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  • 51.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Canty, Donal
    Examining the components of fluid intelligence: Implications for STEM education2018In: , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Athlone Institute of TechnologyCo. WestmeathIreland.
    Canty, Donal
    Heuristics and CAD modelling: An examination of student behaviour during problem solving episodes within CAD modelling activities2017In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design activities typically involve and culminate in the creation of models representative of new ideas and conceptions. The format is often dictated by the specific discipline, with ideas in design and technology education regularly being externalised through the use of computer aided design (CAD). This paper focusses on the realisation stage of a design process, specifically when conceptual ideas are being externalised through CAD. Acknowledging students as novices or quasi-experts with regards to their levels of technical expertise and recognising the limitations in the cognitive capacities of humans suggests merit in investigating problem solving strategies through the lens of heuristics. A comparative study was employed between two distinct CAD systems to examine students modelling behaviour. Considering the situational context of the problems encountered and the bounded rationality which the students are operating within, a number of insights are generated from the findings which are of importance from a pedagogical perspective within design and technology education.

  • 53.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Canty, Donal
    Insights from eye-tracking and pupillometry in design education research2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Canty, Donal
    Spatial cognition in engineering education: Developing a spatial ability framework to support the translation of theory into practice2017In: European Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 0304-3797, E-ISSN 1469-5898Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A substantial degree of empirical evidence has illustrated the correlation between spatial skills and performance in engineering education. This evidence has been foundational in the construction of educational interventions which have resulted in both increased levels of spatial ability and increased educational performance and retention. However, the cognitive faculty of spatial cognition is widely recognised as multifactorial and a number of factors exist within this domain which have not been examined as potential influences on educational success. A number of factors have been identified within the pertinent literature which do not appear in any formal framework of spatial cognition. This paper presents a review and synthesis of this work with the amalgam presented as a model to support the further integration of spatial ability into engineering educational practices.

  • 55.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Canty, Donal
    The validity and reliability of online testing for the assessment of spatial ability2016In: ASEE Engineering Design Graphics Division 71st Mid-Year Conference, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 56.
    Bälter, Olof
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Pettersson, Kerstin
    Stockholm University.
    Scheja, Max
    Stockholm University.
    Svedin, Maria
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Student Approaches to Learning in Relation to Online Course Completion2013In: Canadian Journal of Higher Education, ISSN 0316-1218, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the relationship between approaches to studying and course completion in two online preparatory university courses in math- ematics and computer programming. The students participating in the two courses are alike in age, gender, and approaches to learning. Four hundred and ninety-three students participating in these courses answered the short version of the Approaches and Study Skills Inventory for Students (ASSIST). Results show that students demonstrating a deep approach to learning in ei- ther course are more likely to complete. In the mathematics course, a com- bination of deep and strategic approaches correlates positively with course completion. In the programming course, students who demonstrate a surface approach are less likely to complete. These results are in line with the inten- tions of the course designers, but they also suggest ways to improve these courses. Furthermore, the study demonstrates that ASSIST can be used to evaluate course design. 

  • 57.
    Cai, Yuzhuo
    et al.
    University of Tampere.
    Pinheiro, Romulo
    University of Agder.
    Geschwind, Lars
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Aarrevaara, Timo
    University of Lapland.
    Towards a novel conceptual framework for understanding mergers in higher education2016In: European Journal of Higher Education, ISSN 2156-8235, E-ISSN 2156-8243, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 7-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper tries to develop a conceptual framework for a comprehensive understanding of the merger process, which is regarded as a matter of institutionalization of organizational innovation. In the framework, a number of factors affecting merger process or institutionalization of merger are identified, such as those related to environmental issues, economic benefits, institutional compatibility and human agency. The framework hopefully narrows our knowledge gap on theorizing innovation process, in general, and university merger, in particular. It also has a potential to better assist decision-makers and managers in planning and implementing university mergers.

  • 58. Canty, Donal
    et al.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    O'Connor, Adrian
    Kelly, Matt
    The validity of digital badges as a currency for soft skill attainment2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 59.
    Canty, Donal
    et al.
    University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Athlone Institute of Technology, Athlone, Ireland.
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Doyle, Andrew
    University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland.
    Integrating Peer Assessment in Technology Education through Adaptive Comparative Judgment2017In: PATT34: Technology & Engineering Education – Fostering the Creativity of Youth Around The Globe, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advocates of assessment ‘for’ learning argue for its use as a diagnostic tool to support direct and meaningful feedback in a way that is a pedagogical feed-forward.  Implementations and interpretations of assessment for learning have begun to push the boundaries of educational transactions to actively include the learner in the process of assessment (Black & Wiliam, 1998; Orsmond, Merry, & Reiling, 2000; Sadler, 2009; Yorke, 2003).  Critically, assessment ‘as’ learning encourages self and peer appraisal as a self-regulatory act.

    With design and technology education requiring a disposition of enquiry and critique it is critically important that appraisal as a self-regulatory act is developed as a central element of practice. Recognising the impact assessment has on shaping the learning experience (Orsmond et al., 2000), the role and position of the student in assessment activities becomes increasingly important when the outcomes of learning are value laden. The goal is to lead students away from uncritical indoctrination in the technology education discipline to a space where they can conceive and imagine the subject for what it should be. This study looks at how assessment practise can be augmented to support ITTE (Initial Technology Teacher Education) students in developing a disposition appropriate to the goals of technology education.

    This study utilised the Adaptive Comparative Judgment (ACJ) method of assessment (Kimbell, 2008) as the medium for the integration of peer assessment in a Technology based ITTE programme. Students (n= 136) presented their own conception of capability through an e-portfolio and holistically assessed the work of their peers using non-explicit assessment criteria.

    This paper presents the findings from a study that implemented a student-centred approach to assessment in design and technology education. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were employed to evaluate the impact of the initiative on student behaviour, values and capability. Results present student reactions to holistic peer assessment and examine the impact that the integration of the assessment method had on student learning.

  • 60. Cleveland-Innes, M.
    et al.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Bälter, Olle
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Wiseman, C.
    Pedagogical development, E-learning and teaching in higher education2015In: International Handbook of E-learning Volume 1: Theoretical Perspectives and Research, Taylor and Francis , 2015, p. 93-114Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 61. Cleveland-Innes, M.
    et al.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Faculty change in engineering education: Case study of a blended course about blended and online learning2015In: ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings, 2015, no 122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Making Value for SocietyConference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports results from a case study of teaching development in engineering education at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden, in answer to the research question "what impact, if any, does participation in a blended course about teaching in blended face-to-face and online formats have on faculty views about teaching in engineering education?" Early results indicate that 1) faculty can assess the value of online and blended learning through this experience, 2) faculty engaged actively in online and face-to-face discussions of pedagogy, 3) disciplinary differences in the application of online and blended learning are a concern to STEM faculty, and 4) the evaluation and implementation, if any, of online and blended learning in engineering education has to include discussions beyond the use of applicable technologies.

  • 62.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Faculty development for online and blended learning: Communities of inquiry in higher education reform2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 63.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Athabasca University, Canada.
    Learning to Learn Online: A MOOC with a difference for novice online learners2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 64.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Research in online and blended learning: Communities of inquiry in higher education reform2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 65.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Athabasca University, Canada.
    Teaching in an online Community of Inquiry: Faculty role adjustment in the new higher education2012In: Educational Communities of Inquiry: Theoretical Framework, Research and Practice, IGI Global, 2012, p. 389-400Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Regardless of education delivery mode - face-to-face, online, distance, or some combination through blended learning - teaching (and learning) is changing. Online learning, whether synchronous or asynchronous, offers a range of instructional practices previously unavailable in either distance or faceto-face higher education. A principled approach to teaching allows faculty to stay on track of teaching requirements, regardless of delivery mode. These principles may support new teaching practices, but, if adopted, will also change the way the role of faculty is configured and executed in the higher education context.

  • 66.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Teaching in blended communities of inquiry2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 67.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Technology-enabled learning MOOC for teachers in the developing world.2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 68.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Athabasca University, Canada.
    Briton, M.
    Gismondi, M.
    Ives, C.
    MOOC instructional design principles: Ensuring quality across scale an d diversity2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 69.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Athabasca University, Canada.
    Gauvreau, Sarah
    Faculty role change: Adjustment to the influence of online teaching and learning2015In: European Journal of Open, Distance and eLearning, EDEN Special Issue, p. 134-144Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Athabasca University, Canada.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Henriksson, Ann-Sofie
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Leadership and Pedagogical Change: Accidental, Ad‐Hoc, or Arranged?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 71.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Henriksson, Ann-Sofie
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Leading for pedagogical change2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 72.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Athabasca University.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Teaching blended learning through a blended community of inquiry: A course for faculty in Sweden2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 73.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Athabasca University.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    The Influence of Emotion on Cognitive Presence in a Case of Online Math Coaching2014In: Challenges for Research into Open & Distance Learning: Doing Things Better – Doing Better Things. Proceedings of the European Distance and E-Learning Network 2014 Research Workshop , Oxford, 2014, p. 87-94Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Math Coach program provides help with mathematics instruction using online coaching. Instructive communication using text-based CMC with additional whiteboard capacity is used. Coachees range from sixth to ninth year of compulsory school, and upper secondary school (aged 12–19). Coaches are enrolled from students at teacher training colleges. Stenbom, Cleveland-Innes, & Hrastinski (2012) introduced a framework for analyzing online coaching called the Relationship of Inquiry. That framework is a modification of the well-researched and verified theoretical framework the online Community of Inquiry (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer ( 2000, 2001). Transcript analysis of Math Coach conversations indicates that emotional expression is a natural part of the practical inquiry process that constitutes cognitive presence.

  • 74.
    Couturier, Catherine
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Geschwind, Lars
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Organisation and leadership.
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Interdisciplinary teaching in Swedish primary schools: teachers’ perspectives of subject-matter integration in technology and history2018In: 2018 PATT36 International conferenceResearch and Practice in Technology Education:: Perspectives on Human Capacity and Development / [ed] Niall Seery, JeffreyBuckley, Donal Canty and Joseph Phelan, 2018, p. 288-294Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology is a compulsory subject for all school years in Sweden. The curriculum states that teaching should contribute to the students' understanding of technological development (LGr11, syllabus in technology). Interdisciplinary teaching is encouraged in the curriculum, however, the relationship between subject-matter in technology and history is not well documented. It this study, five primary school teachers’ experiences and attitudes of interdisciplinary teaching are investigated through open-ended interviews. A thematic analysis of the data identified three preliminary themes. The first theme confirms that interdisciplinary teaching occurs. The teachers say that through interdisciplinary teaching, they build meaningfulness and coherence for students. In the second theme, teaching on technological development often emerges as spontaneous and unplanned. Here, teachers became aware in the interview that their teaching may also be described as technological. The third theme suggested that teachers used artefacts as an entrance to the past, for student’s immersion and understanding. The interdisciplinary teaching between technology and history is largely unexplored, especially for the younger ages. Through identifying that in teaching practice technology is integrated with history, although not always planned or consciously, the technology subject can gain more awareness and a stronger position in the curriculum and wider contexts. 

  • 75. Crawley, E. F.
    et al.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Malmqvist, J.
    Söderholm, D. H.
    Östlund, S.
    Curriculum design based on the CDIO model2005In: SEFI 2005 Annual Conference: Engineering Education at the Cross-Roads of Civilizations, Middle East Technical University, Faculty of Engineering , 2005, p. 184-191Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Implement-Operate (CDIO) engineering educational strategy has been adopted by a number of universities as a framework for reforming engineering programs. One of the key activities in CDIO adoption and implementation is designing the engineering curriculum to integrate personal, interpersonal and system-building learning outcomes into the curriculum. This paper details approaches and experiences from curriculum design efforts at MIT, KTH, and Chalmers.

  • 76.
    Crawley, E. F.
    et al.
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
    Malmqvist, J.
    Chalmers.
    Östlund, Sören
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.).
    Brodeur, D. R.
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Rethinking engineering education: The CDIO approach, second edition2014Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book describes an approach to engineering education that integrates a comprehensive set of personal, interpersonal, and professional engineering skills with engineering disciplinary knowledge in order to prepare innovative and entrepreneurial engineers. The education of engineers is set in the context of engineering practice, that is, Conceiving, Designing, Implementing, and Operating (CDIO) through the entire lifecycle of engineering processes, products, and systems. The book is both a description of the development and implementation of the CDIO model and a guide to engineering programs worldwide that seek to improve the education of young engineers.

  • 77.
    Crawley, Edward F.
    et al.
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
    Östlund, Sören
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.).
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    Soderholm, Diane F.
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
    Curriculum Design based on the CDIO Syllabus2005In: 8TH UICEE ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING EDUCATION, CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS: BRINGING ENGINEERING EDUCATORS TOGETHER, UICEE , 2005, p. 313-317Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 78.
    Cronhjort, Mikael
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Motives for choosing a double degree programme. a case study in engineering and education2017In: INTED2017: 11TH INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE / [ed] Chova, LG Martinez, AL Torres, IC, IATED-INT ASSOC TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION A& DEVELOPMENT , 2017, p. 4267-4271Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, as in many other western countries, student interest and performance in STEM subjects (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) has been declining during the last decades. In Sweden, to make it worse, there is presently a severe shortage of teachers in these subjects in secondary and upper secondary school. In an effort to increase students' interest in becoming teachers, a double degree programme in engineering and education called Master of Science in Engineering and in Education was started at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in 2002. The programme is given in cooperation with Stockholm University and prepares for three roles: The pedagogical engineer, the upper secondary teacher with the engineering perspective, and the researcher in technology and learning. The contribution of teachers to the upper secondary school from this double degree programme is significant. According to a study by the trade union "Lararforbundet", half of those taking a degree in Sweden from a five years teacher programme in the spring 2014 in the subjects physics, chemistry, biology and technology, graduated from this programme. During the last four years there has been around 500 applicants to the programme. 60 students are admitted yearly. According to a yearly exit survey, sent out within 12 months from graduation, about 30% of the graduates indicate that they work as teachers in upper secondary school. \ This study investigates what motives are expressed in the exit survey for having chosen this double degree programme in engineering and education. Data are available from 48 respondents. The material is analysed in an exploratory approach using content analysis, including manifest as well as latent content [1]. Codes were generated from the data. The findings identify two major types of motives: Students chose this programme because they found the combination of STEM-subjects and pedagogics attractive (expressed 40 times). They express that the different parts reinforce each other and that this combination match their personal interests. Students also chose this programme because they were uncertain of career choices and identity, afraid of choosing other specific alternatives, or they had a desire for security (expressed 37 times). Several minor types of motives are also identified. Some graduates express that status was a motive for choosing this programme (6 times), some had strategic motives (5 times), and some express that this programme was their second choice (3 times). When these motives are compared with motives for choosing other engineering programmes at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, there are similarities as well as differences [2]. One conclusion is that the programme seems to have fulfilled the ambition to make more students interested in a degree in education.

  • 79.
    Cronhjort, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Filipsson, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.).
    Maria, Weurlander
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Can Peer Instruction in calculus improve student learning? 2013In: Proceedings of the 9th International CDIO Conference: Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University School of Engineering and Applied Sciences , Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA: CDIO , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on an experiment in which we used Peer Instruction instead of traditional lectures in a Calculus course for beginning engineering students at KTH Royal Institute of Technology. In order to enable evaluation in a controlled experiment setting, we kept the rest of the course – text book, tutorials and examination – unchanged. The student’s pre-knowledge was measured by a diagnostic test, and their post-knowledge was measured by the written exam of the course. Our data indicate that the Peer Instruction group learned more than the control group, who had traditional lectures. In questionnaires at the beginning of the course and at the end, we asked for the students’ perceptions of Peer Instruction as teaching method and if they had found it useful as a tool for learning calculus. The answers show that the students appreciated being more active and motivated with Peer Instruction, but also that they found the method challenging and somewhat frustrating. A major problem was that the textbook was difficult to read in advance.

  • 80.
    Cronhjort, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Filipsson, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.).
    Weurlander, Maria
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Improved engagement and learning in flipped-classroom calculus2018In: Teaching Mathematics and its Applications, ISSN 0268-3679, E-ISSN 1471-6976, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 113-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on an effort tomeasure the effect of replacing traditional lecture-based teachingin calculus with a flipped-classroom approach.We base the comparison between the twoteaching models on data fromthree sources: (a) a Calculus BaselineTest, designed specificallyfor this purpose and given as pre-test and post-test; (b) a survey measuring studentengagement; and (c) student achievement on the final exam. On the Calculus BaselineTest, we found that the normalized gain was 13% higher in the flipped-classroom group.Similarly, the flipped-classroom group scored significantly higher on the engagementsurvey. Also, the students of the flipped-classroom group performedmuch better than expectedon the final exam of the course, with a substantial decrease in failure rate.

  • 81.
    Cronhjort, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Naeslund, L.
    Nyberg, Sara
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Competences developed in a double degree programme: Master of science in engineering and in education2017In: INTED2017: 11TH INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE / [ed] Chova, LG Martinez, AL Torres, IC, IATED-INT ASSOC TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION A& DEVELOPMENT , 2017, p. 1762-1767Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since 2002 there has been a double degree programme in Stockholm, Sweden thanks to a joint venture between KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University. After five years of studying, which is the stipulated time for the teacher programme and engineering programmes in general, the graduates become engineers and teachers. By choosing this programme the graduates have the option of two professions during their careers. At present Sweden is in desperate need of more teachers in maths, science, and technology. These career options also offer flexibility when the number of teenagers decreases, or companies have to downsize. Sceptics might fear that this programme could lead to less competence, due to less time spent on specialising within the subjects of engineering, but according to Trevelyan most engineers spend more time on human interaction than on design and calculus [1]. Thus, studies in education can provide engineers with additional useful competence. Previous studies on double degree programmes have mainly focused on organizational problems, except for Wimshurst & Manning who mapped students' ongoing experiences when they combined a degree in criminology with degrees in other disciplines. These students complained about disjoint courses instead of joint discourses [2]. The aim of our study is to map and analyse: 1 how alumni evaluate this programme in retrospect, and 2 how they describe their present competences. Accordingly, 49 alumni answered a questionnaire in June 2016; and 15 of these respondents were selected for a tape recorded interview face to face. These alumni graduated from the programme 2-9 years ago. The data were coded according to principles of Grounded Theory [3]. In retrospect these alumni do appreciate the programme. Most respondents comment on the merits of maths learnt at KTH, though only a minority of engineers use higher maths as a practical tool. On the other hand, maths serves as a prototype for problem solving in general. Studies and training in leadership, learning theories and communication offer important tools for most engineers. Alumni employed as teachers claim that they are more well-prepared to teach maths, science, and technology than other teachers, partly because they can illustrate phenomena by giving examples from other realities than the school context. Alumni's descriptions of their present competence illuminate various combinations of engineering and educational skills. When data were coded three main categories emerged: material, processual and functional. Finally, the core category was formulated as follows: The programme matches new needs in present working life, i.e. that expertise knowledge is communicated to various kinds of recipients. The programme does not primarily reproduce labour, but rather support alumni in creating niches for themselves by pushing, widening and going beyond previous professional roles in working life. Conclusion: The double degree programme provides labour market with competent teachers and with communicative engineers. This is important in our era, when working life is partly transforming from standardized production into flexible knowledge processing.

  • 82.
    Cronhjort, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Naeslund, L.
    Nyberg, Sara
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    DOUBLE DEGREES: HITS AND PITS FOR THE CAREERS2017In: INTED2017: 11TH INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE / [ed] Chova, LG Martinez, AL Torres, IC, IATED-INT ASSOC TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION A& DEVELOPMENT , 2017, p. 4302-4309Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most of the programmes at KTH Royal Institute of Technology are engineering programmes with traditional contents, but some are norm-breaking innovations, created to respond to changes or demands perceived in society or in working life. One example is the double degree programme Master of Science in Engineering and in Education, given in cooperation with Stockholm University. In this programme students get two degrees, one in engineering and one in education as teachers for the upper secondary school. This is a rather unusual concept in Sweden and Europe, but similar programmes exist in Gothenburg, Sweden, and in Tampere, Finland. Graduates from Master of Science in Engineering and in Education have several career options. Their engineering degrees are characterised by much Mathematics and Pedagogics, but also contain a specialisation in Physics, Chemistry or Technology/Computer Science. Besides working as engineers, graduates can work as teachers in the upper secondary school. It is a challenge for students in these double degree programmes to develop two professional identities [1]. Similar identity problems also exist for scientists who later add a second career as teacher, but they focus on one career at a time, which could make it easier [2]. In this study we focus on how alumni from Master of Science in Engineering and in Education describe their working tasks and careers, and how they perceive their success on the job market. Data were gathered by means of questionnaires and interviews. The development of the careers was addressed in a web questionnaire, sent out in the spring 2016 to alumni who graduated 2-9 years ago (49 respondents). To get more details, we invited 17 of the respondents to follow up interviews. The programme exit survey, given to all graduates within 12 months from their graduation, provides a picture of the introduction to working life (106 respondents). Preliminary results indicate that a little more than half of the graduates work in business, about 30% work as teachers, and about 10% are employed at universities. 2-9 years later, only a slightly higher percentage seems to have been working as teachers. About 10% of the alumni seem to have been working as engineers as well as teachers, and about 20% with education in another context than school. More than 50% of the respondents think that they have been favoured on the job market by having studied this particular double degree programme. About 40% express that they have been neither or both disadvantaged and favoured, and about 10% think that they have been disadvantaged. Some express that they were more favoured on the job market for teachers than on the job market for engineers. The interviews provide details about the introduction to working life. Those who work as teachers seem to have a busy first year. They perceive that their subject knowledge is appreciated and many have additional responsibilities as e.g. scheduler, head of department, or for the learning management system. When applying for jobs in engineering, many find it challenging to explain their qualifications to an employer. Especially outside of Stockholm, few employers seem to have knowledge of the programme and of double degrees in engineering and in education. Many respondents seem to find the first year as an engineer to be a soft start, but some data indicate that they may advance rapidly towards more difficult challenges and responsibilities.

  • 83.
    Cronhjort, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Nyberg, Sara
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Naeslund, Lars
    Civilingenjör och lärare – ett bidrag till hållbar ingenjörsutbildning2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vi har studerat hur kombinationsutbildningen Civilingenjör och lärare på KTH bidrar till att avhjälpa lärarbristen och därigenom bidrar till en hållbar ingenjörsutbildning. Studien bygger på data från enkäter och intervjuer med programmets alumner. Enkätmaterialet visar att cirka 30% av alumnerna arbetar i gymnasieskolan, 60% i näringslivet och 10% med övrigt, exempelvis i organisationer eller på universitet. Alumnerna anser sig vara gynnade på arbetsmarknaden. De har ett starkt självförtroende och en mycket positiv bild av den egna kompetensen.

  • 84.
    Cronhjort, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Weurlander, Maria
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    STUDENT PERSPECTIVES ON FLIPPED CLASSROOMS INENGINEERING EDUCATION2016In: Proceedings of the 12th International CDIO Conference / [ed] J. Björkqvist, K. Edström, R. J. Hugo, J. Kontio, J. Roslöf, R. Sellens, & S. Virtanen, CDIO , 2016, p. 1041-1050Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used focus group interviews and the student perspective in order to investigate student perceptions of flipped classroom in engineering education. The learning environment included web-based interactive video films, where students had to answer quizzes in order to continue seeing the films, and interactive in-class sessions with clickers. In general the students had experience of flipped classroom in many courses and subjects, and could compare different implementations in physics, mechanics and calculus. We studied perceived advantages, strengths, drawbacks, or difficulties, and students’ views on learning with flipped classroom. Overall, the students were positive, or in one case indifferent to flipped classroom. They saw many advantages, but they also pointed out difficulties and had many opinions about how a flipped learning environment was best implemented. In the interviews, they also expressed their views on learning and described how they studied. Many used rote learning and surface approaches to learning, but many also had a focus on understanding. Some declared an intention to focus on understanding but still used rote learning. Some students expressed a strategic approach to learning with focus on the examination. Heavy workload and a threatening examination system seem to favor surface approaches to learning also in a flipped classroom learning environment. One of our interviewees had dyslexia and described her experience and special conditions. We conclude by suggesting a list of five key elements for flipped classroom. We think that the interplay between these elements is important, and that they are considerably weaker without the support of the others.

  • 85. Dagiene, V.
    et al.
    Mannila, L.
    Poranen, T.
    Rolandsson, Lennart
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Stupuriene, G.
    Reasoning on children’s cognitive skills in an informatics contest: Findings and discoveries from Finland, Lithuania, and Sweden2014In: Informatics in Schools. Teaching and Learning Perspectives: 7th International Conference on Informatics in Schools: Situation, Evolution, and Perspectives, ISSEP 2014, Istanbul, Turkey, September 22-25, 2014. Proceedings, Springer, 2014, p. 66-77Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present the results from a multi-national study of students’ results in the international IT contest “Bebras”. Be-bras provides motivating and game-like tasks in the format of multiple-choice questions and interactive problems to students in grades 2-12. Our study focuses on the results of nearly 8 000 students aged 10-13 in Finland (n=852), Sweden (n=201) and Lithuania (n=7 022), using gender, task and country as the underlying variables. In addition to presenting the overall results of the three student groups, we also analyse a subset of tasks in common according to Bloom's taxonomy and put forward detailed results for these tasks with regard to gender and country. The results show that there is no difference in performance between boys and girls in this age group. Our findings also indicate that there was a slight mismatch between the difficulty level of the tasks used in the contest and students’ actual abilities; finding more efficient and trustworthy ways of evaluating difficulty levels upfront and choosing a suitable task set is hence important for upcoming contests.

  • 86. Dagiene, V.
    et al.
    Mannila, L.
    Poranen, T.
    Rolandsson, Lennart
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Söderhjelm, P.
    Students'performance on programming-related tasks in an informatics contest in Finland, Sweden and Lithuania2014In: ITICSE 2014 - Proceedings of the 2014 Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education Conference, 2014, p. 153-158Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ways in which informatics is covered in K-12 education vary among European countries. In Finland and Sweden, informatics is not included in the core curriculum, whereas, for example, in Lithuania, all students are exposed to some informatics concepts starting in the fifth grade. Bebras is an annually arranged international informatics contest for K-12 level, resulting in a large collection of data about contestants and their results. In this paper, we analyse contest data from the Finnish, Swedish and Lithuanian 2013 contests, focusing on students'performance on tasks related to algorithmic thinking. Our findings suggest that despite coming from different educational systems, students perform rather similarly on the tasks. The same tasks are difficult and the thinking behind picking an incorrect answer seems rather similar throughout the countries. The analysis also points out that there is a lack of easy questions - this needs to be fixed in order to not risk scaring students away.

  • 87. de Leeuw, Esther
    et al.
    Opitz, Conny
    Lubinska, Dorota
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Language and communication.
    Dynamics of first language attrition across the lifespan Introduction2013In: International Journal of Bilingualism, ISSN 1367-0069, E-ISSN 1756-6878, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 667-674Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 88. Deiaco, Enrico
    et al.
    Broström, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Entrepreneurship and innovation.
    Geschwind, Lars
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Högskola och region - ett trevande förhållande: reflektioner över exemplet Västra Götalandsregionen2007Book (Other academic)
  • 89.
    Doyle, Andrew
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Canty, Donal
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Agendas, influences, and capability: Perspectives on practice in design and technology education2017In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A philosophical shift in policy now situates the development of technological capability as the focus of Irish technology education. Internationally, the effectiveness of curricular reform in the discipline has previously been called to question, as the legacy of the preceding vocational craft subjects has been seen to throttle the evolution of practice in aligning with emergent policy. As Irish technology education shares this vocational heritage, this research seeks to explore the effectiveness of policy change through an investigation of current practices in the discipline. Specifically, this research seeks to explore the alignment of teachers’ perceptions of practice in terms of the focus of learning activities and educational outcomes as prescribed by curricula. A methodological framework was developed to explore teachers’ (n = 15) perceptions, ecologically rooted in the tasks and activities they use to teach in their classrooms. The results suggest a misalignment between what teachers conceive as important to the discipline, and their enacted practices. The paper unpacks the contentions surrounding this misalignment and discusses factors which appear to influence teachers’ perceptions, forming a greater understanding of what influences practice in the discipline.

  • 90. Doyle, Andrew
    et al.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Athlone Institute of Technology, Athlone, Ireland..
    Canty, Donal
    University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland..
    McGuiness, John
    University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland..
    Professional Continuity: Investigating the Alignment of Technology Teachers’ Internal Capability Constructs2017In: In Proceedings of the Pupils Attitudes Towards Technology (PATT-34) Conference: Technology & Engineering Education - Fostering the Creativity of Youth Around the Globe. 10-14th July, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA., 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In contemporary education, teachers’ epistemological beliefs governing what and how to teach are important due to their influence on practice, pedagogy, assessment, and the learner. Teachers’ beliefs are perhaps of more significance in technology education as defining clear subject boundaries regarding ‘what to teach’ has traditionally proven difficult. Despite this, there are recognisable practices, processes and outputs that are considered of value to the learner. This research sets out to explore the level of professional continuity among educators regarding such outputs in technology education.

    Initial data collection involved the generation of authentic evidence in response to an open design task. Participants were sought from five schools across Ireland. The cohort consisted of first- and second-year technology education pupils (n=64) in post-primary education. Following this, technology teachers (n=27) were engaged in the holistic assessment of pupil work utilising the Adaptive Comparative Judgment (ACJ) method. The ACJ method relies on a series of binary judgments between two pieces of evidence, effectively producing a rank order of evidence.

    In alignment with previous studies utilising the ACJ method, teachers generated very high levels of reliability when tasked with the adjudication of pupil work, despite the lack of assessment criteria. This suggests an implicit understanding of capability among teachers, irrespective of variables such as culture, context or curricula. Interestingly however, not all teachers engaged in judgements agreed consensually. Taking cognisance of this, an analysis of constructs of capability highlighted five criteria that governed teachers’ adjudication on portfolios. The significance of these criteria and the continuity between teachers’ constructs of capability is discussed.  

  • 91.
    Doyle, Andrew
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Athlone Institute of Technology, Athlone, Ireland..
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Canty, Donal
    University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland..
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Reconceptualising PCK research in D&T education:proposing a methodological framework to investigateenacted practice2018In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since first conceived, the concept of pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) hasattracted much attention. Despite being lauded by educationalists as the unique knowledgebase of teachers, research on the concept over the past 30 years has yet to result in a universallyaccepted definition being presented. Much of the contentions surrounding the lack ofan agreed upon conception appear to have stemmed from difficulties in understanding therelationship between PCK, other areas of teacher knowledge, teacher beliefs, and enactedpractice. This paper considers the application of PCK frameworks to design and technology(D&T) education, through an analysis of the nature of the discipline from an ontologicaland epistemological perspective and contemporary perspectives on the construct of PCK.It is theorised that the volition afforded to teachers in D&T through weakly framed subjectboundaries negates the effective application of PCK frameworks, as teachers’ beliefs have agreater impact on enacted practices. In an attempt to better understanding enacted practicein D&T education, the paper proposes a methodological framework centred on the interactionsbetween teachers’ beliefs and knowledge in the discipline, through synthesising theconcept of amplifiers and filters of practice with the nature of D&T education. The proposedframework outlines the need to recognise individual teachers’ conception of capabilityas a critical influence on enacted practice.

  • 92.
    Edelbro, Catrin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Eitzenberger, Andreas
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Jonsson, Kristina
    LKAB.
    Svedberg, Erik
    LKAB.
    Engaging with Program Stakeholders to Support Program Development2017In: The 13th International CDIO Conference Proceedings - Full Papers / [ed] Brennon, R., Edström, K., Hugo, R., Roslöf, J., Songer, R., & Spooner, D., Calgary, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Luleå University of Technology (LTU) has adopted CDIO as the framework for developing its engineering programs. At the Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, there are two programs focusing on tunnelling, mining and rock excavation. Despite very positive prospects for professionals in the field, the number of students has decreased for the last two years. Further, program content might not reflect recent developments or new requirements in the industry. Therefore, the programs and their courses are taken under renewed consideration. Given the nature of the challenges facing the programs, it is in this case particularly important to inform of the planned development through a dialogue with stakeholders. Stakeholder dialogue is also a key feature of a CDIO curriculum development (CDIO Standard 2). This paper reports on a process of engagement with industry representatives, initiated through a meeting to discuss the competence of newly graduated from LTU as well as the future needs in the industry. The input will make it more visible what programme and course development work needs to be done in the nearest future. A continued support and feedback from the industry is warranted during the programme development.

  • 93.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Academic and professional values in engineering education: Engaging with history to explore a persistent tensionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The tension between academic and professional aims of engineering education is a remarkably consistent challenge facing engineering educators. Here, some historical roots of this issue are traced through the life and work of Carl Richard Söderberg (1895 - 1979), who emigrated from Sweden to the U.S. for an illustrious industrial and academic career. While Söderberg was a proponent for a more science-based curriculum, his rationale was related to solving real professional problems, and he would come to criticise the distancing of engineering education from engineering practice. Söderberg’s views are compared to a present-day reform concept for engineering education, the CDIO approach, founded by MIT and three Swedish universities. The similarities show the persistence of the issue, as many of Söderberg’s ideals, arguments, and proposed strategies, are fully recognisable in the current discussion. Further, Söderberg and CDIO share the ideal of mutually supporting professional and disciplinary preparation, implying that the tension should not be a zero-sum game. The paths to this ideal were different, however, as Söderberg wanted to integrate theoretical aspects to improve an overly practical education, while CDIO is about improving an overly theoretical education by integrating also other necessary professional aspects.

  • 94.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Academic and Professional Values in Engineering Education: Engaging with History to Explore a Persistent Tension2018In: Engineering Studies, ISSN 1937-8629, E-ISSN 1940-8374, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 38-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tension between academic and professional aims of engineering education is a remarkably consistent challenge facing engineering educators. Here, some historical roots of this issue are traced through the life and work of Carl Richard Söderberg (1895–1979), who emigrated from Sweden to the US for an illustrious industrial and academic career. While Söderberg was a proponent for a more science-based curriculum, his rationale was related to solving real professional problems, and he would come to criticise the distancing of engineering education from engineering practice. Söderberg's views are compared to a present-day reform concept for engineering education, the CDIO approach, founded by MIT and three Swedish universities. The similarities show the persistence of the issue, as many of Söderberg's ideals, arguments, and proposed strategies are fully recognisable in the current discussion. Further, Söderberg and CDIO share the ideal of mutually supporting professional and disciplinary preparation, implying that the tension should not be a zero-sum game. The paths to this ideal were different, however, as Söderberg wanted to integrate theoretical aspects to improve an overly practical education, while CDIO is about improving an overly theoretical education by integrating also other necessary professional aspects.

  • 95.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Aims of Engineering Education Research - The Role of the CDIO Initiative2016In: Proceedings of the 12th International CDIO Confernce, Turku, Finland, June 12-16 2016, Turku, 2016, p. 974-985Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 96.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Design for Motivation2002In: The Digital University - Building a Learning Community / [ed] Hazemi, Reza, & Hailes, Stephen, London: Springer London, 2002, p. 193-202Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 97.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Exploring the dual nature of engineering education: Opportunities and challenges in integrating the academic and professional aspects in the curriculum2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineering education is both academic, emphasising theory in a range of subjects, and professional, preparing students for engineering practice. Ideally, these aspects are also in a meaningful relationship in the curriculum, but the dual nature ideal is simultaneously a source of tensions. This theme is explored in the context of engineering education development, represented by the CDIO (Conceive, Design, Implement, Operate) approach. Cases on programme and course level illustrate how the dual nature ideal is pursued in the integrated curriculum. CDIO is also compared with PBL (problem/project-based learning), and opportunities to further emphasise research in the CDIO community are explored.

    Two critical accounts suggest widening the perspective from curriculum development per se, to the organisational conditions. First, the views of Carl Richard Söderberg (1895-1979) are compared with CDIO, showing considerable similarities in ideals, arguments, and strategies. This leads to a critique of the swinging pendulum metaphor. Then, experiences of unsustainable change leads to a model called organisational gravity, explaining the stability of programmes and implying two change strategies, with different availability, risks, resource demands, and sustainability of results.

    Refuting a rationalist view on organisation, an institutional logics perspective is used to analyse the tensions within engineering education. It is suggested that the logics of the academic profession dominates over the logics of the engineering profession, hence favouring “teaching theory” over “teaching professionals”. The integrated curriculum strategy is contingent on educators’ ability to unite theoretical and professional aspects in courses, and on the collegial capacity for coordination. Finally, the CDIO initiative is conceptualised as a field-level driver of institutional innovation, identifying some strategies for legitimacy.

  • 98.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Granskning av en tjänsteförslagsnämnds prövning av behörighetskravet för lektor avseende högskolepedagogisk utbildning: ett stickprov2008Report (Other academic)
  • 99.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Reflections on the Nordic Journal of STEM Education: Strengthening a Nordic STEM education community2017In: Nordic Journal of STEM Education, E-ISSN 2535-4574, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 257-261Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This journal is a new arena for “scholarship that matters”, particularly welcome due to its Nordic scope, STEM education focus, open access, and language options. By disseminating ideas, experiences, and credible evidence, it can help improve our understanding of consequential issues and support the advancement of education. By offering opportunities to learn about and build upon the work of others, it can strengthen the community, and increase the legitimacy of our work. Here, some reflections are made on the positioning and potentials of the journal.

  • 100.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    The role of CDIO in engineering education research: Combining usefulness and scholarlinessManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The CDIO Initiative is a community for engineering education development, but since 2016 its annual conference also calls for research. This paper considers possible roles for CDIO in the field of engineering education research (EER). The EER landscape is explored, in particular whether the aim of research is to seek knowledge to improve engineering education, or to seek knowledge for its own sake? Although usefulness and scholarliness are not mutually exclusive, the priority matters throughout the research process and in evaluating work. Introducing concepts from similar debates, this paper argues for embracing the tension, to form a productive relationship between scholarliness and usefulness. A dual objective is implied: usefully contributing to the improvement of engineering education and establishing a recognised research field enabling sustainable careers for researchers. Quality mechanisms are necessary for staking out borders and upholding standards, at least to weed out work that is neither scholarly nor useful.

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