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  • 51. Gaver, Bill
    et al.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    In Search of the Elusive CHI Design Paper2017In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 22-23Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Gedik, Ali Cenk
    et al.
    Department of Musicology, Dokuz Eylül University.
    Holzapfel, André
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    The Meaning of Music in Ethnomusicology and Music Information Retrieval: Obstacles Against Computational Ethnomusicology2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 53. Genlott, Annika Agélii
    et al.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Viberg, Olga
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Disseminating digital innovation in school – leading second-order educational change2019In: Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, ISSN 1360-2357, E-ISSN 1573-7608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using digital technology effectively in schools requires profound changes in traditional teaching and learning activities. Pedagogical innovations often start small-scale and developing good ideas into shared practice across schools is challenging in many ways, especially if the innovation requires second-order change, i.e. challenges to fundamental beliefs about teaching and learning. This study investigates how a validated pedagogical method requiring integrated Information and Communication Technology (ICT) use and second-order change can be disseminated and sustained over time. We surveyed 92 primary school teachers who at different times over a 5-year period participated in a training course designed to implement an innovative technology-supported teaching method, Write To Learn, across an entire city. We found that organized teacher development programs can drive second-order change, but this requires considerable, active, and sustained effort from leaders at both school and district level. Additional factors include immediate and extended social systems and handling diversity among teachers. The results are useful for both practitioners and researchers since they contribute to a deeper understanding of the opportunities and challenges involved in disseminating effective ICT-based methods that requires profound changes of thinking about teaching and learning to guide the transformation of teaching practice.

  • 54.
    Gillner, Disa
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Exploring the Design Space of Web-based Solutions for Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy2018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    More and more people are affected by stress in their work lives, and it is in society’s interest to decrease the levels of stress [15]. There are several approaches that can be used to reduce stress, such as bodily exercises, digital aids, psychological treatment programs, or relaxation exercises. A new psychological program called Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT), originally used to prevent relapses in depression, can also help to treat stress. However, not much research has been conducted on the effects of MBCT to treat stress, and even less on how to design for web solutions for this treatment. The aim of this study is to investigate and explore how web solutions for mindfulness-based cognitive therapy used to treat stress can be designed, with the research question Based on an informed understanding of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy, how might we, from a design perspective, design a novel web application for it? To investigate this, a research through design approach was used, and the method “future workshop” for the evaluation of the design prototype. The results of this study suggest that when designing websites for MBCT treatments, the most important features to include are visual representations of the patient’s progress and regulated home assignments. The visual representations should show the correlation between stressors and mood, and the regulation would provide assurance to the therapist that the patient does the home assignments. However, more research should be done to further explore the design space in web solutions for mindfulness-based cognitive therapy.

  • 55.
    Grünloh, Christiane
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Harmful or Empowering?: Stakeholders’ Expectations and Experiences of Patient Accessible Electronic Health Records2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Healthcare systems worldwide face organisational and financial challenges due to increasing number of people with chronic conditions, increasing costs, and an ageing population. eHealth services have the potential to address some of these challenges, for example, by supporting patients who are engaged in self-care, improving quality of care, and reducing medical costs.

    In 2012, Region Uppsala in Sweden launched an eHealth service that enabled patients to access their electronic health records through the Internet. The launch of the service was accompanied by strong criticism from healthcare professionals (HCPs) and was heavily debated in the media. Patients on the other hand were very positive towards the service.

    Albeit promising, the potential of Patient Accessible Electronic Health Records (PAEHRs) cannot be realised if HCPs still have reservations towards the service and their concerns are not fully understood. The purpose of this research is therefore to enhance our understanding of how physicians view PAEHR in relation to both their work environment and the level of patient participation. Furthermore, the aim is to shed light on whether their concerns related to patients’ well-being have materialised in practice and how patients view and make use of the service. Finally, this thesis identifies implicated human values and value tensions related to PAEHR.

    To enhance our understanding of the physicians’ perspective, semi-structured interviews with 12 physicians in Uppsala were thematically analysed. A national patient survey was conducted to investigate patients’ use of and their experiences with PAEHR. Furthermore, empirical and conceptual investigations were carried out to identify human values and value tensions.

    The results of this research show that the physicians’ assumptions and views of PAEHR and its consequences for patients were different from the views and actual experiences of patients using the PAEHR system. The physicians were mainly concerned about potential increase in their workload and that it could be harmful for patients to access their Electronic Health Record (EHR), for example, as it might evoke anxiety or worry. The vast majority of patients appreciated timely access to their results, felt more involved in their care, and read their records to become more involved. The investigation of human values associated with PAEHR identified values such as Ownership & Property, Professional Autonomy, Responsibility, Human Well-Being, Accountability & Transparency, and Trust. Furthermore, value tensions were identified that may occur between direct and indirect stakeholders (here: patients and physicians), or are related to an interpretation of PAEHR.

    This thesis contributes to current research on eHealth in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) by instigating a critical discussion of values associated with eHealth technologies that might be perceived as conflicting given a stakeholder’s framing of the technology. For example, tensions that emerge between values that prioritise placing the responsibility on a physician for their patients versus a value system that prioritises patient autonomy. The findings of this thesis suggest that while policymakers and government agencies adhere to a system of values that place a premium on patient empowerment, paternalistic tendencies are still present among physicians. However, an eHealth service like PAEHR is an important first step towards patient participation. The results of this thesis suggest that the support of patient participation in their own care through PAEHR outweighs the potential harm.

  • 56.
    Grünloh, Christiane
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Using technological frames as an analytic tool in value sensitive design2018In: Ethics and Information Technology, ISSN 1388-1957, E-ISSN 1572-8439Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article proposes the use of technological frames (TF) as an analytical tool to support the investigations within value sensitive design. TF can help to identify values that are consistent or conflicting within and between stakeholders, which is exemplified with a case of patient accessible electronic health records in Sweden. The article concludes that TF can help to identify values, which may then help to understand and address possible concerns in the design process.

  • 57.
    Grünloh, Christiane
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. Institute of Informatics, Technische Hochschule Köln, University of Applied Sciences, Gummersbach, Germany.
    Myreteg, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Department of Business Studies.
    Cajander, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction..
    Rexhepi, Hanife
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. The Informatics Research Centre.
    “Why Do They Need to Check Me?” Patient Participation Through eHealth and the Doctor-Patient Relationship: Qualitative Study2018In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 20, no 1, article id e11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Roles in the doctor-patient relationship are changing and patient participation in health care is increasingly emphasized. Electronic health (eHealth) services such as patient accessible electronic health records (PAEHRs) have been implemented to support patient participation. Little is known about practical use of PAEHR and its effect on roles of doctors and patients. Objective: This qualitative study aimed to investigate how physicians view the idea of patient participation, in particular in relation to the PAEHR system. Hereby, the paper aims to contribute to a deeper understanding of physicians’ constructions of PAEHR, roles in the doctor-patient relationship, and levels and limits of involvement. Methods: A total of 12 semistructured interviews were conducted with physicians in different fields. Interviews were transcribed, translated, and a theoretically informed thematic analysis was performed. Results: Two important aspects were identified that are related to the doctor-patient relationship: roles and involvement. The physicians viewed their role as being the ones to take on the responsibility, determining treatment options, and to be someone who should be trusted. In relation to the patient’s role, lack of skills (technical or regarding medical jargon), motives to read, and patients’ characteristics were aspects identified in the interviews. Patients were often referred to as static entities disregarding their potential to develop skills and knowledge over time. Involvement captures aspects that support or hinder patients to take an active role in their care. Conclusions: Literature of at least two decades suggests an overall agreement that the paternalistic approach in health care is inappropriate, and a collaborative process with patients should be adopted. Although the physicians in this study stated that they, in principle, were in favor of patient participation, the analysis found little support in their descriptions of their daily practice that participation is actualized. As seen from the results, paternalistic practices are still present, even if professionals might not be aware of this. This can create a conflict between patients who strive to become more informed and their questions being interpreted as signs of critique and mistrust toward the physician. We thus believe that the full potential of PAEHRs is not reached yet and argue that the concept of patient empowerment is problematic as it triggers an interpretation of “power” in health care as a zero-sum, which is not helpful for the maintenance of the relationship between the actors. Patient involvement is often discussed merely in relation to decision making; however, this study emphasizes the need to include also sensemaking and learning activities. This would provide an alternative understanding of patients asking questions, not in terms of “monitoring the doctor” but to make sense of the situation.

  • 58.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Incorporating Europe's Values in Future Research2019In: Communications of the ACM, ISSN 0001-0782, E-ISSN 1557-7317, Vol. 62, no 4, p. 40-41Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 59.
    Handberg, Leif
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Chafe, C.
    Canfield-Dafilou, E. K.
    Op 1254: Music for neutrons, networks and solenoids using a restored organ in a nuclear reactor2018In: TEI 2018 - Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 537-541Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, an installation is presented that connects Stanford and Stockholm through a one-of-a-kind combination of instrument and venue: the Skandia Wurlitzer theatre organ (Wurlitzer serial no. 1254) situated in the KTH R1 Experimental Performance Space, a disused nuclear reactor. A continuous stream of musical data, audio, and video between the two places explored the capabilities of the digital to play with the concepts of presence and embodiment, virtuality and the physical. In the installation, a series of performances presented new pieces written especially for this setting. The pieces were performed by musicians in Stanford, mediated in real-time, allowing them to play together with the theatre organ in Stockholm, temporarily fusing the two venues to create one ensemble, one audience, in one space.

  • 60.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ljungdahl Eriksson, Martin
    Atienza, Ricardo
    Sound design through large audience interaction2019In: SMC, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Hasselqvist, Hanna
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Designing for shared energy responsibility2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A significant part of the world’s carbon emissions is related to energy use for housing and personal transport, and there are many efforts to make this energy use more sustainable. In the field of Sustainable Human-Computer Interaction, there has been a great interest in exploring how interactive systems can be used to influence people’s energy use, often with a focus on providing information and encouraging energy users to change their behaviours. Similar ideas have been implemented in commercial products aiming to raise households’ awareness of their energy use. This approach suggests that energy use is a matter of individual choice, and that it is the energy user’s responsibility to change energy-related practices such as driving, cooking and heating the home. The effectiveness of the approach has, however, been questioned and it has been proposed to extend the focus beyond the individual – to the communities, corporations and governments that influence people’s energy practices.

    With my research, I have aimed to contribute to an understanding of how various stakeholders can share responsibility for energy use and of how to take shared responsibility into account in design. The research has a starting point in studies of sustainable mobility and energy management in housing cooperatives. For these two cases, I have used design interventions to explore energy-intensive practices and more sustainable alternatives from the perspectives of both energy users and other stakeholders. In the thesis, I present ways that stakeholders influence, or could influence, energy use in terms of adoption of more sustainable practices and maintenance of these practices over time. Building on these findings, I suggest opportunities for interactive systems to amplify stakeholder initiatives and support shared responsibility for energy use, for example by contributing to transparency and trust between households and more powerful stakeholders. This includes to consider design sensitivities such as tensions between “odd” and “normal” practices, when and how to engage different stakeholders, and designing for other values than resource optimisation.

  • 62.
    Hasselqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Designing for Diverse Stakeholder Engagement in Resource-Intensive Practices2018In: Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite many contributions to Sustainable HCI stressing the importance of “moving beyond the individual”, a majority of HCI work is still targeted mainly at consumers or resource users. However, many stakeholders influence resource use and including such stakeholders in design work can open up new design opportunities for supporting sustainable practices. In this paper, we present results from a longitudinal study of practices related to energy improvement work in housing cooperatives. During the study, we discovered new opportunities for interactive technologies to support this work when we involved various stakeholders other than housing cooperatives. In addition, we discuss more general implications for design aiming to support diverse stakeholder engagement in practices related to resource use: which stakeholders and practices to include, temporal aspects of engagement, and opportunities for supporting shared responsibility for resource use.

  • 63.
    Hasselqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hesselgren, Mia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Bridging citizen and stakeholder perspectives of sustainable mobility through practice-oriented design2018In: Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transitions toward more sustainable mobility are necessary and involve changes in complex constellations of mobility-related practices. To understand opportunities for moving in this direction, there is a need to explore both the consumption side of sustainable mobility practices and the perspective of stakeholders that provide products, services, infrastructures, and policies required for such practices. This article contributes to a discussion of critical aspects of sustainable mobility practices in relation to the responsibilities and concerns of stakeholders with power to influence these practices. We present four sets of design concepts for supporting car-free living which were formulated and co-created based on a practice-oriented analysis of a one-year study of three families in Stockholm, Sweden that replaced their cars with light electric vehicles. The design concepts bring forward elements of sustainable mobility with a focus on: trying out new mobility practices, cycling infrastructure, child-friendly public transport, and transporting stuff. Furthermore, we discussed the concepts with public and private sector stakeholders and examined their interests in particular practices. Also considered are how the responsibilities of different stakeholders may clash. Finally, we suggest that practice-oriented design concepts can support discussions and increased knowledge about responsibilities and potential conflicts related to sustainable practices, as well as provide means for supporting learning about sustainable practices among decision makers.

  • 64.
    Hedberg, Evelina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Runhem, Alexandra
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    En undersökning om miljömärkning av kläder på en e-handelsplattform2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether an information gap exists between Lindex way of displaying sustainable choices for clothes on their web shop and what the customer perceives the meaning as. The focus is also to discuss if there would be useful for the consumer of a more specific sorting system when it comes to sustainable aspects and online purchases of clothes. The study was conducted with students as a primary group and Lindex web shop as the primary testing environment. The data was collected through a survey of students taking the course DM1578 Programintegrerande kurs i Medieteknik at KTH Royal Institute of Technology. The results show that there is an information gap between the meaning of Lindex sustainable tag and how our user group perceived it. It also shows that our target group had different opinions on which of the sustainability factors, social and ecological, were of importance. Due to the fact that the test subjects were students, the results cannot be generalized to a wide population. The study provides insight in how environmental attitudes towards the clothing industry looks like among students and what could be improved in order to make the consumer gain more knowledge about the clothing production as well as reevaluate their decisions when shopping online in favor for sustainability.

  • 65.
    Hedin, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Jorge Luis, Zapico
    Department of Computer Science and Media Technology, Linnaeus University.
    What Can You Do with 100 kWh? A Longitudinal Study of Using an Interactive Energy Comparison Tool to Increase Energy Awareness2018In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 7, article id 2269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reducing the use of energy is important for several reasons, such as saving money and reducing impact on the climate. However, the awareness among non-experts of how much energy is required by different activities and appliances is generally low, which can lead to wrong prioritizations. In this study, we have developed an interactive tool to increase “energy awareness”, and performed a longitudinal study to evaluate its effect. A group of 58 students first did a test to benchmark their current energy awareness, where their current knowledge of energy used for 14 different activities, such as driving vehicles and using home appliances, was measured. They then tried the interactive learning tool for 10 min. Next, they did the same test immediately after trying the tool, then again one week after trying the tool, and finally again six months after trying the tool. The results showed a significant learning effect in energy awareness with a “huge” effect size of 2.25 immediately after the intervention, a “very large” effect size of 1.70 after one week, and a “large” effect size of 0.93 after six months. The results further showed that the respondents consistently underestimated what 100 kWh could be used for, and especially so for appliances and activities requiring little energy. Before the intervention, on average they underestimated how much 100 kWh could be used for by 95.2%, and six months after the intervention the underestimation was 86.8%.

  • 66.
    Hedin, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Kann, Viggo
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Improving Study Skills by Combining a Study Skill Module and Repeated Reflection Seminars2019In: Education Research International, ISSN 2090-4002, E-ISSN 2090-4010, article id 9739854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    If students have a broad spectrum of study skills, learning will likely be positively affected, since they can adapt the way they learn in different situations. Such study skills can be learned in, for example, learning-to-learn courses. Several studies of such courses have been done over the years, but few of these have been carried out in longitudinal naturalistic settings, where the effect has been evaluated over several years in nonexperimental settings. In this paper, we present a novel approach for learning study skills, as a part of a course running over three years. The course starts with a learning-to-learn module, followed by 11 follow-ups that include, among other things, peer discussions about learning strategies with the aim of promoting self-regulated learning. This evaluation shows which study skills the students were most interested in trying, how successful they were in continuing to use the study skills, and which effects the students believed the study skills had after trying them. No significant change was found in how satisfied the students were with their overall study technique immediately after the initial module, but in the long term, 78% of the students believed the course had promoted their ability to analyze and adapt their study habits. We conclude that our approach could be a useful way to get the students to improve their repertoire and use of study skills, and we believe that the students also will improve general self-regulated learning skills.

  • 67.
    Hedin, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    A Systematic Review of Digital Behaviour Change Interventions for More Sustainable Food Consumption2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 9, article id 2638Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food production and consumption present major sustainability challenges, and finding ways to reduce the environmental impact of food, for example through behavioural changes by consumers, is becoming increasingly important. In recent years, digital interventions have become important tools to change behaviours in many areas. In this review, we evaluate the status of current scientific knowledge of digital behaviour change interventions for sustainable food consumption practices. Following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) checklist for how to conduct systematic reviews, we searched multiple databases for papers containing terms related to food, sustainability and digital behaviour change interventions. Only studies where the digital interventions were actually implemented and evaluated from a behaviour change perspective were included, resulting in 15 primary studies in the final review. The quality of the studies was evaluated from a behaviour change perspective, and the approaches used were categorised using two intervention frameworks, the Behaviour Change Wheel and the Behaviour Change Technique Taxonomy v1. The results show that all of the included studies had major quality issues when evaluated from a behaviour change perspective. This means that we could not find any evidence regarding whether the digital behaviour change interventions examined worked or not. Most studies further lacked theoretical grounding or a clear approach to how or why they should be effective for behaviour change for more sustainable food consumption practices. Our main recommendation for future research in the field is to expand from the current exploratory phase to conducting scientifically rigorous studies of higher quality, more thoroughly grounded in behaviour change theory and methods. Furthermore, based on our study, we suggest changes to the Behaviour Change Technique Taxonomy v1.

  • 68.
    Hedin, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    En systematisk forskningsöversikt av digitala interventioner för mer hållbara beteenden kring livsmedelskonsumtion2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Livsmedelsproduktion och livsmedelskonsumtion medför stora hållbarhetsutmaningar, och det blir allt viktigare att hitta sätt att minska miljöpåverkan orsakad av mat, till exempel genom beteendeförändringar hos konsumenterna. Under de senaste åren har digitala interventioner blivit viktiga verktyg för att förändra beteenden på många områden. I detta projekt har vi gjort en systematisk forskningsöversikt där vi gått igenom forskningsläget rörande digitala beteendeinterventioner för hållbar matkonsumtion. Vi har utgått från PRISMA-checklistan för hur sådana systematiska forskningsöversikter ska genomföras, och vi har genomsökt flera forskningsdatabaser för att hitta vetenskapliga artiklar som rör mat, hållbarhet och digitala beteendeinterventioner. Endast studier där de digitala interventionerna har implementerats och testats ur ett förändringsperspektiv har inkluderats, vilket resulterade i 15 primära studier som ingått i vår slutliga granskning. Kvaliteten på studierna utvärderades ur ett beteendeförändringssperspektiv, och de metoder för beteendeförändring som använts har kategoriserats med hjälp av två ramverk, “Behavior Change Wheel” och “Behavior Change Technique taxonomy v1”. Resultaten visade att alla inkluderade studier hade stora kvalitetsproblem när de utvärderades ur ett beteendeförändrings-perspektiv. Det innebär att vi inte kunde hitta några resultat som visade på om de digitala beteendeinterventionerna som undersöktes fungerade eller ej. De flesta studier saknade vidare en teoretisk bas för hur eller varför interventionerna skulle kunna leda till beteendeförändring för mer hållbar livsmedelskonsumtion. Vår huvudsakliga rekommendation för framtida forskning inom området är att gå vidare från en utforskande fas till att genomföra vetenskapliga studier med tydligare teoretisk bas och metodik.

  • 69.
    Hedin, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Larsson, Victor
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Artman, Henrik
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Indoor temperature awareness using an Ambient Information Display: a semi-longitudinal study of one household2018In: ICT4S2018. 5th International Conference on Information and Communication Technology for Sustainability / [ed] Birgit Penzenstadler, Steve Easterbrook, Colin Venters and Syed Ishtiaque Ahmed, 2018, Vol. 52, p. 112-124Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the use of an Ambient Information Display (AID) to visualize indoor temperature, in order to promote behavior change through reflection and discussion. A prototype system was built using Philips Hue, a personal wireless LED lighting system, to visualize indoor temperature with colors, and an unused smartphone as temperature sensor. A household with a family of five was used as test environment. The design process underwent two major design iterations focusing on the visualization and its impact on the family’s everyday perception of the indoor temperature, and the reflective processes this triggered. After three months of usage, late December to late March, the system was evaluated thoroughly. The awareness of the indoor temperature had been increased with the use of the system, where the AID had served as a trigger for discussions.

  • 70.
    Heinzel, Tincuta
    et al.
    Loughborough Univ, Text, Loughborough, Leics, England..
    Munthe, Hillevi
    Almeida, Teresa
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Andor, Corina
    Univ Oradea, Oradea, Romania..
    Badut, Anca
    Baker, Camille
    Univ Creat Arts, Epsom, Surrey, England..
    Biro, Anna
    Montreal Arts Interculturels, Montreal, PQ, Canada..
    Chieh, Shih Wei
    Gaui, Renata
    Arango, Maria Paulina Gutierrez
    Kock, Shary
    Univ Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Kurbak, Ebru
    Univ Appl Arts Vienna, Vienna, Austria..
    Santos, Aline Martinez
    Bauhaus Univ, Weimar, Germany..
    Patrascu, Ionut
    Zest Collect, Bucharest, Romania..
    Pennock, Veerle
    Popescu, Ioana
    Ion Mincu Architecture & Urbanism Univ, Bucharest, Romania..
    Popovici, Zoran
    Psarra, Afroditi
    Univ Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Roussel, Natacha
    Schmid, Annette
    Sicchio, Kate
    Virginia Commonwealth Univ, Richmond, VA USA..
    Shupliak, Vitalii
    Stewart, Rebecca
    Queen Mary Univ, London, England..
    Tharakan, Milie John
    Tomasello, Giulia
    van Waardenberg, Bram
    Willem Kooning Acad Art & Design, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Vierne, Pauline
    Berlin Univ Arts, Berlin, Germany..
    Attempts, Failures, Trials and Errors. Notes on an exhibition of failed prototypes and rejected projects.2019In: Design journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 22, p. 1941-1956Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present the history, the concept and the results of " Attempts, Failures, Trials and Errors" exhibition project which was first presented in the frame of Piksel Festival in Bergen, Norway (November 2017) and later on at " Salonul de Proiecte", Bucharest, Romania (February 2018). The project aimed to incite the e-textiles artists and designers to reflect upon the way they are engaging with their failures, as well as to the way in which they use these failures to better understand the context in which they are working and to continue to experiment. Our approach reverses the common R& D constructivist methods, by using deconstruction as a process of investigation in the field of wearable technologies and e-textiles. By questioning the ideas and the concepts of failure and success, the project puts an emphasis on art's capacity to be critical, while at the same time to poetically and self-ironically address contemporary challenges and concerns.

  • 71.
    Heinzel, Tincuta
    et al.
    Loughborough University.
    Munthe, Hillevi
    KTH.
    Almeida, Teresa
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Andor, Corina
    University of Oradea, Romania.
    Badut, Anca
    University of Creative Arts, London, UK.
    Baker, Camille
    University of Creative Arts, London, UK.
    Biro, Anna
    Montreal Arts Interculturels, Canada.
    Wei Chieh, Shih
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Gaui, Renata
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Gutierrez Arango, Maria Paulina
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Kock, Shary
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Kurbak, Ebru
    University of Applied Arts Vienna, Austria.
    Martinez Santos, Aline
    Bauhaus University, Weimar, Germany.
    Patrascu, Ionut
    Zest Collective, Bucharest, Romania.
    Pennock, Veerle
    ​ “Ion Mincu” Architecture and Urbanism University, Bucharest, Romania.
    Popescu, Ioana
    “Ion Mincu” Architecture and Urbanism University, Bucharest, Romania.
    Popovici, Zoran
    University of Washington, Seattle, USA.
    Psarra, Afroditi
    University of Washington, Seattle, USA.
    Roussel, Natacha
    Virginia Commonwealth University, USA.
    Schmid, Annette
    Virginia Commonwealth University, USA.
    Sicchio, Kate
    Virginia Commonwealth University, USA.
    Shupliak, Vitalii
    Queen Mary University, London, UK.
    Stewart, Rebecca
    Queen Mary University, London, UK.
    John Tharakan, Milie
    Willem de Kooning Academy for Art and Design, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Tomasello, Giulia
    Willem de Kooning Academy for Art and Design, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    van Waardenberg, Bram
    Willem de Kooning Academy for Art and Design, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Vierne, Pauline
    Berlin University of the Arts, Germany.
    Design Studio, DZNR
    Attempts, Failures, Trails and Errors. Notes on an exhibition of failed prototypes and rejected projects2019In: Running with Scissors, 13th EAD Conference, University of Dundee, 10-12 April 2019, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 72. Heitlinger, S.
    et al.
    Bryan-Kinns, N.
    Comber, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Connected seeds and sensors: Co-designing internet of things for sustainable smart cities with urban food-growing communities2018In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, Association for Computing Machinery , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a case study of a participatory design project in the space of sustainable smart cities and Internet of Things. We describe our design process that led to the development of an interactive seed library that tells the stories of culturally diverse urban food growers, and networked environmental sensors from their gardens, as a way to support more sustainable food practices in the city. This paper contributes to an emerging body of empirical work within participatory design that seeks to involve citizens in the design of smart cities and Internet of Things, particularly in the context of marginalised and culturally diverse urban communities. It also contributes empirical work towards non-utilitarian approaches to sustainable smart cities through a discussion of designing for urban diversity and slowness.

  • 73.
    Heitlinger, Sara
    et al.
    City Univ London, Dept Comp Sci, London, England..
    Bryan-Kinns, Nick
    Queen Mary Univ London, Media & Arts Technol CDT, London, England..
    Comber, Rob
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    The Right to the Sustainable Smart City2019In: CHI 2019: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2019 CHI CONFERENCE ON HUMAN FACTORS IN COMPUTING SYSTEMS, ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental concerns have driven an interest in sustainable smart cities, through the monitoring and optimisation of networked infrastructures. At the same time, there are concerns about who these interventions and services are for, and who benefits. HCI researchers and designers interested in civic life have started to call for the democratisation of urban space through resistance and political action to challenge state and corporate claims. This paper contributes to an emerging body of work that seeks to involve citizens in the design of sustainable smart cities, particularly in the context of marginalised and culturally diverse urban communities. We present a study involving co-designing Internet of Things with urban agricultural communities and discuss three ways in which design can participate in the right to the sustainable smart city through designing for the commons, care, and biocultural diversity.

  • 74.
    Helms, Karey
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Do You Have to Pee? A Design Space for Intimate and Somatic Data2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The management of bodily excretion is an everyday biological function necessary for our physiological and psychological well-being. In this paper, I investigate interaction design opportunities for and implications of leveraging intimate and somatic data to manage urination. This is done by detailing a design space that includes (1) a critique of market exemplars, (2) three conceptual design provocations, and (3) autobiographical data-gathering and labeling from excretion routines. To conclude, considerations within the labeling of somatic data, the actuating of bodily experiences, and the scaling of intimate interactions are contributed for designers who develop data-driven technology for intimate and somatic settings.

  • 75.
    Helms, Karey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Brown, Barry
    Stockholm University, DSV.
    Sahlgren, Magnus
    RISE SICS.
    Lampinen, Airi
    Stockholm University, DSV.
    Design Methods to Investigate User Experiences of Artificial Intelligence2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper engages with the challenges of designing "implicit interaction", systems (or system features) in which actions are not actively guided or chosen by users but instead come from inference driven system activity. We discuss the difficulty of designing for such systems and outline three Research through Design approaches we have engaged with - first, creating a design workbook for implicit interaction, second, a workshop on designing with data that subverted the usual relationship with data, and lastly, an exploration of how a computer science notion, “leaky abstraction”, could be in turn misinterpreted to imagine new system uses and activities. Together these design activities outline some inventive new ways of designing User Experiences of Artificial Intelligence. 

  • 76.
    Helms, Karey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Humor in Design Fiction to Suspend Disbelief and Belief2018In: NordiCHI '18 Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 801-818Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates humor as a resource and strategy for design with discourse as an intended outcome. While humor can incite empathy and understanding, it can also lead to alienation and disengagement. Through the detailing of the pre-narrative and narrative processes of a design fiction, we describe why and how elements of humor, in particular puns, parody, and pastiche, were employed. Following the presentation of the fiction and its use in the design of an exhibition of diegetic prototypes, the paper presents responses from participants and audience members to reflect upon how the humor was received. Following a discussion on these reflections, as the near-future scenario was written four years prior and is now situated within the present-day, it then concludes with a post-mortem reflection on the floating nature of humor. 

  • 77.
    Hesselgren, Mia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Wangel, Josefin
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Broms, Loove
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Exploring Lost and Found in Future Images of Energy Transitions: Towards a Bridging practice of Provoking and Affirming Design2018In: DRS2018: Catalyst, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We need to transition our society in a more sustainable direction, for example through enormous cuts in carbon emissions. Yet this future is hard to envision and work towards. In this project, with a transition design posture, we have designed tools that we believe can be useful to initiate dialogues and reflections for the future. In particular we are interested in using the bridging between provocative and affirmative design as a way to explore and articulate what people see as the lost and found of such a transition. In this paper, we present a study where we used a practice lens to address one possible low carbon future through a provocation workshop. We present our methodology, the tentative tools we used during the workshop and the experiences as expressed by the workshop participants.

  • 78. Hodge, J.
    et al.
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hastings, S.
    Morrissey, K.
    Exploring the design of tailored virtual reality experiences for people with dementia2018In: CHI '18 Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, Vol. 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite indications that recreational virtual reality (VR) experiences could be beneficial for people with dementia, this area remains unexplored in contrast to the body of work on neurological rehabilitation through VR in dementia. With recreational VR applications coming to the market for dementia, we must consider how VR experiences for people with dementia can be sensitively designed to provide comfortable and enriching experiences. Working with seven participants from a local dementia care charity, we outline some of the opportunities and challenges inherent to the design and use of VR experiences with people with dementia and their carers through an inductive thematic analysis. We also provide a series of future directions for work in VR and dementia: 1) careful physical design, 2) making room for sharing, 3) utilizing all senses, 4) personalization, and 5) positioning the person with dementia as an active participant.

  • 79.
    Holzapfel, André
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sturm, Bob
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Coeckelbergh, Mark
    Department of Philosophy, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Ethical Dimensions of Music Information Retrieval Technology2018In: Transactions of the International Society for Music Information Retrieval, E-ISSN 2514-3298, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 44-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines ethical dimensions of Music Information Retrieval (MIR) technology.  It uses practical ethics (especially computer ethics and engineering ethics) and socio-technical approaches to provide a theoretical basis that can inform discussions of ethics in MIR. To help ground the discussion, the article engages with concrete examples and discourse drawn from the MIR field. This article argues that MIR technology is not value-neutral but is influenced by design choices, and so has unintended and ethically relevant implications. These can be invisible unless one considers how the technology relates to wider society. The article points to the blurring of boundaries between music and technology, and frames music as “informationally enriched” and as a “total social fact.” The article calls attention to biases that are introduced by algorithms and data used for MIR technology, cultural issues related to copyright, and ethical problems in MIR as a scientific practice. The article concludes with tentative ethical guidelines for MIR developers, and calls for addressing key ethical problems with MIR technology and practice, especially those related to forms of bias and the remoteness of the technology development from end users.

  • 80. Hultén, G.
    et al.
    Picha Edwardsson, Malin
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Storylab lessons: A collaborative project between courses in journalism and media technology2018In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 3-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines Storylab, a collaborative learning project between the journalism programme at Stockholm University and the engineering programme in media technology at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, designed to combine journalistic storytelling with pervasive media technology. The aim of the study is to identify and reflect on the challenges associated with the approach. The methods used are a survey and semi-structured interviews with the students. The analyses draw on research concerning the current main challenges for the news industry and journalism educators. The results show that Storylab was highly appreciated, and provided students with useful skills for their professional lives. However, not all groups worked well together, and some students wished that the collaboration had been more extensive. Differences in motivations and priorities were mentioned as restraining factors. Therefore, it is argued that for a sustainable media landscape, journalists and engineers must collaborate, and that this cooperation can be brought about during professional training.

  • 81.
    Högfeldt, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Lantz, Ann
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lujara, Suzan
    Univ Dar Es Salaam, UDSM, Coll Informat & Commun Technol, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania..
    Understanding Engineering Education Change With The Introduction of Challenge Driven Education in Tanzania2018In: PROCEEDINGS OF 2018 IEEE GLOBAL ENGINEERING EDUCATION CONFERENCE (EDUCON) - EMERGING TRENDS AND CHALLENGES OF ENGINEERING EDUCATION, IEEE , 2018, p. 1335-1343Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden and Tanzania have collaborated since 1976 in research projects. A PhD sandwich program was established in the 90's in the field of electrical engineering between UDSM (University of Dar es Salam), Tanzania and KTH (Royal Institute of Technology), Sweden. This collaboration has opened up for shared trust, idea exchange and the emergence of the challenge driven education approach. Challenge driven education brings in socio-technical challenges to engineering education, or rather, brings out students and academic faculty, to real life challenges outside academy. The research of the first years' experience reveals factors like high motivation among students, faculty and stakeholders in society. New ways of teaching and learning have evolved, and clear contrasts with traditional education have been found.

  • 82.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Designing with the Body: Somaesthetic Interaction Design2018Book (Other academic)
  • 83.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Caramiaux, Baptiste
    UMR STMS Ircam CNRS UPMC, 1 Pl Igor Stravinsky, F-75004 Paris, France.;McGill Univ, Schulich Sch Mus, Montreal, PQ H3A 1E3, Canada.;Univ Paris Saclay, Inria, Univ Paris Sud, CNRS LRI, Bat 650 Noetzlin St, F-91190 Gif Sur Yvette, France..
    Erkut, Cumhur
    Aalborg Univ, Dept Architecture Design & Media Technol, DK-2450 Copenhagen SV, Denmark..
    Forlizzi, Jodi
    Carnegie Mellon Univ, Human Comp Interact Inst, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 USA..
    Hajinejad, Nassrin
    City Univ Appl Sci, Hsch Bremen, Inst Informat & Automat, D-28199 Bremen, Germany..
    Haller, Michael
    Upper Austria Univ Appl Sci, Sch Informat Commun & Media, A-4232 Hagenberg, Austria..
    Hummels, Caroline C. M.
    Univ Technol, Dept Ind Design, NL-5612 AZ Eindhoven, Netherlands..
    Isbister, Katherine
    Univ Calif Santa Cruz, Dept Computat Media, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn Univ, Dept Nat Sci Technol & Environm Studies, S-14189 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Khut, George
    Univ New South Wales, UNSW Art & Design, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia..
    Loke, Lian
    Univ Sydney, Sydney Sch Architecture Design & Planning, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia..
    Lottridge, Danielle
    Yahoo Inc, Sunnyvale, CA 94089 USA..
    Marti, Patrizia
    Univ Technol, Dept Ind Design, NL-5612 AZ Eindhoven, Netherlands.;Dept Social Polit & Cognit Sci, I-53100 Siena, Italy..
    Melcer, Edward
    NYU, Tandon Sch Engn, Brooklyn, NY 11201 USA..
    Muller, Florian Floyd
    RMIT Univ, Exert Games Lab, Melbourne, Vic 3000, Australia..
    Petersen, Marianne Graves
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Comp Sci, DK-8000 Aarhus, Denmark.
    Schiphorst, Thecla
    Simon Fraser Univ, Sch Interact Arts & Technol, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada..
    Segura, Elena Marquez
    Univ Calif Santa Cruz, Dept Computat Media, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE SICS, S-16440 Kista, Sweden..
    Svanaes, Dag
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol NTNU, Dept Comp Sci IDI, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway.;IT Univ Copenhagen, Digital Design Dept, DK-2300 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Comp & Syst Sci DSV, S-11418 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tobiasson, Helena
    Umeå Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, S-90187 Umeå, Sweden..
    Embracing First-Person Perspectives in Soma-Based Design2018In: INFORMATICS-BASEL, ISSN 2227-9709, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A set of prominent designers embarked on a research journey to explore aesthetics in movement-based design. Here we unpack one of the design sensitivities unique to our practice: a strong first person perspective-where the movements, somatics and aesthetic sensibilities of the designer, design researcher and user are at the forefront. We present an annotated portfolio of design exemplars and a brief introduction to some of the design methods and theory we use, together substantiating and explaining the first-person perspective. At the same time, we show how this felt dimension, despite its subjective nature, is what provides rigor and structure to our design research. Our aim is to assist researchers in soma-based design and designers wanting to consider the multiple facets when designing for the aesthetics of movement. The applications span a large field of designs, including slow introspective, contemplative interactions, arts, dance, health applications, games, work applications and many others.

  • 84.
    Idrovo, René
    et al.
    The University of York.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Immersive Point-of-Audition: Alfonso Cuarón’s Three-Dimensional Sound Design Approach2019In: Music, Sound, and the Moving Image, ISSN 1753-0768Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technological advances have always had an impact on the development of new audio-visual aesthetics. Recently, exploiting the spatial capabilities of immersive sound technology in the form of Dolby Atmos, Alfonso Cuarón introduced in Gravity (2013) an innovative sound design approach that enhances the illusion of ‘presence’ in the space of the diegesis by always maintaining a coherent, realistic, and immersive representation of a given point-of-audition. Such sonic strategy – which we have termed immersive point-of-audition – provides a three-dimensional representation of the filmic space, localising sound effects, music, and dialogue in accordance to the position of the sources within the diegesis. In this paper, we introduce the definition and main characteristics of this emergent sound design approach, and using Gravity as an illustrative example, we argue that it has the potential of facilitating the processes of transportation and identification in cinema.

  • 85.
    Ilstedt, Sara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Hesselgren, Mia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Sustainable lifestyles: How values affect sustainable practises2017In: Design + Power / [ed] Andrew Morrisson, Dagny Stuedahl, 2017, p. 1-7Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a project that explores how different values and lifestyle choices are related to sustainable practices. The goal has been to develop an understanding of both complexity in people’s everyday practices as well as patterns in this complexity to be used when designing interventions for sustainable lifestyles. In the project, we have used a mixed methods approach in order to develop a more comprehensive picture of both the larger patterns of the complexities of everyday practices as well as the particulars of sustainability engagement in Sweden. In this paper we present the initial results from a Swedish study of people with different values and their relations to sustainability, based on Schwartz Theory of Basic Human Values. In particular, we present their overall perspective on sustainability, their existing sustainable practices, and their needs for transitions towards more sustainable lifestyles.

  • 86.
    Isaksson, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Smart interactions for the quantified self2018In: Challenges and Solutions in Smart Learning: Proceeding of 2018 International Conference on Smart Learning Environments, Beijing, China, Springer International Publishing , 2018, p. 67-72Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Quantified Self is a movement for collecting personal data with the goal of providing possibilities for new insights through reflecting on own relevant data, with applications in areas such as physical exercise, food, and health. When collecting personal data, difficulties may arise, such as information from different sources which cannot easily be combined, closed access to information sources, inflexible tooling for producing desired quantifications, varying precision of data used for producing quantifications, and a lack of control over data sharing for supporting relevant comparisons with others. In this paper, we introduce the concept of smart interactions, backed by linked data, as a means of introducing the QS through smart and personal learning environments, both for reducing the associated difficulties and further empowering the QS.

  • 87.
    Jap, Lilian
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Mapping detected periodic dance movements to control tempo in the music playback of Electronic Dance Music2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Engaging in the music set of one’s favorite artist or DJ is oftentimes leading to the result of a powerful and euphoric felt experience, a sensation partly also induced from dancing in beat to the music. In an attempt to simulate a similar dance experience, this user-study examines when a user is let to dance in rhythm to a music playback and in addition, in control of a music playback tempo through the generated dance movements. A proof-of-concept prototype was built and tested in an initial study, followed by a main study where the prototype had been modified and 12 participants participated. A questionnaire was given containing various question statements to be rated through a Likert-scale regarding their subjective experience. Open-ended questions were also included to collect their own opinions. From the results, an enhanced engagement and enjoyment of the music could be identified when being able to manipulate the tempo. 

  • 88.
    Jap, Lilian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Real-time Mapping of Periodic Dance Movements to Control Tempo in Electronic Dance Music2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dancing in beat to the music of one's favorite DJ leads oftentimes to a powerful and euphoric  experience. In this study we investigate the effect of putting a dancer in control of music playback tempo based on a real-time estimation of body rhythm and tempo manipulation of audio. A prototype was developed and tested in collaboration with users, followed by a main study where the final prototype was evaluated. A questionnaire was provided to obtain ratings regarding subjective experience, and open-ended questions were posed in order to obtain further insights for future development. Our results imply the potential for enhanced engagement and enjoyment of the music when being able to manipulate the tempo, and document important design aspects for real-time tempo control.

  • 89.
    Jarusriboonchai, Pradthana
    et al.
    Univ Lapland, Rovaniemi, Finland..
    Meissner, Janis Lena
    Newcastle Univ, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Almeida, Teresa
    IT Univ Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Understanding Children's Free Play in Primary Schools2019In: 9TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON COMMUNITIES & TECHNOLOGIES (C&T) / [ed] Cech, F Tellioglu, H, ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY , 2019, p. 178-188Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Various technologies (e.g., tablets, toolkits, and digital toys) are used in schools. However, they are often designed to introduce new play practices for serving pre-defined learning purposes. In this study, we are interested in constructive play 'in the wild' and how technologies can be integrated more organically into the ways young school children are already playing. This paper presents 4 one-week ethnographic study in four early primary school classrooms (children aged 5-7). The aim is to gain insights in children's free play and identify design opportunities for technology serving children's constructive play. Our findings illustrate children's interactions with resources and peers during free play, which often involve imitations and dynamically change between being solitary and social. We observed that children's constructive play was often associated with other forms of play. On this basis, we suggest three design implications for technologies that support and encourage constructive play during fee play in schools.

  • 90.
    Jonsson, Martina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Exploring Designs for Enhancing the In-store Customer Experience through Digital Product Information in Fashion Retail2018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The ongoing consumer transition from offline to online shopping in the fashion retail industry requires retailers to take action. Not only do consumers shop more online, they also go online for research of retail products. Forecasts tell that bringing the online experience to offline stores might bridge the gap between the two channels. The online experience provides high-end digital content, and puts a demand on the product information offline as this was found crucial for the customer experience. The marketing possibilities in-store was found to be an advantage to bricks-and-mortar retailers. Thus, this study aims to investigate how the customer experience can be enhanced in retail bricks-and-mortar stores through digital product information. A survey was conducted to identify user requirements in terms of product information. An augmented reality prototype was formed to satisfy the identified user requirements. The prototype was tested in two user studies that evaluated the content, visualization, interaction and satisfaction. The prototype was iterated between the two user studies. The most crucial parameters of fashion retail product information were established, together with implications for the visual representation and interaction. It was found that there were unfulfilled user needs with existing service options, which were satisfied with the use of an augmented reality prototype for product information retrieval. The use of AR for this purpose also proved to be able to contribute to an omnichannel solution for multi-channel retailers. The conclusion was thus that the customer in-store experience could be enhanced by the introduction of an augmented reality prototype for product information retrieval, taking into account the implications for content, visualization and interaction provided in this study.

  • 91.
    Josefsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Baltatzis, Alexander
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bälter, Olle
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Enoksson, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Riese, Emma
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    DRIVERS AND BARRIERS FOR PROMOTING TECHNOLOGY ENHANCED LEARNING IN HIGHER EDUCATION2018In: 12TH INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE (INTED) / [ed] Chova, LG Martinez, AL Torres, IC, IATED-INT ASSOC TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION & DEVELOPMENT , 2018, p. 4576-4584Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents a study were drivers and barriers for increased use of Technology Enhanced Learning in higher education were identified. The method included focus groups with Faculty Pedagogical Developers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, followed by a Force Field Analysis. Ten drivers and ten barriers were identified, and are presented in this paper. The most significant drivers found were: collegial discussions, increased automatization, Technology enhanced learning support for the teachers (to assist exploration), tech savvy students and engagement among faculty. The most significant barriers identified were: unclear return on time investment, insufficient funding for purchases and lack of central decisions. The analysis also revealed that some drivers and barriers could act both ways. One example is locally developed systems which are understood to be drivers when it comes to solving (local) problems and encouraging experimentation with IT systems, but when these local systems are cancelled due to lack of funding, or for example replaced by centralized systems, they discourage use and development. The findings constitute a foundation for future discussions about change processes to increase utilization of technology enhanced learning in higher education.

  • 92.
    Jutterström, Ellinor
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    News for Everyone - Investigating Universal Accessibility with Cognitively Disabled Users on Swedish News Sites2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As more readers consume news through digital platforms such as computers, mobiles and tablets, it is essential to make these interfaces accessible to as many users as possible, both from an economic and social standpoint. The terms ‘universal accessibility’, ‘inclusive design’ and ‘design-for-all’ refer to the method of designing for users both with and without disabilities, which is a widely debated subject among researchers in the field where some say that it improves the usability for everyone, while others argue that it is impossible to create a design that fits all needs. The aim of this thesis is to investigate this ‘universal design’ method on news sites and answer the question whether a more accessible design can improve the experience for all users regardless of cognitive abilities. In order to do so, five current news sites were evaluated and compared to accessibility guidelines and previous research. Based on the results, two prototypes were developed and tested in a qualitative user study together with the existing sites. The user study consisted of two test groups of students with (Group 1) and without (Group 2) cognitive disabilities, with 5 users in the first group and 9 users in the second. Oral opinions were compared within and between the groups together with results from a hierarchical sorting of sites based on general preference, appearance and credibility. The results showed both differences and similarities between the groups, whereas the greatest common factor was the preference for the “clean” and “calm” design, ranking both prototypes higher than their originals. The conclusion was that it is indeed difficult to design for everybody because of individual needs and preferences, but including disabled users in the design process highlights general problems that could otherwise have been missed, while also making it easier to implement customizable options for disabled users.

  • 93.
    Juul Sondergaard, Marie Louise
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hedegård Schiølin, Kasper
    Harvard Kennedy School of Government.
    Bataille’s bicycle: execution and/as eroticism2017In: Executing Practices / [ed] Helen Pritchard, Eric Snodgrass, Magda Tyżlik-Carver, Brooklyn, New York: Open Humanities Press , 2017, p. 179-197Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 94. Kannabiran, G.
    et al.
    Ahmed, A. A.
    Wood, M.
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Tanenbaum, J. G.
    Bardzell, S.
    Bardzell, J.
    Design for sexual wellbeing in HCI2018In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, article id W09Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This workshop focuses on the design of digital interactive technology for promoting sexual wellbeing as a fundamental human rights issue and social justice concern in the field of Human Computer Interaction (HCI). Sexuality related topics have garnered much interest in recent years and there is a need to explicitly engage with the intersections of sexuality and social justice as applicable to the design and development of digital interfaces and interactive experiences. This one day workshop will raise interdisciplinary issues, identify research gaps, gather resources, and share innovation strategies for designing sociotechnical interfaces that promote sexual wellbeing in HCI.

  • 95. Kazakos, K.
    et al.
    Asthana, S.
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Duggal, M.
    Holden, A.
    Jamir, L.
    Kannuri, N. K.
    Kumar, S.
    Mamindla, A. R.
    Manikam, S. A.
    Murthy, G. V. S.
    Nahar, P.
    Phillimore, P.
    Sathyanath, S.
    Singh, P.
    Singh, M.
    Wright, P.
    Yadav, D.
    Olivier, P.
    A real-time IVR platform for community radio2016In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interactive Voice Response (IVR) platforms have been widely deployed in resource-limited settings. These systems tend to afford asynchronous push interactions, and within the context of health, provide medication reminders, descriptions of symptoms and tips on self-management. Here, we present the development of an IVR system for resource-limited settings that enables real-time, synchronous interaction. Inspired by community radio, and calls for health systems that are truly local, we developed ’Sehat ki Vaani’. Sehat ki Vaani is a real-time IVR platform that enables hosting and participation in radio chat shows on community-led topics. We deployed Sehat ki Vaani with two communities in North India on topics related to the management of Type 2 diabetes and maternal health. Our deployments highlight the potential for synchronous IVR systems to offer community connection and localised sharing of experience, while also highlighting the complexity of producing, hosting and participating in radio shows in real time through IVR. We discuss the relative strengths and weaknesses of synchronous IVR systems, and highlight lessons learnt for interaction design in this area.

  • 96. Keenan, Fiona
    et al.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Evaluating a Continuous Sonic Interaction: Comparing a Performable Acoustic and Digital Everyday Sound2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 97.
    Khan, Muhammad Sikandar Lal
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Dept Appl Phys & Elect, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Halawani, Alaa
    Umea Univ, Dept Appl Phys & Elect, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.;Palestine Polytech Univ, Comp Engn Dept, Hebron 90100, Palestine..
    Rehman, Shafiq Ur
    Umea Univ, Dept Appl Phys & Elect, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Li, Haibo
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Action Augmented Real Virtuality: A Design for Presence2018In: IEEE Transactions on Cognitive and Developmental Systems, ISSN 2379-8920, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 961-972Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the important question of how to design a video teleconferencing setup to increase the experience of spatial and social presence. Traditional video teleconferencing setups are lacking in presenting the nonverbal behaviors that humans express in face-to-face communication, which results in decrease in presence-experience. In order to address this issue, we first present a conceptual framework of presence for video teleconferencing. We introduce a modern presence concept called real virtuality and propose a new way of achieving this based on body or artifact actions to increase the feeling of presence, and we named this concept presence through actions. Using this new concept, we present the design of a novel action-augmented real virtuality prototype that considers the challenges related to the design of an action prototype, action embodiment, and face representation. Our action prototype is a telepresence mechatronic robot (TEBoT), and action embodiment is through a head-mounted display (HMD). The face representation solves the problem of face occlusion introduced by the HMD. The novel combination of HMD, TEBoT, and face representation algorithm has been tested in a real video teleconferencing scenario for its ability to solve the challenges related to spatial and social presence. We have performed a user study where the invited participants were requested to experience our novel setup and to compare it with a traditional video teleconferencing setup. The results show that the action capabilities not only increase the feeling of spatial presence but also increase the feeling of social presence of a remote person among local collaborators.

  • 98.
    Kondori, Farid Abedan
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Dept Appl Phys & Elect, Umea, Sweden..
    Liu, Li
    Umea Univ, Dept Appl Phys & Elect, Umea, Sweden..
    Li, Haibo
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Telelife: An Immersive Media Experience for Rehabilitation2014In: 2014 ASIA-PACIFIC SIGNAL AND INFORMATION PROCESSING ASSOCIATION ANNUAL SUMMIT AND CONFERENCE (APSIPA), IEEE , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, emergence of telerehabilitation systems for home-based therapy has altered healthcare systems. Telerehabilitation enables therapists to observe patients status via Internet, thus a patient does not have to visit rehabilitation facilities for every rehabilitation session. Despite the fact that telerehabilitation provides great opportunities, there are two major issues that affect effectiveness of telerehabilitation: relegation of the patient at home, and loss of direct supervision of the therapist. Since patients have no actual interaction with other persons during the rehabilitation period, they will become isolated and gradually lose their social skills. Moreover, without direct supervision of therapists, rehabilitation exercises can be performed with bad compensation strategies that lead to a poor quality recovery. To resolve these issues, we propose telelife, a new concept for future rehabilitation systems. The idea is to use media technology to create a totally new immersive media experience for rehabilitation. In telerehabilitation patients locally execute exercises, and therapists remotely monitor patients' status. In telelife patients, however, remotely perform exercises and therapists locally monitor. Thus, not only telelife enables rehabilitation at distance, but also improves the patients' social competences, and provides direct supervision of therapists. In this paper we introduce telelife to enhance telerehabilitation, and investigate technical challenges and possible methods to achieve telelife.

  • 99.
    Kondori, Farid Abedan
    et al.
    Umeå Univ, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Yousefi, Shahrouz
    KTH.
    Ostovar, Ahmad
    Umeå Univ, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Liu, Li
    Umeå Univ, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Li, Haibo
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    A Direct Method for 3D Hand Pose Recovery2014In: 2014 22ND INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PATTERN RECOGNITION (ICPR), IEEE COMPUTER SOC , 2014, p. 345-350Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a novel approach for performing intuitive 3D gesture-based interaction using depth data acquired by Kinect. Unlike current depth-based systems that focus only on classical gesture recognition problem, we also consider 3D gesture pose estimation for creating immersive gestural interaction. In this paper, we formulate gesture-based interaction system as a combination of two separate problems, gesture recognition and gesture pose estimation. We focus on the second problem and propose a direct method for recovering hand motion parameters. Based on the range images, a new version of optical flow constraint equation is derived, which can be utilized to directly estimate 3D hand motion without any need of imposing other constraints. Our experiments illustrate that the proposed approach performs properly in real-time with high accuracy. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate the system performance in 3D object manipulation. This application is intended to explore the system capabilities in real-time biomedical applications. Eventually, system usability test is conducted to evaluate the learnability, user experience and interaction quality in 3D interaction in comparison to 2D touch-screen interaction.

  • 100. Lampinen, Airi
    et al.
    McGregor, Moira
    Comber, Rob
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Brown, Barry
    Member-Owned Alternatives: Exploring Participatory Forms of Organising with Cooperatives2018In: Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 2573-0142, Vol. 2, no CSCW, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cooperatives are member-owned organisations, run for the common benefit of their members. While cooperatives are a longstanding way of organising, they have received little attention in CSCW. In this paper, through interviews with 26 individuals from 24 different cooperatives, our focus is an exploratory inquiry on how cooperatives could expand thinking into what future economies can look like and the part technologies may play in them. We discuss (1) the work to make the co-op work, that is, the special effort involved in managing an enterprise in a democratic and inclusive way, (2) the multiple purposes that cooperatives can serve for their members, well beyond financial benefit, and (3) ICT usage within cooperatives as a site of tension and dialogue. We conclude by discussing the meaning and measures of success in alternative economies, and lessons learned for CSCW scholarship on civic and societal organisations.

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