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  • 51. Crona, Beatrice
    et al.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Cape Town.
    Prell, Christina
    Reed, Mark
    Hubacek, Klaus
    Combining social network approaches with social theories to improve understanding of natural resource governance2011In: Social Networks and Natural Resource Management: Uncovering the Social Fabric in Environmental Governance / [ed] Bodin, Örjan; Prell, Christina, Cambridge University Press , 2011, p. 44-71Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 52.
    Cupitt, Rebekah
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Phantasms collide: Navigating video-mediated communication in the Swedish workplace2013In: Global Media Journal : Australian Edition, ISSN 1835-2340, E-ISSN 1835-2340, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 247-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global telecommunications companies sell new technologies and services that aim to increase communication possibilities. This case study of one Swedish telecommunications company (‘the Company’), examines how employee notions of video-mediated communication are embedded social meanings. These social meanings are purposefully linked to notions of efficiency in the workplace, the environment, corporate social responsibility and economic gain. Through advertisements, slogans, in-house incentive programs and company policies, the Company has achieved what could be described as a shift in employee attitudes towards working using video-mediated communication (VMC) – so-called video meetings. The shift is however, far from comprehensive and this consciously constructed understanding of video-mediated communication co-exists and conflicts with multiple other meanings – explicit, implicit and purposefully ignored. Often moral dilemmas arise as personal wellbeing in the short-term conflicts with corporate sales targets, budget restrictions and environmental goals to ‘save the planet’. By detailing these different understandings and their inter-relations, the complex and purposed nature of video-mediated communication phantasms in a global telecommunications company emerges.

  • 53.
    Cupitt, Rebekah
    Socialantropologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitetet.
    We Are the Robots: An anthropological perspective on human-robot interaction2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    How do we cope with technology today? We are surrounded by machines, computers and technological devices from mobile phones to automated check- outs. These types of machines are no longer exotic in Sweden where today the average person is usually fluent in their use. But do we really have an understanding of how these objects work, is understanding necessary and how do we cope when our knowledge is lacking?

    This thesis is intended as an introduction to an anthropological way of look- ing at strategies people develop for understanding, using and interacting with technological objects, specifically robots. Still an exotic object, robots are more widely known-about than experienced. Based on ethnographic data, primarily gathered in two distinct workplace environments as well as interviews and video documentation, my analysis aims to illustrate the implications of defining hu- mans and robots as equally significant agents within networks whilst disputing the traditional importance given to the dichotomy of technology (non-human) and human.

    Whilst robots are definitely less than we expect them to be, they are still so- cial artefacts, firmly situated within social networks and meaning which manifest through human–robot interactions. Perhaps little more than tools, an ambigu- ity exists in human–robot interactions which suggests that we form quasi-social relations that could, and have been exploited by designers and engineers to broaden the range of use for technological objects.

    Keywords: human-robot interaction, network theory, situated knowledges, agential realism, performativity, social contextualisation of technological objects

    Download full text (pdf)
    rcupitt_wearetherobots
  • 54. Davydov, Vladimir
    et al.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry
    Grani sot͡sial'nogo: antropologicheskie perspektivy issledovanii͡a sot͡sial'nykh otnosheniĭ i kul'tury2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 55.
    Diani, Mario
    et al.
    University of Trento.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Lorien, Jasny
    University of Essex.
    ‘‘Right to the City’’ and the Structure of Civic Organizational Fields: Evidence from Cape Town2018In: VOLUNTAS - International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, ISSN 0957-8765, E-ISSN 1573-7888Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract This article proposes a network analytic approach to the role of frames in shaping the structure of civic organizational fields. Adopting a perspective from the global South, it looks at the impact of the expression ‘‘Right to the city’’ (RTC) over alliance building among civil society actors, exploring patterns of collaborative ties among 129 civil society organizations active in Cape Town from 2012 to 2014. The article addresses two broad ques- tions: What is the relation between RTC and other frames that are also frequently invoked to describe urban struggles and issues? Does the RTC frame affect the structure of urban civic organizational fields in significant ways? Data suggest that while RTC plays a significant role in local civil society, it is neither the only interpretative frame that Capetonian civic organizations draw upon to characterize their activity, nor the more salient. ‘‘Urban conservation,’’ especially tied to nature conservation and environmental issues, actually shapes the structure of local organizational fields in a sharper manner. This is, however, a potentially more divisive frame, rooted as it is in the apartheid legacy that still shapes urban dynamics in the city.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Diani Ernstson Jasny 2018 Right to the city & SNA in Cape Town
  • 56.
    Ding, Jielan
    et al.
    Chinese Acad Sci, Natl Sci Lib, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, 19A Yuquan Rd, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Ahlgren, Per
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Library, Publication Infrastructure. National Science Library, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190, China.
    Yang, Liying
    Chinese Acad Sci, Natl Sci Lib, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China..
    Yue, Ting
    Chinese Acad Sci, Natl Sci Lib, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, 19A Yuquan Rd, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Disciplinary structures in Nature, Science and PNAS: journal and country levels2018In: Scientometrics, ISSN 0138-9130, E-ISSN 1588-2861, Vol. 116, no 3, p. 1817-1852Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes, using Web of Science publications and two time periods (2004-2006 and 2014-2016), the disciplinary structures in the three prestigious journals Nature, Science and PNAS, compared with two baselines: Non-NSP_Multi (multidisciplinary publications that have other source journals than Nature, Science and PNAS), and Non-Multi (publications assigned to other categories than Multidisciplinary). We analyze the profiles at two levels, journal and country. The results for the journal level show that for Nature and Science, the publications are considerably less concentrated to certain disciplines compared to PNAS. Biology is the dominant discipline for all the three journals. Nature and Science have similar publication shares in Medicine, Geosciences, Physics, Space science, and Chemistry. The publications of PNAS are highly concentrated to two disciplines: Biology and Medicine. Compared with Non-NSP_Multi and Non-Multi, the shares of Biology in NSP journals are higher, whereas the share of Medicine is lower. At the country level, 14 countries are included, among them the five BRICS countries. With respect to the NSP journals, the emphasis disciplines (in terms of world share of publications) of most countries other than USA are the disciplines in which USA has its weakest performance. The disciplinary structures of USA and of most of the other studied countries therefore tend to be different. Regarding Non-NSP_Multi and Non-Multi, the shapes of the disciplinary structures of the 14 countries can be roughly grouped into three groups, while there are more types of shapes for the countries in the NSP journals. For all five units of analysis, the discipline structures of most countries generally change only slightly between different time periods. The structures of some BRICS countries, however, change to a relatively large extent.

  • 57.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Cape Town.
    Social Network Analysis (SNA)2012In: The Encyclopedia of Sustainability: Vol. 6. Measurements, Indicators, and Research Methods for Sustainability / [ed] Fogel, D.; Fredericks, S.; Harrington, L.; Spellerberg, I., Berkshire Publishing , 2012, Vol. 6, p. 322-325Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University.
    The Drama of Urban Greens and Regimes: Social Movements and Ecosystem Services in Stockholm National Urban Park2007Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 59.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Cape Town.
    Transformative collective action: A network approach to transformative change in ecosystem-based management2011In: Social Networks and Natural Resource Management: Uncovering the Social Fabric in Environmental Governance / [ed] Bodin, Örjan; Prell, Christina, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011, p. 255-287Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [From Introduction] This chapter will strive to add to contributions made by other authors in describing and explaining transformative change. Special attention will be paid to elucidate the collective nature of these transformations, hence the title of transformative collective action. The analysis will show that in order to bring about radical institutional change of natural resource management, a whole network of individuals and organizations are needed that through time can sustain pressure for change. These actors furthermore need to relate to each other through information exchange and repeated collaborations in order to coordinate their collective action, to learn as they go along of what works and what does not work, and to negotiate their vision of change to reach some common ground that can unite their collective effort. This type of sustained collective action furthermore needs to operate through, and challenge, already established institutions, modes of thought and ways of doing things. As such we can talk about collective action as a ‘collective actor’ – the network of actors – that over time builds enough agency to generate institutional change.

  • 60.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Barthel, Stephan
    Andersson, Erik
    Borgström, Sara T.
    Scale-Crossing Brokers and Network Governance of Urban Ecosystem Services: The Case of Stockholm2010In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 28-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban ecosystem services are crucial for human well-being and the livability of cities. A central challenge for sustaining ecosystem services lies in addressing scale mismatches between ecological processes on one hand, and social processes of governance on the other. This article synthesizes a set of case studies from urban green areas in Stockholm, Sweden-allotment gardens, urban parks, cemeteries and protected areas-and discusses how governmental agencies and civil society groups engaged in urban green area management can be linked through social networks so as to better match spatial scales of ecosystem processes. The article develops a framework that combines ecological scales with social network structure, with the latter being taken as the patterns of interaction between actor groups. Based on this framework, the article (1) assesses current ecosystem governance, and (2) develops a theoretical understanding of how social network structure influences ecosystem governance and how certain actors can work as agents to promote beneficial network structures. The main results show that the mesoscale of what is conceptualized as city scale green networks (i.e., functionally interconnected local green areas) is not addressed by any actor in Stockholm, and that the management practices of civil society groups engaged in local ecosystem management play a crucial but neglected role in upholding ecosystem services. The article proposes an alternative network structure and discusses the role of midscale managers (for improving ecological functioning) and scale-crossing brokers (engaged in practices to connect actors across ecological scales). Dilemmas, strategies, and practices for establishing this governance system are discussed.

  • 61.
    Forstorp, Per-Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Quantifying automobility: speed, 'Zero Tolerance' and democracy2006In: Against Automobility / [ed] Bohm, S; Jones, C; Land, C; Paterson, M, 2006, p. 93-112Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Forstorp, Per-Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Science, social theory and public knowledge2005In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 272-273Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 63.
    Grange, Kristina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Mellan skrå och profession: Om de svenska arkitekt- och ingenjörsutbildningarnas framväxt och hur ett dominerande kunskapsideal har tagit form2010In: FormAkademisk, ISSN 1890-9515, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 26-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I denna artikel kommer utvecklingen från skråväsendets upplösning till de moderna arkitekt- och ingenjörsprofessionernas framväxt i slutet av 1800-talet att tecknas. I fokus för den i huvudsak empiriska framställningen står utvecklingen av det utbildningssystem som än i dag i hög grad bildar utgångspunkt för arkitekters och ingenjörers professionella identiteter. En teoretisk utgångspunkt hämtas från Foucault och föreställningen att makt och vetande förutsätter varandra. Med ett brett angreppssätt identifieras sedan ett antal yttre händelser som har bidragit till att producera ett tekniskt-vetenskapligt kunskapsideal. Detta kunskapsideal finns institutionaliserat i dagens utbildningssystem och fortsätter därigenom att produ-cera fältet av möjliga handlingar för arkitekter i dag.

  • 64. Grönvall, E.
    et al.
    Lundberg, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    PYCIPEDIA: Supporting local and remote collaboration between social workers2019In: Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW, Association for Computing Machinery , 2019, p. 195-199Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PYCIPEDIA is a web-based collaborative tool for social workers that support parents with intellectual disabilities taking care of their small children. These particular social workers have been certified in providing parenting-skills training and support for parents with intellectual disabilities or with learning difficulties. As only a relatively small number of social workers are certified in providing the relevant support, there may be few colleagues to discuss with and learn from, even in larger municipalities with many social workers. To support social workers in providing the best possible support, the web-based collaborative tool PYCIPEDIA has been co-designed with social workers from two Swedish municipalities. The tool allows social workers to log in, and independent from what municipality they work in, create, browse, edit and share material (e.g. text, images and video) that can support the parents. They can discuss cases, rate online material, and access a forum.

  • 65.
    Gudjonsdottir, Rosa
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Personas and Scenarios in Use2010Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Personas are fictitious characters that represent the needs of the intended users, and scenarios complementing the personas describe how their needs can be met. The present doctoral thesis considers the usage of personas and scenarios and how they are used in system development projects. The study is motivated by the relative lack of empirical data on the persona method in actual use.

    The study was carried out in the context of a large international research project called Nepomuk and involved two conceptually dif­ferent field studies. On the one hand, field studies in user settings were conducted, which aimed at creating personas and scenarios, and for which a user-centered design approach was applied using partici­pant observation, contextual interviews, video brainstorming and proto­typing. On the other hand, a field study in the setting of the Nepomuk project itself was conducted, which aimed at observing how the per­sonas and scenarios were received and used in the project work. The work conducted in the project setting was a multi-sited ethnographic field study, which was documented through ethnographic writing.

    The project setting field study showed that the persona method was difficult to put into consistent use, and the support of persona advocates guiding usage would have been helpful. The method was used without much effort to communicate about the needs and desires of the intended users, but was less successful in compelling project members to use personas and scenarios during various design activities. The field study also revealed alternative usages of the method that can be supported and utilized.

    The contributions of the thesis include an account of the effect the storytelling aspect has on the creation as well as usage of personas and scenarios. Also, the essential elements of constructing personas and scenarios are discussed as well as the prerequisites for making personas and scenarios support the design process in system development projects. Lastly, the thesis describes how personas and scenarios can support the communication of user needs and desires to project members and stakeholders as well as support design activities in system development projects.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Dissertation_RosaGudjonsdottir
  • 66.
    Gullberg, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Det fängslande planeringstänkandet: och sökandet efter en verklighetsutväg1986 (ed. andra)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis I intended to deal with the problem: “what is plan­ning?” I especially planned to analyze the obvious, but in planning theory never the less foreseen fact that things (plans, projects) never become what they were intended to be. But, and in accordance with this, I found myself paying much more attention to another problem: “how to catch the effects of plans and reforms?”

    In my analysis of planning theory and planning thought I have tried to demonstrate 1. the aprioristic/rationalistic basis for this mode of thinking; 2. that it deals with problems central to the human fate; and 3. that it is unavoidable in a world modernized in a western way.

    The search for a point outside this mode of thinking led me to scrutinize the possibilities of answering the empirical question: “what difference does planning make?” Two prob­lems are identified: 1. separating the effects of a certain plan­ning activity from the influ­ences of all other circum­stances; and 2. avoiding destruction of the knowledge-producing process by interested parts. The distinction between causality and correlation is crucial for the first problem. Methods such as experiment, quasi-experiment and ”natural” experi­ment are found to be of limited capacity in this respect and the regularity theory of causality does not solve the problem. The counter factual approach to causality is shown to be dependent on that of regularity. A program called transcendental realism (Bhaskar) I found much more promising in evaluation tasks, but many problems remain. Still more problematic is the second question which I don’t even attempt to answer.

    Scientific thinking belongs to the same rationalistic tradition as planning thought. I therefore doubt if there can be any such thing as scientific liberation of planning idiosyncrasies. But I discern, nevertheless, some emancipating potential in the quest for truth.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 67.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Junqueira Barbosa, Simone Diniz
    Joshi, Anirudha
    Lawson, Shaun
    Palanque, Philippe
    Role of Conferences in Shaping the Field of HCI2015In: HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION - INTERACT 2015, PT IV, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2015, p. 637-639Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The panel will discuss the role various conferences have played in developing the field of HCI in academic research and industrial practice. It is composed of people who have experience in organising HCI conferences in different parts of the world. It provides a platform to the participants to think and reflect about what they are doing when attending a conference, what their expectations are and how it impacts positively their knowledge, work and career.

  • 68.
    Haas, Tigran
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Infrastructure.
    Ethnic Conflict and the Right to Return of Limbo Disaporas: Multifaceted Reflections on the Case of BiH2004In: Migration and Ethnic Studies (Migracijske i Etničke Teme), ISSN 1333-2546, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 29-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the phenomenon of refugees and resettled persons in the process of forcedmigrations in the aftermath of man-made disasters. Although some of the ideas presented here couldhave wider application, the focus is on post-conflict zones within the former Yugoslavia, namely BiH.The paper uses the questions of ethnicity and nationalism within resettlement, dislocation and immigrationas a backdrop, into which the issue of globalization is also briefly reflected. The intention hereis not to cover a wide range of pressing topics, but simply to relate a number of issues arising in contemporarylarge-scale forced migrations to a resurgence of cultural specificity and ethnicized nationalismas counterpoints to globalization. The paper introduces the concept of “limbo diasporas” in the caseof Bosnian refugees in Sweden through reflection and linkage with the aforementioned concepts. Thepaper ends with some recommendations and open questions on social rehabilitation and ethnic healingas well as some general conclusions.

  • 69.
    Haas, Tigran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    New Urbanism and Beyond: Designing Cities for the Future2008 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Haas, Tigran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    The Best of New Urbanism: Selected Articles & Essays 2002-2012: Celebrating the 20th Anniversary of Congress for New Urbanism2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This unique book brings together, for the first time ever, a collection of probably the best papers & essays written on the international phenomena known as new urbanism. The range of articles spans different tenets of the movement, its theories and principles, methods & tools, contributions & critique and much more. The authors originate from variety of disciplines such as, sociology, public policy, human geography, economics, urban planning, urban design, architecture, real estate development and urban studies. It is a unique and timely collection of new and older works, freshly complied for the 20th anniversary of congress of new urbanism and the new urbanism movement. This volume is a limited release printed only for academia, faculty and students

  • 71.
    Haas, Tigran
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure.
    Roberts, Andrew
    Hifab International AB.
    Opportunities for Sustaining Human Settlements in a Post-Conflict War Zone: The Case of Bosnia and Herzegovina1999In: Open House International, ISSN 0168-2601, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 54-65Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 72.
    Hall, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing.
    Pitt, L.
    Wallström, A.
    The secrets of secret societies: The case of wine2015In: Business Horizons, ISSN 0007-6813, E-ISSN 1873-6068Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Secret societies have intrigued humanity since earliest times. In this article we explore secret societies in the context of wine and how these institutions might be insightful in formulating marketing strategies. We contrast the characteristics of secret societies with those of existing secret wine societies such as The Wine Society and La Confrérie. Yet while some of these functions and characteristics transfer well, many ’secret’ wine societies aren’t actually that secret. Some of the characteristics of secret societies are also found in consumer brand communities. Armed with this knowledge, wine marketers can exploit the characteristics of secret societies to target market segments with precision and to gain the benefits of focused distribution opportunities.

  • 73. Hallonsten, Olof
    A classic laboratory study in science policy clothing2011In: Science and Public Policy, ISSN 0302-3427, E-ISSN 1471-5430, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 79-80Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 74.
    Hallonsten, Olof
    University of Gothenburg.
    How scientists may ‘benefit from the mess’: A resource dependence perspective on individual organizing in contemporary science2014In: Social Science Information, ISSN 0539-0184, E-ISSN 1461-7412, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 341-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is general consensus in the study of science, and especially research policy studies, that a wave of profound change has struck academic science in the past decades. Central parts of this change are increased competition, growing demands of relevance and excellence, and managerialism reforms in institutions and policy systems. The underpinning thesis of this article is that, if seen from the perspective of individual scientists, these changes are exogenous and lead to greater environmental complexity and uncertainty, which in turn induces or forces individuals towards strategic planning and organizing in order to maintain control over their own research programs. Recent empirical studies have made various worthy contributions to the understanding of the macro-level (institutions, policy and funding systems, and broader epistemic developments) and the micro-level (individual and group behavior) developments of the social system of science, but there is a lack of comprehensive conceptual tools for analysis of change and its effect on individual scientists. This article takes the first steps towards developing a conceptual scheme for use in empirical studies of the (strategic) response of individual scientists to exogenous change, based on an adaptation of Resource Dependence Theory (RDT). The intended theoretical contribution builds on conceptualization of the individual researcher as crucially able to act rationally and strategically in the face of potentially conflicting demands from a growingly unpredictable environment. Defining a basic framework for a broad future research program, the article   adds to the knowledge about the recent changes to the academic research system and calls for renewed interest in organizing in science and an analysis of the complex social system of science from the perspective of its smallest performing units: individuals.

  • 75.
    Hallonsten, Olof
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Department of Education and Social Sciences, Wuppertal University, Germany.
    Unpreparedness and risk in Big Science policy: Sweden and the European Spallation Source2015In: Science and Public Policy, ISSN 0302-3427, E-ISSN 1471-5430, Vol. 42, p. 415-426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The politics of European collaborative Big Science are inherently uncertain. The European Spallation Source (ESS) for materials science, planned to be built in Sweden with a collaborative European funding solution that was recently finalized is the most recent example. Sweden has so far invested around one billion SEK (&E110 million), taking a significant risk given these uncertainties and given Sweden’s complete lack of experience in hosting such big labs. Tracing the Swedish government’s investments in the ESS project, this article shows that so far, the Swedish ESS bid seems to be generally well funded, but that a long-term plan for the funding and a contingency plan for increased costs seem to be absent. This adds to the seeming unprepared- ness of Sweden and elevates the already quite high level of risk for Swedish science and science policy of investing in the ESS. 

  • 76.
    Hallonsten, Olof
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Heinze, Thomas
    Formation and Expansion of a New Organizational Field in Experimental Science2015In: Science and Public Policy, ISSN 0302-3427, E-ISSN 1471-5430, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 841-854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the formation and expansion of a new organizational field in experimental science: synchrotron radiation laboratories. These labs were once peripheral servants of some specialisms of solid-state physics, but over the 40 years studied they have grown into a worldwide generic resource for tens of thousands of users in a broad spectrum of disciplines. The paper uses insights primarily from historical institutionalism, but also neo-institutional theory, to analyze the formation and expansion of the organizational field of synchrotron radiation laboratories, and thus contributes to the analysis of the rather dramatic growth of this tool for experimental science from a small-scale lab curiosity to a generic research technology. But the key contribution of the paper is to provide insights into multi-level and multi-dimensional change in science systems by analyzing the emergence and expansion of a new organizational field in experimental science, which has implications not least for science policy.

  • 77.
    Hallonsten, Olof
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Heinze, Thomas
    Bergische Universität Wuppertal.
    From particle physics to photon science: Multi-dimensional and multi-level renewal at DESY and SLAC2013In: Science and Public Policy, ISSN 0302-3427, E-ISSN 1471-5430, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 591-603Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of institutional transformation in science have largely overlooked Big Science installations, despite far-reaching changes to the roles and functions of such large labs in the past decades. Here, we present and analyze two Big Science labs that have undergone profound transformations from single-purpose particle physics labs to multi-purpose centers for so-called photon science: SLAC in the USA and DESY in Germany. We provide brief historic accounts of the labs and an analysis of the processes of change on different levels and from different aspects informed by a theoretical framework of institutional change in science. Thus, we describe the relevance of the study of Big Science labs from the perspective of institutional change and in terms of science policy/management. We also prove the aptness of the framework used and pave the way for a detailed analysis of particular forces of change and their interrelatedness.

  • 78.
    Hallonsten, Olof
    et al.
    Department of Philosophy, Linguistics, and Theory of Science, University of Gothenburg.
    Heinze, Thomas
    Department of Education and Social Sciences, Wuppertal University.
    Institutional persistence through gradual organizational adaptation: Analysis of national laboratories in the USA and Germany2012In: Science and Public Policy, ISSN 0302-3427, E-ISSN 1471-5430, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 450-463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the institutional persistence of systems of national laboratories (SNLs) that unlike other public and private research organizations appear to have experienced only minor institutional shifts in recent years. Although national laboratories started as time-limited mission-oriented projects, most of them have remained in operation as continuously renewed multi-purpose organizations. By comparing the SNLs in Germany and the USA, this paper discusses the relationship between the system and the organizational level and concludes that incremental organizational rearrangements have enabled the institutional persistence of SNLs despite considerable changes in their political and funding environments. The paper applies recent advances in institutional theory and thus contributes to a better understanding of institutional change in path-dependent public R&D systems.

  • 79.
    Hallonsten, Olof
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Hugander, Olof
    Supporting ‘future research leaders’ in Sweden: Institutional isomorphism and inadvertent funding agglomeration2014In: Research Evaluation, ISSN 0958-2029, E-ISSN 1471-5449, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 249-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The most recent fashion in the policy-level promotion of excellence in academic research seems to be the launching of funding programs directed to young and promising (postdoc level) researchers with the purpose of assisting them in establishing their own research profile at this allegedly crucial and fragile career stage. In the Swedish public research funding system, which is rather diversified and also quite recently has been recast, a number of such programs have been launched in recent years by public and private actors alike, all with the stated ambition of providing funding to those typically in lack of the same. In this article, we discuss the rather striking uniformity of these programs on the basis of the concept of institutional isomorphism from neoinstitutional theory, which is a powerful conceptual tool with capacity to explain why organizations in the same field grow alike in their practices despite preconditions that would suggest otherwise. Analyzing qualitatively the stated purposes of the programs and the discursive shift that accompanies them in policy, and analyzing quantitatively the 130 recipients of funding from the programs, we show that there are agglomeration effects that are unintended but also expectable, given the nature of the funding landscape in Sweden and the institutional isomorphism among the organizations in the field.

  • 80. Hansson, K.
    et al.
    Cars, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Ekenberg, L.
    Danielson, M.
    The importance of recognition for equal representation in participatory processes: Lessons from Husby2013In: Footprint, ISSN 1875-1504, E-ISSN 1875-1490, no 13, p. 81-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the ambition to involve people on more equal terms, participation often still means that the audience is involved in clearly demarcated parts of the process and attempts to develop more deliberative democratic processes in urban planning often fail due to unequal representation in the participatory process. While sharing the general idea of the value of participatory processes, we will investigate some problematic features involved and suggest how some of these can be remedied. We employ the concept of recognition to analyse the conditions for public participation in a recent case of urban planning in the Stockholm suburb of Husby. This case is particularly interesting as it clearly demonstrates the impact of globalisation on local participatory processes. The results show the importance of broad recognition for equal representation in participatory processes, and the need for a plurality of public spheres to support long-term participation in the development of the common urban space.

  • 81.
    Healey, P.
    et al.
    United Kingdom.
    Cars, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Madanipour, A.
    United Kingdom.
    De Magalhães, C.
    United Kingdom.
    Transforming governance, institutionalist analysis and institutional capacity2017In: Urban Governance, Institutional Capacity and Social Milieux, Taylor & Francis, 2017, p. 6-28Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 82. Heidler, Richard
    et al.
    Hallonsten, Olof
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Department of Business Administration, Lund University, Sweden.
    Qualifying the performance evaluation of Big Science beyond productivity, impact and costs2015In: Scientometrics, ISSN 0138-9130, E-ISSN 1588-2861, Vol. 104, no 1, p. 295-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of quantitative performance measures to evaluate the productivity, impact and quality of research has spread to almost all parts of public R&D systems, including Big Science where traditional measures of technical reliability of instruments and user oversub- scription have been joined by publication counts to assess scientific productivity. But such performance assessment has been shown to lead to absurdities, as the calculated average cost of single journal publications easily may reach hundreds of millions of dollars. In this article, the issue of productivity and impact is therefore further qualified by the use of additional measures such as the immediacy index as well as network analysis to evaluate qualitative aspects of the impact of contemporary Big Science labs. Connecting to previous work within what has been called ‘‘facilitymetrics’’, the article continues the search for relevant biblio- metric measures of the performance of Big Science labs with the use of a case study of a recently opened facility that is advertised as contributing to ‘‘breakthrough’’ research, by using several more measures and thus qualifying the topic of performance evaluation in contem- porary Big Science beyond simple counts of publications, citations, and costs. 

  • 83.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    An Empirical Test of the Importance of Knowledge Exchange for new Service Development in Swedish Pharmacies.2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 84.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Feedback and Sustainable Competitive Advantage2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 85.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The Influence of Internal Channels of Communication on Incremental and Radical Innovation in Swedish PharmaciesIn: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 86.
    Henriksson, Greger
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Why do we buy and throw away electronics?2014In: ISDRC 2014: Resilience - The New Research Frontier, Trondheim: Paper 6d7 in Electronically published full papers , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Henriksson et al 2014 Why electronics
  • 87.
    Henriksson, Greger
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Åkesson, Lynn
    Lund University.
    Environmental Policy Instruments Seen as Negotiations2012In: Negotiating Environmental Conflicts: Local communities, global policies / [ed] Gisela Welz, Franziska Sperling, Eva Maria Blum, Frankfurt am Main: Institut für Kulturanthropologie und Europäische Ethnologie , 2012, p. 83-105-Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 88.
    Henriksson, Greger
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Kupersmidt, Judith
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Räsänen, Minna
    Södertörn University / School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies.
    A Day at the School of Opera: Less Travel throug Distance Education2013In: Nachhaltigkeit in der Wirtschaftskommunikation / [ed] Martin Nielsen, Iris Rittenhofer, Marianne Grove Ditlevsen, Sophie Esmann Andersen, Irene Pollach, Wiesbaden: Springer VS, Springer Fachmedien , 2013, p. 191-214Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    .

  • 89.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Tienari, J.
    Meriläinen, S.
    Bendl, R.
    Executive search as ethnosociality: A cross-cultural comparison2016In: International Journal of Cross Cultural Management, ISSN 1470-5958, E-ISSN 1741-2838, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 153-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we explore how executive search consultants in Austria, Finland and Sweden address ethnicity. Our findings suggest that while consultants working in these different sociocultural settings may attribute different meanings to ethnicity, they share a tendency to evade questions of ethnicity with regard to the search process. We specify three discursive practices that serve to eliminate questions of ethnicity from executive search: constructing whiteness as self-evident, constructing varieties of whiteness (articulating deficiency and lack for those not belonging to Us), and distancing responsibility for the current situation to clients and society. In view of these findings, we argue that executive search can be understood as an arena for ethnosociality that stops cultural diversity at the door of management suites and serves to undermine efforts to promote cross-cultural understanding in organizations. Our study indicates that sustaining whiteness as a privileged ethnicity takes multiple forms. While executive search consultants play an important role in these processes, it is suggested that they inherit a more fundamental problem in society and they have few opportunities to change the ethnic status quo at the top.

  • 90. Kan, Sergei
    et al.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry
    The Saga of The L.H. Morgan Archive, or How an American Marxist Helped Make a Bourgeois Anthropologist the Cornerstone of Soviet Ethnography2016In: Local Knowledge, Global Stage, University of Nebraska Press, 2016, Vol. 10, p. 149-220Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 91.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Diffusion of dynamic innovations: A case study of residential solar PV systems2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the literature on diffusion of innovations, it is widely known that the characteristics and socio-environmental settings of adopters do evolve in space and time. What about innovations themselves? During the diffusion process, don’t some innovations continuously alter in space and time? If so, how does the dynamic character of an innovation influence the diffusion process? In previous research, it has been often assumed that innovations do not continuously alter or get modified when diffusing from a source to potential adopters. This assumption may mean that the innovation is invariant as it diffuses in time and space—i.e., the innovation does not have a continuously dynamic character. Is it always the case in practice?   

    A single form of an innovation is not always necessarily compatible with the preferences, limitations, and residential settings of adopters. The innovation might appear in different forms when it diffuses in space and time, i.e., it is “dynamic”. This PhD thesis aims to explore how dynamic innovations diffuse in space and time—a relatively understudied topic in research. In doing so, it distinguishes between the diffusion of dynamic innovations and other kinds of innovations. Anchored on the case of diffusion of residential solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, this thesis is composed of a cover essay and six appended papers. The first two appended papers are systematic literature reviews, aiming at understanding the state of the art of the theoretical and contextual research domains. The third paper is based on a case study in southern Germany and explores the diffusion of a dynamic innovation at adopter level. The fourth paper is empirically focused on a local firm’s business model, which is assumed to be a key to understanding the mechanism behind the diffusion of dynamic innovations. The fifth paper is based on lead market hypothesis and tries to explore the diffusion of innovations at the regional level. The sixth paper studies a semi-hypothetical case and offers an innovative method to forecast the diffusion of innovations in general.

    The contribution of this PhD thesis lies in three research dimensions: context, method, and theory. Firstly, the thesis takes the existing theories (e.g., diffusion of innovations theory and lead market hypothesis) and methods (e.g., case study) and applies them in different contexts of the diffusion of residential solar PV systems: the individual, sub-national, and national level. Secondly, it proposes a new research method, namely the finite element method for forecasting the diffusion of innovations, based on an existing theory (e.g., wave-like diffusion of innovations in time and space) and context (e.g., solar PV systems). Last but not least, the cover essay of this thesis takes the findings of the appended papers and employs an extension of theory of diffusion of innovations. In doing so, it includes the role of the dynamic characteristic of innovations that do alter in time and space during the diffusion process.

    Overall, the findings of this thesis indicate that the diffusion of dynamic innovations is different in nature, and continuous efforts of change agents are critical for enhancing the diffusion of such innovations. Change agents are especially important to help potential adopters to find out and develop the form of innovation that best fits their needs, limits, and preferences, which are heterogeneous in space and time. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    karakayaPhDthesis
  • 92.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics. Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain.
    Finite Element Method for Forecasting the Diffusion of Photovoltaic Systems: Why and How?2016In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 163, p. 464-475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Finite Element Method (FEM) has been used in the broad field of continuum mechanics in engineering disciplines for several decades. However, recently, some scholars have attempted to apply the method to social science phenomena. What is the scope of using FEM in social science-related fields?  Anchored in the literature on social sciences, this paper, firstly, reviews the scope of using FEM in social science phenomena, and then applies FEM to a semi-hypothetical case study on the diffusion of solar photovoltaic systems in southern Germany.  By doing so, the paper aims to shed light on why and how the Finite Element Method can be used to forecast the diffusion of solar photovoltaic systems in time and space. Unlike conventional models used in diffusion literature, the computational model considers spatial heterogeneity. The model is based on a partial differential equation that describes the diffusion ratio of photovoltaic systems in a given region over time. The results of the application show that the FEM constitutes a powerful tool by which to study the diffusion of an innovation as a simultaneous space-time process.

  • 93.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Barbara, Breitschopf
    Hidalgo, Antonio
    Lead markets at sub-national levelManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature on lead markets has long argued that the global diffusion of innovations is often driven by country-specific attributes of a lead country. However, less attention has been paid to the sub-national level. Can region-specific attributes of a lead region drive the national diffusion? The paper takes the lead market model and applies it in a sub-national context.  Based on spatiotemporal data and an extensive case study on diffusion of solar photovoltaic systems in Germany, this paper identifies the presence of both lead and lag markets at the sub-national level. Our findings indicate that the lead market model of the international diffusion of innovations is also applicable in a national context. 

  • 94.
    Kimari, Wangui
    et al.
    University of Cape Town.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    University of Cape Town.
    Imperial Remains and Imperial Invitations: Centering Race within the Contemporary Large-Scale Infrastructures of East Africa2020In: Antipode, ISSN 0066-4812, E-ISSN 1467-8330, Vol. 3, no 52, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we combine infrastructure studies and black radical traditions to foreground how imperial remains deeply inform the logics that bring forth contemporary large-scale infrastructures in Africa. The objective, prompted by the ongoing avid promotion of such architectures on the continent, is to contribute to an analysis that centres race in these projects. Our argument is that these initiatives have to be understood in relation to inherited material and discursive scaffoldings that remain from the colonial period, through what we refer to as imperial remains and imperial invitations. These remains and invitations demonstrate how recent mega infrastructures inhere, in their planning, financing and implementation, a colonial racialism, despite rhetorical claims to the opposite. Empirically, we draw, principally, on China built and financed infrastructure projects from Kenya, and theoretically upon black radical traditions in order to foreground a longer genealogy of black pathologizing and resistance to it on the continent.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 95. Kings, Lisa
    et al.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    Tahvilzadeh, Nazem
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Platskamp: inledande reflektioner2018In: ARKIV. Tidskrift för samhällsanalys, ISSN 2000-6225, E-ISSN 2000-6217, no 9, p. 7-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Det här specialnumret är ett temanummer om hur kampen om förorten förs i vår samtid. Genom att uppmärksamma förorten som en politisk företeelse, skapad i spänningsfältet mellan reproduktion och motstånd, försöker författarna fånga den komplexa dynamik mellan olika intressen som präglar den urbana periferin. Med texter av Magnus Dahlstedt, Christophe Foultier, James Frempong, Lisa Kings, René León Rosales, Vanja Lozic, Nazem Tahvilzadeh och Aleksandra Ålund. Bidragens skilda perspektiv på förorten som skådeplats för politisk kamp och de ”platskamper” som utspelar sig där öppnar upp för spännande samtal om detta ständigt återkommande tema: förorten, levd som föreställd.

  • 96. Kings, Lisa
    et al.
    Åhlund, Aleksandra
    Tahvilzadeh, Nazem
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Contesting Urban Management Regimes: The Rise Of Urban Justice Movements In Sweden2016In: Solidarity without Borders: Gramscian perspectives on migration and civil society alliances / [ed] Agustín, Ó. G. & Jörgensen, M. B., Pluto Press, 2016, p. 186-202Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 97.
    Kjellgren, Björn
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Fluid Modernity: Wine in China2019In: The Globalization of Wine / [ed] David Inglis & Anna-Mari Almila, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2019, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 98.
    Larsen, Katarina
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    Back to basics – revisiting rhetoric of competitive research funding allocation and impact agenda in Sweden2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Science policy studies have traditionally been concerned with analysis of research programs, national science policy and their motivation for investments in science and in basic research in particular. As Keith Pavitt (1991) pointed out, the “market failure” line of argument has been in the limelight with less attention paid to other questions such as the following: “How does science contribute to technology?” In the Swedish context, this is a relevant question given that it is a nation with high share of investments in science and historically high level of industry investments in R&D. The aim of the current study is to analyse the rhetoric of science policy about how investments in scientific excellence contributes to industrially relevant output. We examine this by taking a closer look at different strands of arguments and assessment criteria used to support competitive funding allocation to university-based research. Particular attention is paid to examining centres of excellence (CoE) as a form of science policy of promoting both scientific excellence and interaction between academia and industry. Moreover the study examines consequences of interim evaluations and the policy advice given  in assessments of centre activities. One conclusion is that the research funding agency assessment criteria have a strong influence on the direction on future centre activities but also that the range of present and future activities are determined by areas where the centre have internationally high quality research and the impact agenda defined by the centre in interaction with industry partners of ongoing research projects. 

  • 99.
    Larsson, Tore J
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Normark, M
    AFA Insurances Sweden.
    Oldertz, Cecilia
    AFA Insurances Sweden.
    Tezic, K
    AFA Insurances Sweden.
    Allvarliga arbetsskador och långvarig sjukfrånvaro 2011: Severe work-related injury and long-term absence from work in 2011 (In Swedish)2011Report (Other academic)
  • 100.
    Lee, Linda
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing.
    Advice from creative consumers: a study of online hotel reviews2014In: International Journal of Technology Marketing, ISSN 1741-878X, E-ISSN 1741-8798, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 53-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This studyexplores what creative consumers are compelled to say about hotels throughonline reviews.  Online reviews arehighly influential, with consumers preferring the advice of other consumersover industry experts or information provided by the marketer.  Over 7,000 online hotel reviews posted onTripAdvisor were examined, using Leximancer, a content analysis tool.  This study provides insights on the factorscontributing to guest satisfaction and dissatisfaction in luxury hotels andmoderate hotels.  It also demonstrates theimportance of the information provided by creative consumers, both in terms ofmarket research and as part of an overall marketing communicationsinitiative. 

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