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  • 51.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Macintyre, Mairi
    Parry, Glenn
    Discretion and complexity in customer focused environments2012In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 466-472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Operations have traditionally focused on reductive analysis; transactional processes open to mass-customisation and standardisation. This study proposes that service complexity created by extensive ‘reasonable’ customer demand limits the ability to standardise and manage systems through mass-customisation. Beyond mass-customisation we propose management is by discretion. Discretion is difficult, if not impossible to codify, so operations are ‘managed’ via framework principles that also are difficult to replicate and provide a source of sustainable competitive advantage. The study furthers the servitisation discussion through a public sector services case.

  • 52.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    Warwick Business School.
    Parry, Glenn
    Macintyre, Mairi
    Discretion and complexity in customer focused environments2011In: Proceedings of the Service Alliance Complex Service Systems Conference, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    Warwick Business School.
    Pinheiro de Lima, Edson
    Shifting from production to service to experienced-based operations2011In: Service Design and Delivery: Research and Innovations in the Service Economy / [ed] Perry, G., Macintyre, M. and Angelis, J., London: Springer London, 2011, p. 83-94Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter covers the shift in focus of value added business operations from ­production to services, and in turn, to experience-based operations where customer involvement itself becomes part of the offering. The shift has significant implications for how businesses are managed. The greater service focus affects the firm’s unique value proposition, which necessitates considerations on strategy, supplier relations, post-sale offerings and so on. Meanwhile, the inclusion of customer ­experiences affect the way operations are designed and employed so that these are structurally systematically captured and capitalised.

  • 54.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    Warwick Business School.
    Pinheiro de Lima, Edson
    Siraliova, Jelena
    Servitised experiences: Business and management implications2010In: Issues of Business and Law, ISSN 2029-1094, Vol. 2, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores business and management implications of the increased emphasis placed on experiences in a servitised context. Customer experience becomes an integral part of the offering, which necessitates greater end-user access to the value chain and emphasises their involvement in the offering. The two research questions on such a servitisation trend and management implications are investigated conceptually, supported by industry examples. The results indicate that operations need to be designed with customer perception and experience in mind, with corresponding performance measures and management. The split between front- and back office becomes less distinct, with greater customer involvement throughout the supply chain and life cycles stages. Relevant components that impact the experiences must be incorporated deliberately and from the outset, and controlling for error through reduced discretion becomes a priority.

  • 55.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    Warwick Business School.
    Thompson, Mark
    Product and service complexity and high performance work practices in the aerospace industry2007In: Journal of Industrial Relations, ISSN 0022-1856, E-ISSN 1472-9296, Vol. 49, no 5, p. 775-781Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Offering products or services with high specification and complexity is often used as a competitive business strategy for organizations that cannot compete on cost. Theories on high performance work practices suggest that the combination of high employee involvement and aligned human resources and industrial relations allows firms to achieve higher performance. This study explores the adoption of such work practices in the UK aerospace industry. The results are based on responses from 225 firms across the value chain, ranging from service providers and systems integrators to component and material suppliers. The study identifies relevant work practices at each level of product and service complexity and discusses the varying needs firms have depending on their product offerings, and the implications on their work practices.

  • 56.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    University of Oxford.
    Thompson, Mark
    Product and service complexity and high performing aerospace organizations2005In: Proceedings of the 16th Annual Production and Operations Management Society Conference, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Offering products or services with high specification and complexity is often used as a competitive business strategy for organizations that cannot compete on cost. Theories on high performance work practices suggest that the combination of high employee involvement and aligned human resources and industrial relations allows firms to achieve higher performance. This study explores the adoption of such work practices in the UK aerospace industry. The results are based on responses from 225 firms across the value chain, ranging from service providers and systems integrators to component and material suppliers. The study identifies relevant work practices at each level of product and service complexity and discusses the varying needs firms have depending on their product offerings, and the implications on their work practices.

  • 57.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    University of Oxford.
    Thompson, Mark
    Taking the high road: Product specificity and high performance work organizations2005In: Proceedings of the Annual British Academy of Management Conference 2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 58.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    Warwick Business School.
    Watt, Cameron
    Macintyre, Mairi
    Customer value and lean operations in self care2008In: Proceedings of the 19th Annual Production and Operations Management Society Conference, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 59.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    Warwick Business School.
    Watt, Cameron
    Macintyre, Mairi
    Customer value and lean operations in self care2008In: Proceedings of the 15th Annual European Operations Management Association Conference, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 60.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    Warwick Business School.
    Watt, Cameron
    Macintyre, Mairi
    Customer value and lean operations in self care2008In: Proceedings of the 3rd World Conference on Production and Operations Management, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    Warwick Business School.
    Watt, Cameron
    Macintyre, Mairi
    Information systems and the pursuit of patient value in the care chain2009In: Integrating Healthcare with Information and Communication Technology / [ed] Finnegan, D. and Currie, W., Oxford: Radcliffe Publishing, 2009, p. 255-266Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    Warwick Business School.
    Watt, Cameron
    Macintyre, Mairi
    Tis a Far Place2008In: Proceedings of the 15th Annual European Operations Management Association Conference, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 63.
    Aniander, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Blomgren, Henrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Business Development and Entrepreneurship.
    On the Production Concept1997Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Aniander, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Blomgren, Henrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Business Development and Entrepreneurship.
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Gessler, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Gramenius, Jakob
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Karlson, Bok
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Lagergren, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Storm, Pär
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Westin, Paul
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Industriell Ekonomi: Faktabok1998Book (Other academic)
  • 65. Annosi, M. C.
    et al.
    Giustiniano, L.
    Brunetta, F.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.). LUISS School of Business and Management, Italy.
    The emergence of new organization designs. Evidences from self-managed team-based organizations2017In: Learning and Innovation in Hybrid Organizations: Strategic and Organizational Insights, Springer International Publishing , 2017, p. 255-268Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New organization designs emerge continuously in highly dynamic innovation context to improve readiness to change. The adoption of self-managing teams operating cross-functionally on a bulk of products, together with the reduction of vertical layers in the organization, seems to be a common strategy for many organizations aiming to achieve higher level of efficacy and shorter lead times. Authors explore the extent to which new micro-and meso-level organizational forms contribute to the achievement of organizational efficiency, and produce secondary effects on long-term innovation goals.

  • 66. Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    Foss, Nicolai
    Brunetta, Federica
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The Interaction of Control Systems and Stakeholder Networks in Shaping the Identities of Self-Managed Teams2017In: Organization Studies, ISSN 0170-8406, E-ISSN 1741-3044, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 619-645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Team identity has received little research attention even though an increasing number of firms are moving to team-based organizations and there is evidence that teams form identities. We explore the extent to which team identity can be institutionalized as a central organizing principle of team-based firms. We argue that managerial and stakeholder interventions shape the self-construction of team identity as well as the team's commitment to specific work objectives. We also suggest that team identity becomes isomorphic to organizational identity because of pressures related to: (1) the presence of a dense network of managers and stakeholders, which orients teams towards a focus on certain aspects of the higher-order identity; (2) the use of team routines and regular feedback loops, which force alignment with the organizational identity; and (3) the use of coordinating roles aimed at promoting, ratifying and reinforcing the convergence of identity within the team. We analyse multiple cases from a major multinational corporation in the telecommunications industry, which we examine through the lens of a multi-level model of controls involving the micro, meso and macro organizational levels. We expand and refine the model in the process.

  • 67.
    Anop, Sviatlana
    Polotsk State University, Novopolotsk, Belarus.
    Анализ хозяйственной деятельности: Учеб.-метод. комплекс для студ. спец. 25 01 07, 25 01 04 Полоцкий Государственный Университет, Новополоцк, Республика Беларусь /Analysis of the economic activity: Study manual for students with specialization 25 01 07, 25 01 04. 2nd ed. Polotsk State University, Novopolotsk, Belarus2005Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [ru]

    Приведены темы изучаемого курса, изложены теоретические и практические основы анализа хозяйственной деятельности промышленных предприятий и в основных отраслях экономики. Представлены задания для практических занятий, рекомендации по организации рейтингового контроля изучения дисциплины, вопросы к экзамену, тест для проведения зачета, контрольные работы по курсу, тематика курсовых работ.

  • 68.
    Anop, Sviatlana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management.
    Aldaghi, Shaghayegh
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Applied Mechanical Engineering (KTH Södertälje).
    MANAGEMENT OF COMMUNICATION RISKS: EVIDENCEFROM INTERNATIONAL PROJECTS CASE STUDY2010In: International conference proceedings PM-05 -  Advancing project management for the 21st century “Concepts, tools & techniques for managing successful projects”,  Heraklion, Crete, Greece., 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The realization of project requires collaboration between many different participants.  The majority of interactions happen on the project management team level. The general believe is that teams/groups can achieve more efficiency if they use effective instruments of risk management in their communication process. The aim of this study is to investigate how the level of communication risks varies between different project group development stages and how project manager can help project group to reach the maximum effectiveness of communication. The study analyzes different communication barriers that project group meets while working at project. The investigation was performed by using qualitative analysis method in four different projects of an engineering and consulting company involved with mining industries in South Africa. Interpersonal relationships were measured by FIRO model and communication risks were evaluated by a typical risk analysis method. Results of investigations show that communication risks are directly affected by the stage of group development and different factors of group development tend to synchronize with each other. The total amount of risks tends to decrease as group moves from one stage to another on the FIRO model. For improving communication process in project groups the dynamic nature of FIRO model should be considered. The risks will not be settled down unless the group stands in “Openness” stage and the group development stage is vulnerable to any changes; the environmental effects should be carefully followed for preventive action.

  • 69.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab). KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Barriers to further commercialization of NFC pilots in Western Europe2013In: The Second International Cashless Society Roundtable (ICSR) / [ed] Fergal Carton and Jonas Hedman, 2013, p. 39-41Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A mobile payment can be performed in various ways. For example, the Near Field Technology (NFC) integrated with mobile devices provides an opportunity of a contactless mobile payment. However, it is not only payment. The NFC can further expand functionality of mobile phones and enrich consumer experience. Indeed, added value services created by the NFC include mobile ticketing, loyalty applications, smart advertisement, informational service, physical and logical access, and other functionalities.

    However, despite NFC potential to create added value we cannot witness its wide penetration and global spread unless some successful solutions are implemented on a national level. The research aims to define the barriers preventing NFC pilots from entering commercialization stage in Western Europe. Commercialization of NFC mobile solutions needs to overcome a range of barriers and obstacles predefined by macro- and micro-environmental conditions, and individual factors related to consumers, which are analized in this research.

  • 70.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab). KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Challenges Related to the Introduction of Innovative Services in the Market: Mobile Payment Services in the Swedish Retail Industry2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile payment services are expected to be the next step of the electronic payment evolution. However, the level of penetration in European countries is lower than expected. The focus of most academic research has been in two main areas: (i) mobile payment adoption by consumers and (ii) technical aspects of the service. Consequently, a number of themes remain under-researched. In order to expand knowledge on reasons that affect the wider penetration of mobile payments, challenges related to the introduction of mobile payment services in the market have been explored in this thesis.

    More specifically, this research has addressed two problem areas: (i) why mobile payments have not been widely adopted by merchants; and (ii) what effects that the introduction of mobile payments has had on the business networks of the involved actors. As an example, we use the mobile payment services applied in the Swedish retail industry. The study is focused on the main groups of stakeholders – the mobile payment providers, the retailers, and the consumers.

    First, this study has helped to identify what different stakeholders expect of mobile payments and how these services correspond to their needs. In order to analyse the expectations of stakeholders, we have developed an analysis framework based on the theory of diffusion of innovations, the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), and the theory of network externalities. The analysis highlights the expectations of stakeholders and helps to understand what kind of mobile payment service merchants expect and are willing to adopt. One key finding is that existing mobile payment services for retailing could be further improved in order to ensure an enhanced purchasing process for consumers.

    Second, the research has explored the impact of mobile payment services on the business networks. In order to analyse the relationships and cooperation between business actors, and changes in business strategy and network structure, we used the approach proposed by the Industrial Marketing and Purchasing (IMP) Group. The performed analysis illustrates the following changes in the structure of business networks for the traditional payment solutions (bank cards): (i) emergence of new business actors (i.e. independent mobile payment providers); (ii) new roles and activities of business actors; and (iii) exclusion of traditional business actors (i.e. banks) from the mobile payment systems.

    All these changes lead to increased complexity of relationships and increased level of interdependence between business actors within the networks. The following changes in the strategies of involved actors have been identified: (i) mobile payment providers seek to achieve a control over the business network; (ii) the retailers affect strategies of the mobile payment providers; (iii) the marketing strategies of business actors include cross-marketing in different sectors. All these changes result in additional value and enhanced quality of service for consumers.

    In order to analyse a complex and multidisciplinary area such as mobile payments, it is beneficial to use more than one analysis approach. A combination of different complementing methods helps to explore different aspects of the phenomenon and provides a more comprehensive overview of several research aspects.

    This work contributes to the academic research of mobile payment service adoption by merchants through proposing a theoretical analysis framework. More specifically, the research addresses a new area – expectations of retailers when new solutions are introduced. The framework consists of the following criteria and aspects: technological feasibility, economic benefits, lower service costs, added value of services, network externalities and the problem of critical mass, and finally, ease of use. This framework helps to identify what merchants can expect of mobile payment services.

    Another area of contribution is the analysis of the effect that mobile payments make on the actors and business networks of traditional payment services. The introduction of new services results in emergence of new business actors, a need to establish new relationships, and increased complexity of a business network. Moreover, in order to succeed, cooperation between all network actors is needed. As a result, business actors have to adjust their services and strategies according to needs of others.

  • 71.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab). KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Factors Influencing the Slow Rate of Penetration of NFC Mobile Payment in Western Europe2013In: the 12th International Conference on Mobile Business (ICMB2013), Berlin, Germany, June 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The NFC technology implemented on the base of contemporary mobile handsets can provide considerable benefits to end-users. However, despite high level of diffusion of mobile phones in Western Europe, the level of penetration of the NFC based mobile payment is low. A considerable number of trials have been initiated, however, large scale deployment of commercial NFC services cannot be seen. This paper identifies and analyzes different factors that influence the slow rate of penetration of NFC based mobile payment in Western Europe.

    This paper presents a qualitative study based on experience of six NFC pilots implemented in Finland, France, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, and the UK. The research findings confirm that a number of demand and supply barriers negatively affect the rate of the penetration of the NFC payment. The network externalities and the lack of consumer awareness about NFC services were identified as the most important demand side barriers. The most significant supply side barriers are the lack of uniform technological standards, the lack of NFC enabled mobile phones, and the coopetition issue. In addition, the interrelation between mentioned obstacles was identified. This fact means that a delay in the NFC payment’s diffusion is affected not by a single factor, but rather by a set of interrelated factors. The sources of these obstacles are related to the consumer acceptance, the specifics of business environment, and the technology.

  • 72.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab). KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Mobile Payments: Main Trends in the Retail Industry2014In: 25th European Regional Conference of the International Telecommunications Society (ITS), Brussels, Belgium, June 22 - 25, 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective of the ongoing study is to investigate obstacles ans driving forces affecting organization adoption of innovation. In order to that an example of the mobile payments applied in the Swedish retail industry has been used. The main analyzed factors are: adopter characteristics, supplier marketing activity, perceived innovation dcharacteristics, social network, and environmental influences.

    The analysis of case study findings helped to estimate some common trends in the adoption of mobile payment services by retailers. As a result, the analyzed factors were categorized as obstacles or driving forces to adoption of the mobile payments.

  • 73.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab). KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Obstacles to investments in mobile payments: The perspective of merchants: Work in progress2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective of the ongoing research is to investigate obstacles and driving forces affecting merchants’ decision to invest in mobile payment solutions. The core aim of this paper is to present initial results of a desktop analysis revealing the current market situation, identifying main players, and estimating the structure of investment costs. In order to do that available secondary information was analyzed.

    The conducted analysis served to identify market fragmentation existing in the Swedish market due to existence of a number of competing mobile payment solutions. Another finding allows making conclusion, that retailers select to adopt already existing solutions, rather than developing own. Finally, the size of an organization and financial resources are important when making a decision to invest in a new payment solution.

  • 74.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Opportunities and challenges of mobile payment services: The perspective of service providers2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

     Mobile payments are transforming the payments industry. These services open up the opportunity for non-banking actors to enter the market. In order to embrace this challenge, banks, traditional payments market players, are forced to launch mobile payments. However, in Europe and most developed economies, a big number of launched services get terminated soon after their introduction in the market. Hence, the ability of different actors to act locally calls for additional research.

    The main objective of this thesis is to broaden knowledge and understanding about the ways mobile payment service providers address the opportunities and challenges of mobile payment services. In order to investigate this problem, this research (i) explores factors stimulating and hindering the introduction of mobile payments using perspectives of different types of service providers (i.e., banks, independent providers, direct operator billing providers, retailers, and public transport companies) and (ii) seeks to explain the importance of these factors for each type of provider.

    The primary data collected using interview method. More than 40 industry representatives in six countries were contacted. The Service, Technology, Organisation, and Finance (STOF) model was used as a theoretical research framework. This is a business modelling framework that specifies a set of critical design issues that have to  be considered within each model’s domain.

    Research findings highlight that the organisation domain is the key domain, which  affects all other domains and has an impact on the general viability of the business model. A comparison of the approaches used by different service providers to address each of the critical design issues helped to identify the factors that are most important within each domain. These factors stimulate or hinder development of a viable business model within each category of service providers.

    This research contributes to a better understanding of challenges and success factors associated with the design of business models for new mobile services and uses the lens of the STOF model. The contributions to the academic research on mobile payments are: (i) collection and analysis of a rich empirical data set on mobile payment services implemented in six Northern European countries, (ii) discussion of a bigger picture by connecting research findings to the context of the existing payment system, (iii) extension  of knowledge on business models for mobile ticketing, and (iv) extension of knowledge on the value of mobile ticketing services in the business-to-business (B2B) context.

  • 75.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab). KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Organizational Acceptance of Mobile Payments2014In: 30th annual International Marketing and Purchasing Conference (IMP 2014), Bordeaux, France, September 4-5, 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 76.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Primary data collection: Approaches of service providers towards mobile payments2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile payments are new services enabled by evolution of information and communication technologies. These services can be provided by different types of actors both banks and non-banks. The understanding of capabilities and limitations of different service providers to act in local markets requires further understanding. Implemented research seeks to extend knowledge in this area. I have implemented research focused on approaches used by different types of service providers including banks, independent providers, operator billing providers, retailers, and public transport companies in six Northern European countries.

    Exploratory part of the research aims to address the following research question: What factors stimulate and hinder the introduction of mobile payments? The main objective of this report is to present primary data collected during the research through interviews with contacted companies.

    The collected primary data is classified and organised using the STOF (Service, Technology, Organisation, and Finance) model. Evidence is presented in tables. This primary data is further used for explanatory study. At the same time, this data can be used by other researchers studying the same area. The collected data is reach in facts and presents the overview of different strategies. 

  • 77.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab). KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    The Effect of Innovation on Business Networks2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 78.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Arvidsson, Niklas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Markendahl, Jan
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab).
    Mobile payments: a proposal for a context-oriented approach based on socio-technical system theoryIn: Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 2183-0606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A recent review on mobile payment research by Dahlberg et al. (2015) concludes that there is a need to synthesise this research area by studying contexts in which innovation is done as well as to integrate different aspects of research. This article aims to provide a proposal for how to achieve such integration and context-orientation by building on previous studies as well as an additional review. Our systematic literature review of mobile payments research is focused on papers published during 2006–2016. The main objective is to examine how mobile payments research has been conducted from the methodological and theoretical perspectives. Our findings show that research on mobile payments is a multidisciplinary research. Three main themes, which are in line with previous studies, in research are: customer adoption, technological aspects, and business aspects. Moreover, research is mainly analytical based on deductive approach. To meet the challenge formulated in the previous research, we propose and apply a socio-technical system framework to achieve synthesis and context-specific consideration in future research on mobile payments.

  • 79.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Markendahl, Jan
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab).
    Mobile ticketing services in the Northern Europe: Critical business model issues2018In: Internet of Things Business Models, Users, and Networks, 2017 / [ed] Morten Falch, Copenhagen, Denmark: IEEE, 2018, p. 1-8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Started as SMS ticketing, today, mobile ticketing services become a platform for combined mobility solutions that integrate mobile ticketing, bike renting, car sharing, and parking payment services. Mobile ticketing services provide a number of benefits for public transport companies and passengers, however, in some Northern European countries, the share of mobile ticket sales does not exceed 10 percent. In this paper, we analyse business models of three types of mobile ticketing services (SMS, in-app, and “Be-In Be-Out” (BIBO)) in order to identify factors that negatively affect wider penetration of mobile ticketing. In order to do so, we use STOF (Service, Technology, Organisation, and Finance) model. The research reveals that there are a number of challenges related to service, technology, and finance domains of mobile ticketing. Due to this, with the help of price policy, many public transport companies push choices of their customers towards use of plastic travel card.

  • 80.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab). KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Markendahl, Jan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab).
    Stakeholder’s expectations: Mobile payments in retail in Sweden2014In: 13th International Conference on Mobile Business, 2014 (ICMB 2014), London, June 4-5, 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the main application areas of mobile payment services in Sweden is retailing. The main stakeholders involved in this service are mobile payment service providers, banks, merchants, and consumers. The main focus of this paper is on the change of expectations of different stakeholders taking part in service provisioning. Analysis has been performed by comparison of the initial expectations before the introduction of a mobile payment service and expectations after practical experience of the service usage. Three cases of mobile payment solutions for retailing have been investigated: BART provided by Swedbank, SEQR provided by Seamless, and a service provided by Payair.

    The analysis indicates that a number of expectations of stakeholders about mobile payment services did not come true. The results for the different cases differ but the main findings are: banks were excluded from direct service provisioning; merchants see some advantaged to deploy mobile payment, but are uncertain which solution will be a dominant in the market; consumer expectations of improved purchasing experience and usefulness are not met. The performed analysis also helps to identify some of the reasons that can be seen as obstacles for a wider penetration of mobile payment services.

  • 81.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab). KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Markendahl, Jan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab).
    The mobile payment in retail: Teaching case summary2013In: The 29th Annual IMP Conference (IMP2013) proceedings: Building and Managing Relationships in a Global Network: Challenges and Necessary Capabilities / [ed] Minna Rollins and Brian Rutherford, IMP Group, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The case is written for master level students from business, commerce, and technical areas having some background in strategic marketing and management. The work over case implies a group work and a discussion of a strategy behind taken decision.

    THE OBJECTIVES OF THE CASE

    The main objective of the case is to gain practical skills in and better understanding of decision making in the circumstances of market uncertainty. The decision making process requires analysis of company’s core competences (Collis and Montgomery, 2008), market forces (Porter, 1996; Porter, 2008), and understanding of consumer needs. Students should apply different analysis frameworks in order to develop a strategy improving company’s competitive advantage and leveraging opportunities provided by a new technology, namely a new mobile payment solution. In addition, a consumer-centered thinking should lead to a suggestion of a bundle of attractive added values services build on top of mobile payment solution.

  • 82.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Markendahl, Jan
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab).
    The value of mobile ticketing from a public transport perspective2018In: Journal of Payments Strategy & Systems, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 292-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the field of mobile payments, the market segment for mobile ticketing services is expected to grow, driven by the public transport sector. Although a large number of studies have explored the value of mobile payments to customers (ie service end users), there is a lack of research exploring the value of mobile payment and mobile ticketing for business customers (ie transport companies and retailers). This paper aims to address this gap and to explore the kinds of value that mobile ticketing services create for public transport companies. The research considers mobile ticketing services in six Northern European countries. The research findings suggest that within the business-to-business context, mobile ticketing services create multiple dimensions of value, namely enhanced technical functionality; financial value; better working environment; operational value; and reputational and customer relationship value. For passengers, meanwhile, value takes the form of convenience and service enhancement. These benefits are factors driving adoption of mobile ticketing and mobile payment services by public transport companies.

  • 83.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab). KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Markendahl, Jan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab).
    Arvidsson, Niklas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Entrepreneurship and innovation.
    An exploratory study of consumer attitudes towards mobile ticketing in Sweden2013In: 24th European Regional Conference of the International Telecommunications Society: Technology, Investment and Uncertainty, ITS , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish public transport organizations have set an objective to double usage of the public transport during the next coming five years. This study attempts to investigate if the current ticket solutions support the goal of the public transport companies, and if the available mobile phone solutions can lower barriers for consumers. In order to do that, critical travelling moments for users of different market segments were estimated during a pre-study stage. The following focus group discussions helped to validate problems identified during the pre-study. At the same time, focus groups provided deeper consumer insights on general consumer perception of the transport service, ticketing, mobile payment, quality of service, consumer expectations related to the public transport services, and consumer satisfaction and loyalty.

    The conducted research helped to identify problems existing in public transport ticketing and mobile payment areas, which have the negative impact on the usage of the public transport service and contribute with additional barriers for users. Moreover, this conclusion is supported by multiple examples that clearly illustrate what does not work, and why it does not work. Hence, mentioned solutions do not support the overall objective of the public transport operators. The comprehension of these problems and barriers can contribute to a better understanding of consumer needs and expectations, and help the public transport service providers to improve the service.

  • 84.
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab). KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Markendahl, Jan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab).
    Arvidsson, Niklas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Entrepreneurship and innovation.
    Stakeholder’s expectations: The case of mobile public transport ticketing in Sweden2014In: 13th International Conference on Mobile Business, 2014 (ICMB 2014), London, June 4-5, 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the main areas of mobile payment application in Sweden is mobile public transport ticketing. The main stakeholders involved in this service are mobile network operators, mobile payment service providers, SMS ticket’s “technology solution” providers, public transport companies, and consumers.

    Traditionally, mobile operators have had a strong position in this niche since the mobile phone bill or pre-paid subscriptions were used for end-user billing. Due to financial regulation, this situation was changed in February 2013 when new SMS payment solutions were introduced for all public transport companies in Sweden. A number of new actors entered the scene, and the position of existing actors changed dramatically. At the same time, the Swedish mobile operators formed a joint venture, 4T Sweden, offering a new mobile payment solution – WyWallet.

    The main focus of this paper is on the change of expectations of different stakeholders taking part in provisioning of SMS payment services. Analysis has been performed by comparison of the initial expectations before the introduction of the new SMS payment system and the real outcome in approximately half a year time. Analysis revealed the fact that expectations of a number of stakeholders about mobile payment services did not come true. Moreover, due to barriers set by the mobile payment solution, mobile payment transactions in public transportation is dramatically lower than what SMS payments were before the market changed.

  • 85.
    Arias Peregrina, Leticia Elizabeth
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    The Value Added by the Purchasing Department to the Organization2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The role of purchasing has been evolving during the last years, increasing its strategic importance inside the organization. Traditionally viewed as a supportive function impacting only the bottom-line of the company, the main performance indicators for purchasing were cost-reduction and savings. Nowadays, organizations recognize the importance of the value added generated in the purchasing processes and they are broadening their vision of purchasing as a strategic contributor of value in both economical and intangible aspects.

     

    One of the main intangible value contributions from the purchasing department (PD) of any company is the one provided to its internal customers; measured in the level of internal service quality and customer satisfaction. An adequate internal customer relationship management can translate into advantages for the PD, improving its strategic position in the organization, and in benefits for the company, increasing directly or indirectly its business performance.

     

    The purpose of this research study was to understand how the purchasing department can create value inside an organization, how that value is measured and how it can be increased; being the central focus on the internal customers of the department. This research work was conducted as a single case study performed in a multinational company from the telecommunication industry. Qualitative data was gathered through structured interviews, formal and informal meetings with personnel from the company and a survey to triangulate the information. The objective was to determine the most important value adding factors for the internal customers of the purchasing department and evaluate their satisfaction level.

     

    Two models for assessing the value contributed by the PD were the grounding for developing the tools used in the achievement of the objectives; one of them was based on the SERVQUAL model and the other one on the concept of meaningful involvement. Using inputs from both, a model for evaluating the value added to internal customer was proposed. In addition, the author identified improvement opportunities, related mainly with relationship management in the company and she suggested improvement measures accordingly. Finally, future courses of action were recommended, relating the value added concept with purchasing maturity models.

  • 86.
    Arvidsson, Niklas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics.
    DET KONTANTLÖSA SAMHÄLLET: RAPPORT FRÅN ETT FORSKNINGSPROJEKT2013Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 87.
    Arvidsson, Niklas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics (Closed 20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Entrepreneurship and innovation.
    The cashless society: Industrial dynamics influencing cash-based payment services2013In: Proceedings: Second International Cashless Society Roundtable (ICSR) / [ed] Fergal Carton and Jonas Hedman, 2013, p. 48-52Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 88.
    Arvidsson, Niklas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    The future of cash2018In: The Rise and Development of FinTech: Accounts of Disruption from Sweden and Beyond / [ed] R. Teigland, S. Siri, A. Larsson, A. Moreno Puertas & C. Ingram Bogusz, Routledge , 2018, 1, p. 85-98Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 89.
    Arvidsson, Niklas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Apanasevic, Tatjana
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT).
    Markendahl, Jal
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT).
    Mobile payments: A proposal for a context-oriented approach based on socio-technical theory2018In: Journal of Innovation Management, E-ISSN 2183-0606, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 40-97Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 90.
    Arvidsson, Niklas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Darmani, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Albors, Jose
    Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain).
    Technological Innovation System Drivers; Toward a Typology2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 91.
    Arvidsson, Niklas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Hedman, Jonas
    Segendorf, Björn
    När slutar svenska handlare acceptera kontanter?2018Report (Other academic)
  • 92.
    Arvidsson, Niklas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Jonsson, Sara
    Department of Finance, Business School, Stockholm University, Kista, Sweden.
    Snickare, Lotta
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Banking and Finance.
    The transaction-relationship paradox2019In: Managerial Finance, ISSN 0307-4358, E-ISSN 1758-7743, Vol. 45, no 9, p. 1253-1271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to apply a capability perspective to investigate the shift from relationship lending to transaction lending in a bank’s corporate segment. The authors investigate the impact of three operational capabilities: assisting corporate clients in funding and business operations, management of customer relationships and internal cooperation on performance in relationship and transaction lending. Design/methodology/approach: The primarily empirical material comprises longitudinal survey data, collected on three occasions during the period 1998 throughout 2001 from one of Sweden’s largest banks. Data are analyzed using factor analysis and OLS regression. Findings: Results show that the effects of the three capabilities are contingent on the type of lending strategy: In relationship lending, assisting corporate clients has no significant direct effect on performance; however, it has an indirect effect on performance via the management of customer relationships. In transaction lending, assisting corporate clients has a direct effect on performance, and this effect becomes stronger as the transaction strategy is further implemented. The results also show that the direct effect of the management of customer relationships and cooperation on performance is significant in both strategies; however, the relation is stronger in relationship lending compared with transaction lending. Originality/value: The findings indicate that the choice of lending strategy is more complex than a choice between a strict relationship strategy and a strict transaction strategy and that a strategy that leads to competitive advantage includes elements of both strategies.

  • 93.
    Arvidsson, Niklas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Mannervik, Ulf
    The innovation platform: enabling balance between growth and renewal2009Report (Other academic)
  • 94.
    Arvidsson, Niklas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Mannervik, Ulf
    Värdeskapande innovationsmiljöer2005Report (Other academic)
  • 95.
    Arvidsson, Niklas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Ramirez, Rafael
    University of Oxford.
    Aesthetics of business innovation: experiencing "internal process" versus "external jolts"2005In: Innovation: management, policy & practice, ISSN 1447-9338, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 373-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper summarizes findings of a research project on business innovation. It contrasts two forms of innovation - those of 'internal process' and 'external jolt'.

    We propose that their deployment depends on how managers responsible for business innovation in large firms feel about, and sense and make sense of innovation. The felt-sensed form of innovation that they find appealing or with which they are comfortable, makes a big difference on what type of innovation process is actually put in place, and is sometimes manifested in the actual business model.

    Our ambition is to highlight these so-called 'non-rational' aspects in innovation decision-making that, we propose, complement - and sometimes shape - rational analyses determining managerial efforts to innovate.

  • 96.
    Astbury, Marc
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Marketing and Entrepreneurship.
    Lux, Marius
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Marketing and Entrepreneurship.
    Foreign Market Entry Strategies: A Study of Born Global B2B SME’s2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The global market place is becoming ever more accessible. Internet and communication technologies are opening up new opportunities for firms of all configurations. Based on that, this research will focus on Born Global business-to-business (B2B small, medium enterprises (SME) entering in the German market. The aim is to answer the following two research questions: ‘What does a Born Global B2B SME’s internationalization process look like?’ and ‘Which adaptations should a Born Global B2B SME make to acquire customers in the German market?’ A review of internationalization literature, complemented by company participation and interviews furthers the body of academic research in this subject area.

    Qualitative research is applied through a company case study and primary interviews are conducted. A case study is employed to further understand and practically apply adaptations a firm can make to increase its chance of success in a foreign market environment, once internationalizing.

    The conclusions drawn that a Born Global B2B SME entering a foreign market should make adaptations in its online presence to cater to the new market. Specifically, language adaptations are required to the native tongue. This research concludes with both practical and theoretical suggestions. The key findings from the interviews show that the Born Global B2B SME’s studied have taken an ‘accidental’ internationalization process. 

  • 97. Ax, Christian
    et al.
    Johansson, Christer
    Kullvén, Håkan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Management Control.
    Den nya ekonomistyrningen2009 (ed. 4)Book (Other academic)
  • 98.
    Aydede, Cem
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Marketing and Entrepreneurship.
    Turkoglu, Tunca
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Marketing and Entrepreneurship.
    How to utilize a value-based pricing strategy in service contracts: A descriptive case study of how a Swedish pricing consultancy company optimizes pricing of services for its customers2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper’s aim is to analyze value-based pricing strategies in service contracts and how they help companies generate sustainable advantages. Scoop of the analysis will be service contracts in manufacturing industry. A service contract could be defined as an intangible value proposition that includes but not limited to maintaining client’s machines continuously for a negotiated amount of time.

    By working with a Swedish pricing consultancy firm Navetti AB, a descriptive research was conducted in an effort to answer the research question: “How to utilize a value-based pricing strategy in service contracts?”. By trying to answer this question, authors of this paper wanted to contribute to the developing framework of value-based pricing phenomena.

    Results of this study indicates that certain steps need to be followed by service providers in manufacturing industry in order to utilize a value-based pricing strategy. Obscure perceived value of customers need to be realized and their value drivers need to be extracted, quantified and analyzed.

    Findings of this study have implications both in theoretical and industrial perspective. From industrial aspect, service providers need to communicate with their customers deeply and analyze their value drivers, they also need to take cost-based and competition-based pricing strategies into consideration while utilizing a value-based pricing strategy. From the theoretical perspective this study contributes to the field of pricing and price optimization part of industrial management. 

  • 99.
    Azasu, Samuel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Building and Real Estate Economics.
    Reward Management in Swedish Real Estate Firms: Five essays2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 100.
    Bank, Jakob
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Marketing and Entrepreneurship.
    Integrating online and offline worlds through mobile technology in physical stores: A quantitative study investigating the impact of technology readiness on the technology acceptance model for mobile technologies in physical retail2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Customers uses both offline and online channels before the final purchase, retailers that are operating and selling their products both online and offline can benefit from aligning the experiences on their channels by using an omni-channel strategy. The smartphone is becoming a natural part of our day-to-day life and keeping us connected, also when visiting abrick and mortar retailers. Mobile technology therefore possesses the opportunity to integrate in-store experience with the online world for creating value for customers. But many retailers are struggling in their integration efforts towards an omni-channel strategy due toall the possible technologies to invest. Therefore, the purpose of this thesis was to investigate the acceptance of mobile technologies in a brick and mortar retail setting, the chosen technologies are beacons and augmented reality.This research investigated the mediating effect of the four technology readiness dimensions:optimism, innovativeness, discomfort and insecurity, on the constructs of the technology acceptance model: perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use. The research was carried out with a positivist research philosophy, inductive approach and lastly with an explanatory research design including a quantitative method. The data was collected through a survey, which got answered by 224 participants. The data was further statistically analyzed. The result showed that several of the dimensions of technology readiness had a significant effect on the constructs of technology acceptance model, especially the dimension: optimism. Thus, retailers that wants to introduce mobile technology into their stores should put emphasis on customizing their offerings towards the customers’ different level of technology readiness, especially optimism.

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