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  • 51.
    Asplund, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Knowing too much?: On bias due to domain-specific knowledge in internal crowdsourcing for explorative ideas2021In: R&D Management, ISSN 0033-6807, E-ISSN 1467-9310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Internal crowdsourcing utilizes a firm’s employees, of which many have a strong understanding of the domains in which the firm operates, for contributing with, developing and evaluating ideas. On the one hand, these employees can use their domain-specific knowledge to identify the value of what may seem a far-fetched solution to the average employee. On the other hand, previous research has shown that employees typically evaluate ideas in their domains less favorably if they do not align with ongoing exploitation activities. Hence, this study focuses on whether a higher degree of relevant domain-specific knowledge makes employees participating in internal crowdsourcing prefer exploitative solutions when evaluating ideas. An empirical study of an online platform for firm-internal innovation in a multinational engineering company showed that employees who only infrequently participated in internal crowdsourcing mostly contributed to and evaluated ideas within their own domain. Employees who frequently participated also contributed to and evaluated ideas outside their own domains. By statistically analyzing group differences during idea evaluation, we show that employees participating infrequently favor exploitable solutions, whereas employees participating frequently are more uncertain. The former difference is only seen concerning ideas that require domain-specific knowledge to understand, but the latter is observed for all types of ideas. This study makes three substantial contributions. First, employees with domain-specific knowledge, through their preference for exploitative solutions, bias the outcome of internal crowdsourcing when idea evaluation requires domain-specific knowledge. Second, this bias is aggravated by the overall higher level of uncertainty displayed by employees participating frequently in internal crowdsourcing and thereby tend to reach out to other domains. Third, in order to mitigate this, bias management can build engagement in internal crowdsourcing through idea challenges that do not require domain-specific knowledge and consider avoiding employees with a strongly associated domain knowledge for idea evaluation.

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  • 52.
    Asplund, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Patrick, Adam J.
    Rolls-Royce plc.
    The genesis of public-private innovation ecosystems: Bias and challenges2021In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 162, article id 120378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of technology increasingly depends on innovation ecosystems and frequently involves actors from both industry and academia. However, value creation may experience challenges due to bias formed during public-private innovation ecosystem genesis.

    This empirical study of bias in a new pan-European public-private initiative provides results regarding innovation ecosystems and the individuals typically active during their genesis: value creation is biased towards the selection of incumbent firms and complement challenges, and participation is biased towards engineers with knowledge of exploitation from multiple domains and researchers with knowledge of exploitation from single domains.

    This suggests that the implications of the loose coupling emphasised by the innovation ecosystems discourse and the knowledge of the different contexts in which firms capture value are more complex than previously acknowledged. The practical implications are that the ability of public innovation ecosystem leadership to act early on novel technology might be offset by the inability of involved firms to commit to bringing the technology to market and that individuals typically active during public-private innovation ecosystems genesis are not ideal for handling this challenge. In fact, increasingly connected public leadership could smother the innovation ecosystem unless well-connected and multidisciplinary researchers are brought in as brokers.

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  • 53.
    Asplund, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Törngren, Martin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Vahlne, Tobias
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Karlsson, Martin
    Northvolt AB.
    Which skills? A critical perspective on the skills facilitating the transfer of third-cycle students to knowledge-intensive SMEs2022In: Proceedings of Frontiers in Education 2022, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This Research Full Paper relates to public-private innovation ecosystems. This loosely knit form of cooperation allows for beneficial activities such as knowledge transfer, dissemination of novel technology, and recruitment. In these contexts students graduating from third-cycle education should be able to find opportunities for transferring to knowledge-intensive positions in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

    However, a 3-year study of the reasons why firms approach public organisations within a Europe-wide, public-private innovation ecosystem suggests that students might struggle to find such opportunities. Through a questionnaire provided to all firms approaching the ecosystem we identify recruitment as one of their lowest ranked interests. By interviewing members of the public organisations found in the ecosystem we identify how cooperation is initiated and maintained, and how this influences the opportunities for students to transfer into industry. The results provide nuance to the current emphasis in skill development within third-cycle (engineering) education. It is rarely recognized that fostering technical skill and academic entrepreneurship might not be enough to allow all types and sizes of firms to receive engineering students. 

    Particularly, this study identifies the academic and industrial boundary spanning roles at knowledge-intensive SMEs as important. These roles require a third-cycle education that early on hones skills that typically do not become critical until much later for students that pursue an academic path – e.g., the inter-organisational project management skills necessary to effectively seek research funding or to negotiate goal alignment between organisations. We argue that to allow third-cycle students to practice the finer points of such skills, universities need to evolve more distributed support structures for innovation that integrate in-depth engineering knowledge with innovation skills and have an increased focus on human and social capital.

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  • 54.
    Atterblad, Rasmus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Strinnholm, Mathias
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    KTH Hyperloop: En studie om ett studentdrivet radikalt innovationsprojekt2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    To enable businesses to maintain strong competitiveness in today’s dynamical marketplace they need a high level of innovation. KTH Hyperloop is a student project in Sweden Stockholm at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), currently in the middle of a radical innovation project with the goal to change future transportation. The main idea of the project is to create a vehicle which will be transported in a vacuum by electromagnetism. The purpose of this thesis is to increase the knowledge of the product development process of an innovation project such as KTH Hyperloop, a project driven and executed only by students with high staff turnover without any form of compensation. This study analyzed two research questions linked to KTH Hyperloop seen as a radical innovation project. The study was initiated by conducting a thorough literature study. Related areas were examined and a theoretical frame of references was created. Litterature areas examined were motivation, agile methods, organizational structures and radical innovation. Further into the project, a qualitative interview study which included four respondents from KTH Hyperloop was conducted . Results from this study can be applied to similar projects regarding beneficial and inhibitory factors to a radical innovation project. The results of this study shows that intrinsic motivation is one of the major factors to why people apply to a student project as KTH Hyperloop. It is also important to have extrinsic motivational factors such as achieving good results in the project. Another conclusion that this study shows is organizing a radical innovation project under a high turnover of staff requires agile work methods. Also, the project needs to have aspread of information that reaches all levels in the organization to be able to reach radical innovation results.

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  • 55.
    Baid, Vishal
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Seres, Irén
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Service Design for Internal Sustainable Mobility: Designing Internal Sustainable Mobility Solutions for employees at a Swedish Automotive Industry2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is a service design project investigating the matter of internal sustainable mobility provided for employees within the industrial area of Scania CV AB, in Sweden. The purpose of the project was to offer new transport service ideas to Scania or improve the existing ones based on the needs and behaviours of the users. The target requirements of the transport system were time- and cost efficiency as well as environmental sustainability.

    In these days, the internal transport system provided for the employees is not popular, meaning that the majority choose to use their own car to commute in the area of the company which results both inefficiency in the system as well as increasing demand on parking places around the area.

    Service Design methodology was chosen to carry out the project. This is a user centered and iterative method that allows to investigate the user needs and behaviours and generate service concepts based on gained insights, which are discovered during the process. Three loops of iteration were conducted, each made up of stages such as Discover, Define, Develop and Deliver. Each loop started with an interview session to discover new insights and have a better understanding, which was followed by an analysis, and then concept generation or development was executed resulting in developed concepts at each loop. Before the process was started, a background research, a literature study and personal meetings with the client were conducted to understand the problem better and explore the possibilities and limitations.

    The final concepts were merged into five concept groups, which are called as Walking, Biking, On-demand service, Scania Move application and Autonomous shuttle service. The final concepts were presented on a road map, showing the recommended implementation in a chronological order. Business Plan was also done with the use of different tools.

    The conclusion of the project is that a sustainable mobility system was designed for Scania to implement in Södertälje achieving the project targets. Design features and recommendations for future work were also created for Scania. Based on the explorations discovered during the thesis work, Scania is recommended to work further on its internal sustainable mobility system.

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  • 56.
    Bazarkhuu, Dagvadorj
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Dannert, Evelina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Integrering av säkerhetsaspekter i produktutvecklingsprocessen av semiautonoma gaffeltruckar2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Forklifts are motor-driven vehicles which are frequently used for the transportation of goods in the industry. The automation of these is a step in the right direction when it comes to digitalization and prioritized safety work, and as semi-autonomous forklifts are regarded as safer, both the supply and the demand for them are increasing. The aim of this report was to investigate how companies involve users and integrate safety aspects in their product development process of semi-autonomous forklifts to minimize the risk for bodily injuries. Furthermore, the view on automation among users and manufacturers was studied, along with the possibilities and challenges automation entails. The research questions were answered through a literature study and an interview study with five respondents from three different companies. The results from the interview study were compiled and compared with the theoretical source in a subsequent analysis and discussion. The study showed that safety aspects are regarded and integrated systematically during the start of the product development process. The manufacturers as well as the users believed that safety is an aspect which is becoming more and more important and which is perceived as having improved immensely during the last ten years. The safety aspects have evolved into more of hygiene factors which need to be reached due to legislative demands and regulations. A finding from this study was therefore that users were not involved with the purpose to integrate safety functions but rather to meet demands which are more difficult to define and which concern how the product should feel and be perceived in usage, such as driving sense and ergonomics. There are good possibilities to increase safety by automation. Many mishaps and accidents originate from human factors, such as misunderstandings and lack of attention. Reducing or eliminating the human contribution would probably lead to fewer problematic situations and mistakes, which could save lives. Other possibilities are in productivity, where there are financial profits to gain when streamlining the industry. However, there are always challenges related to large, digital transitions. Automation of the material handling means an investment which needs to be approved and realized, which also requires preparatory work and research. Lack of knowledge was a suggested obstacle, but neither the users nor the manufacturers considered the obstacles larger than the possibilities.

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  • 57.
    Bejefalk, Thomas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.).
    Att konstruera för tillverkning: En arbetsmodell för ett enstyckskonstruerande företag2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    DynaMate AB, the owner of DynaMate Industrial Services AB (DIS), is a free-standing whollyownedaffiliate company of Scania CV AB. The company started its business in 1993 initially as asupport and maintenance department within and for Scania solely. During the first six-months of2001 DynaMate’s business was re-formed to also offer its service and production support to otherclients besides Scania. Therefore, in 2009 DynaMate Industrial Services AB was established. Thiscompany offer complete industrial solutions with special skills in the automation, electrical andmechanical areas.In the management of Scania, DynaMates missions has often depended on single designers, playingthe role as both project leader and project member as well as project performer and finisher. As aeffect of this working procedure many crucial decisions have been only verbal and informal, whereimportant task documentation and possible drawings rectifications has been inadequate. The factthat DIS now, continuously increasing in extent, is aiming to other clients than just Scania, a morestandardized working procedure is required. This is important to be able to decrease time from ideato complete solution, and still provide customers with high quality products.The primary task with this project was therefore to develop a working model proposal forimproving designers’ every-day work at DIS, concerning reduced lead time for one-productmanufacturing.This Master Thesis was performed with the support from litterature within associated research area,followed by the formation of a interview questionnaire. All interviews were performed within DISdepartment of mechanical design and with external manufacturing companies.The compiled result indicated several areas that a designer must be aware of when designing formanufacturing. Manufacturers pointed out that the most common defects with constructiondelivered drawings are missing measurements, as well as superflously tolerances, radius’ andchamfers. These factors are all contributing to increased lead time and product complexity.The proposed new working model presented in this Master Thesis is a phase-divided sequentialprocess, where both the customer and manufacturer will be more involved than today. This toensure that the manufacturer will be given complete data from the designer, and that the finalproduct will obtain customer satisfaction.

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  • 58.
    Bengtsson, Theodor
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Hägerlöf, Jonas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Stora mängder användardata för produktutveckling: Möjligheter och utmaningar vid integrering av stora mängder användardata i produktutvecklingsprocesser2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The technology development has contributed to an increased amount of user data companies have access to and is expected to continue to increase. Companies that integrate user data into their product development processes are expected to gain competitive advantages. The purpose of the work is to investigate opportunities and challenges when integrating large amounts of user data. By answering two questions, the study determines the purpose of the work, where the consequences for decision­ making also are addressed. The work process began with a literature study that formed the basis for both the problematization and the purpose that identifies a gap in the research about user data in product development processes. The literature study created a broader understanding of the subject. The empirical part consisted of a qualitative semi­structured interview study with four participating companies and an equal number of respondents with knowledge in the field. Coding of the material identified areas among the respondents which contributed within sights that were processed to contribute to the research area.The results highlight opportunities and challenges companies face when integrating large amounts of user data into product development processes. The study highlights the user as central to product development, where increased data enables complex data analysis. Efficient analysis of data enables faster iteration processes and repetitive jobs can be replaced by more stimulating. In addition, the basis for decision-making becomes more extensive and can generate new strategies and designs for offers. The study also determines that increased data places demands on companies, where the relevance of the data is important and processes for handling must be able to define the relevant data. Furthermore, companies need to mature in the role of integrating user data. In order to ensure the safe basis for decision­making from user data, qualitative and quantitative analyses should be promoted to work together to confirm each other’s identified patterns. The integration of large amounts of user data into product development processes is determined by this study to require the acquisition of competence in order to ensure relevance in data management processes by defining which data to collect. With successful integration, companies that integrate user data achieve competitive advantages and capitalization opportunities that are long­-term beneficial.

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  • 59.
    Bergendahl, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Collaboration and competition in firm-internal ideation management: Two alternatives – and a third way out2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The passive reliance on ideas to spontaneously emerge within companies is today replaced with more active and continuous ideation management that embraces employees from different functions and knowledge-domains within the company to create and develop ideas. A frequently observed feature in the active management of ideation is the reliance on collaboration and competition mechanisms. These mechanisms use the strength of enabling people to working together towards a shared interest (collaboration) and the power of enabling people to outperform each other in submitting the best idea (competition). The existing research on collaboration and competition in ideation is found inconclusive about their effects as collaboration is stated to both enhance and hamper performance, and as competition is claimed to both drive and reduce performance in ideation. This constitutes a limitation to the management of ideation as it reduces the ability to actively and purposefully guide ideation through a deliberate use of the two mechanisms.

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate collaboration and competition mechanisms in firm-internal ideation.

    A multi-methodological approach has been deployed using three different studies: a multiple case study, a survey, and an experiment. This has allowed for the phenomenon of ideation to be studied using different perspectives and for the individual results to be triangulated. The empirical data has been acquired from both industry and experiments with university students.

    The conducted research has revealed that the inconsistencies on the effects from the two mechanisms are possible to understand and resolve by applying a more detailed level of analysis. When competition is decomposed into components of individual- and group competition, it is found that individual competition drives idea quantity and that it hampers collaboration, whereas group competition instead is found to induce collaboration and to nurture idea quality. This indicates that competition can be used to manage levels of collaboration in ideation, thereby bridging the two mechanisms.

    This thesis further presents that the individual effects from each of the mechanisms are complementary to each other. This implies that the effect from each mechanism is retained when combined with the other mechanisms, and that the combined effect is equal to, or even greater than, the sum of the individual effects. This combined use is found to drive both ideation efficiency and motivation, and is offering management an interesting third alternative, out of the two mechanisms, of how firm-internal ideation can be managed in a more effective and efficient manner.

    An analytical framework is included, presenting the interrelationships between the mechanisms, motivation, ideation behavior and the ideation performance. 

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    Thesis
  • 60. Bergendahl, Magnus
    et al.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Sapucci, Mirco
    Making collaborative ideation work: Challenges and success factors for the use of collaborative ideation tools2012In: IAMOT 2012, Taiwan, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Bergendahl, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Dagnino, Giovanni Battista
    Ferrigno, Giulio
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Coopetition and ideation performance: Observations from two complementary experimentsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 62.
    Bergendahl, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Combining collaboration and competition: a key to improved idea management?2014In: European Journal of International Management, ISSN 1751-6757, E-ISSN 1751-6765, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 528-547Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Earlier research in the field of idea management has highlighted both collaboration and competition driving ideation. While these two are normally considered opposing and excluding, recent work proposes them to be complements. Previous studies have primarily focused on firm-external communities, and little is known about the joint use of collaboration and competition inside firms. This paper addresses collaborative and competitive mechanisms used in firm-internal idea management. Case studies of three multinational firms active in idea management have been performed. The firms' use of collaboration and competition in firm-internal idea management is analysed, revealing that the two approaches can be combined, and explores how their paradoxical coexistence can be managed. This study underlines the importance of addressing intrinsic motivation and facilitating sharing of knowledge in order to bridge and align collaboration and competition mechanisms. It also highlights issues of rewards and company culture, requiring informed attention from human resources management.

  • 63.
    Bergendahl, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. SCA Hygiene Products, Sweden .
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Creating Ideas for Innovation: Effects of Organizational Distance on Knowledge Creation Processes2015In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 87-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation is to a large extent considered a social and communicative process, and input from other individuals potentially improves the generation of novel and valuable ideas also in the early stages of idea creation and development. Both colleagues inside organizations and external parties have frequently been proposed as important sources of information and knowledge within this part of the innovation process. Other contributions addressing social networks and innovation bring into focus the potentially negative effects that certain network structures may have on innovation, pointing to inconsistencies in received theory. In order to address these inconsistencies, an empirical study of ideation in a Swedish multinational firm was performed, taking into account two different knowledge creation processes - combination and in-depth analysis - and their inter-relationships with organizational distance between contributing individuals. Data was collected using a survey and was analysed using regression models. It was found that different levels of organizational distance correlate with different knowledge creation processes. In-depth analysis occurred more often with employees' close colleagues, whereas the combination of existing ideas and information was more frequent in interaction with employees' close colleagues and with external parties. Both these interaction patterns were also found to be positive for the generation of patents, whereas no such relationship could be seen when individuals interacted with colleagues in other departments in the same firm. The findings have implications for theory on cognitive distance, and also suggest that management needs to facilitate different types of collaboration and networking when aiming to facilitate and support ideation, taking into consideration the type of innovation aimed for, as well as its supporting knowledge creation processes.

  • 64.
    Bergendahl, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ideation High Performers: A Study of Motivational Factors2015In: Creativity Research Journal, ISSN 1040-0419, E-ISSN 1532-6934, Vol. 27, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As innovation today is one of the keys to success for firms, creativity among its employees becomes a key asset and the understanding about what motivates employees in ideation is consequently of high interest. This article addresses differences in motivation among high- and low performers in ideation and contributes to existing theory by enhancing the understanding about what characterizes motivation among ideation high performers. The quantitative analysis used is based on a study performed at a multinational consumer goods company based in Sweden, surveying employees’ performance, motivation and their preferences towards collaboration and competition. Among key findings is the possible combination of collaboration and competition mechanisms as motivating means in firms’ ideation management. 

  • 65.
    Bergendahl, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Inducing ideation collaboration through competition?2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 66.
    Bergendahl, Margareta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Combining collaboration and competition in firm-internal ideation management2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 67.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Compose or decompose - Resource allocation in engineering design projects2013In: Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education: Design Education - Growing Our Future, EPDE 2013, 2013, p. 362-367Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a paper that reviews the planning, execution and reflection of the collaborative writing efforts made by students when composing their final design project reports. Past research has indicated collaborative writing (CW) as one of the most challenging task that could be assigned to student groups [1]. CW is a process that involves project management, including resource allocation and essentially a great portion of writing skill. Whereas numerous engineering design projects highlight the uniqueness and creative aspects brought forward and the process in which this was created - the final piece of the puzzle how the final report was established is a phenomenon that get dimmed. There is dualistic propagation of parallel processes where the 'artifact' constitutes the main design work and where the efforts made to produce a written report relates to the other. A tradition that maybe is obsolete in some places but that has a life of its' own in other domains. The more administrative work involved with compiling a report of 'good enough' character whilst motivating and supporting each other should be balanced against the activities involved in producing the final output/design/prototype. This study is based on interviews and written 'pros and cons' reflections with project participants, project documentation and lecturer's reflections. Early indications show that communication and iterative work processes, allowing cross-checking, validation and confirmation is crucial for engaging greater commitment to the collaborative writing process. Independently of project management style and delegations made; labour intensity and work distribution of activities seem to propagate a skew execution of work. This is especially noticeable when administrative functions are weak amongst project members, which can be a consequence when putting students from various programs/disciplines/schools in a joint exercise of this type. Based on the findings, the paper stipulates a set of preventive coaching tips to guideline collaborative writing efforts and endorsing increased rigor to the final report and its process. Establishing this set of awareness among students would ultimately minimize uncertainties and dilemmas prior to 'entering the boat' - when the ship has sailed so has also its crew and based on how well they master to serve and execute their skills - so will also the trip be remembered - pleasant or horrific - taking them to paradise or hell.

  • 68.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Do we facilitate an innovative learning environment?: Student efficacy in two engineering design projects2012In: Global Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 1328-3154, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 27-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates student efficacy and motivation to work in relation to three distinct elements of interaction. Rather than rediscovering evaluation, student perceptions determine a project's overall efficiency by individual reflection on the effort made, and form circles of influence and impact on interacting elements. Based on previous research on student efficacy, this study takes a student-centric point of view, where the self-efficacy is grounded in stud ents' intr insic mo tiva tio n for work [1]. The article's principal ide a is to inve stiga te how differe nt elements of interaction cause students' beliefs to shift individually and in groups. A qualitative approach has been used, where the results have been collected through structured questionnaires, with respondents from an extensive engineering design project course. Results show that the internal proximity and joint motivation to work have positive influence together with lecturer/coach presence, informative clarity and valuable input. Reported differences clearly separated the teams with several useful features of course analysis to consider for future work.

  • 69.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Innovation in Engineering Design Teams! Opening Pandora’s Box by Enabling Autonomous LearnersIn: European Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 0304-3797, E-ISSN 1469-5898Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates student prerequisites for innovation in education. Engineering design teams have been studied extensively over the last few decades, providing insights in a wide variety of areas. Building on how new knowledge is interpreted and disseminated as part of a design challenge in relatively large design teams involves a process perspective with a concern for project management, collaborative design, creativity and resource allocation. To clarify these issues, two student teams engaged in year-long engineering design Masters level project courses were studied. The case studies highlight activities that contributed to radical new outputs and a total of three patent applications. The importance of outcome-based project learning is frequently cited, but there is little understanding of the factors that spur early-phase innovation. This paper shows that early-phase innovation is strongly encouraged by active learning and forms of testing in the autonomous product development cycle. To increase student autonomy, it will be necessary to increase the extent to which the functionality of existing knowledge is put into practice.

  • 70.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Moving Beyond Traditions: Bachelor Thesis Redesign2012In: International Journal of Quality Assurance in Engineering and Technology Education, ISSN 2155-496X, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 31-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Student learning is built on native ability, prior preparation and experiences but also by the compatibility of his or her learning style and the instructor’s teaching style. Past research (Kolb, 1984; Felder & Silverman, 1988; Baillie & Moore, 2004; Biggs & Tang, 2007; Crawley, Malmqvist, Ostlund, & Brodeur, 2007) indicate mismatches between engineering students’ common learning styles and traditional teaching styles. This paper addresses a transition from a teacher centered approach to a collaborative student centered approach. A longitudinal study of bachelor thesis redesign is described by following the progression in three parallel courses over four consecutive years. Moving beyond the traditional practices of individual thesis writing, a strict individual assignment has been transformed where roughly 50% now originates from collective work efforts. Findings show support to a collective approach when working with bachelor thesis writing as work groups become self-governed, attached with a creative disposition, pursuing functioning knowledge, key generic skills of industrial relevance, and collectively supporting deep level learning.

  • 71.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Moving Beyond Traditions: Bachelor Thesis Redesign2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 72.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Proactive Student Learning: Towards Innovation in Engineering EducationArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates student prerequisites for innovation in education. It looks at the level of proactivity and autonomy in students taking two full-year engineering design masters-level project courses. This research is rooted in what traditionally is categorized as a problem-based learning course. The paper presents strategies to improve the quality of student learning by shaping learning activities to encourage strong self-discipline and motivation to perform. The case studies address activities that contributed to radical new outputs and a total of three patent applications. Outcome-based project learning is frequently cited across a multitude of studies in the field, but evidence is scarce regarding the characteristics that drive early-phase innovation efforts and maximize students’ level of autonomy. This paper shows that early-phase innovation excels through deep-level learning, where embedded knowledge is applied in and stimulated by peer interactions. Proactive characteristics are apparent in work motivation, time on task and overall performance. Clearly stated learning objectives are critical in curricula design, in combination with open and flexible coaching that nurtures the intrinsic motivation to learn, participate and understand future work roles and processes.

  • 73.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The Experiences of an Engineering Design Education Project: The Case of Prototyping the Next Generation Dishwasher Door2008In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON INTELLECTUAL CAPITAL AND KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT & ORGANISATIONAL LEARNING / [ed] OSullivan, K, NR READING: ACADEMIC CONFERENCES LTD , 2008, p. 61-69Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation is not a skill that belongs to a single individual that cannot be improved. Instead innovation should be addressed as a social event where the unified working knowledge stands the chance of leveraging regular work activities, enhancing the status quo. The purpose of this paper is to describe how an engineering student project can produce radical new output working in a highly self-regulated project team. The paper investigates how learning objectives, creative activities and team performance is centralized around committed individuals working as one. Using a full year academic graduate course, observational data and participant's reflections has been directed to better understand the relationship between functional knowledge, problem-based learning and creative activities. The findings emphasize that clear stated learning objectives in combination with an open and flexible coaching could have a positive affect on students' motivation to learn, participate and understand future work roles and processes.

  • 74.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The Knowledge Map, A Lubricant for the Firm's Machinery2005In: ECKM 05' Limerick, Ireland., 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 75.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Two facets of Innovation in Engineering Education: The interplay of Student Learning and Curricula Design2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis covers two main perspectives ofinnovation; first, innovation is regarded as an outcome-related mechanism wherelearning is expressed through artefact presentations at the end of adevelopment process; second, innovation comprises a change mechanism in theprocess of student learning, influencing educators to reconsider new methods andpractices. Building on qualitative data from engineering design courses, theaim has been to explore how learning elements in engineering educationinfluence students during early-phase innovation. By implementing andpracticing learning elements, early-phase innovation could strengthen both currentand future engineering curricula, courses, and programmes.This thesis put attention to authentic experiences in which learning elementsis acted upon by students and targeted, defined, and refined by educators.Introducing learning elements need educators to manifest learning efforts moreexplicitly to match students’ capability to interpret new knowledge. Adoptinglearning elements that challenge existing paths of action are characterized by diversity, proactivity, opennessand motivation. For students to excel in the exploration of early-phaseinnovation, it is important to identify when, how and to what extent leaningelements can be reinforced. Thestrengthened understanding by students is mirrored in improved ability to takeaction and apply relevant knowledge in distinct learning situations. Theopportunity to influence student learning provides the design and redesign of curricula,courses and programmes as a prime feature to leaning elements relevant to early-phaseinnovation. To successfully pursue innovation in engineering education abalance is necessary between responsible actors integrating learning elementsand by those determined to learn.

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    Innovation in Engineering Education
  • 76.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Understanding Innovativeness by Encapsulating Creativity in Higher Engineering Education2009In: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education EPDE09 / [ed] Clarke, A, Ion, W, McMahon, C and Hogarth, P, 2009, p. 376-381Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovativeness implies willingness of individuals to support new ideas, creativity and experimentation with impact to change traditional practices. From past studies innovativeness has been brought forward in several dimensions (e.g. market, strategic and technological) [1]. This paper endeavor innovativeness from an academic perspective, viable in a context of product development driven courses (i.e. industry related project). Innovativeness is scarcely if all addressed in higher engineering education. In specific course elements it is difficult to find a red thread between creativity input and output. Perhaps, this is precisely the dilemma with creativity as it follows no given rule and thus not easily followed. Project output, the way things turns out, is often taken for granted as something part of a development process rather than something that need guidance and systematic support like most other elements involved. From academia a more systematic approach to perceive ideation phases is welcomed so that engineers are: 1) more acquainted with supporting methods for creativity, and 2) by integrate the use of such methods improve students' innovativeness, their individual innovation capability. The study covers a literature review of a dozen of the most cited and practiced idea generation (IG) methods. In addition, three case studies involving approximately 50 students in equally divided project groups is used to better understand and propose suitable IG methods to be used in higher engineering education. The author work with a large capstone design course Integrated Product Development (IPD), which have been used to retrieve useful data through interviews, archival records and observations. The IPD constitutes a way of working, an integrated perspective that is attained during the full year academic course. In the course plan, one of the objectives is to establish an increase in students' creative abilities. Research has shown that systematic approaches to creative thinking improve output quality, in terms of producing better final design projects [2][3]. To meet demands of a systematic approach idea generation methods is today considered essential in product development processes. In this paper several idea generating methods are presented together with their usefulness in engineering design projects conducted in close relation with industry. A comparison between several idea generation IG cases is looked upon to withdraw insights in how and what to look for when applying IG methods in project classes. Thus, the overall purpose of the paper is to investigate whether innovativeness by students can be derived from students' ways of using IG methods.

  • 77.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    What influences student innovation?2012In: Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education: Design Education for Future Wellbeing, EPDE 2012, 2012, p. 167-172Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates how elements of the learning environment influence student innovation. In detail, the paper addresses students' perceived efficacy and their motivation to work in two parallel engineering design projects. Rather than rediscovering evaluation, student perceptions determine a project's overall efficiency by individual reflection on the effort made. Based on previous research on student efficacy [1], this study takes a student-centric point of view where the self-efficacy is grounded in students' intrinsic motivation for work. The paper's principal idea is to investigate how different elements of interaction cause students' beliefs to shift individually and in groups. A qualitative approach has been used where the results have been collected through structured questionnaires with project participants. Results show that the internal proximity and joint motivation to work have positive influence together with lecturer/coach presence, informative clarity and valuable input. Reported differences clearly separated the teams with several useful features of course analysis to consider for future work.

  • 78.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Bernhard, J.
    Co-creation beyond the expected: LAB environments as mean to enhance learning2015In: Proceedings of the 43rd SEFI Annual Conference 2015 - Diversity in Engineering Education: An Opportunity to Face the New Trends of Engineering, SEFI 2015, European Society for Engineering Education (SEFI) , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Co-creation is a term that has been used to emphasize collaborative learning in design education. Allowing students to develop both hard and soft skills has been demonstrated important to facilitate effective learning [1]. Mixing disciplines with each other is an important catalyzer to gain new insights and also grow applicability on societal challenges and innovation. This paper proposes a curricula design that matches student interdisciplinary learning, design challenges and societal benefit. With an aims to create innovation in the meeting between e.g., medicine, social sciences and engineers it is a process that involves empathy and capability to define, ideate, prototype and test. Creation allows prototypes to be made, which are by default presented and interpreted differently by people according to their understanding and frame of reference[2]. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to present the curriculum for a master level course that emphasis and support the creations performed by problem-solving interdisciplinary teams. The subsequent purpose is to position the course design in relation existing best practices that has presented similar challenges of merging the specific methods presented, e.g. Scrum and Design thinking. Design/Methodology: Observational notes and more than 100 student reflections, notes and remarks from more than 30 peer-to-peer faculty internal meetings, international workshops and faculty-student ?review screenings? sessions have been used to evaluate the pros and cons of the presented curriculum. Findings: Open lab has arisen as a new course offering targeting societal challenges and an unique opportunity for students to take part in. To allow divergent and radical thought patterns to arise design thinking and scrum are put together as key elements to support a dynamic learning environment already from start. Moreover, initial team building and checkpoints, pre-checks and cultural differences have been reported to be affected in a positive way resulting deepen student project understanding and appreciation. Conclusions: From initial course design and analysis the learning environment provides a catalyzer for learning to be appreciated and acted upon. The design of activities should build on a shared perspective from faculty and motivate students and convincing them to deepen their need for interdisciplinary design. By working interdisciplinary and collaborative it has been possible for students to co-create new knowledge beyond the expected from the stakeholders? perspective.

  • 79.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Bernhard, Jonte
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Reforming Engineering Education: Proposing a Change Model for Sustained ImpactManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Universities must take swift, targeted, and efficient action to overcome future challenges in engineering education. In particular, good decision-making is required to strengthen the educational efforts that influence students’ learning. Engineering education research has not yet produced a robust framework capable of supporting a systematic approach to implementing change initiatives. In addition, existing pedagogical research provides little guidance on how best to ensure the spread of good practice, and the available evidence indicates that the diffusion of such practices tends to be limited, which reduces their long-term impact. Striving for effective teaching provides a systems change at many universities, still universities seem unable to fully transmit or properly support the adoption of new practices, approaches and methods needed by faculty. This paper presents a model that can be used to guide change efforts and support good practices at times when careful decision-making can have profound long-term consequences.

  • 80.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Blackne, Johannes
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Jansson, Niklas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Proposing a Feedback System to Enhance Learning Based on Key Performance Indicators2014In: International Journal of Quality Assurance in Engineering and Technology Education, ISSN 2155-496X, Vol. 3, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes a feedback system that is based on the self-evaluation of perceived productivity as a mechanism for detecting deviations in an engineering design student project. By monitoring key performance indicators, project members used feedback loops to recognize alarming patterns and act accordingly. The study is based on descriptive survey data that addressed three factors of influence: perceived productivity, perception of stage completion, and work-activity distribution. The productivity data was analysed by detecting patterns in the form of peaks and lows and by combining the patterns with qualitative data from observations and documented work activities. Measurements were taken every time the project team got together; 33 occasions during the course of the project, resulting in a total of 280 student responses for productivity (P) and completion (C) and 115 student replies for work activity distribution. The findings provide an extraction of peak values and low values that enables tracking of critical incidents. Through an in-depth activity log, each value was enriched with lessons learned about what took place and the consequences for the project, thus enhancing learning from past activities through systematic feedback sessions. The accumulated set of data provided distinguishable patterns for the project team to interpret. Over time this made student actions more proactive, activity execution more distinct and purposeful, and resource allocation in combination with feedback reflections more refined.

  • 81.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Blackne, Johannes
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Jansson, Niklas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Tracking productivity patterns in an engineering design project2013In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED: Volume 8, The Design Society, 2013, Vol. 8 DS75-08, p. 125-134Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to analyze if self-evaluation of perceived productivity could help detect alarming patterns in time and stop projects from failing. The study is based on descriptive quantitative data that has been gathered continuously throughout a student engineering design project, highlighting three factors of influence; perceived productivity, perception of stage completion and work activity distribution. The productivity data was analyzed by detecting patterns in form of peaks or lows and combining the patterns with qualitative data from observations and documented work activities. Measurements were done on 33 occasions during the project where 280 individual answers for productivity (P) and completion (C) and 115 individual answers for work activity distribution were collected. The findings provide extraction of peak values and low values that enable tracking of critical incidents. Through an in-depth activity back-log each value was enriched with an understanding of what took place and its project consequences. Over time the recognized pattern helped the design team to become more proactive in activity precision and execution, resource allocation and process reflections.

  • 82.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Edin Grimheden, Martin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    The Importance of Prototyping for Education in Product Innovation Engineering2011In: 3rd International Conference of Research into Desgin 11', 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 83.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    El Gaidi, Khalid
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Havtun, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Kjellgren, Björn
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    Kommer det på tentan?: Uppfattningar om motivation och demotivation bland studenter på ingenjörsutbildningar2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Motivation är en av de viktigaste drivkrafterna bakom människors handlingar. Hur en student klarar sina studier beror till stor del på graden av motivation, men också på graden av demotivation. Vi har i den här studien valt att utforska upplevda källor till studenters motivation och demotivation i ingenjörskurser. Dessa har kodats och kategoriserats i termer av kontext, struktur och lärare, och resultatet har jämförts med en liknande omfattande undersökning från USA. Resultaten visar att frågor rörande kurs ens struktur i högre grad anges som viktiga både för motivation och demotivation för våra studentgrupper, jämfört med den andra undersökningen. Vidare förekommer synpunkter kring lärarens förmåga att förklara och lärarens attityd till studenterna i betydligt högre omfattning än lärarens ämneskompetens i sig, vilket kan ses som stöd för att pedagogisk och didaktisk skicklighet bör vara starkt meriterande för undervisande personal. En slutsats är att lärare har mycket stora möjligheter att påverka studenternas motivation både positivt och negativt, och att det är av stor vikt att lärare är både medvetna om, och har verktyg för att hantera, detta.

     

  • 84.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Havtun, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Kjellgren, Björn
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Will this be on the exam?: Or, How to Motivate your Students to Learn2017In: KTH SoTL 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 85.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Havtun, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Wingård, Lasse
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Andersson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Kjellgren, Björn
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Language and communication.
    THE PEDAGOGICAL DEVELOPERS INITIATIVE: SYSTEMATIC SHIFTS, SERENDIPITIES, AND SETBACKS2017In: 13th International CDIO Conference in Calgary, Canada, June 18-22, 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pedagogical projects have often, at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, as well as elsewhere, been initiated and managed by individual enthusiasts rather than dedicated teams. This generally decreases the possibility of successful implementation of more ambitious ideas, e.g., changing educational programs, implementing the CDIO syllabus, or strengthening the pedagogical development of larger parts of the faculty. To enable wider and more effective change, KTH top management therefore launched a universityencompassing three-year project in 2014, in which a group of highly motivated teachers from all schools at KTH were appointed part-time pedagogical developers (PDs). The PDs were given the task of promoting pedagogical development and facilitate cooperation and knowledge exchange among faculty members, as described in two previous papers at CDIO conferences. From 2017, the outcomes of this project are supposed to be integrated parts of the KTH line organization. The project has led to numerous actions, which would have been difficult to set in motion unless given the freedom in time to explore and to develop into a collective effort rather than a myriad of individual “stand-alone” examples. By addressing key areas for pedagogical development, our group of dedicated faculty have tried to surpass the suboptimal "lock-in" of strict individual reasoning and to deal with surfaced questions and relevant issues in a broader collective manner. A major insight confirmed by the project and its many sub-projects has indeed been the fundamental importance of collegial discussions and the creation of processes that facilitate and support teacher cooperation. We have also, through discussions with faculty at KTH, confirmed the need for clearly defined, tangible incentives for teachers, motivating them to participate in pedagogical development activities, even if this means less time left for the traditional pathway to rewards within academia, i.e. research. In this paper, we chart changes that have occurred in the educational practices at KTH by describing and discussing the project’s focus on pedagogical development of faculty, actual execution of changes in the engineering educations, lessons learned along the way, and visions yet to be realised.

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    fulltext
  • 86.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH.
    Havtun, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology. KTH.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management. KTH.
    Wingård, Lasse
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering. KTH.
    Andersson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Soulard, Juliette
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Kjellgren, Björn
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Language and communication.
    The pedagogical developers initiative - development, implementation and lessons learned from a systematic approach to faculty development2016In: Proceedings of the 12th International CDIO Conference, Turku University of Applied Sciences, Turku, Finland, June 12-16, 2016, Turku University , 2016, p. 497-508Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a systematic, university--wide approach to creating an encompassing movement towards faculty development. In 2014, KTH Royal Institute of Technology launched the pedagogical developers initiative, appointing part--time pedagogical developers among teachers from all schools of KTH, to implement and strengthen good teaching and learning practices among faculty and students. They are teachers active in different educational programmes, with experience of, and interest in, pedagogical issues. In line with CDIO standard 10, the purpose of the pedagogical developers’ initiative is to facilitate cooperation and knowledge exchange between faculty members, and to establish communities of practice. The paper presents the activities, processes for developing these activities and preliminary results from the initiative’s second year, which focused much on supporting faculty development by putting into place a series of workshops, a format chosen for its combination of active community-building learning and time efficiency. The topics of the workshops emerged to meet faculty needs identified by the pedagogical developers during the first year. The workshops were created by smaller teams of pedagogical developers from different schools of KTH. This enabled a wide array of experiences and perspectives to be incorporated into the workshops. Main focuses of the workshops have been on creating internal discussions in dynamic communities of practice on specific subjects of interest, and on creating forums for exchange of ideas, open to the whole faculty. During Autumn 2015, the workshops have been offered as voluntary add-on parts of the basic course in teaching and learning offered to faculty at KTH. This first round of workshops generated a positive interest from teachers, and participant feedback indicates that they particularly appreciated the opportunity to work directly with their own courses and the opportunity to discuss pedagogical aspects with peers. 

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    CDIO-Åbo-2016
  • 87.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Havtun, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Johansson, Hans Bengt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Andersson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT).
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Soulard, Juliette
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electrical Energy Conversion.
    Kjellgren, Björn
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    The Pedagogical Developers Initiative – Changing Educational Practices and Strengthening CDIO skills2015In: Proceedings of the 11th International CDIO Conference, Chengdu, China, June 8-11 2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper put emphasis on change agents within the universities and how local initiatives can be systematically approached and ramped up. Rooted in the challenges and constraints that have been addressed in past educational program initiatives, the case consists of specific focus areas to leverage impact. Universities continuously strives to provide the best conditions for an inspiring and prosperous learning environment, and to provide educational programs with teaching of excellent educational quality. KTH is no exception and therefore the university management has initiated a pedagogical program starting in 2014. One of the first thing initiated within the framework of this pedagogical program is the creation of a group of 24 pedagogical developers.

    The focus for the pedagogical developers is to facilitate the opportunities for KTHs faculty to work together and create consensus on educational development in different teaching teams. This paper presents the University's pedagogical developers' initiative as a whole and how this has been outlined in detail to reach specific redesign targets. The School of Industrial Engineering and Management pedagogical group consists of five practicing teachers that besides this new role also engage heavily in various courses of the School's departments. Since the pedagogical initiative is aligned with several important CDIO aspects, e.g. the learning environment, formats of formative feedback, assessment and examination there is also importance to reassure this in the existing Master level programs.

    At KTH the five-year comprehensive Master of Science in Engineering programs concern distinct vocational educations in which the CDIO aspects are very important. At the same time the programs has been divided in a basic level (B.Sc. in Engineering) of three years and a advanced level (M.Sc.) of two years. This has for instance made it harder to align the progression between first cycle level and second cycle level regarding for instance the CDIO efforts (e.g. oral and written communication, teamwork). This paper will therefore discuss and enhance how the pedagogical programme, we as pedagogical developers, can support and strengthen the initiation and implementation of the CDIO aspects in the education.

  • 88.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Klasén, Ida
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Hanson, Mats
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    Edin Grimheden, Martin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Changing Mindsets, Improving Creativity and Innovation in Engineering Education2011In: Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education E&PDE11 / [ed] Kovacevic, Ahmed, Ion, William, McMahon, Chris, Buck, Lyndon and Hogarth, Peter, 2011, p. 121-126Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Universities need to reconfigure and rethink existing engineering beliefs in order to keep promoting students that can target and capitalize on tomorrow’s opportunities. This put pressure on promoting the best possible Engineering Education, which means continuant upgrades and revisions to existing curricula’s and faculties’ pedagogical methods and processes. This paper summarizes the experiences and lessons learned from a nationwide initiative to rethink and redesign existing engineering programs towards more traceable innovative practices. The Swedish Product Innovation Engineering Program (PIEp) and the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in particular have a long tradition of successful exchanges involving research and education. PIEp is committed to a system change towards innovation and entrepreneurship in institutes of higher education and research. From PIEp an organized network of senior researchers, PhD students, lecturers and students is seen as the seed for this change. Activities are conducted in three areas; research in product innovation, education for product innovation and industrial collaboration for product innovation. Turning away from one-timer and mere embryonic attempts, PIEp visions a systems shift through long term dedication to influence higher engineering education curricula design. KTH is currently performing a revision of all engineering program to fit the European Bologna higher education restructuring process. Encompassing both undergraduate and master level studies, the integration of engineering syllabus imperatives strive to converge with the internationally recognized CDIO standards and the new Swedish national degree specifications. The paper aims to summarize the initiative provided between PIEp, KTH and Stanford to stimulate Swedish Engineering faculty to embrace methods and tools for integrating creativity and innovation. Ultimately, building on the long experiences of successful workshops held by PIEp and KTH the overall ambition is to establish a change in mindsets, and by so influencing key participants to directly leave endurable footprints onto their respective Swedish Engineering Education Program. The paper has a descriptive character blending ‘best-of-both-worlds’ concepts as it reveals how a nationwide initiative has set up a learning hub overseas together with Stanford University. Utilizing this source of entrepreneurial and inspiring environment the ambition is to equip Swedish faculty with experiences, success stories, lessons learned, personal opinions, to provoke and challenge existing program and curricula design. In summary, the full paper version entails the set-up, reflections and actions outline by Swedish university representatives to address implementation of more transferability between innovation characteristics in respective education programs.

  • 89.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Leifer, L.
    Beyond design thinking - Whose perspective is driving the people-Centric approach to change?2017In: Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education: Building Community: Design Education for a Sustainable Future, E and PDE 2017, Institution of Engineering Designers, The Design Society , 2017, p. 613-618Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research paper attempts to position fundamental principles of design thinking within a framework of problem-solving theory. The roles that are assumed in a co-creation community, team or workplace, are influenced by a champion who arises and systematically anchors alternatives and ideas once proposals are about to be realised. By embracing diversity, design thinking introduces interdisciplinary challenges that can lead to radical change and break-through innovation. This paper attempts to trace design thinking back to its foundational concern with the design of novel products, services, and business models. Regarding design thinking as a problem-focused (rather than solution-fixated) ethos, mindset or disposition, instead of merely a practitioners’ tool, we believe that this perspective is needed to deepen our understanding of design thinking. Hence, this paper provides a literature review at some depth, guided by a purpose-driven question: How do individual roles in an organisation become utilized throughout the anchoring and implementation of design thinking among stakeholders?.

  • 90.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Leifer, L.
    For whom are we prototyping?: A review of the role of conceptual prototyping in engineering design creativity2012In: ICDC 2012 - 2nd International Conference on Design Creativity, Proceedings: Volume 2 DS73, 2012, 2012, p. 201-208Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prototypes are made, presented and interpreted differently by people according to their understanding and frame of reference. Design educators have, in recent decades, come closer to one another in how design creativity is approached. Still, many distinct differences exists. One of the most striking has to do with the role of prototyping in transporting ideas into concrete manifestations. Prototypes unlock cognitive association mechanisms related to visualization, prior experience, and interpersonal communication in ways that favour iterative learning between peers in the product development community. When, where, and how to use prototyping strategies depends on context and demands a high level of situation awareness. The nature of this awareness is in turn dependent on cultural variables. This paper investigates how prototyping is perceived in two distinctly different high performance academic contexts (i.e. Stanford and KTH). In both cases we have studied how prototyping enables new knowledge to emerge through iteration and team-based communication. The paper focuses on student's perceived learning experiences and on teacher's experiences within engineering design projects. Building on related research, this paper establishes a link between embedded implicit knowledge and its consequences for objective learning.

  • 91.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Leifer, Larry
    Triple-loop-learning: An instrumentation model for engineering design innovation education2016In: DESIGN EDUCATION: COLLABORATION AND CROSS-DISCIPLINARY, The Design Society, 2016, p. 77-82Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a framework for engineering design innovation education. This is discovery research in a purely qualitative sense. The authors, both highly experienced educators, are reflecting upon their practice of delivering team-based new product development courses at the master's degree level at deeply different universities in Sweden and the United States of America. In both cases, industry partners bring real-world projects and funding to the curricula. They have, as their primary objective, the development of talented new product development leaders. In both cases there is no intellectual property attachment to the funding. This paper seeks to make important distinctions about common language and practices within different regional and academic cultures. We are hopeful that our observations and the presented framework will draw others to deepen our understanding through next generation quantitative studies.

  • 92.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Leifer, Larry
    Stanford University.
    Why we Prototype!: An International Comparison of the Linkage between Embedded Knowledge and Objective Learning2013In: Engineering Education, ISSN 1750-0044, E-ISSN 1750-0052, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 2-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prototypes are made, presented, and interpreted differently by people according to theirunderstanding and frame of reference. Design educators have, in recent decades, comecloser to one another in how they approach design creativity. Still, many distinct differencesexist. One of the most striking has to do with the role of prototyping in developing ideasinto concrete manifestations. Prototypes unlock cognitive association mechanisms relatedto visualisation, prior experience, and interpersonal communication in ways that favouriterative learning between peers in the product development community. When, where, andhow to use prototyping strategies depends on context, and it demands a high level ofsituation awareness. The nature of this awareness is, in turn, dependent on culturalvariables and curriculum development. Prototyping has been portrayed as an excellentactivity to share inner thoughts, yet a deeper connection to its knowledge-buildingprocesses has been lacking in previous research. This paper builds on related literature inshaping a common understanding of how prototyping is perceived and applied in twodifferent high-performance academic contexts (Stanford University, Stanford, USA, and theKTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden). Our exploration focuses onstudents’ perceived learning experiences and on teachers’ experiences within engineeringdesign projects. Prototyping is an active enabler in both cases, establishing iterative loopsof new knowledge through social interaction and team-based communication. The deeperlevel of cognitive attachments to prototyping provides an explicit link between embeddedimplicit knowledge and its consequences for objective learning.

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  • 93.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Lindh Karlsson, M.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Allowing Playfulness: Examining Innovativeness2010In: Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education EPDE10 / [ed] Boks W; Ion, W; McMahon, C and Parkinson B, 2010, p. 114-119Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A child’s playfulness and ability to fantasize are also key creative mechanisms in adulthood. Allowing low formal control functions and high self determination is valuable for intrinsic motivation, triggering new ideas, curiosity, experimentation and the desire to impact and change traditional practices – creating innovativeness. This paper sets out to do three things: provide a literature review of the different aspects and angles of knowledge- and competence learning, and the area of creative techniques and an innovative team process; offer experiences and learning from the unique case studies used; and thirdly, to present the concept of Innovopoly - a new tool to better achieve creative learning and examination in higher education through both the innovative working process and the creative process. These elements together give us the ability to discuss how higher education could best implement courses and methods in order to prepare our students for the future.

  • 94.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Lindh Karlsson, M.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Innopoly: Design Steps Towards Proficiency in Innovative Practices2011In: Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education E&PDE11 / [ed] Kovacevic, Ahmed, Ion, William, McMahon, Chris, Buck, Lyndon and Hogarth, Pete, 2011, p. 281-286Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a follow-up on last year’s design steps and case studies analysis to bundle innovation skills in an educational model. In our previous research we presented the ideas and construct foundations to a game plan ideology to build up common knowledge and examine innovativeness. In this, the next phase paper, our ambitions is to deepen students’ abilities for self-governed innovative practices within a team. We have used a series of workshops with engineering design students and design students to frame and concretize the ‘Innovopoly’ educational platform. But also to find a way of communicate a coveted and sustainable knowledge and to motivate the learning since it will affect the momentum of a self-driven learning process. The implementation efforts of specific interdisciplinary design elements aim to strengthen the acknowledgement of how to perform a common and open innovative process and a holistic perspective. In order to do that, Innopoly has a three-dimensional concept based on four process phases and four different layers that can be varied according to level, how the team solves the defined task but also from the effect of an unknown factor in the game. Firstly, Innopoly put emphasis on the team process and team requirements as individual and mutual accountability, commitment to a common purpose, shared leadership and autonomy. Secondly, the game integrates the divergence of the team with a creative process where different knowledge backgrounds and experiences can open up a broader set of perspectives and refinements of ideas for each individual. Thirdly, Innopoly put the focus on external factors like working environment and visual and concrete working techniques and methods that can affect teams' work process. Fourthly, the involvement with organisations and industry in the task definition and also the idea that industry people can work together with the students when they perform the game give a realistic and up to date knowledge to the students in the learning context. The iterative process provides a greater understanding and anchoring knowledge through reflection and students' common discussion. The education model, ‘Innopoly’, builds on student-oriented learning, derived in design situations and situated practices. The ambitions to examine innovative practices are redeemed in incorporation of skills applied to manifest an autonomy level of performance and integrity. ‘Innopoly’ carries the outline logics from the innovation process – identification, research, ideation, concept, prototyping, testing and commercialization similar to the value increase as can be back traced to the original game form. The knowledge construction is supported in their performance, behaviour, thinking and reflections during all four phases. The educational prototype ‘Innopoly’ comprises of an inclination model inspired from Bloom’s taxonomy where ambitions is to prepare our students for future challenges.

  • 95.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nath, A.
    Analyzing the Meritocratic Periphery: Understanding the Value of Applicable Skills2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 96.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nath, A.
    Is Meritocracy Important Anymore?: A Study of Small Business Recruitment and Engineering Design Skills2011In: INTED2011 Proceedings, 2011, p. 3334-3344Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides a perspective, not a definitive answer, and draws from quantitative and qualitative evidence in how individual skills and meritocratic beliefs are perceived in human resource activities of Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs). We aim to explore the ambiguity of meritocratic preferences relating to educational skills, task specific experiences and job performance when searching for skilled individuals in recruitment situations. Human resource management (HRM) is ranked as the second most important activity in organizational management, yet it remains one of the most frequently cited problem areas for SMEs. While there have been considerable research investigating human resource issues over the last decades, few have focused on SMEs. In the last decades remarkable few articles have been published in the field focusing on recruitment and personnel selection issues in small businesses. Thus there is an imperative for renewed research in this area, especially since allocation of available job opportunities are increasingly becoming contentious issues for organizations. In a free market economy, meritocracy is prima facie an ideal rule for such allocations. However, application of the practice has to be weighed against increasing concerns for equality in employment as well as the pitfalls of impersonal evaluations and higher stress on efficiency that often a purely meritocratic system entails; resulting in possible employee dissatisfaction or mismatch between a meritocratic sorting and the skills applied. The main objective of this paper is to provide an identification and review of the factors and associated problems with meritocracy. The paper also examines to what extent the management at SMEs are familiar with meritocracy, and whether a set of defined HR activities are conducted based on meritocratic practices. The formative components of meritocracy in HR practice are identified from literature. The study entails an empirical testing of theoretical suppositions, covering two separate data collection phases. First a sample of 75 manufacturing SMEs in Northern Sweden where used and secondly 17 interviews to verify and test the transferability with students, faculty and HR people in Sillicon Valley small sized design ventures. Our data confirms two principal codified factors linked to meritocracy in recruitment and evaluation of individuals in organizations, and a third non-codified subjective factor based upon the recruiter’s personal traits. The research further shows an increasing moderating effect of experience as a strong influencer past the initial recruiting phase as opposed to meritocracy within Swedish SMEs of the region.

  • 97.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Prototyping: The collaborative mediator2012In: Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education: Design Education for Future Wellbeing, EPDE 2012, 2012, p. 648-653Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Given the potential to deliver 'future wellbeing products', learning mechanisms behind the establishment of such efforts is vital. In this scenario, early efforts are manifested in prototypes that concern ergonomic and innovative product features. Prototypes are made, presented and interpreted differently by people according to their understanding and frame of reference. Newness could interchangeably be used for prototyping as it unlocks cognitive mechanisms where embedded modes, e.g. visualization and communication, enable iterative learning loop in-between peers. The freedom of its use, which depends on contextual relevance and appropriate levels, is therefore important to be aware of. Looking at an ideal, prototypes should be equally strong knowledge disseminators in education as they acted upon in industry, but are they, and how could we expand our perspective on prototyping as a mechanism for creation? This paper investigates how prototyping allows new knowledge to emerge in its implicit role as collaborative mediator. The paper conceptualizes views on prototyping based on student's perceived learning experiences and lecturer experiences from engineering design projects. In contrast to past prototyping research, this paper establishes a link between knowledge embedded perspectives relevant for prototyping and its consequences for learning.

  • 98.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Towards individual innovation capability: The assessment of idea generating methods and creativity in a capstone design course2010In: Proceedings of the ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference 2009, NEW YORK: AMER SOC MECHANICAL ENGINEERS , 2010, p. 459-466Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation is per se based not only on the individual problem solving, but the process from new ideas to commercialization of new products. However, in a time with rapid technology shifts and frequently altered customer requirements, creativity and more precisely the lack of useful new ideas surfacing is viewed as problematic by companies. Ways of involving creativity has been to apply idea generating (IG) methods for identification of creativity sources. This paper consists of a combined theoretical and empirical approach which aims at studying existing tests and proposing suitable creative methods to be used in higher engineering education. The authors work with an extensive capstone design course in Integrated Product Development that emphasizes systematic and parallel approaches to product development. In contrast to traditional modes and styles of teaching that make few attempts to encourage students to pursue a variety of IG methods the capstone design course in integrated product development puts a large part of the responsibility on the students. In all cases IG and use of creativity methods is a natural ingredient. Thus, students' self-regulation and insights into how to work with methods and exercises is particularly interesting as this may have an affect on managing their creative skill. Overall possible improvements in students' creative potential transcend interesting notions on capability to innovate. Thus, this paper's purpose is to investigate whether creativity as an ingredient of a student's innovation capability is influenced by using IG methods. And whether the selections made by project groups are aligned to best utilize students' creative thinking.

  • 99.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Bernhard, J.
    Reforming engineering education - A feasibility analysis of models for innovation2014In: SEFI Annual Conference 2014, European Society for Engineering Education (SEFI) , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 100.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Sturm, Dennis
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical sensors, signals and systems (MSSS).
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Embracing Entrepreneurial Behaviour in a Research School2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Product Innovation Engineering program (PIEp) has recently established a Research School withthe aim to increase innovation capabilities in Swedish industries and to promote entrepreneurialbehaviour. By following a bottom-up approach PIEp has been able to both embrace and fosterentrepreneurship. As a result, the research school has already been able to change preexisting mindsetsand to encourage PhD students to be more proactive, risk-taking and innovative. Through descriptions of their own experiences and of key cases along the way, the authors illustratethe transformation from the initial idea to the research school as it is today. This paper seeks toprovide insight and draw comparisons with other research schools to further research and assist policymakers interested in founding new research schools.

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