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  • 51.
    Appelgren, Ester
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Adoption of interactive media services among young people in the Nordic countries2006In: Advances in printing and media technology, vol. XXXIII, Oxford: Pergamon Press , 2006, p. 81-102Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies adoption of interactive media news services among young people in the Nordic countries, focusing on Sweden. The paper aims to reflect the courses of events in terms of usage as the services are established on the market.

    Using statistics and survey data concerning four contemporary media technology based news services selected to reflect different levels of available interactivity - on-line newspaper editions, web TV, news podcasting and news blogs - this paper analyzes some of the adoption characteristics of the services.

    The new technological platforms as well as the presentation of content for the four analyzed news services can be compared to specific precursors, thus the S-curve and the five adopter categories suggested in diffusion theory can to some extent be used when forecasting the diffusion of the new services.

  • 52.
    Appelgren, Ester
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Convergence and divergence in media: different perspectives2004In: ICCC 8th International Conference on Electronic Publishing 2004,Brasilia, Brazil., 2004, p. 237-248Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A current issue in the media industry is coping with the effects of convergence. The concept ofconvergence is frequently used both in the academic field and within the media industry to denotethe ongoing restructuring of media companies as well as to describe the latest developments inmedia forms, distribution, and consumption. However, there is currently no generally accepteddefinition of the concept. Depending on the context, the meaning and connotations vary. Someresearchers suggest that convergence is a result of a change toward a more modern media societywhile others treat the concept as denoting the actual process toward a more efficient managementof the media value chain. This paper discusses various definitions of convergence, both in a historicalperspective and as it is used and understood in contemporary media and communications research,one aim being the evaluation of how the meaning of the concept has evolved during the past decade.The study is based on literature research and one conclusion is that convergence is a processdependent on current circumstances within society. The use of the concept has therefore developedfrom being mainly connected with digitalization in media technology to also include elements ofintegration, combination, competition and divergence. This paper suggests that convergence shouldbe seen as an ongoing process of media and media industry development that is dependent on and incontinuous interplay with a contrasting and complementary process, that of media divergence.

  • 53.
    Appelgren, Ester
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    Interactive News Services: Competitors to the printed newspaper2006In: Proceedings of the 33rd International Research Conference, Iarigai, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Appelgren, Ester
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    Media Convergence and Digital News Services2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis, media convergence strategies and added value of digital news services are investigated, focusing on the newspaper industry and it’s audience. Convergence implies that previously unalike areas come together, approaching a common goal. A subordinate concept of convergence, i.e., media convergence, is a concept that has become common when denoting a range of processes within the production of media content, its distribution and consumption.

    Newspapers are one of many so-called publishing channels that provide information and entertainment. They have traditionally been printed on paper, but today’s digital technology makes it possible to provide newspapers through a number of different channels. The current strategy used by newspaper companies involves a process of convergence mainly regarding multiple publishing. A newspaper company interested in publishing content through multiple channels has to adapt its production workflow to produce content not only for the traditional printed edition, but also for the other channels. In this thesis, a generalized value chain involving four main stages illustrates the production workflow at a newspaper company in relation to the convergence processes. The four stages are creation, packaging, distribution and consumption of content.

    One of the aims of this thesis is to assess how the views and strategies of newspaper companies concerning media convergence correspond with the opinions and views concerning convergence of their audience. In order to discuss this, seven types of media convergence are suggested.

    Furthermore, the thesis explores how the newspaper industry is relating to the processes of convergence, using two examples: newspaper companies’ ventures into the use of moving images, and the newspaper companies’ strategies for a future epaper edition.

    Among the findings of this thesis are that digital news services can add value to a newspaper company, however that the digital news services investigated, in their current form, are not sophisticated enough to give added value as perceived by the audience.

    The findings of the thesis are based on studies of the newspaper industry in Sweden and reflect specific newspaper companies, their strategies, production workflow and ventures from 2002 to 2007. The methods used have mainly been case studies and surveys.

  • 55.
    Appelgren, Ester
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    Perceived simultaneous consumption of media content services among media aware university students2007In: Proceedings of the I-Media Conference 2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 56.
    Appelgren, Ester
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    The influence of media convergence on strategies in newspaper production2005Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Convergence implies that previously unalike areas come together, approaching a common goal. A subordinate concept of convergence, i.e., media convergence, is a concept that has become common when denoting a range of processes within the production of media content, its distribution and consumption. The concept of media convergence has achieved buzzword status in many contexts due to its widespread use.

    The concept is not new and has been discussed by researchers in many academic fields and from several different points of views. This thesis will discuss media convergence as an ongoing process and not an end state.

    Newspapers are one of many so-called publishing channels that provide information and entertainment. They have traditionally been printed on paper, but today’s digital technology makes it possible to provide newspapers through a number of different channels. The current strategy used by newspaper companies involves a process of convergence mainly regarding multiple publishing. A newspaper company interested in publishing content through multiple channels has to adapt its production workflow to produce content not only for the traditional printed edition, but also for the other channels.

    In this thesis, a generalized value chain involving four main stages illustrates the production workflow at a newspaper company in relation to the convergence processes. The four stages are creation, packaging, distribution and consumption of content.

    The findings of the thesis are based on studies of the newspaper industry in Sweden and reflect specific newspaper companies, their strategies, production workflow and ventures from 2002 to 2005. The methods used have been case studies, literature studies and scenarios.

    Some of the conclusions of the thesis indicate that convergence processes have steered the newspaper companies’ development towards multiple channel publishing. Advancing technology and mergers between companies have contributed to the processes of convergence. However, the new publishing channels have been described as threatening to the traditional printed editions since they compete for consumers’ time and advertising revenues. Convergence of technology has made it possible to store, edit and publish material over many different networks using the same tools and the same database system. If the content is stored in a neutral format, it can be packaged and used in many different types of publishing channels. However, according to the studied newspapers, a fully automated workflow for all publishing channels is undesirable and impossible to achieve with the existing technology, standards and organizational structure.

    This licentiate thesis will discuss some of the strategies behind multiple channel publishing, production workflows and market conditions to detect how the newspaper industry is coping with media convergence.

  • 57.
    Appelgren, Ester
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Möller, Kristina Sabelström
    Tidningsutgivarna, Stockholm.
    Nordqvist, Stig
    Tidningsutgivarna, Stockholm.
    E-Paper Production Workflow: Adapting Production Workflow Processes for Digital Newsprint2004In: Proceedings of the Technical Association of the Graphic Arts, TAGA, 2004, 2004, p. 181-208Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on production flow for publishing in generic digital newsprint editions, such as e-paper, PDAs or on-line editions, by analyzing and mapping existing production workflow at three Swedish newspaper publishing companies covering the most common organizational types in the newspaper publishing industry today. Most newspaper publishing companies produce a range of electronic editions, all part of the digital newsprint family. In general, there exists two types of organizational production workflows - the integrated multiple channel workflow, and the separated, where the printed and the electronic workflows are detached, sometimes in totally separate organizations. Using scenarios, the aim is to propose a model for the production workflow of the electronic paper editions in newspaper publishing. The results indicate several possibilities for automation in the workflow. Furthermore, the study points out stages as challenges in the workflow where changes have to be done in order to introduce epaper as a publishing channel for news publishing. We will as an introduction, along with the workflow scenarios in this paper, also present a brief overview of the existing techniques for displaying content on electronic paper terminals.

  • 58.
    Appelgren, Ester
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Nordqvist, S.
    Tidningsutgivarna, Stockholm.
    Evaluating digital TV as a publishing channel for newspapers2003In: Proceedings of the Technical Association of the Graphic Arts, TAGA, 2003, 2003, p. 23-24Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Can there be synergies between newspapers and digital TV? What business synergies exist and are the technical formats reliable and flexible enough for cross media publishing? At the end of the 1990's, several Swedish newspapers applied for a license to broadcast digital TV. The major trend among newspapers during this time was to develop websites as a secondary publishing channel, and many companies withdrew their applications. Today, digital TV is again raising expectations. When digital TV broadcasting technology replaces analogue broadcasting, the media landscape will change. The conversion will offer new publishing and business opportunities for newspaper companies. We have studied three Swedish newspaper companies actively working with TV production, three major Nordic television companies, and five television broadcasting operators in Sweden. The objective is to give a wider perspective on the digital TV publishing market today, focusing on technical as well as on economical aspects. In addition, we have evaluated the next steps for newspaper companies interested in establishing themselves in the digital TV medium. The study indicates that among the viable strategies for small and medium sized newspapers are entering the digital TV business through text based services and using cross promotion in order to strengthen the brand.

  • 59.
    Arfaoul, Ghada
    et al.
    Orange Labs, F-75015 Paris, France..
    Bisson, Pascal
    Thales, F-45400 Fleury Les Aubrais, France..
    Blom, Rolf
    RISE SICS, Secur Lab, S-16480 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Borgaonkar, Ravishankar
    Univ Oxford, Dept Comp Sci, Oxford OX1 2JD, England..
    Englund, Hakan
    Ericsson AB, Ericsson Res, S-16480 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Felix, Edith
    Thales, F-45400 Fleury Les Aubrais, France..
    Klaedtke, Felix
    NEC Labs Europe, D-69115 Heidelberg, Germany..
    Nakarmi, Prajwol Kumar
    Ericsson AB, Ericsson Res, S-16480 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Näslund, Mats
    KTH.
    O'Hanlon, Piers
    Univ Oxford, Dept Comp Sci, Oxford OX1 2JD, England..
    Papay, Juri
    Univ Southampton, IT Innovat Ctr, Southampton SO16 7NS, Hants, England..
    Suomalainen, Jani
    VTT Tech Res Ctr Finland, Espoo 02044, Finland..
    Surridge, Mike
    Univ Southampton, IT Innovat Ctr, Southampton SO16 7NS, Hants, England..
    Wary, Jean-Philippe
    Orange Labs, F-75015 Paris, France..
    Zahariev, Alexander
    Nixu Corp, Espoo 02150, Finland..
    A Security Architecture for 5G Networks2018In: IEEE Access, E-ISSN 2169-3536, Vol. 6, p. 22466-22479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    5G networks will provide opportunities for the creation of new services, for new business models, and for new players to enter the mobile market. The networks will support efficient and cost-effective launch of a multitude of services, tailored for different vertical markets having varying service and security requirements, and involving a large number of actors. Key technology concepts are network slicing and network softwarization, including network function virtualization and software-defined networking. The presented security architecture builds upon concepts from the 3G and 4G security architectures but extends and enhances them to cover the new 5G environment. It comprises a toolbox for security relevant modeling of the systems, a set of security design principles, and a set of security functions and mechanisms to implement the security controls needed to achieve stated security objectives. In a smart city use case setting, we illustrate its utility; we examine the high-level security aspects stemming from the deployment of a large number of IoT devices and network softwarization.

  • 60. Arkenson, Caroline
    et al.
    Chou, Y. -Y
    Huang, C. -Y
    Lee, Y. -C
    Tag and seek a location-based game in tainan city2014In: CHI PLAY 2014 - Proceedings of the 2014 Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, p. 315-318Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tag and Seek is a location-based game which leads a traveler through Tainan City in Taiwan. The traveler's task is to find Harry's friends who are hiding at different sites in the city. Once at the site, the traveler has to scan a Near Field Communication (NFC) tag placed on a board looking like Harry's friend. When the NFC tag is scanned the lost friend is found, information about the site is presented and instructions to the next site will be available. The game lets the traveler experience culture, gain knowledge about sites in the city and meet local citizens - without the traveler having to plan the trip ahead. By implementing NFC technology as check points the interaction with the game differs from regular tourist guides and the threat of privacy which comes with location-based services is greatly lowered as the traveler is not being tracked by GPS. From our user evaluation we found that both the interface and interaction with the boards could use some improvements to increase the usability.

  • 61. Aronsson, Sanna
    et al.
    Artman, Henrik
    Lindquist, Sinna
    Ramberg, Ramberg
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Mikael, Mitchell
    Larsson, Magnus
    Ungerth, Stefan
    LVC i vardagen - framtidens flygträning2017Report (Other academic)
  • 62.
    Artman, Henrik
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    A scenario for future informationmanagement in environmentalinspections and enforcement2016In: Efficient Environmental Inspections and Enforcement, Naturvårdsverket, 2016, , p. 25p. 198-213Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 63. Artman, Henrik
    et al.
    Brynielsson, Joel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Herzing, Mathias
    Stockholm University.
    Jacobson, Adam
    Stockholm University.
    More efficient environmental inspections and enforcement2016In: Efficient Environmental Inspections and Enforcement / [ed] Herzing, M., Jacobsson, Adam, Naturvårdsverket , 2016, p. 246-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 64. Artman, Henrik
    et al.
    Edlund, Lena
    Herzing, Mathias
    Stockholm Universitet.
    Jacobsson, Adam
    Stockholm Universitet.
    Chapter 1 Introduction2016In: Efficient Environmental Inspections and Enforcemen / [ed] Herzing, M., Jacobsson, A., Naturvårdsverket , 2016, p. 246-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 65.
    Artman, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    House, David
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Hulten, Magnus
    Linköpings universitet.
    Designed by Engineers: An analysis of interactionaries with engineering students2015In: Designs for Learning, ISSN 1654-7608, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 28-56, article id 10.2478/dfl-2014-0062Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to describe and analyze learning taking place in a collaborative design exercise involving engineering students. The students perform a time-constrained, open-ended, complex interaction design task, an “interactionary”. A multimodal learning perspective is used. We have performed detailed analyses of video recordings of the engineering students, including classifying aspects of interaction. Our results show that the engineering students carry out and articulate their design work using a technology-centred approach and focus more on the function of their designs than on aspects of interaction. The engineering students mainly make use of ephemeral communication strategies (gestures and speech) rather than sketching in physical materials. We conclude that the interactionary may be an educational format that can help engineering students learn the messiness of design work. We further identify several constraints to the engineering students’ design learning and propose useful interventions that a teacher could make during an interactionary. We especially emphasize interventions that help engineering students retain aspects of human-centered design throughout the design process. This study partially replicates a previous study which involved interaction design students.

  • 66.
    Artman, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Tholander, Jakob
    Klas, Karlgren
    Rollen hos representationer och agerande inom interaktionsdesign2014In: Resultatdialog, Vetenskapsrådet , 2014, , p. 8p. 156-163Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 67.
    Bahri, Leila
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Identity related threats, vulnerabilities and risk mitigation in online social networks: A tutorial2017In: CCS '17 Proceedings of the 2017 ACM SIGSAC Conference on Computer and Communications Security, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, Vol. Part F131467, p. 2603-2605Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This tutorial provides a thorough review of the main research directions in the field of identity management and identity related security threats in Online Social Networks (OSNs). The continuous increase in the numbers and sophistication levels of fake accounts constitutes a big threat to the privacy and to the security of honest OSN users. Uninformed OSN users could be easily fooled into accepting friendship links with fake accounts, giving them by that access to personal information they intend to exclusively share with their real friends. Moreover, these fake accounts subvert the security of the system by spreading malware, connecting with honest users for nefarious goals such as sexual harassment or child abuse, and make the social computing environment mostly untrustworthy. The tutorial introduces the main available research results available in this area, and presents our work on collaborative identity validation techniques to estimate OSN profiles trustworthiness.

  • 68.
    Bahri, Leila
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Carminati, Barbara
    Ferrari, Elena
    Univ Insubria, Dept Theoret & Appl Sci, Varese, Italy..
    Knowledge-based approaches for identity management in online social networks2018In: WILEY INTERDISCIPLINARY REVIEWS-DATA MINING AND KNOWLEDGE DISCOVERY, ISSN 1942-4787, Vol. 8, no 5, article id e1260Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When we meet a new person, we start by introducing ourselves. We share our names, and other information about our jobs, cities, family status, and so on. This is how socializing and social interactions can start: we first need to identify each other. Identification is a cornerstone in establishing social contacts. We identify ourselves and others by a set of civil (e.g., name, nationality, ID number, gender) and social (e.g., music taste, hobbies, religion) characteristics. This seamlessly carried out identification process in face-to-face interactions is challenged in the virtual realms of socializing, such as in online social network (OSN) platforms. New identities (i.e., online profiles) could be created without being subject to any level of verification, making it easy to create fake information and forge fake identities. This has led to a massive proliferation of accounts that represent fake identities (i.e., not mapping to physically existing entities), and that poison the online socializing environment with fake information and malicious behavior (e.g., child abuse, information stealing). Within this milieu, users in OSNs are left unarmed against the challenging task of identifying the real person behind the screen. OSN providers and research bodies have dedicated considerable effort to the study of the behavior and features of fake OSN identities, trying to find ways to detect them. Some other research initiatives have explored possible techniques to enable identity validation in OSNs. Both kinds of approach rely on extracting knowledge from the OSN, and exploiting it to achieve identification management in their realms. We provide a review of the most prominent works in the literature. We define the problem, provide a taxonomy of related attacks, and discuss the available solutions and approaches for knowledge-based identity management in OSNs. This article is categorized under: Fundamental Concepts of Data and Knowledge > Human Centricity and User Interaction Application Areas> Internet and Web-Based Applications Application Areas> Society and Culture

  • 69. Becker, Lee B.
    et al.
    Hollifield, C. Ann
    Jacobsson, Adam
    Jacobsson, Eva-Maria
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Vlad, Tudor
    IS MORE ALWAYS BETTER?: Examining the adverse effects of competition on media performance2009In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 368-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While classic market economic theory argues that competition among media is better for consumers, preliminary research in emerging media markets suggests otherwise. High levels of competition in markets with limited advertising revenues may lead to poorer journalistic performance. This study tests that argument using secondary analysis of data from a purposive sample of countries where measures of news media performance and market competition exist. The authors find a curvilinear relationship between competition and the quality of the journalistic product, with moderate competition leading to higher-quality journalism products and higher levels of competition leading to journalistic products that do not serve society well. The implications of the findings for media assistance initiatives are discussed.

  • 70. Belkin, Nicholas J
    et al.
    Clarke, Charles L A
    Kamps, Jaap
    Gao, Ning
    Karlgren, Jussi
    Report on the SIGIR workshop on "entertain me": supporting complex search tasks2011In: SIGIR Forum, ISSN 0163-5840, E-ISSN 1558-0229, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 51-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Searchers with a complex information need typically slice-and-dice their problem into several queries and subqueries, and laboriously combine the answers post hoc to solve their tasks. Consider planning a social event at the last day of SIGIR, in the unknown city of Beijing, factoring in distances, timing, and preferences on budget, cuisine, and entertainment. A system supporting the entire search episode should "know" a lot, either from profiles or implicit information, or from explicit information in the query or from feedback. This may lead to the (interactive) construction of a complexly structured query, but sometimes the most obvious query for a complex need is dead simple: entertain me. Rather than returning ten-blue-lines in response to a 2.4-word query, the desired system should support searchers during their whole task or search episode, by iteratively constructing a complex query or search strategy, by exploring the result-space at every stage, and by combining the partial answers into a coherent whole.

    The workshop brought together a varied group of researchers covering both user and system centered approaches, who worked together on the problem and potential solutions. There was a strong feeling that we made substantial progress. First, there was general optimism on the wealth of contextual information that can be derived from context or natural interactions without the need for obstrusive explicit feedback. Second, the task of "contextual suggestions"--matching specific types of results against rich profiles--was identified as a manageable first step, and concrete plans for such as track were discussed in the aftermath of the workshop. Third, the identified dimensions of variation--such as the level of engagement, or user versus system initiative--give clear suggestions of the types of input a searcher is willing or able to give and the type of response expected from a system.

  • 71.
    Berg, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Skills and Technology.
    Företagskulturers makt: överbrygga språkliga klyftor2008Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    How do we work in projects that are expected to bridge cultural, social and historical boundaries? Is it possible to apply stated instructions across these boundaries so that, for example, the task of producing a requirement specification is interpreted in the same way by all the parties involved?

    In this thesis, the author takes a stand against his personal experience from such a trans-cultural project – a project in which he failed. A factor that made a strong contribution to this failure was the inability of the companies involved to manage the underlying complex of problems, problems associated with the philosophy of language. They possessed neither the knowledge nor the instruments to bridge the chasms of language. Essential reflection and analysis was replaced by the power language of the enterprise; individuals were singled out and held responsible, and the failure was relegated by definition to the level of personal issues.

    Experience does not automatically become knowledge; this is a process that requires reflection.

    The author suggests a number of ways of tackling communications problems among people who not only do not understand one another, but do not understand that they do not understand. The latter may mean that two people think that something is unambiguous, yet their interpretations diverge. This is when problems occur. Nobody has made a mistake – both parties have acted properly, they have even (perhaps) talked the matter through and reached agreement, yet the result still does not coincide with what they anticipated.

    A central concept is dialogue. Through its organised form, dialogue can make openings in problems that cut through cultural, social and historical boundaries. It is an approach that may be illustrated through authors and philosophers such as Witold Gombrowicz, Ludwik Fleck, Oscar Wilde, Joseph Conrad and Galileo Galilei.

    This study has its basis and its origins in the research area of Skills and Technology at the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (KTH).

  • 72.
    Beskow, Jonas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Granström, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    House, David
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Visual correlates to prominence in several expressive modes2006In: INTERSPEECH 2006 AND 9TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON SPOKEN LANGUAGE PROCESSING, BAIXAS: ISCA-INST SPEECH COMMUNICATION ASSOC , 2006, p. 1272-1275Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present measurements of visual, facial parameters obtained from a speech corpus consisting of short, read utterances in which focal accent was systematically varied. The utterances were recorded in a variety of expressive modes including certain, confirming, questioning, uncertain, happy, angry and neutral. Results showed that in all expressive modes, words with focal accent are accompanied by a greater variation of the facial parameters than are words in non-focal positions. Moreover, interesting differences between the expressions in terms of different parameters were found.

  • 73.
    Beskow, Jonas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Granström, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Nordqvist, Peter
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT.
    Al Moubayed, Samer
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Salvi, Giampiero
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Herzke, Tobias
    Schulz, Arne
    Hearing at Home: Communication support in home environments for hearing impaired persons2008In: INTERSPEECH 2008: 9TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF THE INTERNATIONAL SPEECH COMMUNICATION ASSOCIATION 2008, BAIXAS: ISCA-INST SPEECH COMMUNICATION ASSOC , 2008, p. 2203-2206Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Hearing at Home (HaH) project focuses on the needs of hearing-impaired people in home environments. The project is researching and developing an innovative media-center solution for hearing support, with several integrated features that support perception of speech and audio, such as individual loudness amplification, noise reduction, audio classification and event detection, and the possibility to display an animated talking head providing real-time speechreading support. In this paper we provide a brief project overview and then describe some recent results related to the audio classifier and the talking head. As the talking head expects clean speech input, an audio classifier has been developed for the task of classifying audio signals as clean speech, speech in noise or other. The mean accuracy of the classifier was 82%. The talking head (based on technology from the SynFace project) has been adapted for German, and a small speech-in-noise intelligibility experiment was conducted where sentence recognition rates increased from 3% to 17% when the talking head was present.

  • 74. Biasillo, Roberta
    Popularizing Climate Change and the Challenge of Multiple Narratives2018In: Seeing the Woods. A Blog by the Rachel Carson CenterArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This blog piece is inspired by Harald Lesch’s talk “Science, Society, Signs” at the RCC Lunchtime Colloquium. It focuses on the potential and limits of graphic representations of climate change-related phenomena, interpretations, and understandings.

  • 75.
    Bjursted, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Benchmarking gravure cylinders vs. web-offset plates2005In: ADVANCES IN PRINTING AND MEDIA TECHNOLOGY, VOL 32 - DIGITALISATION AND PRINT MEDIA, Stockholm: KTH , 2005, p. 71-89Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with an important part of a forthcoming Survey of the European Publication Printing Industry - and highlights the developments in recent years of the processing costs of producing either offset plates or gravure cylinders. In 1985-1986, one of the most comprehensive studies of the publication printing industry was carried out by the European Rotogravure Association in Munich. This study was the first of its kind and a comparable study has, to author's knowledge, never been compiled. The objective of the present paper is to determine what factors are important when the choice of a particular printing method is made, and if this process was fundamentally different in 1985 than to-day. The hypothesis is that there were some determining factors in 1985 such as the economic consequences (processing costs and market prices), the speed (lead-time) and finally the quality of the printing process to be chosen. In order to make the two studies comparable a statistical analysis of various European macro economic indices has been used, and now 20 year later the first follow-up study is now available.

    With an abundant number of players marketing and selling CTP-solutions, there is a tremendous competition in the world market. Hence, most industry observers have the opinion (or belief) that producing web-offset plate's to-day is much cheaper and easier than processing gravure cylinders. The gravure cylinder processes are still considered to be very expensive, cumbersome and old fashioned to the great disadvantage of the gravure printing process. What is often forgotten is that the recent web-offset plate technology is in fact emulating the much earlier developed gravure technology, going directly from the digital file to the image carrier. The big difference is that modem PC and networking technology has made the direct digital interfaces very much cheaper for the gravure printing industry than it was 20 years ago for the first pioneers, and the reliability of the engraving process has reached a level where gravure proofs are no longer necessary.

  • 76.
    Bjurstedt, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Break-even analyses gravure vs. web-offset: a new approach!2007In: Advances in printing and media technology, xxxiii / [ed] Enlund N; Lovrecek M, Stockholm: KTH , 2007, p. 55-73Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper is to determine what factors are important when a particular printing method is chosen. In 1985-86, a study of the European publication printing industry was carried out by the European Rotogravure Association (ERA) in Munich, and contemporary industry leaders considered that Study to be one of the most comprehensive ever made in the publication printing industry. This paper deals with an important part of an ongoing survey of the European Publication Printing Industry - and highlights the development in recent years of the break-even level between gravure and commercial web-offset printing. These studies were the first of their kind and comparable studies have, to the author's knowledge, never been reported.

    In 1996, the Summary showed that commercial web-offset printing was very competitive when printing signatures with 16 or 32 pages, and that gravure printing was very competitive from 48 pages signatures upwards, even though the manufacturing costs in the bindery for gathering together a number of smaller signatures in web-offset were not included. Further, the data collected also showed that for those gravure printers who were engraving cylinders directly from digital data Without having to proof the cylinders, the break-even level even for a 32 page signature became very competitive.

    About 15 years ago, some commercial web-offset press manufacturers were redesigning the commercial web-offset press, and the Sunday press concept was launched by Harris (later taken over by Heidelberg, now Goss) in 1993/94. Within a few years, a completely new breed of commercial presses was presented for the publication printing markets; not only the traditional 16-32 pages (in short grain), but also larger and wider presses capable of printing 48 to 64 pages oil a single web. There was not only ail increase in the signature pagination but also a significant leap in web speed. Automation of plate processing (CTP-technology), plate Mounting and other press variables led to a sharp increase in productivity and print quality. Web-speed and productivity in web-offset became close to or in sonic instances even higher than in gravure printing. Recently, some indicators have shown that during the last decade gravure has lost its previous market dominance to web-offset printing, and recent investments in new printing capacity in commercial web-offset have outnumbered gravure by 4:1.

    These recent developments made it clear that a new survey comparing printing costs, lead-time and quality for printing was needed. During 2005/2006, interviews have been conducted with a Substantial number of printers - both gravure and web-offset printers - using the same kind of Questionnaire as in 1985-86. Data from internationally renowned printers using gravure and/or commercial web-offset have been collected and analyzed in order to determine the relevant break-even level. A similar non-disclosure agreement as in 1985 has been used to ensure that confidential data will not be disclosed, and that it will not be possible to identify any single printer. For the first time, a scientific methodology has been used to compare the printing costs of a few well-defined signatures.

    In 1986, the following hypotheses were formulated concerning the important and decisive factors of a customer's choice:

    the economy (printing costs and market pricing),

    the required lead-time (process speed and productivity),

    the market requirements of the product (format and print quality).

    In 2006, the hypotheses have been adapted to the present market situation (chapter 3).

  • 77.
    Bjurstedt, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Converging technologies in prepress from 1980 to 20032005In: Proceedings of the Technical Association of the Graphic Arts, TAGA, 2005, p. 238-257Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The author suggests that there have been three paradigm shifts during the 20th century. The first shift was at the turn of the 19th and 20 th century, when the first modern typesetting technology was introduced. The new technology, the first major step since the invention of loose types by Gutenberg in the 16th century, became the most important contribution to mass market circulation of newspapers, magazines, textbooks, books and other publications during the years to come. A supervening social necessity of change was urgent, and there was no suppression from competing technologies. Previously newspapers were very thin, because the manual typesetting, which was slow and expensive, made it impossible to produce more than a few pages every day. Books and textbooks were expensive to produce, and only a minority of the population could afford to buy them. With the new technology textbooks became available for large circulations, which together with school reforms in most civilized countries quickly spread knowledge and information among their citizens. The line casting technology was more or less unchanged during the major part of the 20th century, and only a few technical changes, such as the introduction of punched paper tapes after WW II, improved the productivity. A major concern for quality was the excessive wear of the brass matrix, which made frequent and expensive maintenance necessary. In the beginning of the 1950's many attempts were made to replace the hot metals with other methods such as phototypesetting. The first attempts were more like an emulation of the line casting machines, but soon other technologies were introduced. A major step forward came when the first affordable computers were introduced on the market, such as the PDP-8 from DEC in 1964 and later the PDP-11 in 1970. Again the supervening necessity was created because the competition among publishers was extremely hard. But now there were many forces who wanted to suppress the new technology. The major force was the traditionally very strong labour unions, in particular organizing the labour in newspaper production on Fleet Street but also in Sweden and Denmark. Their influence started to diminish during the second paradigm shift and was more or less completely over a decade later. With the entrance of computerized composition systems for newspaper and other publishers the first step towards the second paradigm shift was taken. The shift was the transfer from all analogue technology in producing text (as hot metal), line works and images to a digital technology. Colour separations made by electronic drum scanners became a standard procedure during the 1970's. A major breakthrough occurred when Scitex Corp. showed the first colour page make up system (CEPS) - the Response system, which was quickly followed by other major suppliers - Dr Hell and Crosfield Electronics, both leading suppliers of digital drum scanners. The graphic art industry went digital. A supervening necessity evolved during the end of the 1980's when publishers were looking for cheaper production methods. The systems of the major suppliers were extremely expensive, and yet there was no simple technique available of exchanging digital information between different systems. The law of suppression held up the introduction of the third paradigm shift, but the Apple Mac and Adobe PostScript slowly became the major technologies in the digital age of publishing. To-day, Apple is still in the market, small but influential in the publishing world, but Adobe - the inventor of PostScript and PDF technology - is the new giant on the world market. Never before has a company had such a position in the graphic art industry. Previously, many customers were complaining about the lack of competition and industry standards in the front-end market. Now, however, Adobe has created a de facto world standard with the PDF-process, which is also backed by the ISO. A new monopoly in the front-end technology has been created by default. Never before has one single company been in a similar position in the graphic art industry. This is like falling from the frying pan into the fire! Many observers - mostly those outside the graphic art industry - believe that the next paradigm shift is imminent. The Internet might be the first paradigm shift in 21st century. The web may have a great impact on the graphic art industry, but this has yet to be proven.

  • 78.
    Bjurstedt, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Gravure vs. Web-offset!: a changing world in publication printing 1986-20062007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The European publication printing industry and its markets have undergone profound structural changes between 1986 and 2006. This thesis is an investigation of these changes and of how the publication industry has been affected, as well as of the balance between publication gravure and commercial heat-set web-offset. The publication printing market has grown substantially during 1986-2006, and the increase in volume is about 250%, from 5 million tons to 13 million tons of paper. In 1986, gravure was the dominating publication printing technique. Since 1986, however, web-offset printing has grown substantially, and the process has today a much larger market share of the European publication market. This domination is also reflected in the investments in new printing capacity since 2000, where 70-75% has gone to commercial heat-set web-offset press manufacturers.

    This thesis focuses on the reasons why the balance between the two competing publication printing techniques, gravure and web-offset, changed between 1986 and 2006. It also studies the main driving forces determining the developments of these techniques and their related processes as well as their competitive strengths. Is gravure a printing process suitable only for very large runs, for huge volumes and for large markets? The changes in the European media market have affected the two major segments of the publication market; magazine and catalogue printing. In the magazine market, print runs in the segments of medium to large titles have decreased, and catalogues have changed from a single, thick catalogue to thinner; more targeted catalogues.

    This thesis is based on two studies. The first, focused on the market requirements and techno-economical comparisons of gravure and web-offset in 1985-1986, was carried out by the author as the Secretary General of the European Rotogravure Association (ERA), and the second, in 2005-2006, has investigated the present situation on the European publication markets. The methodologies used in the investigations have been questionnaires (the originals 1985-86 have also been used in 2005-2006), surveys, literature studies and a substantial number of interviews with representatives of print buyers (publishers and catalogue producers), printers and all the major suppliers to the industry.

    Given these changes, how can the competitiveness of publication gravure be improved and what strategies should a publication gravure printer use in order to survive in a very competitive European market? With shorter runs in very fast running gravure presses, the turn-around time in the cylinder-engraving department becomes very critical. A Double Ender gravure press for paginations from 16-64 pages, with an alternative up to 96 pages, where only four cylinders are needed, in combination with high-speed laser engraving of the cylinders, may be the answer.

  • 79.
    Bjurstedt, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Is there a future for the European publication printing industry?2007In: Proceedings of the Technical Association of the Graphic Arts, TAGA, 2007, p. 1-37Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with a survey of the European Publication Printing Industry - and it highlights the potential development of future markets and some of the techno-economical factors which are important to the industry. Previous research has indicated that the cost of producing signatures in either gravure or commercial web-offset have been reduced by 65-70% over the last 20 years. Nevertheless, it is believed that most of the economic benefit of lower costs has not remained within the printing industry, but has been transferred to the customers. It has been a buyers' market during the last decade. The extremely fast progress of digital technology since the middle of the 1990's has had a great impact on the publication printing industry, not only in gravure but in particular in web-offset. New and affordable software packages for editorial and image manipulation were quickly accepted, and within a short time the previous analogue technology was abandoned. These new techniques led to a dramatic change from the way in which the industry had previously worked, and the customer gained complete control of the work flow. Since the autumn of 2006 until January 2007, a series of in-depth interviews were conducted with top managers in the industry, both customers and suppliers to the industry. A scientific methodology has been used to evaluate the responses, and those have been discussed during extensive personal interviews. The investigation includes interviews not only with the leading managers from the customer to the industry, but also some of the most important suppliers - printing press manufacturers, paper and ink manufacturers, plate and cylinder processing equipment suppliers, and other important contributors to the printing process. This approach makes it possible for the author to explain some of the issues in greater detail and to give the reader a deeper understanding of the current and future European market situation. Are there new technologies to be seen in the near future which will have a strong impact on the structure of the industry? The findings indicate that those publication printers working in the segment of catalogue printing may find the market becoming increasingly difficult. Many of the major catalogue producers are changing their marketing focus from catalogue to E-commerce, which means that today's few but very thick products will probably be replaced by thinner but more frequent issues. The total volume of print will also be affected. Those printers working in the magazine market will also see major differences in the near future. Despite the fact that publishers are increasing the number of titles, the total volume is not expected to increase. The print runs will be more fragmented, and split editions aimed at targeted groups of readers will increase. This means a threat to very large gravure printers, because the newly installed superwide presses may not be sufficiently flexible. This paper shows that the changes in market conditions and product requirements have been dramatic in Europe during the last 20 years, and that further changes are about to take place.

  • 80.
    Bjurstedt, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Market conditions for European publication printing: a twenty year survey 1985-20052006In: Proceedings of the Technical Association of the Graphic Arts, TAGA, Rochester: TAGA , 2006, p. 24-42Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with an important part of an ongoing survey of the European Publication Printing Industry - and highlights the present market conditions and product specifications in relation to the conditions which prevailed twenty years ago. In 1985-86, one of the most comprehensive studies of the publication printing industry was carried out by the European Rotogravure Association in Munich. This study was the first of its kind, and no comparable study has, to the author's knowledge, ever been reported. The objective of the present paper is to determine what factors are important when the choice of a particular printing method is made, and to consider whether this process was fundamentally different in 1985 than it is today. The hypothesis now being formulated is that the determining factors in 1985 were the economy of scale, the speed (lead-time) and finally the quality of the printing process to be chosen. In order to make the two studies comparable, the same questionnaire has been used today as twenty years ago, with only one minor amendment concerning what digital format that present customers prefer. In the present investigation, a qualitative approach has complemented the quantitative study, and most questionnaires have been answered during rather extensive personal interviews. The recent investigation includes in-depth interviews with the leading managers in various sectors in the industry, and this time not only printers but also the most important suppliers - printing press manufacturers, paper and ink manufacturers, plate processing equipment suppliers, cylinder processing equipment manufacturers and other important contributors to the printing process, were interrogated. This approach has also given the author the possibility of explaining some of the issues in greater detail, and this will give the reader a deeper understanding of the current European market situation. The extremely fast progress of digital technology in the 1990's had a great impact on the printing industry, particularly in the prepress area. New and affordable software packages for editorial and image manipulation were quickly accepted by the printing industry, and within a short time the previous analogue technology was abandoned. During the recent interviews, it became clear that most prepress work is now done outside the printing companies (outsourced). Even the integrated publisher/printer prepress work has moved from the printing to the publishing division. These new techniques created a dramatic change from the way in which the industry had previously worked. Suddenly, the customer gained complete control of the work flow, mostly based on PDF technology (a subset of Postscript) and of the prepress work, previously created and controlled by the printing industry. Digital advertising materials are today centrally produced according to the new ISO standards for publication printing (gravure or weboffset). Larger multi-European campaigns can be produced by one agency, whilst the different language versions are later distributed via the Internet. This paper shows that the changes in the market conditions and product requirements have been dramatic in Europe during the last 20 years, and that further changes are about to happen. These new developments in both prepress and press for web-offset have put the gravure industry under immense pressure, and it has become very clear during the interviews that the mid-size gravure concept has fallen between two stools. Most efforts have gone into the development of the super-wide presses, today 3.8 m or wider, whilst little effort has been put into the lower end of the market. A new approach to defend the mid-size markets in Europe may be needed.

  • 81.
    Bjurstedt, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Power in the media - Robert Maxwell - a study of power in leadership2006In: Leadership in the media industry: changing contexts, emerging challenges / [ed] Lucy Küng, Jönköping: Media Management and Transformation Centre, Jönköping International Business School , 2006, p. 179-185Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 82.
    Björndal, Petra
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. ABB Corporate Research.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Artman, Henrik
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    From transactions to relationships: Making sense of user-centered perspectives in large technology-intensive companies2015In: 4th IFIP 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2015, Springer-Verlag New York, 2015, p. 114-124Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we analyze interviews from four technology-intensive companies, focused on service and service development. All companies have during the last two decades introduced interaction design units, and the corporations were selected due to their interest in also expanding the service share of their business. This service shift has been a top-down initiative. However in only two companies, the initiatives have led to the establishment of enterprise wide service development processes, and in the other two companies, the service development is more ad hoc. It is argued that even if interaction design has close theoretical relation to service design such combination has so far been limited. We discuss the shift from product to service view of the offerings within these companies, and relate this to user-centered perspectives. We argue there is a window of opportunity within technology-intensive and engineering focused industries to include user-centered design when formalizing service development.

  • 83.
    Björndal, Petra S.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. ABB Corporate Research, Västerås, Sweden .
    Ralph, Maria B.
    ABB Corporate Research, Västerås, Sweden .
    On the handling of impedance factors for establishing apprenticeship relations during field studies in industry domains2014In: Proceedings of the NordiCHI 2014: The 8th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Fun, Fast, Foundational, 2014, p. 1107-1112Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The process of trying to understand users' perspectives and their mental model is inherently challenging, as anyone who has been involved in conducting field studies and interviewing users can attest to. At the heart of this process is the need to create trust between the interviewer and the interviewee in order to build bonds which facilitate richer information exchange. Building apprenticeship relations is one approach which sees the interviewee as teacher and the interviewer as student/apprentice. However establishing these relations, particularity within a short time frame and within an industrial domain, can be difficult. This paper therefore addresses some of the challenges associated with building these relationships and how researchers can strengthen their connection with the users they interact with.

  • 84.
    Bogdan, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Green, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Hüttenrauch, Helge
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Räsänen, Minna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    Severinsson Eklundh, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Cooperative Design of a Robotic Shopping Trolley2009In: The Good, the Bad and the Challenging: the user and the future of information and communication technologies, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 85.
    Boholm, Max
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Risk, language and discourse2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This doctoral thesis analyses the concept of risk and how it functions as an organizing principle of discourse, paying close attention to actual linguistic practice.

              Article 1 analyses the concepts of risk, safety and security and their relations based on corpus data (the Corpus of Contemporary American English). Lexical, grammatical and semantic contexts of the nouns risk, safety and security, and the adjectives risky, safe and secure are analysed and compared. Similarities and differences are observed, suggesting partial synonymy between safety (safe) and security (secure) and semantic opposition to risk (risky). The findings both support and contrast theoretical assumptions about these concepts in the literature.

              Article 2 analyses the concepts of risk and danger and their relation based on corpus data (in this case the British National Corpus). Frame semantics is used to explore the assumptions of the sociologist Niklas Luhmann (and others) that the risk concept presupposes decision-making, while the concept of danger does not. Findings partly support and partly contradict this assumption.

              Article 3 analyses how newspapers represent risk and causality. Two theories are used: media framing and the philosopher John Mackie’s account of causality. A central finding of the study is that risks are “framed” with respect to causality in several ways (e.g. one and the same type of risk can be presented as resulting from various causes). Furthermore, newspaper reporting on risk and causality vary in complexity. In some articles, risks are presented without causal explanations, while in other articles, risks are presented as results from complex causal conditions. Considering newspaper reporting on an aggregated overall level, complex schemas of causal explanations emerge.

              Article 4 analyses how phenomena referred to by the term nano (e.g. nanotechnology, nanoparticles and nanorobots) are represented as risks in Swedish newspaper reporting. Theoretically, the relational theory of risk and frame semantics are used. Five main groups of nano-risks are identified based on the risk object of the article: (I) nanotechnology; (II) nanotechnology and its artefacts (e.g. nanoparticles and nanomaterials); (III) nanoparticles, without referring to nanotechnology; (IV) non-nanotechnological nanoparticles (e.g. arising from traffic); and (V) nanotechnology and nanorobots. Various patterns are explored within each group, concerning, for example, what is considered to be at stake in relation to these risk objects, and under what conditions. It is concluded that Swedish patterns of newspaper reporting on nano-risks follow international trends, influenced by scientific assessment, as well as science fiction.

              Article 5 analyses the construction and negotiation of risk in the Swedish controversy over the use of antibacterial silver in health care and consumer products (e.g. sports clothes and equipment). The controversy involves several actors: print and television news media, Government and parliament, governmental agencies, municipalities, non-government organisations, and companies. In the controversy, antibacterial silver is claimed to be a risk object that negatively affects health, the environment, and sewage treatment industry (objects at risk). In contrast, such claims are denied. Antibacterial silver is even associated with the benefit of mitigating risk objects (e.g. bacteria and micro-organisms) that threaten health and the environment (objects at risk). In other words, both sides of the controversy invoke health and the environment as objects at risk. Three strategies organising risk communication are identified: (i) representation of silver as a risk to health and the environment; (ii) denial of such representations; and (iii) benefit association, where silver is construed to mitigate risks to health and the environment.

  • 86.
    Borg, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lantz, Ann
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Accessibility to electronic communication for people with cognitive disabilities: a systematic search and review of empiricla evidence2014In: Universal Access in the Information Society, ISSN 1615-5289, E-ISSN 1615-5297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     The purpose of this study was to identify and synthesize measures for accessibility to electronic communication for people with cognitive disabilities by seeking answers to the following research questions: What measures to make electronic  communication accessible to people with cognitive disabilities are evaluated and reported in the scientific literature? What documented effects do these measures have? Empirical studies describing and assessing cognitive accessibility measures were identified by searches of 13 databases. Data were extracted and methodological quality was assessed. Findings were analyzed and recommendations for practice and research were made. Twenty-nine articles with considerable variations in studied accessibility measures, diagnoses, methods, outcome measures, and quality were included. They address the use of Internet, e-mail, telephone, chat, television, multimedia interfaces, texts and pictures, operation of equipment, and entering of information. Although thin, the current evidence base indicates that the accessibility needs, requirements, and preferences of people with cognitive disabilities are diverse. This ought to be reflected in accessibility guidelines and standards. Studies to systematically develop and recommend effective accessibility measures are needed to address current knowledge gaps.

  • 87.
    Bosk, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Rodríguez-Cano, Guillermo
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Greschbach, Benjamin
    KTH.
    Buchegger, Sonja
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Applying privacy-enhancing technologies: One alternative future of protests2018In: Protests in the Information Age: Social Movements, Digital Practices and Surveillance, Taylor & Francis, 2018, p. 73-94Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While current technologies, such as online social networks, can facilitate coordination and communication for protest organization, they can also endanger political activists when the control over their data is ceded to third parties. For technology to be useful for activism, it needs to be trustworthy and protect the users’ privacy; only then can it be viewed as a potential improvement over more traditional, offline methods. Here, we discuss a selection of such privacy-enhancing technologies from a Computer Science perspective in an effort to open a dialogue and elicit input from other perspectives.

  • 88.
    Bradley, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    The sharing economy as the commons of the 21st century2017In: Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, ISSN 1752-1378, E-ISSN 1752-1386, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 231-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to make a contribution to the debate on how contemporary collaborative commons, as part of the wider sharing economy, can be understood and supported. Three cases of contemporary commons are analysed: a DIY bike repair studio, a pop-up home office concept and Wikipedia. The article shows how the design principles developed for governing natural resource commons are only partly applicable to these contemporary commons. It also illustrates the differences in these types of commons in terms of the nature of the resource being shared, scarcity, barriers to entry and how rules are formulated and upheld.

  • 89.
    Brodin, Jane M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Stockholm International Toy Research Center, SITREC.
    Lindstrand, Peg
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Stockholm International Toy Research Center, SITREC.
    Are computers the solution to support development in children in need of special support?2004In: Technology and Disability, ISSN 1055-4181, E-ISSN 1878-643X, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 137-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is based on several studies conducted in the ICT field focussing on children with severe disabilities and their computer use. Topics of interest include how computers are used by children in general, and especially by children with severe disabilities. How effective is technology as support for child development and in daily activities? The main focus is on play and communication/social interaction for child development. The key question is if and how computers are the solution to support development in children in need of special support.

  • 90.
    Broms, Loove
    et al.
    Interactive Intstitute.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    Interactive Institute.
    Bång, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    Nyblom, Åsa
    Interactive Institute.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Coffee Maker Patterns and the Design of Energy Feedback Artefacts2010In: DIS '10 Proceedings of the 8th ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, 2010, p. 93-102Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Smart electricity meters and home displays are being installed in people’s homes with the assumption that households will make the necessary efforts to reduce their electricity consumption. However, present solutions do not sufficiently account for the social implications of design. There is a potential for greater savings if we can better understand how such designs affect behaviour. In this paper, we describe our design of an energy awareness artefact – the Energy AWARE Clock – and discuss it in relation to behavioural processes in the home. A user study is carried out to study the deployment of the prototype in real domestic contexts for three months. Results indicate that the Energy AWARE Clock played a significant role in drawing households’ attention to their electricity use. It became a natural part of the household and conceptions of electricity became naturalized into informants’ everyday language.

  • 91.
    Brown, Terrence
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). Lulea Univ Technol, Dept Business Adm, Lulea.
    Abduljabbar, Meyser
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Englund, Stefan
    Lulea Univ Technol, Dept Business Adm, Lulea, Sweden..
    Treen, Emily
    Simon Fraser Univ, Beedie Sch Business, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Twenty-five years and counting: an analysis of the Journal of Strategic Marketing2018In: Journal of Strategic Marketing, ISSN 0965-254X, E-ISSN 1466-4488, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 125-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a content analysis of the Journal of Strategic Marketing (JSM) over 24 years from the journal's inception in 1993 to 2017. No similar attempt on an analysis of JSM has been found. Analyses were completed to examine how the journal has developed and to uncover relevant information for editors, reviewers, researchers and future authors of JSM by analysing research themes, author and manuscript characteristics, and citation metrics. The findings reveal an increase in multi-authored articles, an increase in empirical research and in the internationalization of researchers. These and other factors illuminate sources and implications of the journal's current state. The relevance of these findings is discussed as it pertains to the future success and publishing opportunities in the Journal of Strategic Marketing.

  • 92.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sch Engn, Dept Ind Engn & Management, Jonkoping, Sweden.;Chalmers, Dept Prod & Prod Dev, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Karltun, Johan
    Jonkoping Univ, Sch Engn, Dept Ind Engn & Management, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Dencker, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Assembly work settings enabling proactivity - Information requirements2008In: MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE NEW FRONTIER / [ed] Mitsuishi, M Ueda, K Kimura, F, SPRINGER , 2008, p. 203-+Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information is a critical factor to support a proactive behaviour of operators in complex work settings characterized by flexible levels of automation and need for knowledge-based decision making. In this conceptual paper the authors define proactive behaviour as the ability of operators to control a situation by taking action in advance. Information requirements that enable proactivity and different control behaviour are identified. Moreover, several demands on the information support system are outlined. Further, the paper presents some implications for management as a result of the new work role of the operator regarding decision making, planning, and control.

  • 93.
    Bruno, Karl
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Larsen, Katarina
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    van Leeuwen, Thed N.
    Knowledge production at industrial research institutes: Institutional logics and struggles for relevance in the Swedish Institute for Surface Chemistry, 1980-20052017In: Research Evaluation, ISSN 0958-2029, E-ISSN 1471-5449, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 337-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines dynamics of knowledge production and discourses of basic-applied science and relevance at the Swedish Institute for Surface Chemistry, a semi-public industrially oriented research institute, from 1980 to 2005. We employ a three-pronged method, consisting of (1) an analysis of how the institute articulated its research priorities and goals in publications primarily directed to stakeholders, (2) an analysis of retrospective narratives by researchers and managers about research ideologies and priorities, and (3) a bibliometric analysis of the institute's scientific publications. Using a theoretical framework centered on the notions of institutional logics and struggles for relevance, we show how the transformations of the institute amount to a substitution of an internalized institutional logic of scientific autonomy with a new logic of industrial utility, and how the institute's knowledge production was managed during this change. We also point out various strategies used by the institute to preserve and advance its own goals while still remaining relevant with regard to changing policy objectives. Another important finding is that although the institute by the end of the study period was fully committed to an industrial service role, parts of the originally deeply entrenched scientific logic were still manifested, although then discussed in the new industrial terminology.

  • 94.
    Bälter, Olle
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Från E-pest till E-bäst: konkreta råd för ett bättre e-postliv : e-post-eposet2002Book (Refereed)
  • 95.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Cupitt, Rebekah
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Meetings, practice and beyond: Environmental sustainability in meeting practices at work2013In: Nachhaltigkeit in der Wirtschaftskommunikation / [ed] Martin Nielsen, Iris Rittenhofer, Marianne Grove Ditlevsen, Sophie Esmann Andersen, Irene Pollach, Wiesbaden: Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden , 2013, p. 159-190Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study shows how the employees at a large transnational telecom company understand and accommodate the implemented travel and meeting policies that regulate business communication. This involves looking at employee decisions on when, how and why to hold meetings. The subsequent understandings of meetings and their practice is formed through negotiation and the formation of a ‘social matrix of workplace communication (meetings)’(Bateson & Reusch 2009). This social matrix and its contexts are analysed from the perspective of environmental sustainability of office work practice. The basis for this is the recent implementation of company-wide restrictions on travel aiming to encourage the use of mediated meetings instead of travel for face-to-face meetings. Some issues that emerge are shared meanings of meetings, more specifically the perceived importance of the physical meeting in a workplace where telephone meetings were the norm. This shows that even if the technological possibilities for mediated meetings and by extension a more flexible work practice exist, they are not regarded as default but seen as complementary to conventional work practices. The need to find a balance in between mediated and physical meetings comes across as a recurring theme in both interviews and policy documents.  As a result the ongoing negotiation of which meetings are deemed necessary to be held in person and thereby requiring travel, is embedded within TeliaSonera employees' notions that face-to-face meetings are better and more efficient than mediated meetings. Subsequently the collective view that mediated meetings are not as successful as face-to-face meetings becomes a central to the character of workplace communication. This negotiation is carried out on an individual level as well as on a more organisational level. When carried out on an organisational level these negotiations occur in policy documents which can sometimes contradict employee perspectives and are equally subject to contextual factors (cf. Kogg 2002). Other related issues present in the empirical data are the blurring of the divide between work and home in relation to the changes in work practices and information and communication technology (ICT).

  • 96. Cajander, Å.
    et al.
    Janols, R.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    On the establishment of user-centred perspectives2014In: Proceedings of the NordiCHI 2014: The 8th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Fun, Fast, Foundational, 2014, p. 103-112Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the obstacles for and discusses possible solutions to successfully establishing a User Centred Perspective (UCP) in organisations. The analysis is made with the use of the theory Communities of Practice (CoP). The analysis is based on a cross case study based on two longitudinal action research projects. In these studies we identified four CoP considered important; users, core business managers, IT coordinators and system developers. The analysis shows in what ways the communities contribute to the difficulties for a successful establishment of UCP. One example is marginalising the IT coordinator community, and another is imperialism of the system developer community as well as the lack of boundary spanning skills. The results indicate that we need to influence all levels in organisations, with a focus on boundaries between communities, in order to successfully introduce a UCP. Boundary spanning objects need to be identified and knowledge sharing needs to be enhanced.

  • 97.
    Campostrini, Matteo
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    The Social Shaping of European Digital Radio2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the social shaping of digital radio in Europe and provides new insights about the main competing technologies and the discourses built around their capabilities.

    The radio frequency spectrum is a limited resource and in order to be used in the most efficient way different organizations have been researching optimizing standards since the mid-1980s. The Eureka-147 project produced the first European digital broadcasting standard DAB whose development have been initially fostered by public service broadcasters and electronics manufacturers, consequently by commercial broadcasters and governmental institutions.

    The design and policy of DAB did not manage to grasp the attention and support of all the actors present in the nascent digital radio industry. A decade after its launch DAB was followed by other digital radio standards, as DAB+ and DRM, in the role of complements/competitors. At the same time the Internet started to be used as infrastructure for delivering radio or sound entertainment content.

    Thirty years after the beginning of the European digital radio experience, the picture is still complex and no technology achieved a complete and harmonized implementation. Across Europe, countries have been involved in the digitalization of radio to different extent: Norway announced FM transmissions shutdown in 2017, UK and Switzerland have developed an almost nationally wide digital network coverage and are about to run their switchover plans, some other countries as Sweden and Italy are still in a transmission-trial and evaluation phase.

    The history of digital radio in Europe offers ground for a Social Shaping of Technology analysis as exposed in “The Social construction of technological systems” (1987) by Wiebe Bijker, Thomas Hughes and Trevor Pinch. The Social Shaping of Technology claims that technologies and their outcomes are always socially negotiated. According to this theoretical framework and in particular to the Social Construction of Technology (SCOT) methodology, it is possible to highlight a number of social groups negotiating the final technology in the development of every artefact. In particular SCOT allows to find points of interpretative flexibility, namely diverging interpretations that different groups have of a same technology or a particular feature of it. These arguments or discourses are built around a technology or its features in order to foster a particular concerns of the corresponding group.

    This master thesis analyses the development of digital radio in Europe according to the framework provided by the Social Shaping of Technology, enriching the number of case studies that have been conducted following this framework. In this way the dissertation “The Social Shaping of European Digital Radio” provides an overview on the social, political and economic forces which negotiated the technology throughout its development and provides a deeper understanding of the overall digital media technology industry. 

  • 98.
    Cano Viktorsson, Carlos
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    From Fixed, Mobile to Complex: The Social Shaping of ICT for Sustainable Travel2013In: ICT4S 2013: Proceedings of the First International Conference on Information and Communication Technologies for Sustainability, ETH Zurich, February 14-16, 2013, ETH Zurich, 2013, , p. 6p. 197-202Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper looks at the changing shape of mobile connectivity and how it has influenced the potential for informing on sustainable travel. It examines the role mobile connectivity has had for an ICT based service informing on traffic and transport in order to trace what role social practices of interconnecting through mobile media may have had for such an enterprise. The paper looks at two historical examples of ICT based traffic and travel information services in Stockholm, Sweden in order to discuss what role mobile connectivity may have for promoting sustainable travel through ICT.

  • 99.
    Cano-Viktorsson, Carlos
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    From Maps to Apps: Tracing the Organizational Responsiveness of an Early Multi-Modal Travel Planning Service2015In: The Journal of urban technology, ISSN 1063-0732, E-ISSN 1466-1853, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 87-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An Internet-based system for informing on multimodal travel planning (several modes of transportation) was introduced in Stockholm, Sweden in October 2000 in the form of a web page called trafiken.nu. The web page has a historical value of being one of the first attempts in Europe, and possibly the world, at providing an ICT-based travel planning service geared towards facilitating sustainable travel to the general public. The aim of this article is to investigate the historical development of trafiken.nu in order to draw lessons on how to better provide for a public information service with a potential for facilitating sustainable travel planning. Findings from the study of trafiken.nu suggest that the organizations behind the service have been slow in adapting to shifting media technology practices on how to provide for information which has affected the uptake of the service. Lessons from the case study provide a basis for arguing that organizations attempting to implement public information services would benefit from finding a means of harnessing collective intelligence in order to provide for a more customizable and responsive service to the general public.

  • 100.
    Cano-Viktorsson, Carlos
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    From Vision to Transition: Exploring the Potential for Public Information Services to Facilitate Sustainable Urban Transport2014Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Policy initiatives to promote sustainable travel through the use of Internet based public information systems have increased during the last decade. Stockholm, in being one of the first cities in Europe to implement an Internet based service for facilitating sustainable travel is believed to be a good candidate for an analysis of key issues for developing sustainable travel planning services to the public.

    Aim: This thesis investigates the past development of two Stockholm based public information systems and their services in order to draw lessons on how to better provide for a public information service geared towards facilitating  environmentally sustainable travel planning through information and communications technology. The overall goal of the thesis is to contribute to an understanding on how to better design and manage current and future attempts at facilitating sustainable travel planning services based on historical case studies.

    Approach: The thesis draws ideas from the concept of organizational responsiveness – an organization’s ability to listen, understand and respond to demands put to it by its internal and external stakeholders – in order to depict how well or not the two public information systems and their owners have adapted to established norms and values of their surroundings.

    Results: Overall, the findings from the historical case studies suggest that organizations attempting to provide sustainable travel planning to the public need to design and manage their systems in such a way that it responds to shifting demands on how to provide for information. Implementing and embedding new technologies involves complex processes of change both at the micro level – for users and practitioners of the service – and at the meso level for the involved public service organizations themselves. This condition requires a contextualist framework to analyze and understand organizational, contextual and cultural issues involved in the adoption of new technologies and procedures.

    Conclusions: The thesis concludes with a discussion on how the findings from the historical case studies may provide lessons for both current and future attempts at providing public information systems geared towards facilitating environmentally sustainable travel planning to the public. Historical examples and issues concerning collective intelligence and peer to peer based forms of designing, producing and supervising public information services identified throughout the study are looked upon and discussed in terms of their possible role in increasing the potential for public information services to facilitate sustainable urban transport.

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