Change search
Refine search result
123 51 - 100 of 147
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Frommer, Ranja
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Between expectation and experience2001Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The problem areas of the 'human side' of mergers andacquisitions as well as post-merger integration are focusedupon in this study. An extensive review of merger-relatedliterature points to the problematic nature of this area oforganisation. Through the analysis of two international casemergers, their post-merger integration processes and theirproblem areas, the nature and causes of these problem areas areinvestigated. The results of the investigation indicate thatexpectations influence mergers and post-merger integration.What seems to be expected of mergers, post-merger integration,of the management of these processes as well as the involvedparties plays a role in the interpretation of and reaction tomerger-related occurrences. If expectations of a merger or anyof its specific features are not met, attitudes towards themerger can get increasingly negative. This evidentlynecessitates 'expectation management' within mergers and theirpost-merger integration processes.

    KEY WORDS: merger, acquisition, post-merger integration,'human side' of organisations, expectation, experience, casestudy, emergent theory

  • 52.
    Gessler, Fredrik
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    The development of the DECT standard: an example of technical standardisation wireless communications2000Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
  • 53.
    Gessler, Fredrik
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    The development of wireless infrastructure standards2002Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis treats the development of wirelessinfrastructure standards resulting from co-operative research,development and standardisation efforts. It strives to identifykey influences on this development process, and toconceptualise the process itself. With this as a basis, it goeson to analyse potential implications for companies in thewireless industry, and for the role of co-operatively developedstandards in this field. The focus of the thesis is on thecreation of standards through development efforts, rather thanthe selection of standards in official forums, or by themarket.

    Two deep empirical studies provide the foundation of thethesis. The first one deals with the development of the DigitalEnhanced Cordless Telecommunications (DECT) standard. DECT isan open, de jure standard that was designed by a number oftelecommunications manufacturers. The standard was formallyapproved by the European Telecommunications Standards Institute(ETSI) in 1992. The second study treats the development ofThird Generation (3G) mobile infrastructure standards, withspecial focus on the radio interface standards such as WidebandCode Division Multiple Access (WCDMA). The development of thefamily of 3G standards today known as International MobileTelecommunications 2000 (IMT-2000) began more than 15 yearsago, and the first version of formally adopted air interfacestandards was released in 2000 by the Third GenerationPartnership Project (3GPP). The research and development goinginto the specification of the standards has involved all majorplayers in the wireless industry.

    The two studies have involved numerous interviews withindustry professionals, academics, regulators, and others. Inaddition, a multitude of technical reports and articles,meeting documents, press releases, etc., have been analysed toprovide good documentation of the development processes. Theempirical studies have also been complemented with extensiveliterature studies into the areas of technical development andstandardisation.

    Apart from two "thick descriptions" of importantdevelopments in the wireless industry, the main result of thethesis is a conceptual framework for how wirelessinfrastructure standards are developed. The frameworkdemonstrates that the development is influenced by thepre-history of the standard in terms of existing systems, aswell as research and development that had been pursued inrelevant fields. Furthermore it shows that preconceptions ofmarket needs and user behaviour are key aspects of the designof the standard. During the development process technologicalcontroversies tend to appear as a manifestation of differentcompetitive intentions among the involved players. In theresolution of these controversies, the stage is set for futurecompetition between suppliers of products adhering to thestandard.

    The pre-history of a standard, as well as the marketpreconceptions, originate in the semi-independent processes oftechnological development, and market diffusion, respectively.When the time frame of the conceptual framework is expanded,generations of standards following upon each other can beidentified. Each new generation incorporates new developments,and improved functionality and performance, but also builds onexisting solutions. The technical standards, such as DECT orWCDMA, act as wasp-like waists between the technologicaldevelopment and the market diffusion processes.

    The thesis shows that wireless infrastructure standards to agreat extent are created through technical development efforts.The processes also involve political, competitive, andregulatory deliberations, but technical content often definesthe form even for these debates. This points to the importanceof considering standards-setting in terms of a developmentprocess rather than as a set of formal decisions made by astandards body. A consequence of this is that companiesdesiring to influence the design of a particular standardshould strive to be in the forefront of research anddevelopment related to that standardisation effort. This is thekey to leading the development of new wireless infrastructurestandards.

    Key words:standards, de jure standards,standardisation, standards-development, competition,technological development, wireless communications, wirelessinfrastructures, telecommunications, WCDMA, DECT, IMT-2000,FPLMTS, 3G

  • 54.
    González Guve, José Bertil
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Bedömning av industriella utvecklingsprojekt: en studie av två projekt på Industrifonden1998Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
  • 55.
    González Guve, José Bertil
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Making up ones mind without ground - on judgment and conviction in venture capital investments2003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
  • 56.
    Gramenius, Jacob
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    CAD-teknikens roll och värde: ett resultat av aktörernas teknik- och versamhetsuppfattning1997Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
  • 57.
    Handberg, Leif
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Aniander, Magnus
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Determining production management requirements in graphic arts companies1998In: Proceedings of the 30th conference of the technical association of graphic arts, 1998, p. 94-108Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Harms-Ringdahl, Lars
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Analysing safety functions and barriers - Experiences from different industrial sectors2004In: PROBABILISTIC SAFETY ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT, VOL 1- 6 / [ed] Spitzer, C; Schmocker, U; Dang, VN, GODALMING: SPRINGER-VERLAG LONDON LTD , 2004, p. 100-109Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper gives a summary of approaches to describing and modelling safety characteristics, including safety functions and barriers. In three examples, the safety function concept has been used to describe how actual safety systems worked. The examples are an incident investigation, a safety analysis of a part of a pharmaceutical plant, and safety rules in the railway industry. Advantages and disadvantages of the concept and approach are discussed.

  • 59.
    Harms-Ringdahl, Lars
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Relationships between accident investigations, risk analysis, and safety management2004In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 111, no 1-3, p. 13-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several different approaches to achieve safety are in common use, and examples are accident investigations (AI), risk analysis (RA), and safety management systems (SMS). The meaning of these concepts and their practical applications vary quite a lot, which might cause confusion. A summary of definitions is presented. A general comparison is made of application areas and methodology. A proposal is made how to indicate parameters of variation. At one end of the scale there are organisations, which are highly organised in respect to safety. At the other end are small companies with informal safety routines. Although the three concepts differ in a number of respects, there are many links between them which is illustrated in a model. A number of relations have been described mainly concerned with more advanced organisations. Behind the practical safety work, there are varying sets of more or less explicit explanations and theories on safety and accident causation. Depending on the theory applied, the relations between approaches can be more or less clear and essential.

  • 60.
    Harms-Ringdahl, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Kecklund, L.
    Safety functions in railways - a structural analysis of safety rules2004In: PROBABILISTIC SAFETY ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT, VOL 1- 6 / [ed] Spitzer, C; Schmocker, U; Dang, VN, GODALMING: SPRINGER-VERLAG LONDON LTD , 2004, p. 2751-2757Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are several ways to describe and structure safety rules for railways, and a few examples are given in the report. A tentative holistic framework for describing safety features in relation to safety rules is presented. The approach has been applied on rules needed to regulate the communication between different railway organisations and other parties.

  • 61.
    Herdenstam, Anders
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Sinnesupplevelsens estetik: vinprovaren, i gränslandet mellan konsten och vetenskapen2004Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Can art express things that science can´t? Communicating experiences of wine attributes is one important part of the practical knowledge of professional wine tasters working in different contexts. From this point of view a central question arise concerning how common terms and concepts emerge and how they are communicated in the wine tasting situation. The analytical perspective have been generated in attempts to quantify experienced and verbalised attributes, using analytical methods with no regard to context . The synthetic perspective, on the other hand, assumes that the wine taster first acquires an overall understanding of a wine's character and then, to the best of his ability, breaks this experience down into separate attributes. The synthetic experience is characterized by being generated during the interaction between the taster and the wine and therefore is related to the context. The synthetic experience, in comparison with the analytical one, is hard to grasp with traditional methods. On the other hand, when adapting an aesthetic perspective on the sensory experience we conclude that there are dimensions of the practical knowledge of wine tasters that can be explored in pragmatic-constitutive studies.

    The technique, inspired by the Dialogue seminar method, was applied in order to compare the judgements of attributes in four wines within different tasting groups of professional wine tasters. It was found that the variances in the terminology for the attributes investigated could be explained by the use of different markings for the same attribute. This indicates that the Dialogue seminar method, with applied modifications, might be a useful tool when training professional wine tasters. This might generate an overall understanding of the reality experienced by the wine taster. Based on our findings, we suggest that the method also can be used in order to introduce new concepts which might be included in a common language and thus make a connection between the analytical and synthetic experience.

  • 62.
    Hollander, Ernst
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Industrial Economics and Management.
    Varför var det så segt?: om lågriskkemi, miljödriven innovation och kravformning1995Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 63.
    Houltz, Anders
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    A Temple of Technology: Modernity and Industral Heritage at the Gothenburg Exhibition of 19232003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [sv]

    The empirical focus of this study is the Jubilee Exhibitionin Gothenburg in 1923–with more than four millionvisitors the biggest exhibition ever held in the Nordiccountries. In its wide-ranging displays of both historical andcontemporary material, technology and technological artifactsoccupied a central position. The technology was revealed,highlighted, and elevated. The exhibition could be compared toa temple of technology, where technology representedconceptions of both the past and the future.

    The overall purpose of the thesis is to discuss the use ofhistory and the view of technology as factors in a criticalphase of the modern project in Sweden. More specifically theintention is to analyse the way in which the GothenburgExhibition, with its historical references and technologicalmetaphors, constituted a resource for the implementation of themodern project. The aim is to show how the exhibition bothreflected and contributed to changes in two areas that wereessential to the modern project. One is the view of museums andcultural heritage, the other the introduction of new principlesand methods in modern industry. In both of these fields changeswere taking place at this time that were to have implicationsthroughout the twentieth century. By analyzing these processesas complementary parallels in the modernization of society Iwish to give examples of how history is created in its own timeand also of how it is used and fulfils an important function inthat time.

    Starting from the technological artifacts exposed in theexhibition, the thesis discusses changes taking place inSwedish society in a large perspective. Visual material such asphotographs, drawings, and plans play an important part inunderstanding the exhibition and its contents. The theoreticalapproach is inspired by cultural theory dealing with the use ofhistory as a means of creating social community, one importantconcept being Eric Hobsbawm’s”invention oftradition”.

    The study shows how an industrial heritage was establishedduring the years shortly after the Great War, and that thisprocess was closely related to upheavals which were currentlytaking place in Swedish industry and society. Rationalization,professionalization and scientific methods were advocated inindustry, but also in the expanding cultural heritage sector.The study also shows that the linear approach introduced inindustry must be understood as a part of a larger concept ofhistory, based on linearity. The Gothenburg exhibition isunderstood as an event for social and cultural mobilization,suggesting a common past and a common path to the future.

    Key words:industrial history, history of technology,cultural history, modernity, cultural heritage, use of history,exhibitions, museums, museology, industrial identity,professionalization, the Gothenburg exhibition of 1923, Sweden,Gothenburg, 20th century.

  • 64.
    Hugnell, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Machine Design.
    Kaulio, Matti
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Uppvall, Lars
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Plattform för virtuellt företagande2004Report (Other academic)
  • 65.
    Hyödynmaa, Marjo
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Miljöledning I byggföretag: motiv, möjligheter och hinder2002Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
  • 66.
    Häggqvist, Susann
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Working Conditions and Development at School. Preconditions for Pupil and Personnel Collaboration2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The principal aim of this dissertation is empirically todevelop and test a collaboration model for how to operatesystematically with the work environment at school. Ontheoretical grounds, a case is made that collaboration betweendifferent groups (various professions and pupils) should beinvestigated despite different conditions, qualifications andages.“School Environment 2000”is a model for theongoing monitoring of the work environment at school. It isdesigned for integration into school-based activities, and itsmaterial offers an opportunity for any stakeholder involved toparticipate in activities concerning conditions at school. The“School Environment 2000”have been used by pupilsand personnel (totally 2,383) at 36 schools in 8 municipalitiesin Sweden. Three of the four studies are follow-up studies; thefourth study had matched control schools. All studies usedquestionnaires; the fourth were completed with other methods asdiaries, observations and interviews. The result showed that amajority of pupils specified both sickness-related andpsychosocial reasons for absence from school. The second(pupils) and third (personnel) study show associations betweenthe work environment and ill-health, especially by females.Among women, all the items describing self-reported complaintscorrelated significantly with the Work at school index and Workclimate index. In the fourth study, in which a work environmentintervention was tested, the participants adopted a morelimited concept than that contained in School Environment2000-questionnaire. A clear desire was expressed, for morestructure and order in school work. The participants attainedin the intervention program, compared with the controller, weremore engaged in greater collaboration with others, had becomemore active in managing problems and conflicts, had greaterinternal effectiveness and perceivedfacilitating factors inwork for change as depending less on personal attributes andbehaviours of personnel. The discussion focus the need forfollowup changes and their effects on health; collaboration topromote objective and subjective scope for action; andcollaboration for goal fulfilment. Special care must beconsidered pupils work environment. The school situation is agood time for learning how to create a good work environmentand to prevent ill-health.

  • 67.
    Johansson, Dan
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    The Dynamics of Firm and Industry Growth: The Swedish Computing and Communications Industry2001Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The growth of the Swedish Computing and Communicationsindustry is studied in this thesis. Growth is seen as a dynamicprocess moved by the entry, expansion, contraction and exit offirms.

    The analysis is founded on the theory of the ExperimentallyOrganised Economy, which views the economy as an experimentalprocess. The entire thesis is organised around the problem ofresource allocation and the issue of growth through theintroduction of new combinations into the economic system,using the terminology of Schumpeter (1911). Competence blocsdetermine the efficiency of the economic process, i.e., theextent to which it leads to sustained economic growth ratherthan stagnation. Change is a fundamental feature of theeconomic process, firms have to be flexible to survive and theeconomic system must promote flexibility to grow. Many trials,or experiments, are required to discover and select "winning"firms and technologies. Hence, the turnover (i.e., entry andexit) of firms is supposed to have positive effects on growth.Theory, furthermore, predicts that new and small firms are moreentrepreneurial and innovative and that they, therefore, willgrow faster than old and large firms.

    The empirical results show that firm growth decreases withfirm age, decreases with firm size, increases with firmindependence, decreases with government ownership and thatindustry growth increases with firm turnover. Moreover, thesmallest firms have been the major job contributors during the1993-1998 period investigated empirically. It is also shownthat employment growth is facilitated by a sustained high entryof firms.

    Lastly, many policies, several of which were introduced inthe late 1960s and early 1970s, have selectively supportedlarge firms in mature industries. Hence, they have exercised arelatively negative influence on exactly the types of firmsthat have been shown to contribute to growth. These policieshave also made the Swedish economy less flexible. It is arguedthat this partly explains the slow economic growth in Swedencompared to other OECD countries since the 1970s. Aninteresting question is where Sweden would have been today witha different policy orientation.

    Keywords:The Experimentally Organised Economy;Competence Blocs; Industrial dynamics; Industrialtransformation; Firm age, Small-firm growth; Turnover of firms;Computing and Communications industry; IT industry;Institutions.

  • 68. Johansson, L.
    et al.
    Björing, Gunnar
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Hägg, G. M.
    The effect of wrist orthoses on forearm muscle activity2004In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 129-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A general hypothesis is that a wrist orthosis reduces the wrist extensor muscle load. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a completely stiff wrist orthosis (SO) and a commercially available wrist orthosis (CO) on flexor and extensor electromyographic (EMG)-activity in a standardised intermittent gripping task and during standardised manual work tasks. Surface EMG from two forearm flexor and two extensor muscles was recorded. The target grip forces were 5%, 20% and 40% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). During the grip contraction phase CO had no effect on the ENIG-readings. SO resulted in higher EMG activity than when gripping with CO and with no orthosis (NO), especially when gripping with 40% MVC. During the relaxation phase neither CO nor SO had any effect on the extensors. For the flexors the SO gave higher ENIG-readings than when gripping with CO and NO, especially at 40% MVC. In conclusion the wrist orthoses tested did not reduce the EMG-activity from the flexors or the extensors during gripping or manual tasks.

  • 69.
    Jonason, Andreas
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Innovative pricing2001Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
  • 70.
    Kaiserfeld, Thomas
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Innovativ verksamhet vid AGA i ekonomisk-historisk belysning2004In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 124, no 3, p. 460-467Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 71.
    Kaiserfeld, Thomas
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Istvan Hargittai, The Road to Stockholm: Nobel Prizes, Science, and Scientists (Oxford, 2002)2004In: Ambix, ISSN 0002-6980, E-ISSN 1745-8234, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 282-283Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 72.
    Karlson, Lennart
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Life cycle assessment (LCA): a sustainable management tool?2002Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
  • 73.
    Kaulio, Matti A.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science (closed 20130101). KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Industrial Economics and Management. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Customer, Consumer and User Involvement: A Framework and a Review of Selected Approaches1998In: Total quality management (Print), ISSN 0954-4127, E-ISSN 1360-0613, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 141-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Customer focus is a key component in a total quality management approach. This paper presents a review of seven different methods for customer involvement in product development, of which quality function deployment is one. Results from the review indicate that different methods support the involvement of customers at different phases of the design process, particularly in three phases: the specification phase, concept development and the prototyping. Moreover, different methods support the involvement of customers in different ways. Three types of involvement are identified: design for customers, design with customers and design by customers. The overall conclusion is that there exists a potential for improvements for practitioners who would like to further customer focus in the design process

  • 74.
    Kaulio, Matti A.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Initial conditions or process of development? Critical incidents in the early stages of new ventures2003In: R &D Management, ISSN 0033-6807, E-ISSN 1467-9310, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 165-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Past research on new venture creation has focussed on initial conditions of start-ups or on the process of evolution. However, few studies have investigated the transitory stage when initial conditions changeover to a process of evolution. The aim of this paper is to investigate critical incidents infant new ventures face in this transitory stage. The paper covers two areas. First, a, review of selected process models of new venture creation is conducted. Results from this review concludes that existing models as described in the literature are associated with several weaknesses: they oversimplify the phenomenon studied as they most often focus on one aspect only and they do not deal with how entrepreneurs adapt to specific situational conditions. Furthermore, the review indicates that the starting-point of a process often is hard to specify and characterize. Second, an empirical study based on the critical incident technique is reported on. On the basis of interviews with founders and entrepreneurial service providers related to the companies 65 critical incidents were identified. This equals an average of 8.1 incidents per company during a period of 6-18 months. Financing and recruiting were the most frequent and most important activities to manage. Then follows reference/first customer in third place. A common pattern of occurring incidents was identified among the ventures. However, in relation to the first round of venture capital financing a strategic choice was made. Either the companies followed a growth strategy and recruitment and organizational development were key goals, or the company focussed on building a patent portfolio. A tentative model is suggested that describes this process in detail.

  • 75.
    Kira, Mari
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    From Good Work to Sustainable Development - Human Resources Consumption and Regeneration in the Post-Bureaucratic Working Life2003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis concentrates on the psychological consequences ofthe contemporary work. Two focal question of the thesis are,first, why do employees’psychological resources becomeconsumed in the contemporary working life? Second, how tocreate regenerative work enabling employees’developmentin the present situation? The latter question aims todistinguish the conditions for sustainable individual andcollective development at work. The empirical research consistsof two studies; the Empirical Study I with explorative casestudies in two »new economy« companies and theEmpirical Study II with action research case studies in apublic hospital and a tenants’union. In the EmpiricalStudy II, the case organizations defined their problemsrelating to human resources consumption. The subsequent actionresearch projects aimed to work on these problems and togenerate ideas for regenerative work.

    The case studies indicate that many contemporary workinglife problems relate to fundamental changes at work. Confinedbureaucratic work is gradually changing into more complex andboundaryless work. Instead of bureaucratic impersonality, suchwork requires comprehensive personal presence from employees.However, organizational arrangements have not followed thedevelopment. Organizational structures and practices are stillaimed at controlling and guiding compartmentalized, stablework. Consequently, post-bureaucratic work realities exist inbureaucratic work organizations; the clashes between the twooperation logics lead to negative consequences at individualand organizational levels.

    The thesis studies the reasons for the gap betweenbureaucratic organizational logic and post-bureaucratic worklogic. Furthermore, organizational and individual approachesleading to more comprehensible, manageable, and meaningful workare explored. When it comes to organizational approaches, theredoes not seem to exist a certain structure for apost-bureaucratic organization; such an organization is a stateof collective and individual mind rather than a fixed solution.At individual level, bureaucratic thinking has to grow intopost-bureaucratic thinking at all hierarchical levels.Responsibility taking and complex thinking are needed. Mentalmodels enabling versatile functioning within an organizationare required.

    KEY WORDS:good work, personal development, professionaldevelopment, stress, human resources, regenerative work,consuming work, bureaucracy, post-bureaucracy, actionresearch.

  • 76.
    Laestadius, Staffan
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Biotechnology and the Potential for a Radical Shift of Technology in Forest Industry2002In: Technological Systems in the Bio Industries - An International Study / [ed] Carlsson, B., Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2002Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Laestadius, Staffan
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Ewa Gunnarsson m-fl. (red): Where have all the structures gone?: Doing Gender in Organizations, Examples from Finland, Norway and Sweden2003In: Arbetsmarknad & Arbetsliv, ISSN 1400-9692, Vol. 9, no 3-4, p. 243-247Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 78.
    Laestadius, Staffan
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Industriarvets industriella dynamik2000In: Industriarvsmiljöer i förändring: Rapport från en konferens i Ramnäs, Västmanland 6-8 oktober 1999 / [ed] Geijerstam, J., Smedjebacken: Ekomuseums Bergslagen , 2000, p. 59-68Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 79.
    Laestadius, Staffan
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Innovation Management in the Knowledge Economy: Series on Technology Management, vol. 7; Ben Dankbaar (Ed); Imperial College Press, London, 20032004In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 24, no 7, p. 593-595Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 80.
    Laestadius, Staffan
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Tacit Knowledge in a Low Tech Firm1995In: European Journal of Vocational Training, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 81.
    Laestadius, Staffan
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Technology and the market - demand, users and innovation2003In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 23, p. 781-783Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 82.
    Laestadius, Staffan
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Technology Level, Knowledge Formation, and Industrial Competence in Paper Manufacturing1998In: Microfoundations of Economic Growth / [ed] Eliasson, G. & Green, C., Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1998, p. 212-226Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 83.
    Laestadius, Staffan
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    The Relevance of Science & Technology indicators: the Case of Pulp and Paper1998In: Research Policy, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 385-395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on a detailed analysis of knowledge formation and technical development within pulp and paper (p&p) technology. In section two it is shown that aggregated published statistics are not reliable for a deeper understanding of R&D activities in p&p technology. The third section contains an in-depth study of the development of thermopulp technology—an incremental innovation creating a more energy efficient process for thermomechanical pulping. It is shown that only some 20% of total development costs are accounted for as R&D. In the fourth section it is argued that project groups responsible for ventures like the recently installed paper machine in Braviken, Sweden, in fact carry out important innovative activities characteristic for this technological system. The innovativeness of these concentrations of engineers is not accounted for as R&D. The long-term potential for p&p technology is probably related to the ability of the actors to transform products and processes to a more intensive use of biotechnology. This transformation process may be classified as a radical technological change, or even a shift of `technological paradigm'. The dominant science and technology (S&T) indicators do not capture this process, however. The conclusion formulated in section six is that the dominant S&T indicators provide us with very blunt tools for understanding and explaining industrial and technological change.

  • 84.
    Laestadius, Staffan
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Utmaningar och möjligheter för skogsbaserad industriell och teknisk verksamhet: fem bidrag till IVA avdelning VIII:s framåtsyftande verksamhet1999Report (Other academic)
  • 85.
    Laestadius, Staffan K.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Biotechnology and the potential for a radical shift of technology in forest industry2000In: Technology Analysis & Strategic Management, ISSN 0953-7325, E-ISSN 1465-3990, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 193-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IS biotechnology a revolutionary technology that will dramatically transform present technological systems, industries and society or will the entrance of biotechnology into industry rather fake the shape of incremental innovations without any deeper impact on dominating technological paradigms' The vast science and technology research in this area has focused on pharmaceuticals and neglected the potential role for large scale biomass handling activities like the forest industry in general and pulp and paper industry in particular In addition the industry itself has not focused its R&D activities towards utilization of biotechnology biotechnology on inputs, processes or products. This is a study on the technological system for pulp and paper facing the challenge of a radical shift of technology, The confrontation between the genuinely science based biotechnology and its community on the one hand and the pulp and paper community (highly scientific within the framework of a low-technology industry) on the other, is analyzed as are the industrial and economic potentials and limitations of biotechnology in this area.

  • 86.
    Laestadius, Staffan
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Karlson, Lennart
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Eco-efficient products and services through LCA in R&D/design2001In: Environmental Management and Health, ISSN 0956-6163, E-ISSN 1758-7085, Vol. 12, no 2-3, p. 181-190Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 87.
    Lagergren, Fredrik
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Rethinking energy systems2004Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
  • 88.
    Leiringer, Roine
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Technological innovations in the context of public-private partnership projects2003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The idea that the private sector can play an important partin the financing and creation of built assets and thesubsequent operation of public services has gained ground overthe last decade. This development has contributed to the risein public-private partnership (PPP) projects in many countriesand within many areas in the public sector. From theconstruction perspective, these projects are usually creditedas providing real incentives for the actors involved, as wellas creating a business environment that is conducive toinnovation and improved practices, especially in theconstruction phase. This thesis examines the validity of thesestatements in the context of the PPP procurement route and theextent to which the actors involved in the design andconstruction phases are presented with, and able to exploit,opportunities for technological innovation. A multiple- casestudy approach was adopted for the empirical part of theresearch. Four major projects, containing significantconstruction work and completed between 1997 and 2002, werestudied: three in the UK and one in Sweden. Project personnel–the principal actors in the design and constructionphases–were interviewed at length. Within the findingsthere is evidence that the existence of certain conditions onprojects, and particular actions arising in relation thereto,can lead to a marked propensity towards innovative behaviour.The conclusion is reached that it is possible to implementtechnological innovations successfully on PPP projects, butthat there is reason to be cautious in promoting thisprocurement route as a prescription for success in theconstruction sector. There are inhibitors in the process thathave the potential to limit the amount of innovation achievedon a project. The thesis discusses this matter and identifiesthree key areas–communication and information, achievingtransparency in the applied framework and risk management–in which actions could be taken in order to improve theprospects for realising technological innovation on PPPprojects.

    Keywords:Public-private partnerships, technologicalinnovation, construction procurement, project management,risk

  • 89.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Production at any prize2003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [sv]

    The thesis - Produktion till varje Pris - deals withmanagerial improvisation in strictly planned economicenvironments. More specifically, it concerns the relationbetween planning and action during the execution phase of heavyconstruction projects. In a business environment where time isgradually becoming a dominating competitive advantage, carefuland substantial planning is vitally important. With stakes inthe range of half a billion SEK or more, the necessity ofsecuring successful and stable operations is immanent. However,as timeframes are constantly compressed at the same time as thecomplexity of system deliveries increases, operations areevermore vulnerable to aberrations. This inquiry takes thenormative ideal of planning as a point of departure toinvestigate and analyze the role of plans and acts of planningthroughout the course of project execution. Using anethnographic approach, the day-to-day activities in severalpower plant projects carried out by the Finnish manufacturingfirm Wärtsilä have been analyzed.The abundance of improvisation within this strictlyplanned context is thus pointed out, and it is suggested thatwe may better understand project management - as well asplanning in general - through a perspective of improvisation.Traditional accounts of organizational improvisation haveusually been focused on the sole act of improvisation, wherethis has been performed by a relatively small and homogenousgroup. In this thesis, the concept of interorganizationalimprovisation is developed, a situation where improvisationcannot be related to a single goal, a homogenous group or asole moment in time.The question of legitimate action, on behalf ofmanagement as well as for subcontractors, becomes central whenaddressing this issue. The study highlights the seeminglyparadoxical situation where management has to pursue plannedand improvised actions simultaneously, within amultiorganizational context. This potential conflict ismitigated, it is claimed, by the generation of "exceptionalstates", through crisis or by other means - an importantmechanism that makes improvisation possible.

    Keywords:Improvisation, Project Management, Planning&Control, Complex processes, Legitimacy of action

  • 90.
    Lindfors, Christian
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Process oriented information management in construction2003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The construction industry is often accused of beingfragmented and inefficient in nature due to the lack ofcontinuity and repetitive behaviour in projects. For many yearsinformation technology has been put forward as a solution. But,despite the potentials, little gains have been harvested by thedevelopment of computerised information systems (IS). Theoverall aim of this research is to determine if a moreaccessible and clearly described housing development processcould be enabled by an information system, which in itself,could improve both individual and project (group) performance.Two research questions are being put forward; first, will aprocess-oriented IS positively impact on the performance ofproject managers and in particular on the performance ofproject groups? Second, how important is a process-orientedinformation management process for the success of the IS? Toanswer these questions an action research approach with largeinfluences of survey research has been adopted. The researchconsists of two phases; a process orientation within a largeSwedish housing development company and a survey of projectmanagers¡¦ attitudes towards a new process-orientedIS also including a study of dependencies found among variablesof information system success (ISS). To enable a verificationof the success of the IS an assessment instrument - hypothesismodel - for evaluating ISS was developed. The assessmentinstrument was built on DeLone and McLean's (1992) ISS modeland extended to include measures of information managementprocess quality (process quality). The hypothesis model wasthen tested empirically with a questionnaire survey. Astatistical test was also performed to test the hypothesisedrelationships of the augmented ISS model. In summarising thefindings of the data analysis, it is evident that the new ISreceived unexpected support from the respondents. The findingsalso indicate that the collected and analysed data show supportfor numerous of the hypothesised relationships of ISS.Conclusions are drawn that confirm the presence of a processquality measure for assessing ISS. From a practitioner'sperspective, this research suggests a course of action forprocess oriented organisational development. It also indicatesbeneficiary useof a process focus in IS development.

    KEYWORDS:Process orientation, information system,information system success, information management, projectmanagement

  • 91.
    Lindgren, John
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Logistikens aktörer - Tankar inför ett ämnesområdes fortsatta utveckling2003Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [sv]

    The purpose of this study is to contribute to thedevelopment of the Logistics Management discipline. A motivefor the study is that I have found actors being very anonymousin the Logistics Management literature. I have found this to bein contrast to my practical experiences where actors are highlyessential. On the basis of an interview study and a literaturestudy I want to give some thoughts and ideas for thedevelopment of the discipline. The interview study wasconducted with 48 actors operating across a supply chain withindifferent business areas of a multinational Swedish company.The actors views of the organisation, problems associated withit and logistical variables were focused. In the literary studyI focused on fundamental ideas and characteristics. I alsofocused on scientific foundations and points of departure inLogistics Management research.

    In the text I strive to view the world as sociallyconstructed and in my writing I have the effort to beinterpretative and reflective. With these points of departure Itry to use approaches seldom used in research within thelogistics management discipline.

    In my work I present thoughts and ideas which are importantto notice with regard to the aim of the discipline to benormative and contribute to the development of one or manyorganisations. The first issue that I highlight is that in theinterview study it was apparent that there existed clusterswith different perspectives across the supply chain. Theseperspectives provided different sorts of understanding for theorganisation and problems associated with it. I found this tobe a reason for problems within the organisation. In theliterature, however, I found the insight about this is low ornot outspoken, which motivates further studies. As aconsequence of the different views and understanding, I noticedthat the interviewees put different meaning into concepts likecustomer focus and holistic vision. The different meaningseemed to be a reason for problems within the organisation.Since I regard the concepts as central and obvious within thediscipline, more attention could be given to the concepts andhow they are used. The interviewees also emphasised awell-functioning organisation and the importance ofimplementing solutions. Implementation issues could thereforebe highlighted to a larger extent, to elucidate obstacles andpossibilities for successful change management and to highlightproblems that need to be treated. In the interviews people andtheir behaviours were seen as central. Therefore human andtheir behaviours could be given more attention. Understandingfor people’s behaviour as a foundation for changemanagement processes could be emphasised even more. As aconsequence, I consider reference to other disciplinesnecessary to reach a higher understanding of these behaviours.Since the studied company was far from the best practicestudies that now dominate the area and the study has proven tobe fruitful, the discipline could strive to be more balancedand use other cases to elucidate problems and highlight theseproblems.

    Some authors’opinions that other paradigms and viewsthan the ones dominating the discipline should be used todevelop it, has been strengthened by the study, especially withregard to paradigms and views with a focus on actors.

  • 92.
    Lindgren, Monica
    et al.
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    A project-based view of entrepreneurship: Towards action-orientation, seriality and collectivity2003In: New movements of entrepreneurship / [ed] C. Steyaert & D. Hjorth, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2003, 1, p. 86-102Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional entrepreneurship research often tends to view entrepreneurship in terms of individual actors starting enterprises, an approach which might limit further development of entrepreneurship theory. The project-based view of entrepreneurship proposed here instead focuses on the organising of entrepreneurial acts (action-orientation). Such entrepreneurial acts can be, but are not limited to, enterprise start-ups – entrepreneurship also happens in many other forms. Moreover, those acts are temporary by nature, which means that they can be analysed in terms of projects. Saying that entrepreneurial acts are temporary projects means that people can perform several entrepreneurial acts during a lifetime – in different ways and with different results (seriality). Entrepreneurial acts are also viewed as collective ones, organised by several actors in actor networks temporarily coupled together by a somewhat common mission (collectivity). From this reasoning, it also follows that empirical investigation of project-based entrepreneurship should be made with a narrative approach, understanding the entrepreneurial act as a part of the various actors’ construction of identity. With respect to every actor’s - socially constructed - view of reality we therefore can understand the social construction of the entrepreneurial act. By stressing a project-based view with a social constructionist perspective we hope to encourage pluralism and diversity in theory, practice and methodology.

  • 93.
    Lindgren, Monica
    et al.
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Deconstructing project prisons: Towards critical perspectives on project theory and projecticised society2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 94.
    Lindgren, Monica
    et al.
    Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Deconstructing Projects: Towards Critical Perspectives on Project Theory and Projecticised Society2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 95. Lindgren, Monica
    et al.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Industrial Economics and Management.
    Interactive entrepreneurship: Entrepreneurial processes from a social constructionist perspective2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper views entrepreneurship from a social constructionist perspective. The basic standpoint is thus that entrepreneurship is an inter-subjective construct produced and re-produced in everyday social interaction. To understand this interaction in practice, the entire entrepreneurial process should be inquired into – how/why entrepreneurial ideas emerge, how/why ideas are developed as legitimate, how/why interaction between actors unfold, how/why different roles develop, etc. In order to develop a theoretical understanding of entrepreneurial processes in general from this perspective, we need to (1) make in-depth studies of a limited number of processes, (2), choose processes that is intended to imply construction of newness, and (3) follow these processes and involved co-actors over time. The aim of the paper is thus to suggest concepts and theories through which an enhanced understanding of entrepreneurship in terms of interactive processes can be achieved.

     

    The empirical data of the paper is based on three in-depth case studies in Swedish independent schools and one entertainment industry organisation, the Söderbaum school, the Viktor Rydberg Gymnasium and the Hultsfred rock festival. All involved co-actors have been repeatedly interviewed, and we have also been participant observers in their daily interaction. These data have been subject to a narrative analysis where the stories – i.e. the narratives of the participants – are re-written by the researcher in order to cover relevant events, conflicts etc that convey a straightforward understanding of the entrepreneurial process.

     

    From these two cases, a number of implications for theory development can be drawn and discussed. The entrepreneurial process per se is often perceived as limited in time, whereafter continuous management of what has been created follows. Most of the decision-making throughout the process happens in informal interaction, and the interactors assume different roles in the process (i.e. the idea generator, the organizer, the public face, the diplomat, the practical guy etc), implying specialization but also learning from each other. Since many of the co-actors often work together again in different constellations on new related entrepreneurial processes, they change these roles over time. Also, social networks are used consciously in order to create long-term benefits. Money and culture are not seen as opposites – money is a tool to create freedom to do what is important and fun, i.e. create new entrepreneurial processes. Finally, there appears to exist a notion of entrepreneurial careers; by increasing age, personal interests, rebellionship and groupthink are gradually substituted by a sense of responsibility for employees, family and society, by professionalism as ideal, and by activities such as networking and mentorship.

  • 96.
    Lindgren, Monica
    et al.
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Woman, teacher, entrepreneur: On identity construction in female entrepreneurs of Swedish independent schools2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 97.
    Lundström, Brita
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    The Role of History in the Modern Company: Ericsson and the Past2004Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall purpose of the thesis is to discuss the presenceand influence of the commercial use of history in modernindustrial companies and history's role in creating andchanging corporate identity. More specifically the aim is toanalyse the way the Swedish telecom company Ericsson has madeuse of its history at three different occasions.

    By analysing three cases, the study shows how the companyhas used its history in different ways at different times. Thefirst case study studies the company's move to a new-builtfactory at Telefonplan at the outskirts of Stockholm in 1940.The factory building was a modernistic model factory, and themanagement wanted to implement a new era in the company. Atthis occasion history was used as a contrast to the future.

    The second case study studies the company's 100 years'anniversary in 1976. Was it a celebration of the past or of thefuture? At this occasion the history came into commercial use.The management of the company invited plenty of guests tocommemorate the company's past but they also used the occasionto show the modern company and its latest products.

    The third case study studies the years 2001-2004. Duringthis period the company used its history to build a corporateidentity. History was used for corporate branding. In 2001 thecompany had its 125th anniversary, but at the same time thecompany experienced a serious economical decline. In 2003 itleft its modernistic factory at Telefonplan and moved to Kista.During this period history was treated more and morelike amythology, and was moulded to fit the company's needs.

    The study also shows how the board room from the oldestfactory building was treated in different ways at the differentoccasions, and how it finally ended up at the National Museumof Science and Technology in Stockholm.

    Key words:industrial history, history of technology,cultural history, use of history, business history, corporateidentity, factory buildings, modernism, telecommunication,Ericsson, Telefonplan (Midsommarkransen), Kista, Stockholm,National Museum of Science and Technology, Sweden, 20thcentury.

  • 98.
    Lööf, Hans
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Dynamic optimal capital structure and technical change2004In: Structural Dynamics and Economic Change, ISSN 0954-349x, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 449-468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]
    The importance of capital structure is explored by comparing existing archetypes of financial systems through a new methodological application. Differences in firms’ cost of capital show that capital structure is relevant in R&D and other investment decisions. The conclusions are that (1) there are large and also unexpected cross-country differences in determinants to optimal capital structure; (2) observed leverage is often different from target in both equity (or stock market based)- and debt (or bank based)-dominated systems; and (3) faster speed towards the target is observed in the equity-based system indicating a higher flexibility.
  • 99.
    Lööf, Hans
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    The Knowledge Production Function: Evidence from New Micro Data2002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    This doctoral thesis consists of five self-contained essays.Common themes that unify the essays are the conditions for innovative engagements and the effort to endogenize innovations into the explanation of profitability, productivity and growthin manufacturing and service production. The purpose is to explore the importance of innovation in explaining heterogeneity in the performance of firms. The traditional analysis of the relationship between research and developmentand productivity is extended and developed by using, on the onehand, firm-level data not previously available and, on theother, a modern state-of-the-art econometric framework.

    Essay I. Methods and results are reviewed and stylized facts presented regarding the return on innovation. The limitations of the data and methods used in mainstream literature are discussed. A set of firm-level observations recently made available and a multiple knowledge production function analysis have been used to clarify the role of innovation in explaining performance heterogeneity among manufacturing firms inSweden.

    Essay II. The relationships between innovation and productivity among manufacturing firms in Finland, Norway and Sweden are studied. The main purpose is to investigate the contributions of firm-level innovation in creating the large observed differences in aggregated productivity growth between Norway on the one hand and Finland and Sweden on the other.

    Essay III. The focus of this essay is threefold. One, since innovation has been found to be a major contributor to productivity growth in manufacturing, we seek to find whether there is any evidence for the notion that service industrie shave a lower propensity to be innovative or that they are less efficient in deriving benefits from innovations. Second, we consider what real productivity growth does, and what the measurement methods do to produce the reported weak growthrates in services. Third, given that intermediate services have been found to be one of the fastest growing input factors inmanufacturing, largely reflecting the replacement of internally provided activities by externally produced outputs, we examine what the impact of outsourcing is on productivity growth in manufacturing. The essay brings a comparative perspective to these issues by analyzing the firm-level data on innovativeactivities and economic performance in knowledge-intensive manufacturing and service firms in Sweden.

    Essay IV.This essay investigates the sensitivity of estimated relationships between innovation and firm performance. The essay compares the sensitivity of results with regards to different types of models, estimation methods, measures of firm performance, classification of firms, type of innovations and data sources. The analyses are performed on both the level and growth rate of firm performance, and theinfluence of outliers is explored.

    Essay V. The role of capital structure and external financing in innovation and production is studied. Results from different model specifications are explored. A preferred dynamic model with flexible adjustment is used for an inter-country and an intra-country comparison of the determinants of the optimal mix between debt and equity as wellas the rate of change towards an optimal capital structure.

  • 100.
    Lööf, Hans
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Heshmati, Almas
    Knowledge capital and performance heterogeneity: A firm-level innovation study2002In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, Vol. 76, no 1, p. 61-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is an empirical analysis of knowledge capital and performance heterogeneity at the firm level. We apply new econometric methods to extensive data on innovation and innovative activities in Swedish manufacturing. A number of interesting results emerge. First, the results show that knowledge capital, defined as the ratio of innovation sales to total sales, is found to be a significant factor contributing to performance heterogeneity among firms. This relationship holds even when we control for human capital, type of output, firm size. and the entry. merger., partial closure or exit of firms. Second. knowledge capital rises with innovation input. the firm's internal knowledge for innovation, and co-operation on innovation with domestic universities. Third, when controlling for differences in innovation investments and human capital, knowledge-intensive firms are not more innovative than labor-intensive or capital-intensive firms. Fourth, organizational rigidities in innovation projects and a lack of appropriate investment sources for innovative activities are found to have a negative impact on productivity. Finally, we find a positive association between an outspoken aggressive innovation strategy, customers and a firm's internal resources for innovation and the size of innovation investment.

123 51 - 100 of 147
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf