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  • 51.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    Warwick Business School.
    Watt, Cameron
    Macintyre, Mairi
    Customer value and lean operations in self care2008In: Proceedings of the 15th Annual European Operations Management Association Conference, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    Warwick Business School.
    Watt, Cameron
    Macintyre, Mairi
    Customer value and lean operations in self care2008In: Proceedings of the 3rd World Conference on Production and Operations Management, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    Warwick Business School.
    Watt, Cameron
    Macintyre, Mairi
    Information systems and the pursuit of patient value in the care chain2009In: Integrating Healthcare with Information and Communication Technology / [ed] Finnegan, D. and Currie, W., Oxford: Radcliffe Publishing, 2009, p. 255-266Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    Warwick Business School.
    Watt, Cameron
    Macintyre, Mairi
    Tis a Far Place2008In: Proceedings of the 15th Annual European Operations Management Association Conference, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Winroth, Mats
    McManus, John
    Service Management: Linking strategy design, and operations delivery2019Book (Refereed)
  • 56. Bourne, C
    et al.
    Grove, Amy
    Macintyre, Mairi
    Angelis, Jannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Self care promotion using social marketing2009Report (Other academic)
  • 57. Bourne, Clare
    et al.
    Grove, Amy
    Macintyre, Mairi
    Angelis, Jannis
    Operations Management, Warwick Business School.
    Social marketing for self care2009In: Proceedings of the 20th Annual Production and Operations Management Society Conference, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 58. Bourne, Clare
    et al.
    Macintyre, Mairi
    Grove, Amy
    Angelis, Jannis
    Operations Management, Warwick Business School.
    The role of access to patient information in fostering sustainable healthcare: A community care perspective in the UK2010In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Environmental, Cultural, Economic and Social Sustainability, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 59. Brunch, Jessica
    et al.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Angelis, Jannis
    Operations Management, Warwick Business School.
    Information management for production system design with a new portfolio approach2011In: Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Production Research, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 60. Conti, Robert
    et al.
    Angelis, Jannis
    Cooper, Cary
    Gender inclusive job and process designIn: New technology, work and employment, ISSN 0268-1072, E-ISSN 1468-005XArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 61. Conti, Robert
    et al.
    Angelis, Jannis
    University of Cambridge.
    Cooper, Cary
    Faragher, Brian
    Gill, Colin
    Effects of just-in-time/lean production practices on worker job stress2004In: Proceedings of the Academy of Management Annual Meeting, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 62. Conti, Robert
    et al.
    Angelis, Jannis
    University of Oxford.
    Cooper, Cary
    Faragher, Brian
    Gill, Colin
    Gender and lean production implementation2005In: Reformulating Industrial Relations in Liberal Market Economies / [ed] K. Devine and J. Grenier, Captus , 2005, p. 89-104Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 63. Conti, Robert
    et al.
    Angelis, Jannis
    University of Cambridge.
    Cooper, Cary
    Faragher, Brian
    Gill, Colin
    Gender and lean production implementation2004In: Proceedings of the 41st Annual Canadian Industrial Relations Association Conference, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 64. Conti, Robert
    et al.
    Angelis, Jannis
    University of Cambridge.
    Cooper, Cary
    Faragher, Brian
    Gill, Colin
    Gender sensibility to particular lean practices2004In: Proceedings of the Decision Sciences Institute Conference, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 65. Conti, Robert
    et al.
    Angelis, Jannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Cooper, Cary
    Faragher, Brian
    Gill, Colin
    Must lean be mean?2003In: Proceedings of the 14th Annual Production and Operations Management Society Conference, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 66. Conti, Robert
    et al.
    Angelis, Jannis
    University of Cambridge.
    Cooper, Cary
    Faragher, Brian
    Gill, Colin
    Must lean be mean?: The verdict2004In: Proceedings of the 15th Annual Production and Operations Management Society Conference, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 67. Conti, Robert
    et al.
    Angelis, Jannis
    Cooper, Cary
    Faragher, Brian
    Gill, Colin
    The effects of lean production on worker job stress2006In: International Journal of Operations & Production Management, ISSN 0144-3577, E-ISSN 1758-6593, Vol. 26, no 9-10, p. 1013-1038Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose-This empirical paper seeks to address the neglected work condition aspect of lean production (LP) implementation, specifically the relationship between LP and worker job stress. Design/methodology/approach-The Karasek job stress model was used to link shopfloor practices to expected worker stress. The model incorporates the effects of job demands (physical and psychological), job control and social support. The study employs management and worker questionnaires, management interviews and structured plant tours. The response variable is total worker job stress-the sum of the physical and mental stress levels. The independent variable for the first question is the degree of lean implementation at the sites. Findings-The results are based on 1,391 worker responses at 21 sites in the four UK industry sectors. About 11 tested practices are significantly related to stress and an unexpected non-linear response of stress to lean implementation is identified. Results indicate that LP is not inherently stressful, with stress levels significantly related to management decisions in designing and operating LP systems. Practical implications-The hypotheses tests shed light on the relationships between LP practices and job stress, and reveal a significant managerial influence on stress levels. The regression model shows the scale and significant lean practices of this influence, with the work practices explaining 30 percent of job stress variations. The stress reduction and stress control opportunities identified in the study show the potential for designing and operating effective lean systems while also controlling stress levels. Originality/value-This is the first known multi-industry empirical study of the relationship of job stress to a range of lean practices and to the degree of lean implementation.

  • 68. Conti, Robert
    et al.
    Angelis, Jannis
    University of Cambridge.
    Cooper, Cary
    Faragher, Brian
    Gill, Colin
    Women, men, and lean production2004In: Proceedings of the International Industrial Relations Association Conference, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 69. Conti, Robert
    et al.
    Angelis, Jannis
    University of Oxford.
    Cooper, Cary
    Gill, Colin
    Gender differences in lean production2005In: Proceedings of the 16th Annual Production and Operations Management Society Conference, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Etemady Qeshmy, Danial
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Makdisi, Jacob
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Ribeiro da Silva, Elias
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.). Pontifical Catholic Univeristy of Parana, Imaculada Conceição, 1155, 80215-901, Curitiba, Brazil.
    Angelis, Jannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management. Research Institute of Industrial Economics, Grevgatan 34, SE-10215, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Managing Human Errors: Augmented Reality systems as a tool in the quality journey2018In: Procedia Manufacturing, E-ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 28, p. 24-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The manufacturing industry is shifting, entering a new era with smart and connected devices. The fourth industrial revolution is promising increased growth and productivity by the Smart Factory and within the enabling technologies is Augmented Reality (AR). At the same time as the technology is introduced, errors in manufacturing are a problem which is affecting the productivity and the quality. This research aims to find the main causes of human errors in assembly lines and thereafter explores whether augmented reality is an appropriate tool to be used in order to address those issues. Based on a literature review that identified and characterized a preliminary set of root causes for human errors in assembly lines, these causes were empirically studied in an exercise that covered an in-depth case study in a multinational automotive company. Data in form of interviews and deviation- reports have been used to identify the causing factors and the result showed that the main causes of human errors are the amount of thinking, deciding and searching for information which affected the cognitive load of the operator and in result their performance. Several interviews with experts in augmented reality allowed to verify if AR technology would be feasible to solve or mitigate the found causes. Besides that, in repetitive manual assembly operations, AR is better used showing the process in order to train new operators. At the same time for experienced operators, AR should show information only when an error occurs and when there is a need of taking an active choice. Nevertheless, while theoretically able to managing human error when fully developed, the desired application makes the augmentation of visual objects redundant and increasingly complex for solving the identified causes of errors which questions the appropriateness of using AR systems. Furthermore, the empirical findings showed that for managing human errors, the main bottleneck of an AR system is the systems artificial intelligence capabilities.

  • 71. Grove, Amy
    et al.
    Macintyre, Mairi
    Angelis, Jannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Exploring operations in health: a systematic investigation of operations management in both primary and secondary care2009Report (Other academic)
  • 72. Grove, Amy
    et al.
    Macintyre, Mairi
    Angelis, Jannis
    Improvement processes in healthcare: Where did primary care go?2010In: Proceedings of the 21th Annual Production and Operations Management Society Conference, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 73.
    Grove, Amy
    et al.
    University of Warwick, Coventry, United Kingdom.
    Meredith, James
    University of Warwick, Coventry, United Kingdom.
    Macintyre, Mairi
    University of Warwick, Coventry, United Kingdom.
    Angelis, Jannis
    University of Warwick, Coventry, United Kingdom.
    Neailey, Kevin
    University of Warwick, Coventry, United Kingdom.
    Lean implementation in primary care health visiting services in National Health Service UK2010In: Quality and Safety in Healthcare, ISSN 1475-3898, E-ISSN 1470-7934, Vol. 19, no 5, p. e43-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background This paper presents the findings of a 13-month lean implementation in National Hearth Service (NHS) primary care health visiting services from May 2008 to June 2009.

    Method Lean was chosen for this study because of its reported success in other healthcare organisations. Value-stream mapping was utilised to map out essential tasks for the participating health visiting service. Stakeholder mapping was conducted to determine the links between all relevant stakeholders. Waste processes were then identified through discussions with these stakeholders, and a redesigned future state process map was produced. Quantitative data were provided through a 10-day time-and-motion study of a selected number of staff within the service. This was analysed to provide an indication of waste activity that could be removed from the system following planned improvements.

    Results The value-stream map demonstrated that there were 67 processes in the original health visiting service studied. Analysis revealed that 65% of these processes were waste and could be removed in the redesigned process map. The baseline time-and-motion data demonstrate that clinical staff performed on average 15% waste activities, and the administrative support staff performed 46% waste activities.

    Conclusion Opportunities for significant waste reduction have been identified during the study using the lean tools of value-stream mapping and a time-and-motion study. These opportunities include simplification of standard tasks, reduction in paperwork and standardisation of processes. Successful implementation of these improvements will free up resources within the organisation which can be redirected towards providing better direct care to patients.

  • 74.
    Grove, Amy
    et al.
    The University of Warwick, Coventry, UK.
    Meredith, James
    The University of Warwick, Coventry, UK.
    Macintyre, Mairi
    The University of Warwick, Coventry, UK.
    Angelis, Jannis
    The University of Warwick, Coventry, UK.
    Neailey, Kevin
    The University of Warwick, Coventry, UK.
    UK health visiting: Challenges faced during lean implementation2010In: Leadership in Health Services, ISSN 1188-3669, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 204-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present the challenges identified during a lean implementation in a health visiting service within a large primary care trust in NHS UK. Design/methodology/approach: Following a series of lean workshops a triangulated approach to data collection was adopted in order to determine the root cause of the challenges that were faced during this lean implementation. The three methods that were selected for qualitative analysis included semi-structured interviews, document analysis and researcher participant observation. Findings: Six key challenges were identified from the data analysis. These were: high process variability; a lack of understanding of lean; poor communication and leadership; target focused; problems defining waste; and difficulty in determining who is the customer and what do they value? Practical implications: Although this particular lean implantation had limited success, the research has highlighted a number of challenges which would have to be addressed prior to future lean exercises. This will assist other clinical and managerial staff to prepare for the challenges that may be faced during a lean implementation, and adapt their approach to future quality improvement. Originality/value: The barriers to lean implementation could be overcome with upfront planning, transformational leadership, excellent communication, identification and sharing of best practice and, above all, a shared vision. There is no quick and easy solution to productivity improvement, community services, as in this paper, cannot expect to select lean tools and techniques and emulate the success seen elsewhere. If they wish to deliver world-class healthcare in the face of constrained resources and greater demand, they need to adopt a long-term vision.

  • 75.
    Hammarström, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Angelis, Jannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Professional Service Firms: Service operations of consulting companies2013In: Proceedings of the European Operations Management Conference, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 76.
    Hammarström, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Angelis, Jannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Managing professional service firms2013In: Proceedings of the 22nd Nordic Academy of Management Conference, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 77. Kong, Xiangyu
    et al.
    Angelis, Jannis
    Exploring customer experience: Level of contact and repurchase intentions2009In: Proceedings of the 20th Annual Production and Operations Management Society Conference, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 78. Lindhagen, Maria
    et al.
    Angelis, Jannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Engwall, Mats
    Managing offerings in engineering PSFs2016In: Proceedings of the Spring Servitisation Conference, Manchester, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 79. Machado, Carla
    et al.
    Pinheiro de Lima, Edson
    Angelis, Jannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Studying sustainability process implementation through an operations management lens2014In: Proceedings of the European Operations Management Conference, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 80. Machado, Carla
    et al.
    Pinheiro de Lima, Edson
    Angelis, Jannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    da Costa, Sergio
    Mattioda, R
    A maturity framework for sustainable operations management2015In: Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Production Research, International Foundation for Production Research (IFPR) , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Business sustainability integration is a complex task and strongly linked to operations management. The challenge is to conduct more sustainable operations through companies? value chain and their network. In sustainable operations management area, maturity models have been developed for specific purposes. However, there is a lack of models that considers sustainability integration through the evolution of sustainable operations? capabilities. Based on literature review, case studies and expert panels, this paper develops and proposes a maturity framework defined by sustainable operations management theory. Its is possible to identify an evolutionary path, which goes from an initial approach focused in compliance aspects and firm?s value protection to an innovative approach, based on corporate social responsibility supporting operations? integration in a sustainable system, and long-term values development. The experts? panel identified key processes areas that need to be prioritized in each level, and also analyzed the adaptation of some elements from Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) to sustainable maturity framework design and development.

  • 81. Machado, Carla
    et al.
    Pinheiro de Lima, Edson
    Gouvea da Costa, Sergio E.
    Angelis, Jannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Maoski Rocha, Letícia
    Studying sustainability process implementation through an operations management lens2014In: Proceedings of the Annual European Operations Management ConferenceArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 82. Macintyre, Mairi
    et al.
    Angelis, Jannis
    Dhaliwal, Jagdesh
    Parry, Glenn
    Delivering complex services2009In: Proceedings of the European Conference on Complex Systems, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 83. Macintyre, Mairi
    et al.
    Bourne, Clare
    Grove, Amy
    Angelis, Jannis
    Agility in self care2009In: Proceedings of the European Conference on Complex Systems, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 84. Macintyre, Mairi
    et al.
    Conroy, Dave
    Grove, Amy
    Bourne, Clare
    Angelis, Jannis
    Application of lean to complex systems2009In: Proceedings of the 20th Annual Production and Operations Management Society Conference, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 85. Macintyre, Mairi
    et al.
    Grove, Amy
    Angelis, Jannis
    Operations Management, Warwick Business School.
    Management of value creation in complex dynamic environments2008In: Proceedings of the Manufacturing Process Optimisation Conference, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 86. Macintyre, Mairi
    et al.
    Grove, Amy
    Bourne, Clare
    Angelis, Jannis
    Operations Management, Warwick Business School.
    Delivering sustainable services in complex environments2010In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Environmental, Cultural, Economic and Social Sustainability, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 87. Macintyre, Mairi
    et al.
    O'Conner, Richard
    Bestwick, Stuart
    Angelis, Jannis
    Warwick Business School.
    Developing appropriate performance measurement of mental health services2010In: Proceedings of the 21th Annual Production and Operations Management Society Conference, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 88. Macintyre, Mairi
    et al.
    Parry, Glenn
    Angelis, Jannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Are you being served?2011In: Service Design and Delivery / [ed] Perry, G., Macintyre, M. and Angelis, J., Springer London, 2011, p. 136-137Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 89. Macintyre, Mairi
    et al.
    Parry, Glenn
    Angelis, Jannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Service Design and Delivery2011Book (Refereed)
  • 90. Macintyre, Mairi
    et al.
    Parry, Glenn
    Grove, Amy
    Martin, Christopher
    Bourne, Clare
    Angelis, Jannis
    Pedagogical implications of emergent social science disciplines2009In: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Interdisciplinary Social Sciences, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 91. Mackenzie, L
    et al.
    Fernandes, Bruno
    Angelis, Jannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Impact of employees’ perceptions and attitudes on productivity and quality in manufacturing firms2010Report (Other academic)
  • 92. Maynard, Daren
    et al.
    Angelis, Jannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Experiential risk planning: Managing ammonia plant refurbishment projects2013In: Proceedings of the Industrial and Systems Engineering Research Conference, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 93. Maynard, Daren
    et al.
    Angelis, Jannis
    University of Warwick.
    Supply chain risk: The case of refurbishment projects2011In: International Supply Chain Management and Collaboration Practices / [ed] Kersten, W., Blecker, T. and Jahn, C., Berlin: Josef Eul Verlag Gmbh , 2011, p. 3-14Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 94.
    Okwir, Simon
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Angelis, Jannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Ruiz, Filippe
    Ulfvengren, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Evaluating change and measuring performance in airport embedded shared services2015In: Proceedings of the 16th International CINet Conference, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 95.
    Okwir, Simon
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Stockholm Business Sch, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nudurupati, Sai S.
    Gandhi Inst Technol & Management, GITAM Sch Int Business, Visakhapatnam 530045, Andhra Prades, India..
    Ginieis, Matias
    Univ Rovira & Virgili, Tarragona, Spain..
    Angelis, Jannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Performance Measurement and Management Systems: A Perspective from Complexity Theory2018In: International journal of management reviews (Print), ISSN 1460-8545, E-ISSN 1468-2370, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 731-754Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Complexity negatively impacts the process of continually improving performance management systems (PMSs). The extant PMS literature considers complexity to be a result of the external environment rather than a user response to that environment. However, this paper argues that organizations generally face internal complexity when adopting PMSs. Introducing PMSs into an organization can have varied effects in those organizations based on the complexity of an organization's associated members and its interactions. This study aims to understand the emergence of complexities while implementing and using PMSs in organizations. From the complexity theory perspective, four system properties (ontological, teleological, genetic and functional) are used to understand complexity in PMSs. The paper builds on a systematic literature review consisting of 76 papers and analyses them in the light of exploring sources of complexity when implementing and using PMSs. From the outset, complexity is understood to be a result of the conflict between existing organizational practices and mechanisms and the organizational controls associated with PMSs. The key findings abstracted six sources of complexity in this study: role, task and procedural types of complexity associated with the social dimension, and methodological, analytical and technological types of complexity associated with the technical dimension. The study findings contribute to the current discussion regarding why PMSs typically lag and are not responsive and resilient in emerging contexts. While understanding and exploring all organizational controls that moderate a PMS is useful, organizations should construct the necessary capabilities, depending on their context and adapt to the changes associated with PMSs.

  • 96.
    Okwir, Simon
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management. Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain.
    Ulfvengren, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Angelis, Jannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management. Research Institute of Industrial Economics, Sweden.
    Ruiz, Felipe
    Nunez Guerrero, Yilsy Maria
    Managing turnaround performance through Collaborative Decision Making2017In: Journal of Air Transport Management, ISSN 0969-6997, E-ISSN 1873-2089, Vol. 58, p. 183-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to explore turnaround performance as a resultant from both Collaborative Decision Making (CDM) processes and collaborative measures. This paper presents how CDM operates in the Turnaround Process (TAP) to propose a new method for managing the collaborative turnaround performance of all actors by predicting the most critical indicators. To achieve this, data from a CDM airport is used. Sample data of 6500 observations, taken from turnaround movements handled in 2014 at Madrid-Barajas Airport, were obtained from three separate databases and analyzed separately (in three databases). To predict turnaround performance, this paper also introduces a predictor dependent variable called "star values" as a measure of minimal delay conditions in order to predict time performance. The analysis shows that the proposed method unveils a new approach in determining how collaborative performance can be measured in the TAP and the predicted key performance indicators, which shows variations in the predicted CDM indicators. Results challenge managers and policymakers to find which improvements can be enacted for better usage of airport infrastructures and resources for optimum use as well as enhanced TAP. In terms of theory use and extension, the study reveals how CDM is an essential element in the literature on air traffic management.

  • 97. Parry, Glenn
    et al.
    Macintyre, MairiAngelis, JannisOperations Management, Warwick Business School.
    Service Design and Delivery2011Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 98. Pinheiro de Lima, Edson
    et al.
    Gouvea da Costa, Sergio
    Angelis, Jannis
    Foundations for strategic operations management system design: Role of performance measurement subsystems2007In: Proceedings of the 14th Annual European Operations Management Association Conference, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 99. Pinheiro de Lima, Edson
    et al.
    Gouvea da Costa, Sergio
    Angelis, Jannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Linking operations and strategy through performance measurementsIn: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 100. Pinheiro de Lima, Edson
    et al.
    Gouvea da Costa, Sergio
    Angelis, Jannis
    Strategic performance measurement systems: A discussion about their roles2009In: Measuring Business Excellence, ISSN 1368-3047, E-ISSN 1758-8057, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 39-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to present a theoretical discussion about the roles that a performance measurement system should perform. The enterprises' operations systems and environments, characterized by their complexity and dynamics, are challenging the strategic operations management models. Design/methodology/approach - The developed theoretical construction is based on a literature review. The measurement system is studied in the context of a strategic operations management system. Findings - The structures, processes and spaces were the lens used to study the performance measurement system and contributed to organize the concepts in tables, that is, roles statements were created based on these guidelines. These tables synthesized and identified the main roles that the system should perform, stating their definitions and related perspectives. Research limitations/implications - The generated framework is theoretical in essence and needs to be tested, although the theoretical exercise showed a common sense around the articulated main concepts. Practical implications - The understanding of the performance measurement system roles contributes to improve design, implementation and use of the performance system. Originality/value - The paper's main contribution is the theoretical underpinning used to develop the performance framework. The system design approach used will enable further research into strategic performance measurement application for the design and use of such a system. Continuous improvement, organizational learning and the management of change process will be required properties for the strategic management of the operations function.

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