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  • 51.
    Botha, Elise M.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing.
    A means to an end: Using political satire to go viral2014In: Public Relations Review, ISSN 0363-8111, E-ISSN 1873-4537, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 363-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the rise of video sharing giants like Youtube and Google Video, coupled with increased broadband connectivity and improved sharing functionality across social networking sites, the role of the viral video has been cemented in many IMC strategies. While most agree about the importance of better understanding viral marketing, there is less agreement about what makes content become viral. While some content gets viewed by millions of people, others struggle to gain viral traction. Content specific, intrapersonal and interpersonal reasons have been proposed for viral marketing success. This paper' focuses on the intrapersonal reasons for content going viral in the context of political satire. More specifically, the role of emotion in the spread of content online, is investigated. Political satire focuses on gaining entertainment from politics. Satire, and specifically political satire, forms part of using humour in advertising and has been influential in shifting public opinion since ancient Greece. This study compares success and unsuccessful viral campaigns that used political satire, by first analysing the online comments that viewers made about the video. Following these findings, an experiment is conducted and the influence of intensity, creativity, humour and utility on virality is modelled, controlling for valence and previous exposure. The findings suggest that, when using political satire in viral campaigns, creativity and the intensity of the emotions felt are key influencing factors in whether videos get "shared" or "liked". Therefore, while many authors contend that particular emotions or positive content has a greater likelihood to become viral, this paper shows that it is not the particular emotion, but the intensity with which that emotion was felt that drives viral success.

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  • 52.
    Bottomley, Jane
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Language and communication.
    Cartney, Patricia
    Studying for your Master's Degree in Social Work2024 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An essential guide for all students studying for a Master's degree in social work, whether they have come directly from their undergraduate studies or after a period of employment. 

    This book focuses specifically on the skills needed to study social work at Master's level, helping students get to grips with the academic rigour required at this higher level of study. This includes research skills, writing style, tone, the emphasis on self-reflection and the need to communicate in both academic and professional contexts. Pedagogical features and activities provide opportunities to explore, analyse and reflect on what has been learnt. The book will help cultivate a social practice approach to writing, raise awareness of the choices available, and aid understanding so that readers can produce the types of discourse required at Master’s level in social work. 

  • 53.
    Bottomley, Jane
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Cartney, Patricia
    Pryjmachuk, Steven
    Studying for your social work degree2018 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 54. Bowyer, A.
    et al.
    Montague, K.
    Wheater, S.
    McGovern, R.
    Lingam, R.
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Understanding the family perspective on the storage, sharing and handling of family civic data2018In: CHI '18 Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Across social care, healthcare and public policy, enabled by the "big data" revolution (which has normalized large-scale data-based decision-making), there are moves to "join up" citizen databases to provide care workers with holistic views of families they support. In this context, questions of personal data privacy, security, access, control and (dis-)empowerment are critical considerations for system designers and policy makers alike. To explore the family perspective on this landscape of what we call Family Civic Data, we carried out ethnographic interviews with four North-East families. Our design-gamebased interviews were effective for engaging both adults and children to talk about the impact of this dry, technical topic on their lives. Our findings, delivered in the form of design guidelines, show support for dynamic consent: families would feel most empowered if involved in an ongoing co-operative relationship with state welfare and civic authorities through shared interaction with their data.

  • 55.
    Broms, Loove
    et al.
    Interactive Intstitute.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    Interactive Institute.
    Bång, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    Nyblom, Åsa
    Interactive Institute.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Coffee Maker Patterns and the Design of Energy Feedback Artefacts2010In: DIS '10 Proceedings of the 8th ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, 2010, p. 93-102Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Smart electricity meters and home displays are being installed in people’s homes with the assumption that households will make the necessary efforts to reduce their electricity consumption. However, present solutions do not sufficiently account for the social implications of design. There is a potential for greater savings if we can better understand how such designs affect behaviour. In this paper, we describe our design of an energy awareness artefact – the Energy AWARE Clock – and discuss it in relation to behavioural processes in the home. A user study is carried out to study the deployment of the prototype in real domestic contexts for three months. Results indicate that the Energy AWARE Clock played a significant role in drawing households’ attention to their electricity use. It became a natural part of the household and conceptions of electricity became naturalized into informants’ everyday language.

  • 56.
    Brouwers, Leo
    et al.
    KTH.
    Maria Ellegård, L.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Janlöv, N.
    Swedish Agency for Health Care Services Analysis, Sweden.
    Johansson, P.
    Ministry of Health and Social Affairs, Sweden View full profile.
    Mossler, K.
    Ministry of Health and Social Affairs, Sweden.
    Ekholm, A.
    Ministry of Health and Social Affairs, Sweden.
    Simulating the need for health- and elderly care in Sweden - A model description of SESIM-LEV2014In: New Pathways in Microsimulation, Ashgate Publishing Ltd , 2014, p. 41-59Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 57.
    Bruno, Karl
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Kings Coll London, London, England.;Kungliga Tekn Högskolan, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Human animality: Our animals in medicine and society past and present2021In: Historisk tidskrift, Vol. 141, no 2, p. 354-357Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Bäcklander, Gisela
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    To see or not to see: Importance of sensemaking in employee self-direction2019In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 25-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Being self-directed is one of the most sought-after employee attributes. The present study examines managers’ approaches to and conceptualization of employee self-directedness through semi-structured interviews with 13 managers from five companies in the Stockholm area. Analysis suggests two different emphases in trying to increase self-direction, with differing underlying assumptions: an evaluation emphasis where self-direction is conceptualized as an inherent property of the individual, and a cultivation emphasis suggesting a more interactionist perspective of self-direction as an emergent behavior based on the interaction of individual and situational characteristics. Further, a “seeing work”-skill emerged in all interviews, implicating situational judgment and attention as core to what is ultimately seen as successful self-direction. Managers with a cultivation emphasis mentioned as viable tactics those focused on supporting sensemaking and thus enriching the working situation to enable better discretionary situational judgements.

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    Bäcklander 2019 To see or not to see_postprint
  • 59.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Cupitt, Rebekah
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Meetings, practice and beyond: Environmental sustainability in meeting practices at work2013In: Nachhaltigkeit in der Wirtschaftskommunikation / [ed] Martin Nielsen, Iris Rittenhofer, Marianne Grove Ditlevsen, Sophie Esmann Andersen, Irene Pollach, Wiesbaden: Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden , 2013, p. 159-190Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study shows how the employees at a large transnational telecom company understand and accommodate the implemented travel and meeting policies that regulate business communication. This involves looking at employee decisions on when, how and why to hold meetings. The subsequent understandings of meetings and their practice is formed through negotiation and the formation of a ‘social matrix of workplace communication (meetings)’(Bateson & Reusch 2009). This social matrix and its contexts are analysed from the perspective of environmental sustainability of office work practice. The basis for this is the recent implementation of company-wide restrictions on travel aiming to encourage the use of mediated meetings instead of travel for face-to-face meetings. Some issues that emerge are shared meanings of meetings, more specifically the perceived importance of the physical meeting in a workplace where telephone meetings were the norm. This shows that even if the technological possibilities for mediated meetings and by extension a more flexible work practice exist, they are not regarded as default but seen as complementary to conventional work practices. The need to find a balance in between mediated and physical meetings comes across as a recurring theme in both interviews and policy documents.  As a result the ongoing negotiation of which meetings are deemed necessary to be held in person and thereby requiring travel, is embedded within TeliaSonera employees' notions that face-to-face meetings are better and more efficient than mediated meetings. Subsequently the collective view that mediated meetings are not as successful as face-to-face meetings becomes a central to the character of workplace communication. This negotiation is carried out on an individual level as well as on a more organisational level. When carried out on an organisational level these negotiations occur in policy documents which can sometimes contradict employee perspectives and are equally subject to contextual factors (cf. Kogg 2002). Other related issues present in the empirical data are the blurring of the divide between work and home in relation to the changes in work practices and information and communication technology (ICT).

  • 60.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Cargo Bike Pool: A way to facilitate a car-free life?2014In: Resilience – the new research frontier. Proceedings of the 20th Annual International Sustainable Development Research Conference (ISDRC 2014) Trondheim 18-20 June 2014, Trondheim, 2014, p. 273-280Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In planning for sustainable cities, there is a need to take into consideration alternative transportation modes and facilitate the use of these, for the types of trips that people tend to use cars for. One way to mitigate car dependency in everyday life could be by using a cargo bike for these types of trips.The purpose of this paper is to map in what ways a specific trial of providing access to a cargo bike pool in a housing association affected both people’s travel habits and how they reimagined the types of trips that could be done at all or done in another way in order to find car-free travel and transportation modes. In this paper we focussed on the residents who actually used the cargo bikes.This qualitative study shows that although many of the residents did indeed lead car-free everyday lives, they got the opportunity to do other types of trips that they had not even thought about beforehand or deemed too difficult to do without a car. The cargo bike proved to fit into the portfolio of sustainable travel modes that facilitate everyday transports. The way that trips are imagined has also changed, that is what a cargo bike can be used to in relation to car, regular bike and public transportation.Having access to a cargo bike through a vehicle pool means that the possibilities to live a car-free everyday life are facilitated and in the long run a sustainable transportation pattern is being put in place.

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    Börjesson Rivera & Henriksson 2014
  • 61.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Åkerlund, Maria
    Getting there and back again: Commuting and ICT in six cities across the globe2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ericsson ConsumerLab performed a qualitative exploratory study of how people experience daily commuting in three different countries. This report aims to present the outcome of the study in such a way that the data can be useful for further analyses and studies of commuting in relation to ICT use and environmental sustainability. Based on the study’s findings this report will present analytical data on: i) how ICT can be linked to everyday travel in order to facilitate commuting from the user’s point of view; and ii) how ICT solutions can enable commuting in an environmentally more sustainable way.

    The study, which had an ethnographic approach, showed that in general, commuters would like their commuting time to be, or at least seem, as short as possible. The respondents spend hours commuting every week and often claim to consider it a waste of time. Regardless of means of transport, they would like to get the most out of their commuting time (working, socialising, relaxing etc.), which implies that there is a demand for further technological improvements in this area (voice recognition services in cars, privacy settings in public transport, connectivity in public transport, etc.). An aspect that adds to how people perceive their commuting time concerns the extent to which its duration is predictable – even if the time cannot be shortened, commuters at least want to know how much time they will spend on their daily commute, so that they can plan their day with more certainty.

    Irrespective of means of transport, two major frustrations for commuters are lack of flow and the presence and behaviour of other people. People seem to lack good real-time information enabling them to avoid interruptions in their commute and much of their frustration relates to poor infrastructure conditions and management. Frustration with other people derives from their conduct in traffic contributing to inconveniences, congestion or hazards, or from noise, smell or littering on public transport.

    The greatest motivators for commuting by car are a feeling of independence in relation to other people, schedule and choice of route, and the private space the car offers. This means that the car provides flexibility in terms of when and how people travel, while also providing a private space both mentally (“in the car you can do whatever you want”) and physically (“you don’t have to hustle with others on the bus or train”). The major frustration when commuting by car is the need to focus on driving, so drivers cannot utilise time as they would wish.

    People generally justify their choice of public transport by anti-car arguments, which include difficulty in finding a parking space at work, expensive parking, fear of driving, lack of driving licence etc., but can also motivate their choice as giving them ‘me-time’ without having to focus on driving. The major frustration with commuting by public transport is dependency on time schedules and the shortcomings of the public transport network. This is exacerbated by a lack of relevant information or available options. However, commuting can be improved in a variety of ways for car and public transport users with the help of ICT. From a sustainability perspective, it is important to exploit the potential of ICT solutions to facilitate more environmentally friendly practices.

    Many of the ICT (Information Communication Technology) solutions identified in this report require reliable access to the internet and/or mobile phone network. The mobile phone is currently the single most important internet device while commuting, thus perhaps being the point of departure for many of the solutions, such as travel planner, ticketing options, etc, but for car users mobile phone services need to be adapted through better in-car voice recognition technologies, since the focus needs to be on driving. Current information services could be more personalised and contextualised in order to better suit the individual driver and most of these ICT solutions and services are also applicable to public transport commuters, but an additional function for such commuters could be some kind of ‘emergency button’ on mobile phones to increase their sense of security in travel.

    Home office solutions are a way of avoiding the frustrations of commuting altogether. While working from home is regarded by some with ambivalence and is impossible for many, there are ways of refining these solutions.

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  • 62.
    Cano Viktorsson, Carlos
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    From Fixed, Mobile to Complex: The Social Shaping of ICT for Sustainable Travel2013In: ICT4S 2013: Proceedings of the First International Conference on Information and Communication Technologies for Sustainability, ETH Zurich, February 14-16, 2013, ETH Zurich, 2013, , p. 6p. 197-202Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper looks at the changing shape of mobile connectivity and how it has influenced the potential for informing on sustainable travel. It examines the role mobile connectivity has had for an ICT based service informing on traffic and transport in order to trace what role social practices of interconnecting through mobile media may have had for such an enterprise. The paper looks at two historical examples of ICT based traffic and travel information services in Stockholm, Sweden in order to discuss what role mobile connectivity may have for promoting sustainable travel through ICT.

  • 63.
    Cano-Viktorsson, Carlos
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    From Maps to Apps: Tracing the Organizational Responsiveness of an Early Multi-Modal Travel Planning Service2015In: The Journal of urban technology, ISSN 1063-0732, E-ISSN 1466-1853, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 87-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An Internet-based system for informing on multimodal travel planning (several modes of transportation) was introduced in Stockholm, Sweden in October 2000 in the form of a web page called trafiken.nu. The web page has a historical value of being one of the first attempts in Europe, and possibly the world, at providing an ICT-based travel planning service geared towards facilitating sustainable travel to the general public. The aim of this article is to investigate the historical development of trafiken.nu in order to draw lessons on how to better provide for a public information service with a potential for facilitating sustainable travel planning. Findings from the study of trafiken.nu suggest that the organizations behind the service have been slow in adapting to shifting media technology practices on how to provide for information which has affected the uptake of the service. Lessons from the case study provide a basis for arguing that organizations attempting to implement public information services would benefit from finding a means of harnessing collective intelligence in order to provide for a more customizable and responsive service to the general public.

  • 64.
    Cano-Viktorsson, Carlos
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    From Vision to Transition: Exploring the Potential for Public Information Services to Facilitate Sustainable Urban Transport2014Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Policy initiatives to promote sustainable travel through the use of Internet based public information systems have increased during the last decade. Stockholm, in being one of the first cities in Europe to implement an Internet based service for facilitating sustainable travel is believed to be a good candidate for an analysis of key issues for developing sustainable travel planning services to the public.

    Aim: This thesis investigates the past development of two Stockholm based public information systems and their services in order to draw lessons on how to better provide for a public information service geared towards facilitating  environmentally sustainable travel planning through information and communications technology. The overall goal of the thesis is to contribute to an understanding on how to better design and manage current and future attempts at facilitating sustainable travel planning services based on historical case studies.

    Approach: The thesis draws ideas from the concept of organizational responsiveness – an organization’s ability to listen, understand and respond to demands put to it by its internal and external stakeholders – in order to depict how well or not the two public information systems and their owners have adapted to established norms and values of their surroundings.

    Results: Overall, the findings from the historical case studies suggest that organizations attempting to provide sustainable travel planning to the public need to design and manage their systems in such a way that it responds to shifting demands on how to provide for information. Implementing and embedding new technologies involves complex processes of change both at the micro level – for users and practitioners of the service – and at the meso level for the involved public service organizations themselves. This condition requires a contextualist framework to analyze and understand organizational, contextual and cultural issues involved in the adoption of new technologies and procedures.

    Conclusions: The thesis concludes with a discussion on how the findings from the historical case studies may provide lessons for both current and future attempts at providing public information systems geared towards facilitating environmentally sustainable travel planning to the public. Historical examples and issues concerning collective intelligence and peer to peer based forms of designing, producing and supervising public information services identified throughout the study are looked upon and discussed in terms of their possible role in increasing the potential for public information services to facilitate sustainable urban transport.

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    From Vision to Transition Carlos Cano Viktorsson Licentiate thesis cover essay
  • 65.
    Cano-Viktorsson, Carlos
    Stockholms universitet.
    Social Media and the Networked Self in Everyday Life2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Internet has become increasingly ubiquitous and with the introduction of Web 2.0 technologies and concepts it has almost become second nature for many Internet users. This study attempts to view the “social life” of this “new” online environment through its current manifestation in the form of the popular social networking site Facebook. It argues that Facebook has become a tool for the management of one's self both online and offline and that people's reflexive relation to their self-identity is made visible through their engagement with this social media. How such a new form of social media incorporates itself into everyday life but also how the media acts as an extension of the reflexive self has been the main focus of this study.

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    fulltext
  • 66.
    Cano-Viktorsson, Carlos
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Traffic Radio as a Precursor to Smart Travel Planning Systems: The Challenge of Organizing “Collective Intelligence”2013In: The Journal of urban technology, ISSN 1063-0732, E-ISSN 1466-1853, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 43-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper depicts how a Swedish radio station organized a means of real-time information management to report on local traffic conditions long before the common use of the Internet. Drawing on a history of the Stockholm traffic radio staff the study examines particular conditions for organizing a service that may inform next generations of smart travel planning systems. The author notes how a vision of involving the public together with the use of increasingly mobile and interconnected communication devices provided the service with an opportunity for harnessing collective intelligence. The study highlights critical success factors and barriers for organizing collective  intelligence and the importance they may have had for providing a real-time information service to the public.

  • 67.
    Cardoso, Ricardo
    et al.
    Yale-NUS College, National University of Singapore, 16 College Avenue West, 138527, Singapore, 16 College Avenue West.
    Chen, Jia Ching
    University of California, Santa Barbara, Department of Global Studies, Social Sciences & Media Studies Building, Santa Barbara, CA, 93106-7065, USA.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    BLOCOS URBANISM: Capitalism and Modularity in the Making of Contemporary Luanda2023In: International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, ISSN 0309-1317, E-ISSN 1468-2427, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 809-832Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we portray and unpack the fabric of urban expansion in contemporary Luanda. In doing so, we examine interdependencies and complementarities between the organization of oil extraction off the coast of Angola, the emergence of particular modalities of modernist city planning for the expansion of its capital city, and the proliferation of cement blocks in the making of new urban forms throughout its burgeoning peripheries. By showing how urban development has unfolded through the interconnected realization of multiple kinds of systematizing blocks—namely oil blocks, city blocks and cement blocks—we analyse key material components in the production of new markets and urban spaces in the Angolan capital. By tracing forms of capitalism and modularity in the making of contemporary Luanda, we develop the concept of blocos urbanism to draw attention to modes of standardization and the production of legibility in contemporary processes of urbanization. Through this study, we aim to contribute to the conceptual apparatus for deciphering our global urban condition.

  • 68.
    Cars, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Healey, P.
    United Kingdom.
    Madanipour, A.
    United Kingdom.
    De Maghãlhaes, C.
    United Kingdom.
    Preface2017In: Urban Governance, Institutional Capacity and Social Milieux, Taylor & Francis, 2017, p. xi-xivChapter in book (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Cars, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Healey, P.
    United Kingdom.
    Madanipour, A.
    United Kingdom.
    De Maghãlhaes, C.
    United Kingdom.
    Urban governance, institutional capacity and social milieux2017Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This title was first published in 2002: Urban governance has faced numerous challenges as city governments, their partners and their critics struggle to transform themselves in the context of post-industrial economies and societies. This context has generated new relations of economic life and social activity to be accommodated in cities, and has also changed expectations of the roles, relationships and modes of governance. New conceptual tools to analyze these experiences are becoming available, linked to a broad "institutionalist" wave of ideas sweeping right across the social sciences. This text responds to the challenges faced by urban governance and explores a range of efforts to build new institutional capacities. An international team of social scientists and practitioners critically analyzes conceptual challenges, policy developments and practical experiences.

  • 70. Castro, Maria Pia
    et al.
    Fragapane, Stefania
    Rinaldi, Francesco Mazzeo
    KTH. University of Catania, Italy.
    Professionalization and evaluation: A European analysis in the digital era2016In: Evaluation, ISSN 1356-3890, E-ISSN 1461-7153, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 489-507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is expected that the number of evaluators will continue to grow in the near future. However, the heterogeneity of different national contexts makes the consolidation of a consistent jurisdiction' for the professional evaluator rather problematic. This article contributes to the debate on the professionalization of evaluators by looking at practices attributed, competences and skills required by employers, and the main topics addressed by the community of evaluators. The authors draw on various sources - ISCO08 (International Standard Classification of Occupation); ESCO (European Skills, Competences, Qualifications and Occupations); job offers posted on the EES (European Evaluation Society) website; EES LinkedIn group - to argue that the practice of evaluation has achieved a supranational dimension, with potential consequences both on evaluators' educational profile and on the ways in which evaluations are commissioned and conducted.

  • 71.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Crime dynamics at Lithuanian borders2007In: European Journal of Criminology, ISSN 1477-3708, E-ISSN 1741-2609, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 131-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article compares levels and patterns of offences in different parts of Lithuaniawith the aim of assessing whether border regions are more susceptible to crimethan the rest of the country. The article focuses on identifying and explainingthese patterns for selected categories of offences while taking account ofcontextual factors. Spatial statistical techniques and Geographic InformationSystems underpin the methodology employed. Findings suggest that there arevariations in the level and geography of offences between border regions and therest of the country. Despite the fact that the highest average increases in recordedcriminal offences were found in two border regions, non-border regions had ahigher average increase in the 1990s. This partially explains why, out of the sixselected offences, only assault shows an increase owing to the ‘border effect’. Theproportion of the population living in urban areas is by far the most importantcovariate in explaining the regional variations in offence ratios.

  • 72.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Expressive crimes in post-socialist states of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania2008In: Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention, ISSN 1404-3858, E-ISSN 1651-2340, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 2-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents trends inexpressive crimes in Estonia,Latvia, and Lithuania from1993 to 2000 and examines howdemographic, socio-economic,land use, and institutional factorsrelate to their geography in2000. Geographical InformationSystem (GIS) and spatial regressionmodels are employed in thestudy, which make use of countryregions as the unit of analysis.Issues concerning crime dataavailability and quality are discussed.While police official statisticsshow a significant rise inrates of expressive crime in theBaltic countries during the 1990s(with the exception of homicide),victimization crime surveys indicatethat there have been nosignificant changes in crimelevels and composition. Resultsalso show that indicators ofregions’ social structure, suchas divorce rate, more stronglypredict the variation of 2000’sexpressive crime ratios thanother indicators, such as landuse and economic covariates.Most of these covariates functionin ways which are predicted byWestern literature on crime geography.

  • 73.
    Ceccato, Vania
    nstitute of Criminology, University of Cambridge, Sidgwick Avenue, CB3 9DT, Cambridge, UK.
    Homicide in Sao Paulo, Brazil: Assessing spatial-temporal and weather variations2005In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 307-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although Sao Paulo is one of the most dangerous cities in the world, very little is known about the variations of levels of crime in this Brazilian city over time. This article begins by investigating whether or not homicides are seasonal in Sao Paulo. Then, hypotheses based on the principles of routine activities theory are tested to evaluate the influence of weather and temporal variations on violent behaviour expressed as cases of homicides. Finally, the geography of space-time clusters of high homicide areas are assessed using Geographical Information System (GIS) and Kulldorff's scan test. The findings suggest that central and peripheral deprived areas show the highest number of killings over the year. Moreover, homicides take place when most people have time off: particularly during vacations (hot months of the year), evenings and weekends. Overall, the results show that temporal variables are far more powerful for explaining levels of homicide than weather covariates for the Brazilian case-a finding that lends weight to the suggested hypotheses derived from routine activity theory.

    Download full text (pdf)
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  • 74.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Säkra städer: Aktivt arbete mot brottskoncentration2024 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I de flesta städer - från minsta småstad i Sverige till megastäder som New York - finns miljöer där brott begås i större utsträckning än i andra. För att kunna förstå brottslighetens natur och agera både brottspreventivt och trygghetsskapande är det viktigt att veta varför brottslighet sker oproportionerligt mycket just i dessa miljöer. Den här boken handlar om vilka stadsmiljöer som koncentrerar brott och presenterar möjliga förklaringar till varför det är så. Här diskuteras också vad det är som får människor att uppleva dessa miljöer som otrygga. Boken ger exempel på systematiska metoder som används för att kunna identifiera platser med hög brottskoncentration samt diskuterar möjliga relevanta situationsbaserade åtgärder för brottsförebyggande arbete i en svensk kontext. Boken vänder sig till alla verksamma inom det expanderande brottsförebyggande och trygghetsfrämjande fältet. Den är särskilt lämplig för kriminologi- och polisutbildning och passar mycket bra för utbildningar inom stadsplanering, geografi och andra samhällsvetenskapliga områden där säkerhet och trygghet betraktas som en dimension av social hållbarhet.

  • 75.
    Ceccato, Vania
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Dolmen, Lars
    The Swedish National Police Academy, Sweden.
    Crime in rural Sweden2011In: Applied Geography, ISSN 0143-6228, E-ISSN 1873-7730, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 119-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this article is to assess the levels and spatial patterns of crime in rural Sweden This involves a summary of the changing levels and composition of a selected group of offences from 1996 to 2007 in two groups of rural areas (remote and accessible) in relation to urban areas Crime rates are modelled cross-sectionally as a function of the municipalities structural indicators Geographical information systems (GIS) and spatial statistics techniques are used to assess shifting patterns of concentration of thefts and violence as well as for modelling crime rates Findings show that rural areas have become more criminogenic than they were a decade ago Changes in the rates and geography were found using cluster techniques for both violence and theft. Although models of rural crime do not show any special rural dimension the predicting variables in models containing both urban and rural areas are not exactly the same as in models with rural areas only Crime is often linked to the presence of alcohol-selling premises characteristics of family structure and proportion of young male population.

  • 76.
    Ceccato, Vania
    et al.
    Institute of Criminology University of Cambridge, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge, .
    Haining, Robert
    Institute of Criminology University of Cambridge, Sidgwick Avenue, Cambridge, .
    Assessing the geography of vandalism: Evidence from a Swedish city2005In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 42, no 9, p. 1637-1656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the occurrence of vandalism at the small-area level for the Swedish city of Malmo using data from the Skane Police Authority's database. Demographic, socioeconomic and land use characteristics measured at the small-area level are used as predictors of vandalism with particular interest in the role of collective resources. Standardised vandalism ratios were calculated and mapped using a geographical information system (GIS). Spatial regression models were used to test hypotheses relating to the variation in vandalism rates. Findings show that spatial variation in vandalism is significantly related to social disorganisation risk factors as well as land use factors, but that the physical presence of local leisure associations (a 'collective resource') produces higher vandalism rates.

  • 77. Ceccato, Vania
    et al.
    Haining, Robert
    Department of Geography, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EN, England;.
    Kahn, Tulio
    Department of Planning and Analysis, Secretaria de Seguranc∞ a Pu® blica de Sa ̈oPaulo,Brazil.
    The geography of homicide in Sao Paulo, Brazil2007In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 39, no 7, p. 1632-1653Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors investigate geographical patterns of homicide in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The geography of crime in developing world cities has been an underresearched area in part because of the lack of good-quality, geocoded offence data. In the case of Sao Paulo the availability of a new digital police dataset has provided the opportunity to improve our understanding of its crime patterns. The authors report the testing of hypotheses about the spatial variation in homicide rates. This variation is explained by poverty, situational conditions determined by differences in land use, and processes that indicate links with the geography of drug markets and the availability of firearms.

  • 78.
    Ceccato, Vania
    et al.
    Nordregio – Nordic Centre for Spatial Development,.
    Persson, Lars Olof
    Nordregio – Nordic Centre for Spatial Development,.
    Differential Economic Performance (DEP) in the periphery: evidence from Swedish rural areas2003In: European Journal of Spatial Development, E-ISSN 1650-9544, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding Differential Economic Performance (DEP) at the local andregional level is a key element in devising practical strategies and programmes forsustainable regional development in different contexts. This paper contributes to theunderstanding of the factors underlying persistent differences in DEP between rurallocalities. The basic hypothesis is that the DEP of rural areas can be explained by acombination of ‘tangible’ and ‘less tangible’ factors and the way in which these interactin specific national, regional and local contexts. Natural and human resources,infrastructure, economic structure and investments are together with institutions,networks and community values the most decisive factors that help to characterise DEPfor the Swedish case studies. Findings show that such factors not only define the differentopportunities and constraints for local development, but also illustrate how effective thelocal and regional system is in tapping into resources and opportunities and inameliorating constraints. This sheds light on the importance of taking a broaderperspective regarding policies towards regional development, making them much morefocused on contextual and environmental aspects than uni-faceted, sectoral measures. Thepaper also provides a discussion of the implications of the results for policy and gives anaccount of new research questions for future studies.

  • 79.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Münter, Ursula
    Satsuka, Shiho
    Introduction2014In: Rachel Carson Perspectives, ISSN 2190-5088, Vol. 3, p. 5-7Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 80.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sivaramakrishnan, KalyanakrishnanYale University.
    Ecological Nationalisms: Nature, Livelihoods, and Identities in South Asia2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The works presented in this collection take environmental scholarship in South Asia into novel territory by exploring how questions of national identity become entangled with environmental concerns in Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan, and India. The essays provide insight into the motivations of colonial and national governments in controlling or managing nature, and bring into fresh perspective the different kinds of regional political conflicts that invoke nationalist sentiment through claims on nature. In doing all this, the volume also offers new ways to think about nationalism and, more specifically, nationalism in South Asia from the vantage point of interdisciplinary environmental studies. The contributors to this innovative volume show that manifestations of nationalism have long and complex histories in South Asia. Terrestrial entities, imagined in terms of dense ecological networks of relationships, have often been the space or reference point for national aspirations, as shared memories of Mother Nature or appropriated economic, political, and religious geographies. In recent times, different groups in South Asia have claimed and appropriated ancient landscapes and territories for the purpose of locating and justifying a specific and utopian version of nation by linking its origin to their nature-mediated attachments to these landscapes. The topics covered include forests, agriculture, marine fisheries, parks, sacred landscapes, property rights, trade, and economic development. Gunnel Cederlof is associate professor of history, Uppsala University, Sweden. K. Sivaramakrishnan is professor of anthropology and international studies and director of the South Asia Center, Jackson School of International Studies, at the University of Washington. The other contributors are Nina Bhatt, Vinita Damodaran, Claude A. Garcia, Urs Geiser, Goetz Hoeppe, Bengt G. Karlsson, Antje Linkenbach, Wolfgang Mey, Kathleen D. Morrison, J. P. Pascal, and Sarah Southwold-Llewellyn.

  • 81.
    Christensen, Miyase
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Jansson, A.
    Cosmopolitanism and the media: Cartographies of change2015Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cosmopolitanism and the Media explores the diverse implications of today’s digital media environment in relation to people’s worldviews and social practices. The book presents an account of the relationship between cosmopolitanized lifeworlds and forces of surveillance, control and mobility, as well as a critique of social power and reproduction in our mediatized society.

  • 82.
    Collin, Lina
    et al.
    FoU-enheten, Stockholms stad.
    Rauhut, Daniel
    FoU-enheten, Stockholms stad.
    50+ år – en osynlig grupp?2007In: Vägen till arbete: Om Stockholms stads arbete med olika grupper av arbetslösa socialbidragstagare / [ed] Daniel Rauhut, Stockholm: Fou-enheten, Stockholms stad , 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 83.
    Comber, Robert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Laing, Mary
    Strohmayer, Angelika
    Justice-oriented ecologies: A framework for designing technologies with sex work support services.2018In: Routledge International Handbook of Sex Industry Research / [ed] Susan Dewey, Isabel Crowhurst, Chimaraoke Izugbara, Routledge, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technologies and digital infrastructures can provide new opportunities for charities to rethink organizational control or potentials for justice. Furthermore, technologies can themselves generate new infrastructure to challenge existing structures. In order for newly adopted technologies to be useful for service delivery and not to simply reinforce existing power imbalances to amplify exclusion, they need to be embedded in the service, to follow “just sustainabilities” where attention is drawn to systemic rather than individual concerns, and be accessible for all. National Ugly Mugs (NUM) is a charity whose aim is to end violence against sex workers. They do this by providing access to justice and protection for sex workers in the UK through a digitally facilitated peer-alerting system, training police and other service providers, and through consensual sharing of intelligence with police forces. This chapter aims to look beyond digital technologies that are employed in sex work support services as “silver bullets” to solving complex socio-cultural, socio-ethical, and socio-technical problems.

  • 84. Crona, Beatrice
    et al.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    University of Cape Town.
    Prell, Christina
    Reed, Mark
    Hubacek, Klaus
    Combining social network approaches with social theories to improve understanding of natural resource governance2011In: Social Networks and Natural Resource Management: Uncovering the Social Fabric in Environmental Governance / [ed] Bodin, Örjan; Prell, Christina, Cambridge University Press (CUP) , 2011, p. 44-71Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 85.
    Cupitt, Rebekah
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Phantasms collide: Navigating video-mediated communication in the Swedish workplace2013In: Global Media Journal: Australian edition, E-ISSN 1835-2340, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 247-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global telecommunications companies sell new technologies and services that aim to increase communication possibilities. This case study of one Swedish telecommunications company (‘the Company’), examines how employee notions of video-mediated communication are embedded social meanings. These social meanings are purposefully linked to notions of efficiency in the workplace, the environment, corporate social responsibility and economic gain. Through advertisements, slogans, in-house incentive programs and company policies, the Company has achieved what could be described as a shift in employee attitudes towards working using video-mediated communication (VMC) – so-called video meetings. The shift is however, far from comprehensive and this consciously constructed understanding of video-mediated communication co-exists and conflicts with multiple other meanings – explicit, implicit and purposefully ignored. Often moral dilemmas arise as personal wellbeing in the short-term conflicts with corporate sales targets, budget restrictions and environmental goals to ‘save the planet’. By detailing these different understandings and their inter-relations, the complex and purposed nature of video-mediated communication phantasms in a global telecommunications company emerges.

  • 86.
    Cupitt, Rebekah
    Socialantropologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitetet.
    We Are the Robots: An anthropological perspective on human-robot interaction2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    How do we cope with technology today? We are surrounded by machines, computers and technological devices from mobile phones to automated check- outs. These types of machines are no longer exotic in Sweden where today the average person is usually fluent in their use. But do we really have an understanding of how these objects work, is understanding necessary and how do we cope when our knowledge is lacking?

    This thesis is intended as an introduction to an anthropological way of look- ing at strategies people develop for understanding, using and interacting with technological objects, specifically robots. Still an exotic object, robots are more widely known-about than experienced. Based on ethnographic data, primarily gathered in two distinct workplace environments as well as interviews and video documentation, my analysis aims to illustrate the implications of defining hu- mans and robots as equally significant agents within networks whilst disputing the traditional importance given to the dichotomy of technology (non-human) and human.

    Whilst robots are definitely less than we expect them to be, they are still so- cial artefacts, firmly situated within social networks and meaning which manifest through human–robot interactions. Perhaps little more than tools, an ambigu- ity exists in human–robot interactions which suggests that we form quasi-social relations that could, and have been exploited by designers and engineers to broaden the range of use for technological objects.

    Keywords: human-robot interaction, network theory, situated knowledges, agential realism, performativity, social contextualisation of technological objects

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  • 87.
    Dahlberg, Leif
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    ”Hope Dies – Action Begins”: Civil olydnad och fredlig direkt aktion inom svensk klimataktivism – exemplet Extinction Rebellion2023In: K & K: kultur og klasse : kritik og kulturanalyse, ISSN 0905-6998, E-ISSN 2246-2589, no 134-135, p. 129-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article explores the use of civil disobedience and non-violent direct action (NVDA) as a strategy and method in climate activism in Sweden, with a particular focus on the group Extinction Rebellion (XR). The article describes and analyzes a number of XR actions carried out in 2019-2022, with a focus on meaning-making practices. The uses of civil disobedience and NVDA are presented within a historical, cultural and social context; the question of the role and legitimacy of civil disobedience in democratic societies is discussed. 

    XR has civil disobedience and NVDA as central strategy and in this way the group has put these protest methods in focus, and after each major action there is a need to both explain and justify their use. This is more noticeable in a Swedish cultural context that is characterized by consensus and a stigmatization of disobedience. This relationship in turn affects the planning and execution of disobedient and disruptive protest actions in Sweden. The article explores how activists in XR Sweden relate to this specific cultural context and how they try to influence it; hence XR Sweden works not only to influence those in power and public opinion regarding the climate crisis, but also on the possibilities and forms of civil political protests. 

    The article is based on participant observation. These began in the spring of 2019 and are still ongoing. The study has an anthropological perspective, with an emphasis on semiotics and hermeneutics. 

  • 88.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Socialt arbete.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköpings universitet, Pedagogik och vuxnas lärande.
    Olson, Maria
    Högskolan Dalarna.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköpings universitet, Pedagogik och vuxnas lärande.
    Sandberg, Fredrik
    Linköpings universitet, Pedagogik och vuxnas lärande.
    Medborgarskapandets paradoxer [Paradoxes of citizen formation]: Medborgarskapspositioneringar i berättelser om tillhörighet i migrationens tid. [Citizenship positioning in stories about belonging in an era of migration]2017In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, E-ISSN 2002-066X, Vol. 54, no 1-2, p. 31-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     This article analyzes the formation of citizenship in today’s multi-ethnic Sweden with a particular focus on how migration renders visible existing citizenship ideals, defined in terms of similarity and difference on the basis of ethno-cultural background. Analysing three individual stories of women who have migrated to Sweden, with different biographies and stories of how they ended up in Sweden, the article focuses on negotiations of the boundaries and contents of citizenship in multi-ethnic Sweden. The point of departure for the analysis is a post-structuralist and discursive approach. In all, the stories address the crucial question of who should be included into the social community and on what conditions – and who should be left out? This particular question is also at the very centre of the political debate in today’s Europe. On the one hand, there are strong arguments about the ’death of multiculturalism’ and demands for new forms of ethno-culturally graduated citizenship – also in Sweden. On the other hand, in Sweden as well as in other European countries, claims for the development of a new and more inclusive societal community have been raised, expanding the rights of citizens to accommodating also those who have been excluded from them.

  • 89. Davydov, Vladimir
    et al.
    Arzyutov, Dmitry
    Grani sot͡sial'nogo: antropologicheskie perspektivy issledovanii͡a sot͡sial'nykh otnosheniĭ i kul'tury2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 90.
    Diani, Mario
    et al.
    University of Trento.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Lorien, Jasny
    University of Essex.
    ‘‘Right to the City’’ and the Structure of Civic Organizational Fields: Evidence from Cape Town2018In: VOLUNTAS - International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, ISSN 0957-8765, E-ISSN 1573-7888Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract This article proposes a network analytic approach to the role of frames in shaping the structure of civic organizational fields. Adopting a perspective from the global South, it looks at the impact of the expression ‘‘Right to the city’’ (RTC) over alliance building among civil society actors, exploring patterns of collaborative ties among 129 civil society organizations active in Cape Town from 2012 to 2014. The article addresses two broad ques- tions: What is the relation between RTC and other frames that are also frequently invoked to describe urban struggles and issues? Does the RTC frame affect the structure of urban civic organizational fields in significant ways? Data suggest that while RTC plays a significant role in local civil society, it is neither the only interpretative frame that Capetonian civic organizations draw upon to characterize their activity, nor the more salient. ‘‘Urban conservation,’’ especially tied to nature conservation and environmental issues, actually shapes the structure of local organizational fields in a sharper manner. This is, however, a potentially more divisive frame, rooted as it is in the apartheid legacy that still shapes urban dynamics in the city.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Diani Ernstson Jasny 2018 Right to the city & SNA in Cape Town
  • 91.
    Ding, Jielan
    et al.
    Chinese Acad Sci, Natl Sci Lib, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, 19A Yuquan Rd, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Ahlgren, Per
    KTH, Library, Bibliometrics. National Science Library, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190, China.
    Yang, Liying
    Chinese Acad Sci, Natl Sci Lib, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China..
    Yue, Ting
    Chinese Acad Sci, Natl Sci Lib, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, 19A Yuquan Rd, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Disciplinary structures in Nature, Science and PNAS: journal and country levels2018In: Scientometrics, ISSN 0138-9130, E-ISSN 1588-2861, Vol. 116, no 3, p. 1817-1852Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes, using Web of Science publications and two time periods (2004-2006 and 2014-2016), the disciplinary structures in the three prestigious journals Nature, Science and PNAS, compared with two baselines: Non-NSP_Multi (multidisciplinary publications that have other source journals than Nature, Science and PNAS), and Non-Multi (publications assigned to other categories than Multidisciplinary). We analyze the profiles at two levels, journal and country. The results for the journal level show that for Nature and Science, the publications are considerably less concentrated to certain disciplines compared to PNAS. Biology is the dominant discipline for all the three journals. Nature and Science have similar publication shares in Medicine, Geosciences, Physics, Space science, and Chemistry. The publications of PNAS are highly concentrated to two disciplines: Biology and Medicine. Compared with Non-NSP_Multi and Non-Multi, the shares of Biology in NSP journals are higher, whereas the share of Medicine is lower. At the country level, 14 countries are included, among them the five BRICS countries. With respect to the NSP journals, the emphasis disciplines (in terms of world share of publications) of most countries other than USA are the disciplines in which USA has its weakest performance. The disciplinary structures of USA and of most of the other studied countries therefore tend to be different. Regarding Non-NSP_Multi and Non-Multi, the shapes of the disciplinary structures of the 14 countries can be roughly grouped into three groups, while there are more types of shapes for the countries in the NSP journals. For all five units of analysis, the discipline structures of most countries generally change only slightly between different time periods. The structures of some BRICS countries, however, change to a relatively large extent.

  • 92. Dockweiler, Maria
    et al.
    Holter, Oystein Gullvåg
    Snickare, Lotta Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management.
    Making sense of downsizing: Exploring masculinities in the Norwegian oil industry.2018In: Bodies, Symbols and Organizational Practice : the gendered dynamics of power / [ed] Bolsø, A., Svendsen, S. H. Bang. & Øyslebø Sørensen, S., London: Routledge, 2018, p. 123-144Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter explores masculinities in the Norwegian oil industry. Using a combination of critical sensemaking theory, organizational gender theory and masculinity theory, it analyses how two men working as engineering leaders make sense of, firstly, their typical career paths during the industry's prosperous times, and secondly, the industry's current downsizings. The downsizings both disrupt and clarify existing sensemaking frameworks as the men struggle to make sense of losing jobs and dismissing employees. The shift makes gender dimensions more evident and reveals uncharacteristically clearly how social framing changes: the men's sense-makings change, linked to three different and conflicting social frameworks and shifting forms of hegemonic masculinity.

  • 93.
    Engel, Julia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Ramstedt, Emma
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Behöver ytterstaden bli innerstaden för att vara socialt hållbar?: En fallstudie av Husbys utemiljöer2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Million House Programme areas are characterized in many cases by a uniformsettlement, large housing estates, traffic separation and lots of greenery. These areas are inneed of renovations, both internally but also in the public environment. Today, an urbanideal prevails in urban planning. This means that one wants to strive for the qualities andstructure of the inner city with dense buildings, living ground floors and urban streets. Oneargument for this is that it is sustainable, and thus also socially sustainable.

    Social sustainability is a concept that lacks a clear definition and therefore must be adaptedto each individual situation. In urban planning, it is therefore difficult to find a model forsocially sustainable urban development that can be applied to all parts of a city. A factor insocially sustainable urban development is a congenial outdoor environment. The purpose ofthe study is to investigate the Million Homes Programme's outdoor environments from asocially sustainable perspective, both on a local and on a large-scale level. The work alsoexamines whether an urban approach is suitable to apply to large-scale Million HomesProgramme areas or not.

    By conducting a literature study on social sustainability and public spaces, a sociallysustainable outdoor environment is defined. Furthermore, a case study is made of Husby'soutdoor environments, where the analysis is based on the theory mentioned above to findout what role physical design of public spaces plays in social sustainability. Additionally, adiscussion is held about potential consequences of the City of Stockholm's focus on creatingan urban environment in Husby.

    The analysis shows that a socially sustainable outdoor environment is accessible, safe and anenvironment that enables the execution of activities. This means that urban planning can beused as a tool to create conditions for an environment to be socially sustainable, but it alsodemands that other sectors in the society are engaged in the work in order for it to besuccessful. Socially sustainable urban development from a larger perspective also requiresinterconnections between different parts of the city for increased integration andcommunity. The analysis also points out that urbanism is not the only way to create a sociallysustainable city. Instead, an adaptation to each area's unique conditions may be moreappropriate, where the area can be supplemented with qualities the area lacks and thatwould improve the living environment for the area's residents. The work's conclusion can beuseful for problematizing how Million Homes Programme areas should be handled in futureurban development.

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  • 94. Eriksson, T.
    et al.
    Pitt, Christine
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Flostrand, A.
    Heinonen, K.
    The Impact of Friendship on Entrepreneurial Decision-Making: An Abstract2019In: Developments in Marketing Science: Proceedings of the Academy of Marketing Science, Springer Nature , 2019, p. 123-124Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the influence of friendship on the relationship between heuristics and biases on decision-making within entrepreneurial founding teams. The research question builds on the recognition that better decision-making promotes venture success. The entrepreneurial environment is characterized by high levels of complexity, ambiguity, and time constraints. By employing heuristic shortcuts, the mind is able to attend to a vastly larger number of decisions in a given space of time than if it were to consciously and deliberately evaluate each and every alternative in the decision-making process. While extant literature in entrepreneurship has begun to focus on the role that heuristics and biases play in shaping the decisions that entrepreneurial teams make, most research has focused on the individual entrepreneur. However, large portion of ventures are founded and led by teams rather than by individuals. Further, most of the literature available on the nature of the entrepreneurial team focuses on how the team functions once it has been established or how a team within a company possesses degrees of entrepreneurial orientation. This paper is concerned with friendship as it pertains to the practical application of entrepreneurial founding teams whose friendship precedes the venture and did not begin for the purpose of starting the venture. Friendship may have both negative and positive implications for the founding and operation of the entrepreneurial venture, providing for both strengths and weaknesses in the organization. This paper develops a number of researchable propositions, which can be tested and then either accepted, rejected, or extended in empirical work. The methodology connects characteristics of friendship from extant literature to a series of previously identified bias groups which can logically be expected to influence decision-making classified within previously identified stages of entrepreneurial venture development. The product of this work is a series of researchable propositions, as well as managerial implications to consider when entering a venture. References Available Upon Request 

  • 95.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. University of Cape Town.
    Social Network Analysis (SNA)2012In: The Encyclopedia of Sustainability: Vol. 6. Measurements, Indicators, and Research Methods for Sustainability / [ed] Fogel, D.; Fredericks, S.; Harrington, L.; Spellerberg, I., Berkshire Publishing , 2012, Vol. 6, p. 322-325Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 96.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University.
    The Drama of Urban Greens and Regimes: Social Movements and Ecosystem Services in Stockholm National Urban Park2007Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 97.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Sweden; African Centre for Cities, University of Cape Town, South Africa.
    Transformative collective action: A network approach to transformative change in ecosystem-based management2011In: Social Networks and Natural Resource Management: Uncovering the Social Fabric in Environmental Governance / [ed] Bodin, Örjan; Prell, Christina, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011, p. 255-287Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [From Introduction] This chapter will strive to add to contributions made by other authors in describing and explaining transformative change. Special attention will be paid to elucidate the collective nature of these transformations, hence the title of transformative collective action. The analysis will show that in order to bring about radical institutional change of natural resource management, a whole network of individuals and organizations are needed that through time can sustain pressure for change. These actors furthermore need to relate to each other through information exchange and repeated collaborations in order to coordinate their collective action, to learn as they go along of what works and what does not work, and to negotiate their vision of change to reach some common ground that can unite their collective effort. This type of sustained collective action furthermore needs to operate through, and challenge, already established institutions, modes of thought and ways of doing things. As such we can talk about collective action as a ‘collective actor’ – the network of actors – that over time builds enough agency to generate institutional change.

  • 98.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Barthel, Stephan
    Andersson, Erik
    Borgström, Sara T.
    Scale-Crossing Brokers and Network Governance of Urban Ecosystem Services: The Case of Stockholm2010In: Ecology & Society, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 28-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban ecosystem services are crucial for human well-being and the livability of cities. A central challenge for sustaining ecosystem services lies in addressing scale mismatches between ecological processes on one hand, and social processes of governance on the other. This article synthesizes a set of case studies from urban green areas in Stockholm, Sweden-allotment gardens, urban parks, cemeteries and protected areas-and discusses how governmental agencies and civil society groups engaged in urban green area management can be linked through social networks so as to better match spatial scales of ecosystem processes. The article develops a framework that combines ecological scales with social network structure, with the latter being taken as the patterns of interaction between actor groups. Based on this framework, the article (1) assesses current ecosystem governance, and (2) develops a theoretical understanding of how social network structure influences ecosystem governance and how certain actors can work as agents to promote beneficial network structures. The main results show that the mesoscale of what is conceptualized as city scale green networks (i.e., functionally interconnected local green areas) is not addressed by any actor in Stockholm, and that the management practices of civil society groups engaged in local ecosystem management play a crucial but neglected role in upholding ecosystem services. The article proposes an alternative network structure and discusses the role of midscale managers (for improving ecological functioning) and scale-crossing brokers (engaged in practices to connect actors across ecological scales). Dilemmas, strategies, and practices for establishing this governance system are discussed.

  • 99. Fernandez-Ardevol, Mireia
    et al.
    Rosales, Andrea
    Östlund, Britt
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Technology in Health Care.
    Digital Practices in Later Life: Tracking Smartphone and Mobile App Activity”: as part of the Symposia: New Conditions for an Active Ageing at Home - an International Comparative Perspective2019In: IAGGER 2019, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 100.
    Fischer, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Technology in Health Care.
    A Socio-Material Study of User Involvement: Interrogating the practices of technology development for older people in a digitalised world2022Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Population ageing and increased digitalization each constitute an ongoing and profound transformation within contemporary modes of living, as growing advances in technological development mix and intermingle with the lived realities of older people as the final recipients. It is against the backdrop of this interplay that user involvement has enjoyed ever-rising advocacy to an almost normative degree. Beyond articulating methodological principles, however, the literature has remained surprisingly vague as to the practical implementation of the approach. Less appears to be known, both empirically and conceptually, about how design and user involvement are done in practice and how they would matter to bring about intentional or unintentional effects. 

    To engage with these developments, this thesis aims at taking the practices of user involvement and design to the centre of its inquiry by adopting a perspective from Science and Technology Studies (STS). Specifically, the thesis seeks to both build on and contribute to the established body of STS on the connection between technology design and older users and ask: What is there to learn about user involvement as a method, if we focus on the practices of doing user involvement? To answer this question, the thesis studies four different aspects of the practices of user involvement and design. In particular, the thesis reviews the literature on how user involvement mattered in previous empirical projects that include older people (Paper I), it examines how different configurations of participation matter in design workshops (Paper II), it scrutinizes the achievement of user involvement in corporate practices (Paper III) and it traces the circumstantial performances of such practices (Paper IV). The largest empirical piece comes from a two-year ethnographic study of a small- to medium-sized enterprise, the material from which informed Paper III and Paper IV.

    The findings highlight how user involvement in practice is both contingent and transformative, as it selectively enrols different participants and performs multiple realities. In practice, user involvement appears to be dependent on a set of underlying premises and socio-material conditions and thus is always a dynamic and momentary achievement. Furthermore, the thesis shows how the practices of user involvement themselves may bring into existence different realities, articulating and materializing particular versions of objects and images of ageing. Accordingly, the thesis contributes theoretically by illuminating the underlying socio-material facets of user involvement, and by emphasizing ageing as a particular object/image of design. Specifically, the appended papers encompass a conceptual framework, as well as three new concepts: design multiple, shifting interstices and viscous image landscape, in order to theorize the underlying conditions for user involvement, its relationship with design and its entanglement with ageing. Practically, the thesis enunciates three main implications regarding questions of goodness, politics and ethics.

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