynthesized human voices.

  • 83. Hiraga, Rumi
    et al.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Katayose, Haruhiro
    Rencon 20052006In: Proceeding of the 20th Annual Conference of the Japanese Society for Artficial Intelligence, 2006, p. 1D2-1Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contest for performance rendering systems, Rencon, was held concurrently with the panel session entitled "Software Tools for Expressive Music Performance" in International Computer Music Conference (ICMC) 2005. In this paper, we describe the contest and the panel session. The contest consisted of the compulsory section where Mozart's Minuette KV 1 (1e) was the compulsory music. The contest winner was decided according to the voting prior to the panel session. Five panelists in the panel session introduced Rencon and research on expressive music performance. The panel session was exciting by the active discussion with the full audiences.

  • 84. Hodge, J.
    et al.
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hastings, S.
    Morrissey, K.
    Exploring the design of tailored virtual reality experiences for people with dementia2018In: CHI '18 Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, Vol. 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite indications that recreational virtual reality (VR) experiences could be beneficial for people with dementia, this area remains unexplored in contrast to the body of work on neurological rehabilitation through VR in dementia. With recreational VR applications coming to the market for dementia, we must consider how VR experiences for people with dementia can be sensitively designed to provide comfortable and enriching experiences. Working with seven participants from a local dementia care charity, we outline some of the opportunities and challenges inherent to the design and use of VR experiences with people with dementia and their carers through an inductive thematic analysis. We also provide a series of future directions for work in VR and dementia: 1) careful physical design, 2) making room for sharing, 3) utilizing all senses, 4) personalization, and 5) positioning the person with dementia as an active participant.

  • 85.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ståhl, A.
    Jonsson, Martin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Mercurio, J.
    Karlsson, A.
    Johnson, E. -CB.
    Somaesthetic design2015In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 26-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Somaesthetics is an interdisciplinary field, originally proposed by the philosopher Richard Shusterman and grounded in pragmatist philosophy and phenomenology. An interesting result of engaging in Feldenkrais exercises was the effect on the whole beings. After a lesson, all students felt they had become more honest, more grounded in themselves, more reflective, and a bit slower in their movements and reactions. When bringing out three designs, researchers repeatedly had to try different digital and physical materials, faking interactions and testing them in situ to find the ones that would make sense. The interactions had to be simulated and acted out in order for them to really feel their impact on their bodily experiences. Simply imagining what they would be like was not enough to qualify the experience.

  • 86.
    Inden, Benjamin
    et al.
    Bielefeld University.
    Malisz, Zofia
    Bielefeld University.
    Wagner, Petra
    Bielefeld University.
    Wachsmuth, Ipke
    Bielefeld University.
    Micro-timing of backchannels in human-robot interaction2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 87. Inden, Benjamin
    et al.
    Malisz, Zofia
    Wagner, Petra
    Wachsmuth, Ipke
    Rapid entrainment to spontaneous speech: A comparison of oscillator models2012In: Proceedings of the 34th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society, 2012, p. 1721-1726Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 88. Jaldemark, Jimmy
    et al.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning. Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Anders D.
    Öberg, Lena-Maria
    Editorial introduction: Collaborative learning enhanced by mobile technologies2018In: British Journal of Educational Technology, ISSN 0007-1013, E-ISSN 1467-8535, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 201-206Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 89.
    Jap, Lilian
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Mapping detected periodic dance movements to control tempo in the music playback of Electronic Dance Music2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Engaging in the music set of one’s favorite artist or DJ is oftentimes leading to the result of a powerful and euphoric felt experience, a sensation partly also induced from dancing in beat to the music. In an attempt to simulate a similar dance experience, this user-study examines when a user is let to dance in rhythm to a music playback and in addition, in control of a music playback tempo through the generated dance movements. A proof-of-concept prototype was built and tested in an initial study, followed by a main study where the prototype had been modified and 12 participants participated. A questionnaire was given containing various question statements to be rated through a Likert-scale regarding their subjective experience. Open-ended questions were also included to collect their own opinions. From the results, an enhanced engagement and enjoyment of the music could be identified when being able to manipulate the tempo. 

  • 90. Jenkins, T.
    et al.
    Helms, Karey
    KTH.
    Tsaknaki, Vasiliki
    KTH.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH.
    Hansen, N. B.
    Sociomateriality: Infrastructuring and appropriation of artifacts2018In: TEI 2018 - Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 724-727Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This Studio offers researchers and designers an opportunity to investigate and discuss prototypes and in-process projects from a perspective that expands beyond material aspects, to also cover social and cultural ones. Participants will bring a project, device, or platform, which will be discussed as sociomaterials that actively participate across multiple social and cultural contexts. This perspective, as well as the prototypes and projects brought by the participants, forms the core of the Studio, where conversation will emerge over several phases: from the demonstration of the individual projects as things, to the generation of speculative fictions as to the role and use of these artifacts in the world. Finally, we end with a discussion of infrastructuring and appropriation of the artefacts and their social roles. The themes that will be examined in this Studio are agency, emerging behaviors, embeddedness and design strategies from a sociomaterial perspective of artifacts.

  • 91.
    Johansson, Stefan
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Design for Participation and Inclusion will Follow: Disabled People and the Digital Society2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitalization is rapidly taking over all aspects of society, but still there are parts of the population who have to struggle for access to, and to be able to use, the digital resources. Design processes and outcomes in the form of artefacts, that takes accessibility into account, is key to participation. This gives the designer a central role in providing for a more equal participation of all, in the digital society. The work in this thesis contributes to a better understanding of the prerequisites for participation in the digital society, and in the design processes to accomplish this, by presenting research done together with three communities: people with cognitive impairments, people with mental health issues and homeless people.

    The overall question has been How can participation in the digital society be understood? We have investigated the nature of difficulties or enabling factors for people with impairments, people with mental health issues and homeless people, when using the internet. We have also investigated possible digital divides within the groups, and how they can be explained.

    Ontologically, the work is based on an assumption that knowledge is to be found in a dialectic interplay between the material world and how we interpret what is going on in this world. The underlying epistemological assumption is that data has to be empiric, and critically interpreted in dialogue between members of the communities, which are being researched, and other stakeholders. This work draws on the idea of emancipation and that research can be liberating.

    The work also takes on a pragmatic stance. We have used adapted versions of Emancipatory Participatory Research, and of Participatory and Value Sensitive Design, thus making them accessible to people with cognitive impairments, people with mental health issues or homeless people. We have tested and adapted methods for sampling of rare populations, to enhance the quality of quantitative studies of how people with impairments and people with mental health issues have access to, and are using, the internet.

    In our research, we have found fourteen prerequisites, all of which need to be in place to provide for participation. To promote participation, we need a toolbox of methods and accessible tools. Finally, to analyse what is going on we need an analytical model which allows for analysis on multiple levels and from multiple perspectives.

    As a result, I here propose, define and position a framework for researching and understanding participation in the digital society, based on three parts: Guidelines, Ethics and Statistics. Guidelines can be understood as the theories, the regulations, the standards, etc. that inform our thinking. Ethics guide us in the right direction. Statistics make progress or lack of progress visible.

    The conclusion is: if we plan for participation - by improved statistic survey sampling methods, a participatory approach to collaborative research and in using research methods in an accessible and emancipatory way – inclusion will follow.

  • 92.
    Johansson, Stefan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. Funka Nu AB, Sweden.
    Towards a framework to understand mental and cognitive accessibility in a digital context2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This digitalization has in many ways contributed to greater inclusion but access to the digital community is not evenly distributed in the population, and we can see that groups of citizens do not feel involved in the transition to a digitalized society, or are not involved as much as they would actually like.

    The purpose of this thesis is to discuss how designers and developers to a greater extent can be able to take account of accessibility requirements for people with mental and cognitive impairments. The discussion is based on the study “Pilot study on accessibility of electronic communications for persons with mental disabilities”, literature reviews and my experience from almost 25 years of work in the field.

    The design and development processes I primarily want to highlight are those that produce digital products and services in what we call the mainstream.  Mainstream is the society in which we act as citizens have rights and duties, and where we should be able to realize our dreams, wishes and needs, where we find friends, family, education, livelihood and meaningfulness in the activities and the tasks we perform.

    The persons who participated in the study describe situations where:

    • Design and development processes often fail to meet the need for cognitive simplicity.
    • Many in themselves relatively simple functions, processes and activities can, used together create new and unknown difficulties.
    • Support processes malfunction.
    • Knowledge of user requirements is missing or does not reach out to the people and the processes where this knowledge would be useful.

    The people also describes that they are never involved in the design- and development processes, and that the knowledge and experience they possess is not being utilized.

    There is a need for a transfer of knowledge from the areas that produce knowledge today (rehabilitation, assistive technology, special solutions) to the mainstream. There is a need to explore and describe the knowledge and experience persons with mental and cognitive disabilities possesses. There is a need to work closely with persons who have mental and cognitive disabilities directly in mainstream-solutions in order to improve the digital society. Methods seem to be further developed on how to do this cooperation, in research, in innovation and in ordinary societal processes.

    The thesis presents a proposed framework for the design and development processes to be able to meet accessibility requirements for persons with mental and cognitive disabilities.

  • 93.
    Johansson, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Can Mainstream Smart Technology Support Homeless People Leaving Homelessness?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a work to create a user-informed practice on how to use smart technology as support for homeless people. The practice challenge traditional methods used by the Social Service Administration, hat may have become obsolete in a digitalized society

    The paper presents and reflects on the process from initial qualitative research, over pilot testing and implementation activities up to the presentation of an implementation-handbook. The paper also presents outcomes of interventions with smart technology conducted during the pilot and implementation phase. 36 of the participating 41 homeless people reported on significant functional improvements and 12 of those labelled them as life-changing improvements.

    The unique contribution in this paper that we have presented a result on homeless people using smart technology and that such technology can be used in areas where before more costly assistive technology had to be used. Contemporary mainstream devices; smartphones, smartwatches and smart pens together with an assemblage of applications supporting cognitive needs were tested and found useable to fulfil the needs for many homeless people. The cost for such intervention is low and homeless people report on important changes in life when using smart technology. The paper also contributes by describing the Social Service Administrations struggle to adopt to a situation where homeless people want to use digital tools in the interaction.

  • 94.
    Johansson, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Catharina, Gustavsson
    Center for Clinical Research Dalarna, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden Nissers vag 3, SE-79182 Falun, Sweden ; School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden Dalarna University, SE-79188 Falun, Sweden ; Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden BMC, Box 564, SE-751 22 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Disability Digital Divide: The Use of the Internet, Smartphones, Computers and Tablets among People with Disabilities in SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although Sweden is one of the most digitalized countries and the Swedish population’s use of the internet is among the most studied in the world, little is known about how Swedes with disabilities use internet.

    Purpose

    To describe use of and perceived difficulties in use of the internet among people with disabilities, and to explore digital divides in-between and within disability groups, and in comparison to the general population.

    Methods

    A cross-sectional survey targeting the same issues as other nationwide surveys but adapted for people with cognitive disabilities. Participants were recruited from May to October 2017 by adaptive snowball sampling. The survey comprised questions on access to and use of devices, and use of and perceived difficulties in use of internet.

    Results

    771 people responded to the survey, representing 35 diagnoses/impairments. Larger proportions of people with autism, ADHD and bipolar disorder reported using internet than other disability groups. Women with autism used the internet more than any other disability group, and women with aphasia used the internet the least. People with disabilities related to language and understanding reported more difficulties using internet than other disability groups. Larger proportions of participants than the general Swedish population, reported not feeling digitally included. In many but not all disability groups larger proportions of men than women reported not feeling digitally included.

    Conclusions

    Our findings show that there are differences in digital inclusion between sub-groups of diagnoses/impairments. Thus, disability digital divides are preferably investigated by sub-grouping disabilities, rather than studied as one homogeneous group.

  • 95.
    Johansson, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Catharina, Gustavsson
    Center for Clinical Research Dalarna, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden Nissers vag 3, SE-79182 Falun, Sweden ; School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden Dalarna University, SE-79188 Falun, Sweden ; Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden BMC, Box 564, SE-751 22 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Survey methods that enhance participation among people with disabilitiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Rare populations, such as people with disabilities, have been poorly represented in surveys. Research has shown that common probability sampling methods for recruitment of participants to surveys often fail to include people with disabilities. Also, that using one single “disability status” as proxy for all conditions that cause disability, restrains disaggregation into disability sub-groups.

    Purpose

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of an adaptive snowball sampling method for recruitment of participants with disabilities and of data collection in a survey entailing thoroughly elaborated survey questions in regard to accessibility, and to describe effects on response rates and the samples’ representativeness of the entire disability populations.

    Methods

    A survey mirroring concept was used to compare a nationwide survey on internet use which applied probability sampling method, with a modified survey applying adaptive snowball sampling of people with disabilities. Questions from the mirrored survey was elaborated to increase accessibility for the target populations. Multiple channels for data collection: online, paper and telephone or face-to-face interview, were used.

    Results

    In total 771 persons participated, representing all 35 target populations. A majority responded by the online questionnaire and 57 responded by interviews. Missing response to single questions was 2.5– 6%.

    Conclusions

    Adaptive snowball sampling method was feasible to reach people with a wide range of disabilities. A modified survey targeting accessibility issues was feasible to enable participation by all target populations. The survey mirroring concept and adaptive sampling methods are suggested favourable to achieve representation of disability populations in surveys.

  • 96.
    Johansson, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lantz, Ann
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    User participation when users have mental and cognitive disabilities2015In: SSETS 2015 - Proceedings of the 17th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility, ACM Digital Library, 2015, p. 69-76Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Persons with cognitive or mental disabilities have difficulties participating in or are excluded from IT development and assessments exercises due to the problems finding good ways to efficiently collaborate on equal terms. In this paper we describe how we worked closely together with persons that have mental and cognitive disabilities in order to test and develop methods for participation in assessments and in processes for developing, Information and Communication Technology (ICT) products and services. More than 100 persons with mental and cognitive disabilities participated in the study (people with diagnoses such as depression, anxiety disorder, bipolarity, and schizophrenia). To explore the conditions for a more equal and fair participation we have developed and elaborated a set of methods, tools and approaches. By combining scientific research methods with well-established methods for empowerment and participation we have developed methods that are cost effective and that easily can be incorporated in existing processes. We believe that our approach have taken steps to implement possibilities for persons with mental and cognitive disabilities to take part where user participation is needed in order not to discriminate or exclude but also to improve the overall quality of the end result. The results clearly show that it is possible to include persons with mental and cognitive disabilities. A mixed method -- mixed tool approach can increase the possibility for participation. The results also show that the quality of the analysis phase increases if the collaborative approach is extended to also embrace the data analysis phase.

  • 97. Jonsson, M.
    et al.
    Ståhl, A.
    Mercurio, J.
    Karlsson, A.
    Ramani, N.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    The aesthetics of heat: Guiding awareness with thermal stimuli2016In: TEI 2016 - Proceedings of the 10th Anniversary Conference on Tangible Embedded and Embodied Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, p. 109-117Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we discuss the design process and results from a design exploration on the use of thermal stimuli in body awareness exercises. A user-study was performed on an interactive prototype in the form of an interactive heat mat. The paper brings forth an alternative understanding of heat as a design material that extends the common understanding of thermal stimuli in HCI as a communication modality to instead bring the aesthetic and experiential properties to the fore. Findings account for felt body experiences of thermal stimuli and a number of design qualities related to heat as a design material are formulated, pointing to experiential qualities concerning the felt body, subjectivity and subtleness as well as material qualities concerning materiality, inertia and heat transfer.

  • 98.
    Juul Sondergaard, Marie Louise
    Dept of Digital Design and Information Studies, School of Communication and Culture, Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Intimate Design: Designing Intimacy As a Critical-Feminist Practice2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM Publications, 2017, Vol. F127655, p. 320-325Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intimate aspects of everyday life are increasingly being connected to and interacted with through digital technologies; this impacts the ways of being in the world and how bodies come to matter. From an interdisciplinary perspective at the intersections of feminist HCI, art, and interaction design I examine how design can reflect on and critically discuss political and cultural issues of intimate technologies, such as gender and identity, embodied experiences, privacy, intimate data and sharing. In presenting my PhD project's background, research objectives, hypothesis and methodological approach, as well as its current and future state and research contributions, I discuss how it is possible to research design of intimate technologies from a critical-feminist perspective.

  • 99.
    Juul Sondergaard, Marie Louise
    Aarhus univ..
    Staying with the Trouble through Design: Critical-feminist Design of Intimate Technology2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 100.
    Juul Sondergaard, Marie Louise
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Hansen, Lone Koefoed
    Aarhus University.
    "It's not that it will kill me": Living with electromagnetic hypersensitivity2017In: Nordes 2017; Design + Power, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the future visions of Internet of Things are slowly being implemented, the wireless and networked infrastructures that enable these connections already intervene and matter in people’s everyday lives in powerful ways. In this paper, we present a case study of a woman living with electromagnetic hypersensitivity; the heightened sensitivity of electromagnetic fields. We describe how her daily activities and everyday habits are both enabled and constrained by digital technologies. Through this narrative, we reflect on how this case has impact for design research regarding how the objects we design matter in people’s everyday life in unpredictable and uncomfortable ways - also those that are not wirelessly connected.

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