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  • 51.
    Bubenko, Janis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Dahlstrand, Ingemar
    An interview with Borje Langefors2005In: HISTORY OF NORDIC COMPUTING / [ed] Bubenko, J; Impagliazzo, J; Solvberg, A, 2005, Vol. 174, p. 7-22Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This interview with professor emeritus Borje Langefors (BL) was carried out by his two former co-workers Ingemar Dahlstrand(1) (ID) and Janis Bubenko(2) (JB).

  • 52.
    Bubenko, Janis, Jr.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Annotations of First Generation Systems Development in Sweden2009In: / [ed] Impagliazzo J; Jarvi T; Paju P, 2009, Vol. 303, p. 95-105Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work presents episodes of first generation information systems development in Sweden using two particular computers, ALWAC IIIE, during the period 1957-1961, and Univac III during 1963-1964. The ALWAC IIIE at ADB Institute, Gothenburg, was used for technical as well as for administrative applications. Another episode concerns re-engineering of an inventory management application; it used the ALWAC IIIE for the Swedish Defence Material Administration in 1960. The next episode concerns the computer Univac III. A sales contract between Gotaverken AB and Univac included a guarantee by Univac to transfer one of Gotaverken's punched card routines to a magnetic tape oriented routine on Univac III. The development work was carried out on a Univac III at Kantonalbank in Bern, Switzerland. They did the work in night shifts during a period of five months. Only one Univac III was installed in Sweden.

  • 53.
    Bubenko, Janis, Jr.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Information Processing - Administrative Data Processing The First Courses at KTH and SU, 1966-672009In: / [ed] Impagliazzo J; Jarvi T; Paju P, 2009, Vol. 303, p. 138-148Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A three semester, 60-credit course package in the topic of Administrative Data Processing (ADP), offered in 1966 at Stockholm University (SU) and the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) is described. The package had an information systems engineering orientation. The first semester focused on datalogical topics, while the second semester focused on the infological topics. The third semester aimed to deepen the students' knowledge in different parts of ADP and at writing a bachelor thesis. The concluding section of this paper discusses various aspects of the department's first course effort. The course package led to a concretisation of our discipline and gave our discipline an identity. Our education seemed modern, "just in time", and well adapted to practical needs. The course package formed the first concrete activity of a group of young teachers and researchers. In a forty-year perspective, these people have further developed the department and the topic to an internationally well-reputed body of knowledge and research. The department has produced more than thirty professors and more than one hundred doctoral degrees.

  • 54.
    Bubenko, Janis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Persson, A.
    Stirna, Janis
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    An intentional perspective on enterprise modeling2010In: Intentional Perspectives on Information Systems Engineering, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2010, p. 215-237Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enterprise Modeling (EM) has two main purposes: (1) Developing the business, which entails developing business vision, strategies, redesigning the way the business operates, developing the supporting information systems, etc., and (2) ensuring the quality of the business where the focus is on sharing the knowledge about the business, its vision and the way it operates, and ensuring the acceptance of business decisions through committing the stakeholders to the decisions made. In addition, EM has also shown to be useful as a general tool for articulating, discussing, and solving organizational problems. Based on a number of case studies, interviews and observations this chapter defines what is required from EM when adopted for these purposes and intentions respectively. More precisely, it addresses the following types of requirements: documents and models required as input, models that should be developed, requirements on the modeling language, requirements on the modeling process, tool requirements and model quality requirements. The defined requirements are then discussed taking a specific EM method, Enterprise Knowledge Development (EKD) as example.

  • 55.
    Bubenko Jr., Janis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Impagliazzo, J.Sølvberg, A.
    History of Nordic Computing, IFIP WG9.7 First Working Conference on the History of Nordic Computing (HiNC1), June 16-18, 2003, Trondheim, Norway2005Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 56.
    Bubenko Jr., Janis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Lindencrona, E.
    Experiences from technology transfer initiatives at SISU2008In: Information Systems Engineering: From Data Analysis to Process Networks, IGI Global, 2008, p. 331-348Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The institute SISU (Swedish Institute for Systems Development) was formed by the Swedish govermnet in 1984 based on the support of more than 20 organisations in business, industry and in the civic sector. SISU operated during 1985 to 2000. In this chapter we reflect on our experiences from this initiative to technology transfer in Sweden in the field of information systems development tools and methods. We are concerned with transfer of knowledge as well as of technical prototypes from academic research to product development, exploitation, and practical use in organisations. We reflect over a number of collaborative projects, national as well as EU-supported, initiated by SISU. We describe, firstly, which were the main "products" of technology transfer, and, secondly, which are the main factors that influence (or hinder) the success of a technology transfer initiative of this kind. The purpose of writing this chapter is to contribute to the experiences of the European Commission of successful technology transfer activities in Europe.

  • 57.
    Bylund, Markus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    A Design Rationale for Pervasive Computing: User Experience, Contextual Change and Technical Requirements2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The vision of pervasive computing promises a shift from information tech-nology per se to what can be accomplished by using it, thereby fundamen-tally changing the relationship between people and information technology. In order to realize this vision, a large number of issues concerning user ex-perience, contextual change, and technical requirements should be ad-dressed. We provide a design rationale for pervasive computing that encom-passes these issues, in which we argue that a prominent aspect of user ex-perience is to provide user control, primarily founded in human values. As one of the more significant aspects of the user experience, we provide an extended discussion about privacy. With contextual change, we address the fundamental change in previously established relationships between the practices of individuals, social institutions, and physical environments that pervasive computing entails. Finally, issues of technical requirements refer to technology neutrality and openness—factors that we argue are fundamen-tal for realizing pervasive computing.

    We describe a number of empirical and technical studies, the results of which have helped to verify aspects of the design rationale as well as shap-ing new aspects of it. The empirical studies include an ethnographic-inspired study focusing on information technology support for everyday activities, a study based on structured interviews concerning relationships between con-texts of use and everyday planning activities, and a focus group study of laypeople’s interpretations of the concept of privacy in relation to informa-tion technology. The first technical study concerns the model of personal service environments as a means for addressing a number of challenges con-cerning user experience, contextual change, and technical requirements. Two other technical studies relate to a model for device-independent service de-velopment and the wearable server as a means to address issues of continu-ous usage experience and technology neutrality respectively.

  • 58.
    Chowdhury, Md.S.A.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV. Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Study on emotion & wearable-technology2008In: MCCSIS - IADIS Multi Conf. Comput. Sci. Inf. Syst.; Proc. Interfaces Hum. Comput. Interact., 2008, p. 333-338Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The report contains a user study on emotion and wearable technology. The questionnaire comprised 10 multiple choice questions relating to user's emotional state and expressing them on wearable by displaying colors and patterns. Very few people (in this user study) wanted to hide their emotion and most of them wanted their emotion to be expressed sometimes depending on context. There is a fair gap between what developers think and what users want. Most of them did not appreciate technology for displaying emotion and it seemed people's awareness and imagination is limited to this new phenomena.

  • 59.
    Ciobanu Morogan, Matei
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Security system for ad-hoc wireless networks based on generic secure objects2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    As computing devices and wireless connectivity become ubiquitous, new usage scenarios emerge, where wireless communication links between mobile devices are established in an ad-hoc manner. The resulting wireless ad-hoc networks differ from classical computer networks in a number of ways, lack of permanent access to the global network and heterogeneous structure being some of them. Therefore, security services and mechanisms that have been designed for classical computer networks are not always the optimal solution in an ad-hoc network environment.

    The research is focused on analyzing how standard security services that are available in classical networks can be provided in an ad-hoc wireless network environment. The goal is to design a security system optimized for operation in ad-hoc wireless networks that provides the same security services – authentication, access control, data confidentiality and integrity, non-repudiation – currently available in classic wired networks.

    The first part of the thesis is the design and implementation of a security platform based on generic secure objects. The flexible and modular nature of this platform makes it suitable for deployment on devices that form ad-hoc networks – ranging from Java-enabled phones to PDAs and laptops.

    We then investigate the problems that appear when implementing in ad-hoc networks some of the security technologies that are standard building blocks of secure systems in classical computer networks. Two such technologies have been found to present problems, namely the areas of certification and access control. In a series of articles, we have described the problems that appear and devised solutions to them by designing protocols, techniques and extensions to standards that are optimized for usage in the ad-hoc network environment.

    These techniques, together with the functionality provided by the underlying security platform, are used to implement all standard security services – confidentiality, authentication, access control, non repudiation and integrity, allowing to integrate ad-hoc networks into the existing security infrastructure.

  • 60.
    Dalianis, Hercules
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Knutsson, Ola
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Cerratto Pargman, Teresa
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Using human language technology to support the handling officers at the Swedish Social Insurance Agency2009In: Design and Evaluation of e-Government Applications and Services: Proceedings of the 2nd International Workshop on Design and Evaluation of e-Government Applications and Services (DEGAS'2009) in conjunction with INTERACT'2009, Uppsala, Sweden, August 24th 2009., 2009, p. 30-32Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish Social Insurance Agency, (Försäkringskassan) receives 40 000 per month as well as phone calls from the citizens that are handled by almost 500 handling officers. To initiate the process to make their work more efficient we carried out two user-centered design workshops with the handling officers at Försäkringskassan with the objective of finding in what ways human language technology might facilitate their work. One of the outcomes from the workshops was that the handling officers required a support tool for handling and answering e-mails from their customers. Three main requirements were identified namely to find the correct template to be used in the e-mail answers, a support to automatically create templates and finally an automatic e-mail answering function. We will during two years focus on these design challenges within the IMAIL-project.

  • 61.
    Dalianis, Hercules
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Nilsson, Gunnar
    Velupillai, Sumithra
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Is de-identification of electronic health records possible?: Or can we use health record corpora for research?2009In: Virtual healthcare interaction: Papers from AAAI fall symposium ; [November 5 - 7, 2009, at the Westin Arlington Gateway in Arlington, Virginia USA], AAAI Press, 2009, p. 2-3Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Danielson, Mats
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Ekenberg, Love
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Computing upper and lower bounds in interval decision trees2007In: European Journal of Operational Research, ISSN 0377-2217, E-ISSN 1872-6860, Vol. 181, no 2, p. 808-816Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents algorithms for computing optima in decision trees with imprecise probabilities and utilities. In tree models involving uncertainty expressed as intervals and/or relations, it is necessary for the evaluation to compute the upper and lower bounds of the expected values. Already in its simplest form, computing a maximum of expectancies leads to quadratic programming (QP) problems. Unfortunately, standard optimization methods based on QP (and BLP - bilinear programming) are too slow for the evaluation of decision trees in computer tools with interactive response times. Needless to say, the problems with computational complexity are even more emphasized in multi-linear programming (MLP) problems arising from multi-level decision trees. Since standard techniques are not particularly useful for these purposes, other, non-standard algorithms must be used. The algorithms presented here enable user interaction in decision tools and are equally applicable to all multi-linear programming problems sharing the same structure as a decision tree.

  • 63.
    Danielson, Mats
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Ekenberg, Love
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Larsson, Aron
    Distribution of expected utility in decision trees2007In: International Journal of Approximate Reasoning, ISSN 0888-613X, E-ISSN 1873-4731, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 387-407Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evaluation of decision trees in which imprecise information prevails is complicated. Especially when the tree has some depth, i.e. consists of more than one level, the effects of the choice of representation and evaluation procedures are significant. Second-order representation and evaluation may significantly increase a decision-maker's understanding of a decision situation when handling aggregations of imprecise representations, as is the case in decision trees or influence diagrams, while the use of only first-order results gives an incomplete picture. Furthermore, due to the effects on the distribution of belief over the intervals of expected utilities, the Gamma-maximin decision rule seems to be unnecessarily pessimistic as the belief in neighbourhoods of points near interval boundaries is usually lower than in neighbourhoods near the centre. Due to this, a generalized expected utility is proposed. The results in this paper apply also to approaches, which do not explicitly deal with second-order information, such as standard decision trees or probabilistic networks using only first-order concepts, for example upper and lower bounds. Furthermore, the results also apply to other, non-probabilistic weighted trees such as multi-criteria weight trees.

  • 64.
    Davidson, Alan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    de La Puente Martinez, Javier
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Huber, Markus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    A SWOT analysis of virtual laboratories for security education2013In: IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, 2013, p. 233-240Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Work is active in many institutes of higher education on utilising virtual computer environments for creating laboratories for practical course-work. Computer Security education is one area where virtual environments are proving to be useful, and where several schools have reported their own schemes for implementing environments for practical exercises. In this study we attempt to take a somewhat broader look at what the use of virtualisation technology can imply terms of a number of factors, i.e. the pedagogy, security, licensing, administration and cost. A simple analysis of the general strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of virtual security laboratories allows us to motivate design choices when implementing yet another of these experimental environments.

  • 65.
    Davidson, Alan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Näckros, Kjell
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Practical assignments in IT security for contemporary higher education: An experiment in exploiting student initiative2007In: Fifth World Conference on Information Security Education: Proceedings of the IFIP TC11 WG 11.8, WISE 5, 19 to 21 June 2007, United States Military Academy, West Point, New York, USA, Springer, 2007, p. 25-32Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modern university studies cater to large groups of students with consideable variation in background knowledge. This creates problems when designing viable practical exercises, not least for the subject of IT Security. We address these problems by creating a study environment within which students have the freedom to design and execute their own exercises. We suggest and test ideas for providing sufficient motivation and structure for student activity while minimising the need and cost for staff intervention.

  • 66.
    Davidson, Alan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Oja, R.
    Yngström, Louise
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    A Swedish IT forensics course - Expert opinions2009In: International Journal of Electronic Security and Digital Forensics, ISSN 1751-911X, E-ISSN 1751-9128, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 322-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is mounting pressure for institutes of higher education to fill society's need for qualified IT forensics practitioners. Despite that pressure, it is not clear how that need should be filled, for whom, and by whom. There are many published texts available on which one might base a course, though they are primarily written for English speaking countries. Given the differences in legal practices in different countries, and forensic's dependency on legal procedures, it is not clear how applicable such texts are to Swedish education in the subject. This paper summarises some of the ongoing work at the Department of Computer and Systems Sciences at Stockholm University where we seek to define what the primary elements of a Swedish IT forensics education should be. Interviews conducted with specialists in IT law and IT forensics indicate that there are discrepancies between how representatives from on the one hand the public legal system and on the other private enterprise view the need and the subject matter.

  • 67. Davidsson, P.
    et al.
    Boman, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Distributed monitoring and control of office buildings by embedded agents2005In: Information Sciences, ISSN 0020-0255, E-ISSN 1872-6291, Vol. 171, no 4, p. 293-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe a decentralized system consisting of a collection of software agents that monitor and control an office building. It uses the existing power lines for communication between the agents and the electrical devices of the building, such as sensors and actuators for lights and heating. The objectives are both energy saving and increasing customer satisfaction through value added services. Results of qualitative simulations and quantitative analysis based on thermodynamical modeling of an office building and its staff using four different approaches for controlling the building indicate that significant energy savings can result from using the agent-based approach. The evaluation also shows that customer satisfaction can be increased in most situations. The approach here presented makes it possible to control the trade-off between energy saving and customer satisfaction (and actually increase both, in comparison with current approaches).

  • 68.
    Davies, Guy
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Mapping and integration of schema representations of component specefications2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Specification for process oriented applications tends to use languages that suffer from infinite, intractable or unpredictably irregular state spaces that thwart exhaustive searches by verification heuristics. However, conceptual schemas based on FOL, offer techniques for both integrating and verifying specifications in finite spaces. It is therefore of interest to transform process based specifications into conceptual schemata.

    Process oriented languages have an additional drawback in that reliable inputs to the integration of diverse specifications can result in unreliable outputs. This problem can more easily be addressed in a logic representation in which static and dynamic properties can be examined separately.

    The first part of the text describes a translation method from the process based language SDL, to first order logic. The usefulness of the method for industrial application has been demonstrated in an implementation. The method devised is sufficiently general for application to other languages with similar characteristics. Main contributions consist of: formalising the mapping of state transitions to event driven rules in dynamic entity-relationship schemas; analysing the complexity of various approaches to decomposing transitions; a conceptual representation of the source language that distinguishes meta- and object models of the source language and domain respectively.

    The second part of the text formally describes a framework for the integration of schemata that allows the exploration of their properties in relation to each other and to a set of integration assertions. The main contributions are the formal framework; an extension to conflicts between agents in a temporal action logic; complexity estimates for various integration properties.

  • 69.
    Davies, Guy
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Ekenberg, Love
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Some observations on elusion, enrichment and domination2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conceptual schemata each representing some component of a system in the making, can be integrated in a variety of ways. Herein, we explore some fundamental notions of this. More particularly, we investigate some ways in which integration through correspondence assertions affects the interrelationship of two component schemata. One of the consequences of combining schemata is the appearance of events, for the united schema, that allow spurious transitions between models, transitions that would not have been possible in one of the original schemata. Much previous work has focussed on dominance with regard to preservation of information capacity as a primary integration criterion. However, even though it is desirable that the information capacity of a combined schema dominate one or both of its constituent schemata, we here discuss some aspects of why domination based on information capacity is insufficient for the integration to be semantically satisfactory.

  • 70.
    Dayarathna, Rasika
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Taxonomy for information privacy metrics2011In: Journal of International Commercial Law and Technology, ISSN 1901-8401, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 194-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A comprehensive privacy framework is essential for the progress of the information privacy field. Some practical implications of a comprehensive framework are laying foundation for building information privacy metrics and having fruitful discussions. Taxonomy is an essential step in building a framework. This research study attempts to build taxonomy for the information privacy domain based on empirical data. The classical grounded theory approach introduced by Glaser was applied and incidents reported by the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP) are used for building the taxonomy. These incidents include privacy related current research works, data breaches, personal views, interviews, and technological innovations. TAMZAnalyzer, an open source qualitative data analysis tool, was used in coding, keeping memos, sorting, and creating categories. The taxonomy is presented in seven themes and several categories including legal, technical, and ethical aspects. The findings of this study helps practitioners understand and discuss the subjects and academia work toward building a comprehensive framework and metrics for the information privacy domain.

  • 71.
    Deegalla, Sampath
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Boström, Henrik
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Reducing high-dimensional data by principal component analysis vs. random projection for nearest neighbor classification2006In: Publications of the Finnish Artificial Intelligence Society, 2006, p. 23-30Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The computational cost of using nearest neighbor classification often prevents the method from being applied in practice when dealing with high-dimensional data, such as images and micro arrays. One possible solution to this problem is to reduce the dimensionality of the data, ideally without loosing predictive performance. Two different dimensionality reduction methods, principal component analysis (PCA) and random projection (RP), are compared w.r.t. the performance of the resulting nearest neighbor classifier on five image data sets and two micro array data sets. The experimental results show that PCA results in higher accuracy than RP for all the data sets used in this study. However, it is also observed that RP generally outperforms PCA for higher numbers of dimensions. This leads to the conclusion that PCA is more suitable in time-critical cases (i.e., when distance calculations involving only a few dimensions can be afforded), while RP can be more suitable when less severe dimensionality reduction is required. In 6 respectively 4 cases out of 7, the use of PCA and RP even outperform using the non-reduced feature set, hence not only resulting in more efficient, but also more effective, nearest neighbor classification.

  • 72. Döös, M.
    et al.
    Rydberg Fåhræus, Eva
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV. Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Alvemark, K.
    Wilhelmson, L.
    Competent web dialogues: Text-based linking of thoughts2008In: Information Communication Technologies for Enhanced Education and Learning: Advanced Applications and Developments, IGI Global, 2008, p. 219-233Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conducting a dialogue on the Web is a matter of linking thoughts in digital conversations. Dialogue differs from discussion by not being aimed at beating or convincing other participants in the conversation. The present chapter highlights group dialogues as conversations in which people learn with and from each other. Learning dialogues have the potential of developing the learners'capacities for critical thinking and complex problem solving. The model of dialogue competence is suggested in order to improve the linking of thoughts in web dialogues. The chapter concludes with considerations when developing dialogue-based communication forms for learning purposes and contributes to teachers' demand for more support in pedagogic and educational issues.

  • 73.
    Ebner, Hannes
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Collaborilla: An enhancement to the Conzilla concept browser for enabling collaboration2006Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 points / 30 hpStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The research field Knowledge Management (KM) is about improving methods to structure and filter information. A concept browser makes it possible to navigate through complex information structures. Conzilla is such a concept browser. It is designed to present knowledge, to set concepts into relations to each other, and to make browsing through the resulting context-maps possible. Conzilla allows information and content being tied to concepts and concept-relations.

    The collaboration facilities in Conzilla are limited. Basic elements such as a lookup mechanism and lifecycle information for information structures are missing. Before knowledge can be contributed, it is necessary to make sure that dependencies are fulfilled and the history of an edited object is obtained. This thesis is about providing these missing parts.

    To be able to load a container, the information about the location of a component has to be held by a central registry. To resolve eventually existing dependencies, it is also necessary to register the components and its references. This thesis provides a design which eliminates the existing restrictions. The aim is to allow real collaboration through a remote services infrastructure, realized with Collaborilla. The theoretical background is discussed as well as a practical solution, including a prototype of a remote collaboration service.

  • 74. Edirisuriya, Ananda
    et al.
    Zdravkovic, Jelena
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Goal support towards Business Processes Modelling2008In: IIT: 2008 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON INNOVATIONS IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY    , NEW YORK: IEEE , 2008, p. 559-563Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enterprises employ goal models and process models in running their businesses, as well as when building information systems. A goal model is used to model the interests, intentions and strategies of different stakeholders. A process model is used to describe organizational business processes. An enterprise can benefit from using goal models to motivate the decisions when constructing process models. There are a number of comprehensive and accepted goal modelling languages, such as Business Motivation Model, i*, and KAOS. The purpose of the paper is to compare these goal modelling languages in the context of business process engineering.

  • 75.
    Ekenberg, Love
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    A gentle introduction to system verification2005In: New trends in software methodologies, tools and techniques, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2005, p. 173-193Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Verification is an important instrument in the analysis of systems. Roughly, this means that requirements and designs are analyzed formally to determine their relationships. Various candidates for formalizing system development and integration have been proposed. However, a major obstacle is that these introduce non-standard objects and formalisms, leading to severe confusion. This is because these models often are unnecessarily complicated with several disadvantages regarding semantics as well as complexity. While avoiding the mathematical details as far as possible, we present some basic verification ideas using a simple language Such as predicate logic and demonstrate how this can be used for defining and analyzing static and dynamic requirement fulfillment by designs as well as for detecting conflicts. The formalities can be found in the appendix.

  • 76.
    Ekenberg, Love
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Andersson, Mikael
    Danielson, Mats
    Larsson, Aron
    Distributions over Expected Utilities in Decision Analysis2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is often recognised that in real-life decision situations, classical utility theory puts too strong requirements on the decision-maker. Various interval approaches for decision making have therefore be. developed and these have been reasonably successful. However, a problem that sometimes appears in real-life situations is that the result of an evaluation still has an uncertainty about which alternative is to prefer. This is due to expected utility overlaps rendering discrimination more difficult;. In this article we discuss how adding second-order information may increase a decision-maker's understanding of a decision situation when handling aggregations of imprecise representations, as is the case in decision trees or influence diagrams.

  • 77.
    Ekenberg, Love
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV. Mid Sweden University, Sweden .
    Danielson, M.
    Larsson, A.
    Second order effects in interval valued decision graph models2005In: Proceedings of the Eighteenth International Florida Artificial Intelligence Research Society Conference, FLAIRS 2005 - Recent Advances in Artifical Intelligence, 2005, p. 728-733Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Second-order calculations may significantly increase a decision maker's understanding of a decision situation when handling aggregations of imprecise representations, as is the case in decision trees or influence diagrams, while the use of only first-order results gives an incomplete picture. The results apply also to approaches which do not explicitly deal with second-order distributions, instead using only first-order concepts such as upper and lower bounds.

  • 78.
    Ekenberg, Love
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV. Dept. of Information Technology and Media, Mid Sweden University, Sweden .
    Larsson, A.
    Danielson, M.
    Second-order risk constraints2008In: Proceedings of the 21th International Florida Artificial Intelligence Research Society Conference, FLAIRS-21, 2008, p. 637-642Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses how numerically imprecise information can be modelled and how a risk evaluation process can be elaborated by integrating procedures for numerically imprecise probabilities and utilities. More recently, representations and methods for stating and analysing probabilities and values (utilities) with belief distributions over them (second order representations) have been suggested. In this paper, we are discussing some shortcomings in the use of the principle of maximising the expected utility and of utility theory in general, and offer remedies by the introduction of supplementary decision rules based on a concept of risk constraints taking advantage of second-order distributions.

  • 79.
    El Mekawy, Mohamed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Rusu, Lazar
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Ahmed, Nabeel
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Business and IT Alignment: An Evaluation of Strategic Alignment Models2009In: BEST PRACTICES FOR THE KNOWLEDGE SOCIETY: KNOWLEDGE, LEARNING, DEVELOPMENT AND TECHNOLOGY FOR ALL, 2009, Vol. 49, p. 447-455Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The process by which business and IT are brought inline with each other to enhance the performance of business and to achieve business goals is called strategic alignment. Some models have been developed for the assessment of strategic alignment but an evaluation and comparison of capabilities of the models has not been studied due to the absence of a structured evaluation criteria.. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the strategic alignment models, collected through a comprehensive survey. For this purpose, we develop a strategic alignment evaluation framework which is a composition of a number of criteria. We further use this framework for the evaluation of six main alignment models. These models present concrete ways to evaluate strategic business IT-alignment.

  • 80. Elias, Mturi
    et al.
    Khurram Shahzad, Muhammad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Johannesson, Paul
    A Business Process Metadata Model for a Process Model Repository2010In: ENTERPRISE, BUSINESS-PROCESS AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS MODELING  / [ed] Bider I, Halpin T, Krogstie J, Nurcan S, Proper E, Schmidt R, Ukor R, 2010, Vol. 50, p. 287-300Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today reuse of business process models is becoming increasingly important. One of the proven solutions for reusing business process models is the use. of repositories. Repositories should have process models and process metadata that can help users in searching, understanding, and interpreting process models. The purpose of this paper is to propose a Business Process Metadata Model (BPMM) that would facilitate a) locating process models, b) understanding and/or interpreting process models, and c) navigating a process model repository. In order to evaluate the BPMM, an empirical study is conducted to measure consistency and correctness of annotating business processes by using BPMM.

  • 81.
    Elias, Mturi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Shahzad, Khurram
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Using Multi-criteria Decision Making to Choose Process Representation Format for a Process Repository2010In: BUSINESS INFORMATION SYSTEMS WORKSHOPS / [ed] Abramowicz W; Tolksdorf R; Wecel K, 2010, Vol. 57, p. 19-24Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reuse of business process models is the act of designing business processes by using existing process models. Reuse of business process models has been considered as a way to reduce the cost of modeling business processes from scratch. In order to support reuse of process models, a critical mass of process models is required which justifies the effort of maintaining a process model repository. While there are several process modeling languages, no single language is widely accepted. So in order to make process models usable, the stored process models must be presented in a language understandable by users. The purpose of this work is to apply multi-criteria decision making to choose process representation format for a process model repository.

  • 82.
    Eliasson, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Cerratto Pargman, Teresa
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Ramberg, Robert
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Embodied Interaction or Context-Aware Computing?: An Integrated Approach to Design2009In: HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION, PT I / [ed] Jacko JA, 2009, Vol. 5610, p. 606-615Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper revisits the notion of context from an interaction design perspective. Since the emergence of the research fields of Computer supported cooperative work and Ubiquitous computing, the notion of context has been discussed from different theoretical approaches and in different research traditions. One of these approaches is Embodied Interaction. This theoretical approach has in particular contributed to (i) challenge the view that user context can be meaningfully represented by a computer system, (ii) discuss the notion of context as interaction through the idea that users are always embodied in their interaction with computer systems. We believe that the particular view on users context that the approach of Embodied Interaction suggests needs to be further elaborated in terms of design. As a contribution we suggest an integrated approach where the interactional view of Embodied Interaction is interrelated with the representational view of Context-aware computing.

  • 83. Erol, Selim
    et al.
    Granitzer, Michael
    Happ, Simone
    Jantunen, Sami
    Jennings, Ben
    Johannesson, Paul
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Koschmider, Agnes
    Nurcan, Selmin
    Rossi, Davide
    Schmidt, Rainer
    Combining BPM and social software: contradiction or chance?2010In: Journal of Software Maintenance and Evolution: Research and Practice, ISSN 1532-060X, E-ISSN 1532-0618, Vol. 22, no 6-7, p. 449-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social software has received much attention in the academia and industry due to many success stories. However, although social software is used widely for business support, its relationship with Business Process Management has not been analysed. The results of the workshop on Business Process Management and Social Software (BPMS2'08), as part of the International Conference on Business Process Management in Milano, show the manifold possibilities of combining concepts from Business Process Management and social software. Social software provides a better integration of all stakeholders into the business process life cycle and offers new possibilities for a more effective and flexible design of business processes. The modelling of business processes may profit particularly from using social software techniques by alleviating the integration of process knowledge from all stakeholders. In addition, the implementation and deployment phase of the business process life cycle may profit from social software by collecting valuable information for continuous process improvement from a larger set of sources than before. Furthermore, social software environments may be used to provide workflow support. Moreover, the use of social software also requires new considerations about the digital identity and reputation in business processes.

  • 84. Fernaeus, Y.
    et al.
    Isbister, K.
    Höök, Kia
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Laaksolahti, J.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Sundström, Petra
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Understanding users and their situation2011In: Cognitive Technologies, Springer Verlag , 2011, no 9783642151835, p. 657-670Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first step in any design process is to set the stage for what to design and how that should be realised. In terms of user-centred design, this includes to develop a sense of who will be using the system, where it is intended to be used, and what it should be used for. In this chapter we provide an overview of this part of the development process, and its place in the design cycle, and some orienting design challenges that are specific to affective interaction. Thereafter we present a variety of methods that designers may want to consider in actual design work. We end by providing a set of examples from previous and ongoing research in the field, which could also work as inspirations or guiding sources in the early stages in a user-centred design process. 

  • 85.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Tangibles for Social Interaction2007In:  , 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Even though collaborative aspects are central in most argumentations for tangible interaction, tangibles that are explicitly designed for such settings may not naturally fit within the standard discourse of this specific area. A theoretical focus has instead concerned either individual sensory experiences, or the technical sides of devices, often based on a paradigm of information processing. Neither of these perspectives takes into account offline aspects of interaction, which is essential when studying how tangibles are actually used in collaborative settings, as well as when tying back to the core arguments for why the resources have been given a physical form in the first place.

  • 86.
    Flores Delgadillo, Will Johnny
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    IT Service Delivery in Nicaraguan Internet Service Providers: analysis and Assessment2010Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

     

    The thesis addresses the research question: How to describe, understand, and explain IT service delivery? Based on the research question, the following research questions were derived:  How to analyse IT service delivery based on ITIL in order to determine its current situation? How to formalize elements of IT service delivery in maturity level that can be used to assess its current status? These research questions are answered by two IT artefacts: an analysis method and a maturity model for IT service delivery. Both of them are constructed by design-science research guidelines. The analysis method is focused on understanding the IT service delivery in organizations; it is founded on the IT service delivery processes of Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) version 2. The method proposed has been applied through three case studies of Nicaraguan Internet Service Providers (ISPs). The maturity model is oriented to formalize and assess the maturity level of IT service delivery; it is supported by IT service delivery elements that are considered significant for managing IT service delivery by the Nicaraguan ISP sector, by IT service concepts, and by maturity model properties, and complemented by the IT Service Capability Maturity Model. The maturity model provides a mechanism for evaluating the maturity level of IT service delivery through a set of maturity statements and includes a graphical representation; it is also applied to the traceable information of the current status of IT service delivery of one of the Nicaraguan ISPs.

     

     

     

  • 87.
    Flores, Johnny
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Lopez, Anayanci
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Vargas, Norman
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Rusu, Lazar
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Strategic Use of Information Technology in Profit and Non-profit Organizations from Tanzania and Sweden2008In: Open Knowledge Society: A Computer Science And Information Systems Manifesto / [ed] Lytras, MD; Carroll, JM; Damiani, E; Avison, D; Vossen, G; OrdonezDePablos, P, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2008, Vol. 19, p. 137-146Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizations have to deal with a dynamic environment such as new technologies. entrepreneurial ideas, strategic alliances, mergers and acquisitions, and regulatory change. A key for a well-functioning company is an efficient and effective strategic use of Information Technology (IT) supporting the business strategies, goals, and needs. It is also referred as Strategic Business and IT Alignment which is interpreted as a continuous process of conscious and coherent interrelation of all components and personnel of the business and the IT in order to contribute to the organizations performance over tithe. This paper reports an analysis of the Business Information Technology Alignment by using Luftman's Strategic Maturity Assessment Model in case of a Tanzanian Profit Company and a Swedish Non-profit Company where both organizations have an intensive use of Information Technology.

  • 88.
    Flores, Johnny
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV. Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Rusu, L.
    Johanneson, P.
    Analyzing IT service delivery in an ISP from Nicaragua2010In: Organizational, Business, and Technological Aspects of the Knowledge Society: Third World Summit on the Knowledge Society, WSKS 2010, Corfu, Greece, September 22-24, 2010. Proceedings, Part II, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2010, no PART 2, p. 155-165Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a method for analyzing IT service delivery and its application in an Internet Service Provider (ISP). The method proposed is based on ITIL-processes and case study technique; it includes questionnaires for gathering information, semi-structured interviews, focus groups and documents as sources of information for recognition of factual information. The method application allows to the ISP determines its practices and limitations of the IT Service Delivery.

  • 89.
    Flores, Johnny
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Rusu, L.
    Johanneson, P.
    Evaluating IT Service Delivery amongst ISPs from Nicaragua2010In: 16th Americas Conference on Information Systems 2010, AMCIS 2010: Volume 2, 2010, p. 1464-1472Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an evaluation of IT service delivery by Internet Service Providers (ISPs) from Nicaragua at the end of 2009. The evaluation is supported by a methodological approach based on IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL) v.2 concepts and case study techniques. The evaluation involved three ISPs that are nation-wide Internet Service Providers with more than ten years running. We describe the current practices and limitations of IT service delivery in ISPs from Nicaragua. Finally, we argue that existing IT service delivery practices amongst ISPs have matches to ITIL processes, although the ITIL processes are not known amongst them.

  • 90. Futcher, L.
    et al.
    Yngström, Louise
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    A review of IFIP TC 11 WG 11.8 publications through the ages2013In: IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, 2013, p. 113-122Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IFIP WG 11.8 established a series of conferences in 1999 entitled World Information Security Education (WISE). These conferences have been held every second year since then, with the eighth one being held in 2013. Not surprisingly, there has been numerous high quality papers presented and published in the WISE conference proceedings over the years. However, many of these publications are not easily accessible and are therefore not being readily cited. One of the reasons for the inaccessibility of these papers is that they have not been made widely available through either print or a well-known repository on the Web. Furthermore, a need exists to reflect on what has been done in the past in order to realize the future of these conferences and related events. In order to begin the process of addressing this need, this paper presents a review of the IFIP WG 11.8 publications through the ages. It also reflects briefly on the problems relating to the inaccessibility of these publications, the decline in paper submissions and the lack of citations.

  • 91.
    Gamukama, Elly Amani
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Towards a framework for evaluating Efficiency-Fairness Tradeoffs on the Internet in Development Context2008In: 2008 INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON COMMUNICATIONS AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES, NEW YORK: IEEE , 2008, p. 551-556Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Efficiency and fairness are main objectives in any system design and many choices in life are made based on their tradeoffs. This paper investigates the current trends in understanding and applying the fairness concept on the Internet. Then it studies and examines the extension of the fairness concept in the context of development and developing regions, where both the traditional lack of infrastructure and costly communication services have also affected the penetration of the Internet and more even distribution of its benefits. The key question is whether or not it is plausible to identify a framework for the evaluation of efficiency-fairness tradeoffs that may provide a sound basis for a model of a more equitable access to the Internet to a diversity of users with different needs and financial possibilities representing mainly developing regions and emerging economies.

  • 92.
    Gamukama, Elly Amani
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Popov, Oliver
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    A framework for evaluating efficiency - Fairness tradeoff in IP networks in context of development2009In: 2009 9th International Symposium on Communications and Information Technology, ISCIT 2009, 2009, p. 507-512Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Efficiency and fairness are main objectives in any system design and many choices in life are made based on their tradeoffs. In this paper we introduce a framework for the evaluation of efficiency-fairness tradeoffs that would provide a sound basis for network providers and social planners to provide or plan for an equitable access to the Internet to a diversity of users with different needs and financial possibilities representing mainly developing regions and emerging economies. Control approaches are introduced to address the upraising distortion of fairness concept in IP based networks by using the (α, β) - fairness concept to establish the upper and lower fairness bounds within which the social welfare and the network efficiency are maximized. Although the use of the (α, β) - fairness concept compromises to a certain extent the degree for fairness in resource capacity allocation, it does not jeopardize the utilities for end users or the network provider. Fairness in this context mainly parameterizes tradeoff between services equality and throughput maximization.

  • 93. Ghafoor, A.
    et al.
    Muftic, Sead
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Schmölzer, Gernot
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    CryptoNET: Design and implementation of the secure email system2010In: 2009 Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Security and Communication Networks, IWSCN 2009, 2010, p. 5683054-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a secure, high assurance and very reliable Email system. The system handles standard Email security services - signing and encryption of Email letters and, in addition, provides a number of extended and innovative security features. These new features are: transparent handling of certificates, strong authentication between Secure Email client and Secure Email server, archiving and recovery of encrypted address books, simple and secure handling of cryptographic keys, security sessions management, tracking of Email letters using confirmation message, elimination of SPAM messages, prevention of fraudulent and infected attachments, and usage of smart cards. The system is structured in the form of security objects organized in the form of a large-scale security architecture based on proxy servers. The system uses hierarchical certification infrastructure for management and verification of certificates.

  • 94. Giambruno, A.
    et al.
    Shibli, Muhammad Awais
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV. National University of Sciences and Technology, Pakistan .
    Muftic, Sead
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Lioy, A.
    MagicNET: XACML authorization policies for mobile agents2009In: International Conference for Internet Technology and Secured Transactions, ICITST 2009, 2009, p. 5402600-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One approach to authorization of mobile agents is to use XACML policies by assigning roles to agents and then enforcing role-based authorization. In this paper we show how traditional XACML polices, used for user access control in distributed environments, can be used for mobile agents' access control. We use such polices to manage delegation of access rights from users to agents while at the same time following the core principles of the XACML standard. We also propose a combination of policies that map users to their mobile agents and make access control decisions for mobile agents by evaluating complex policy sets.

  • 95.
    Giannoulis, Constantinos
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Kabilan, Vandana
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Roza, M.
    Verification, Validation & Accreditation of legacy simulations using Business Process Modeling Notation2008In: Simul. Interoperability Stand. Organ. - Simul. Interoperability Workshop Spring, Workshop Pap., 2008, p. 306-314Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Verification, Validation and Accreditation is an important part of the Modeling and Simulation domain. This paper focuses on legacy simulations and examines two VV&A approaches coming from different communities of the defense. We use the Business Process Modeling Notation (BPMN) to describe both approaches and demonstrate their applicability to any business environment involving M&S, and thus constitute them reusable for any given intended use. Furthermore, under this notation we point out differences and similarities and give insights on how they could complement each other matching one's needs and policies.

  • 96. Guo, M.
    et al.
    Yang, K.
    Musial-Gabrys, K.
    Min, G.
    Yin, H.
    Nguyen, N. P.
    Jiang, Y.
    Kourtellis, N.
    Cheng, X.
    Leng, S.
    Wang, H.
    Dokoohaki, Nima
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Message from the MSNCom 2015 workshop chairs2015In: Proceedings - 15th IEEE International Conference on Computer and Information Technology, CIT 2015, 14th IEEE International Conference on Ubiquitous Computing and Communications, IUCC 2015, 13th IEEE International Conference on Dependable, Autonomic and Secure Computing, DASC 2015 and 13th IEEE International Conference on Pervasive Intelligence and Computing, PICom 2015, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2015, article id 7362990Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 97.
    Hallberg, David
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Socioculture and cognitivist perspectives on language and communication barriers in learning2009In: World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology: An International Journal of Science, Engineering and Technology, ISSN 2010-376X, E-ISSN 2070-3740, Vol. 36, no 3(12), p. 172-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is believed that major account on language diversity must be taken in learning, and especially in learning using ICT. This paper's objective is to exhibit language and communication barriers in learning, to approach the topic from socioculture and cognitivist perspectives, and to give exploratory solutions of handling such barriers. The review is mainly conducted by approaching the journal Computers & Education, but also an initially broad search was conducted. The results show that not much attention is paid on language and communication barriers in an immediate relation to learning using ICT. The results shows, inter alia, that language and communication barriers are caused because of not enough account is taken on both the individual's background and the technology.

  • 98. Halleux, P.
    et al.
    Mathieu, L.
    Andersson, Birger
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    A method to support the alignment of business models and goal models2008In: CEUR Workshop Proc., 2008, p. 120-134Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses one part of business and IT-alignment by proposing a method to align goal models and business models. The method takes as input a goal model and a business model, and outputs a business model that is aligned with the explicit goals of a business actor. The method builds on previous work with the same approach but extends that work in at least two ways: the syntax of some method constituents is altered and a way to combine them is introduced. The result is an improved method that better support a modeller when designing business models based on goal models.

  • 99.
    Hansson, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Danielson, Mats
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Ekenberg, Love
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    A framework for evaluation of flood management strategies2008In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 86, no 3, p. 465-480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The resulting impact of disasters on society depends on the affected country's economic strength prior to the disaster. The larger the disaster and the smaller the economy, the more significant is the impact. This is clearest seen in developing countries, where weak economics become even weaker afterwards. Deliberate strategies for the sharing of losses from hazardous events may aid a country or a community in efficiently using scarce prevention and mitigation resources, thus being better prepared for the effects of a disaster. Nevertheless, many governments lack an adequate institutional system for applying cost effective and reliable technologies for disaster prevention, early warnings, and mitigation. Modelling by event analyses and strategy models is one way of planning ahead, but these models have so far not been linked together. An approach to this problem was taken during a large study in Hungary, the Tisza case study, where a number of policy strategies for spreading of flood loss were formulated. In these strategies, a set of parameters of particular interest were extracted from interviews with stakeholders in the region. However, the study was focused on emerging economies, and, in particular, on insurance strategies. The scope is now extended to become a functional framework also for developing countries. In general, they have a higher degree of vulnerability. The paper takes northern Vietnam as an example of a developing region. We identify important parameters and discuss their importance for flood strategy formulations. Based on the policy strategies in the Tisza case, we extract data from the strategies and propose a framework for loss spread in developing and emerging economics. The parameter set can straightforwardly be included in a simulation and decision model for policy formulation and evaluation, taking multiple stakeholders into account.

  • 100.
    Helal, Sumyea
    et al.
    KTH.
    Sattar, A. H.M.Sarowar
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Ciobanu-Morogan, Matei
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    A privacy preserving authentication in WLAN using RADIUS2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    802.11 access point discovery protocol possesses a common privacy problem. The client needs to send continuous active probe for making a connection with its intended network. This active probe helps the attacker to gain knowledge of favoured network list of the client. Again the client has to send continuous probe to perform the handoff efficiently; a listener can easily capture probe and disclose its favoured network identifiers known as SSIDs which may contain some sensitive information. This problem has been solved partially by some privacy preserving techniques with the help of hidden SSIDs, passive scanning, using undirected active probe and so on. But, these solutions confine to only access point discovery and use open authentication for association. In our research we have proposed a protocol for protecting privacy while implementing strong authentication of network users by RADIUS. 

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