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  • 51.
    Wiklund, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Acoustofluidics 12: Biocompatibility and cell viability in microfluidic acoustic resonators2012In: Lab on a Chip, ISSN 1473-0197, E-ISSN 1473-0189, Vol. 12, no 11, p. 2018-2028Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 52.
    Wiklund, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Brismar, Hjalmar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Önfelt, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Acoustofluidics 18: Microscopy for acoustofluidic micro-devices2012In: Lab on a Chip, ISSN 1473-0197, E-ISSN 1473-0189, Vol. 12, no 18, p. 3221-3234Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this tutorial review in the thematic series "Acoustofluidics", we discuss the implementation and practice of optical microscopy in acoustofluidic micro-devices. Examples are given from imaging of acoustophoretic manipulation of particles and cells in microfluidic channels, but most of the discussion is applicable to imaging in any lab-on-a-chip device. The discussion includes basic principles of optical microscopy, different microscopy modes and applications, and design criteria for micro-devices compatible with basic, as well as advanced, optical microscopy.

  • 53.
    Wiklund, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Green, Roy
    Univ Southampton, Hants, England .
    Ohlin, Mathias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Acoustofluidics 14: Applications of acoustic streaming in microfluidic devices2012In: Lab on a Chip, ISSN 1473-0197, E-ISSN 1473-0189, Vol. 12, no 14, p. 2438-2451Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In part 14 of the tutorial series "Acoustofluidics - exploiting ultrasonic standing wave forces and acoustic streaming in microfluidic systems for cell and particle manipulation", we provide a qualitative description of acoustic streaming and review its applications in lab-on-a-chip devices. The paper covers boundary layer driven streaming, including Schlichting and Rayleigh streaming, Eckart streaming in the bulk fluid, cavitation microstreaming and surface-acoustic-wave-driven streaming.

  • 54.
    Wiklund, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Gunther, C.
    Lemor, R.
    Jager, M.
    Fuhr, G.
    Hertz, Hans M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Ultrasonic standing wave manipulation technology integrated into a dielectrophoretic chip2006In: Lab on a Chip, ISSN 1473-0197, E-ISSN 1473-0189, Vol. 6, no 12, p. 1537-1544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several cell-based biological applications in microfluidic systems require simultaneous high-throughput and individual handling of cells or other bioparticles. Available chip-based tools for contactless manipulation are designed for either high-precision handling of individual particles, or high-throughput handling of ensembles of particles. In order to simultaneously perform both, we have combined two manipulation technologies based on ultrasonic standing waves (USWs) and dielectrophoresis (DEP) in a microfluidic chip. The principle is based on the competition between long-range ultrasonic forces, short-range dielcctrophoretic forces and viscous drag forces from the fluid flow. The ultrasound is coupled into the microchannel resonator by an external transducer with a refractive element placed on top of the chip, thereby allowing transmission light microscopy to continuously monitor the biological process. The DEP manipulation is generated by an electric field between co-planar microelectrodes placed on the bottom surface of the fluid channel. We demonstrate flexible and gentle elementary manipulation functions by the use of USWs and linear or curved DEP deflector elements that can be used in high-throughput biotechnology applications of individual cells.

  • 55.
    Wiklund, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Hertz, Hans M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Ultrasonic enhancement of bead-based bioaffinity assays2006In: Lab on a Chip, ISSN 1473-0197, E-ISSN 1473-0189, Vol. 6, no 10, p. 1279-1292Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultrasonic radiation forces can be used for non-intrusive manipulation and concentration of suspended micrometer-sized particles. For bioanalytical purposes, standing-wave ultrasound has long been used for rapid immuno-agglutination of functionalized latex beads. More recently, detection methods based on laser-scanning fluorometry and single-step homogeneous bead-based assays show promise for fast, easy and sensitive biochemical analysis. If such methods are combined with ultrasonic enhancement, detection limits in the femtomolar region are feasible. In this paper, we review the development of standing-wave ultrasonic manipulation for bioanalysis, with special emphasis on miniaturization and ultrasensitive bead-based immunoassays.

  • 56.
    Wiklund, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Radel, Stefan
    Hawkes, Jeremy J.
    Acoustofluidics 21: ultrasound-enhanced immunoassays and particle sensors2013In: Lab on a Chip, ISSN 1473-0197, E-ISSN 1473-0189, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 25-39Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In part 21 of the tutorial series "Acoustofluidics - exploiting ultrasonic standing wave forces and acoustic streaming in microfluidic systems for cell and particle manipulation'', we review applications of ultrasonic standing waves used for enhancing immunoassays and particle sensors. The paper covers ultrasonic enhancement of bead-based immuno-agglutination assays, bead-based immuno-fluorescence assays, vibrational spectroscopy sensors and cell deposition on a sensor surface.

  • 57.
    Zhou, Xiamo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Micro and Nanosystems.
    Sjöberg, Ronald
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Druet, Amaury
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Micro and Nanosystems.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    van der Wijngaart, Wouter
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Micro and Nanosystems.
    Haraldsson, Tommy
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Micro and Nanosystems.
    Carlborg, Carl Fredrik
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Micro and Nanosystems.
    Thiol–ene–epoxy thermoset for low-temperature bonding to biofunctionalized microarray surfaces2017In: Lab on a Chip, ISSN 1473-0197, E-ISSN 1473-0189, Vol. 17, no 21, p. 3672-3681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One way to improve the sensitivity and throughput of miniaturized biomolecular assays is to integrate microfluidics to enhance the transport efficiency of biomolecules to the reaction sites. Such microfluidic integration requires bonding of a prefabricated microfluidic gasket to an assay surface without destroying its biological activity. In this paper we address the largely unmet challenge to accomplish a proper seal between a microfluidic gasket and a protein surface, with maintained biological activity and without contaminating the surface or blocking the microfluidic channels. We introduce a novel dual cure polymer resin for the formation of microfluidic gaskets that can be room-temperature bonded to a range of substrates using only UVA light. This polymer is the first polymer that features over a month of shelf life between the structure formation and the bonding, moreover the fully cured polymer gaskets feature the following set of properties suitable for microfluidics: high stiffness, which prevents microfluidic channel collapse during handling; very limited absorption of biomolecules; and no significant leaching of uncured monomers. We describe the novel polymer resin and its characteristics, study through FT-IR, and demonstrate its use as microfluidic well-arrays bonded onto protein array slides at room temperature followed by multiplexed immunoassays. The results confirm maintained biological activity and show high repeatability between protein arrays. This new approach for integrating microfluidic gaskets to biofunctionalised surfaces has the potential to improve sample throughput and decrease manufacturing costs for miniaturized biomolecular systems.

12 51 - 57 of 57
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  • apa
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