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  • 51.
    Kleiman, Fernando
    et al.
    Delft Univ Technol, Delft, Netherlands..
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Janssen, Marijn
    Delft Univ Technol, Delft, Netherlands..
    A Systematic Literature Review on the Use of Games for Attitude Change: Searching for Factors Influencing Civil Servants' Attitudes2020In: International Journal of Electronic Government Research, ISSN 1548-3886, E-ISSN 1548-3894, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 1-20Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Governments are increasingly using games for civic engagement, decision making, and education. Serious gaming is a type of game that has often been advocated as a means for changing the attitude of its players and can be used for changing the attitude of civil servants. However, the relationship between games and attitude change in civil servants remains unexplored. This paper aims at identifying factors leading to attitude change of civil servants. As hardly any paper is focused on civil servants' attitude change through games, the authors broaden their research to attitude change through games in general. Out of 483 documents, 19 reference papers were analyzed in detail. Eighty-one games were found, and more than 13 different theories were identified containing 30 different influencing factors, which were found mostly to be unrelated and context-dependent. The conceptual dispersion between studies indicates that the resulting overview of factors is a first step towards creating a uniform theory. The results can help governments to design better games.

  • 52.
    Kleiman, Fernando
    et al.
    Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Janssen, Marijn
    Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    A systematic literature review on the use of games for attitude change: Searching for factors influencing civil servants' attitudes2022In: Research Anthology on Game Design, Development, Usage, and Social Impact, IGI Global , 2022, p. 1956-1977Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Governments are increasingly using games for civic engagement, decision making, and education. Serious gaming is a type of game that has often been advocated as a means for changing the attitude of its players and can be used for changing the attitude of civil servants. However, the relationship between games and attitude change in civil servants remains unexplored. This paper aims at identifying factors leading to attitude change of civil servants. As hardly any paper is focused on civil servants' attitude change through games, the authors broaden their research to attitude change through games in general. Out of 483 documents, 19 reference papers were analyzed in detail. Eighty-one games were found, and more than 13 different theories were identified containing 30 different influencing factors, which were found mostly to be unrelated and context-dependent. The conceptual dispersion between studies indicates that the resulting overview of factors is a first step towards creating a uniform theory. The results can help governments to design better games.

  • 53. Kleiman, Fernando
    et al.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Janssen, Marijn
    Behavioral factors influencing the opening of government data by civil servants: initial findings from the literature2020In: Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Theory and Practice of Electronic Governance, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2020, p. 529-534Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The actual opening of government data is done by civil servants operating within their institutional environment. As such, the institutional environment and their behavior towards the opening of data is key to increase the quality and quantity of open data. However, few studies have analyzed the behavior of government professionals towards open data policy. The objective of this paper is to review the existing literature to find the factors that influences civil servants behaviors towards open data. To identify the drivers and barriers, a literature review was performed listing the most cited papers with "open government data"and "barriers"focusing specific at the behavioral related factors. Even with the increasing of research on the topic of open data, still most of the papers focus on user drivers and barriers rather than on provider challenges. Even less studies focus on the civil servants' individual level of factors influencing their support to the release of governmental data. Most barriers found in the literature are related to infrastructural or technical issues. Whereas some individual level behavioral barriers could be found, including culture, lack of individual incentives and misunderstanding the impact of opening data, broader discussions on social norms, lack of education and experience are still missing in the literature. This paper contributes to the need for deeper understanding of the behavioral factors that influences the civil servants to support the opening of data.

  • 54.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Ind Engn & Management, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Gamification of a Procurement Process for Professional Training of Public Servants2019In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SERIOUS GAMES, E-ISSN 2384-8766, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 23-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Implementation and training about changes in a procurement process are complex due to the complexity of the procurement process characterised by the adaptive stakeholder network and continuously changing market rules. Traditional training approaches for procurement split the process into separate steps; however, to be able to assess all training aspects, it is important to have a holistic look at procurement. This work explores how well gamification can address the complexity of the procurement process for training specialists in the road construction sector. A case study is carried out to train new business models for both experienced specialists and new employees. The steps for the development of gamification for training in procurement are shown. A comparison of results from experienced and less experienced participants is presented. The results show the relationships amongst the complexity of the real system, the gamification design and the results of gamification.

  • 55.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Gamifying Project Procurement to Incorporate Better Goals of Organizations in the Public Sector: A participatory simulation approach on a Swedish road construction use case2019In: Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Governmental institutions need to ensure work of infrastructures, and in most cases, it is done using project procurement process. Such processes have highly complex and dynamic interaction. It leads to issues, such as information asymmetry, over-specified tenders, not efficient feedback loops, etc. As result, projects can rarely match objectives of organizations. This paper explores the use of participatory simulation to help holistically investigate a project procurement process. Based on case studies from the Swedish road construction field, it can be concluded, that a participatory simulation is an effective approach to experiment with the effects of project procurement.

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    Gamifying Project Procurement
  • 56.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Gaming Simulation Validation: Matching Participants’ Worldviews with Their Decisions2019In: ISAGA 2018, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gaming simulation is a successful approach to many issues where a holistic view is important. However, to use results from gaming simulations, the game has to be validated. This paper proposes a two-step approach for process validation of behavior for the gaming simulation by comparing decisions that players make in a game with the perceptions that affect their real-life decisions. Two case studies, where this approach was applied, are presented and the results are analyzed and discussed. A strong correlation between behavior during the games and in the real world was observed. This correlation indicates that gaming simulations in these cases are validated and represent the real system in an accu-rate manner. Thus, these cases show that the proposed approach works and can be used for validation of gaming simulations.

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    Gaming Simulation Validation
  • 57.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems.
    Hauge, Jannicke Baalsrud
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems.
    Perceptions of stakeholders in project procurement for road construction2018In: Cogent Business and Management, ISSN 2331-1975, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 1520447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Planning transport system, building, operating and maintaining public roads and railways is typically performed by public institutions in collaboration with other stakeholders, such as manufacturers, suppliers and distributors. In many cases, this collaboration is done with a procurement process. Despite the formal nature of such process, stakeholders can have different worldviews or perceptions leading to adverse effects on the final procurement result. This article is focused on how to find perceptions of stakeholders related to roadwork-related procurement processes using Q methodology. This methodology uses data from the stakeholders and searches for factors or groups within the data of participants who have similar opinions. A specific case of road procurement in Sweden is used to test the methodology. As a result, three clusters of perceptions are found. These clusters and their interpretation can be applied to many tasks that are related to complex adaptive systems such as policy-making, strategy generation, solution testing, training and others.

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    fulltext
  • 58.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Logistics and Informatics in Health Care.
    Kringos, Nicole
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Using Q Methodology for Developing a System Dynamics Model: A Case Study of Modelling Perspectives on Road Procurement in Sweden2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of strategic and dynamic behaviour in real-world systems is paramount, especially when we consider the large technical infrastructures that make society work. Modelling social aspects are complicated because they are usually not well defined and can highly depend on individuals. This paper proposes and describes a framework on how to combine system dynamics and Q methodology to better understand complex systems. The proposed framework is the tool to work with systems where connections can be explained only by subjective opinions, and it gives opportunities to simulate sociotechnical systems, where social behaviour cannot be described with observation data.

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    fulltext
  • 59.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Kringos, Niki
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    A Research Agenda for Green Procurement of Infrastructures2014In: 2014 International Conference on Engineering, Technology and Innovation: Engineering Responsible Innovation in Products and Services, ICE 2014, IEEE Computer Society, 2014, p. 6871604-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Construction and maintenance of road infrastructure is a major source of emissions and energy usage. Procuring green roads, however, is neither commonplace nor trivial to implement. New ways to enhance the green procurement of roads are therefore needed, and can potentially involve life cycle assessment and green labelling methods. Considering the complexity of the pavement industry sector with its many actors and structures, implementing such innovations in the procurement process is surrounded with a series of uncertainties. The current paper formulates a research agenda for green procurement of roads by looking into potential mechanisms for future procurement. Given the objective of green procurement, the paper is focusing on the question what are the short term and long term effects of potential combinations of life cycle assessment principles and procurement process structures on infrastructure costs, risks, environmental impact and the structure of the road sector. Six different approaches are presented and reviewed for relevant earlier work in the literature. Based upon the complexities found, the authors discuss the challenges in finding a matching single research method. A solution is proposed for a holistic approach using gaming simulation, since it allows evaluating the procurement of infrastructure as a complex adaptive system.

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    fulltext
  • 60.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Logistics and Informatics in Health Care.
    Kringos, Niki
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Developing a System Dynamics Model from Perceptions: A Case Study of Perspectives on Road Procurement in Sweden2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a public organisation, road administrations have the responsibility to improve the road construction process. However, the changes in such process involve a number of the stakeholders, who have different perceptions about what is most important in the road construction process. Perspectives on the necessity and nature of change will differ too. In order to provide an environment in which the potential consequences of changes in procurement can be tested, it is important to develop a model that simulates the process, especially the social part of the system. To achieve this, the model requires perceptions of stakeholders. The paper presents a new framework that obtains worldviews of the stakeholders in the complex adaptive system and transforms them into a System Dynamics model. As a result, a computational model is developed to observe the behaviour of stakeholders in the system. The model can become a tool for testing policies in the complex adaptive system.

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    fulltext
  • 61.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Logistics and Informatics in Health Care.
    Kringos, Niki
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Perspectives of Stakeholders on Road Procurements: In search of Procurement Aspects using Q Methodology2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays much emphasis is given to innovative procurement in the road construction sector. However, typical discussions about it do not focus on all the stakeholders involved in the process and all aspects. However, one cannot forget that procurement is a complex system, and everyone’s perspective is important for success. This paper looks at the worldviews of stakeholders in the road construction industry. The Q methodology is used to analyse the subjectivity of the worldviews. As a result, it is possible to look deeper into the perspectives and to see what each stakeholder sees as most important, and also to compare different worldviews among stakeholders.

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    fulltext
  • 62.
    Liu, Hao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science. Northeastern Univ, Sch Business Adm, Shenyang 110169, Peoples R China.;Northeastern Univ Qinhuangdao, Qinhuangdao 066004, Hebei, Peoples R China..
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Yao, Zhong
    Beihang Univ, Sch Econ & Management, 37 Xueyuan Rd, Beijing 100191, Peoples R China..
    Study of transfer station model for medical waste based on location, construction and financing2020In: Fresenius Environmental Bulletin, ISSN 1018-4619, E-ISSN 1610-2304, Vol. 29, no 9, p. 7228-7238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A medical waste transfer station is a transit station for medical waste from hospital to a disposal plant. Medical waste handlers carry out sorting, compaction and other business processes in the transfer station. and then transport the waste to a disposal plant for treatment. However, there is a lack of professional medical waste transfer stations in the real world. Much medical waste is simply classified and packaged in the temporary storage room in hospitals and then transported to the disposal plant for treatment. A large amount of recyclable waste is treated as non-recyclable medical waste, causing waste of resources and environmental pollution. All kinds of medical waste are mixed together, and bacteria can cross contaminate, which increases the risk of disease transmission. This paper analyzes the regional distribution of 113 tertiary hospitals in Beijing and the existing problems in the construction of a medical waste transfer station. The location, construction and financing channels for the transfer station arc studied, and then discussed for problems resolution, benefits and the return on investment (ROI) of the transfer station. It solves the key issues related to the operation of the transfer station of where to build, how to build, and source of capital for the construction of medical waste transfer station, which provides some references for the actual operation and construction of the transfer station.

  • 63.
    Liu, Hao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science. Northeastern Univ, Sch Business Adm, Shenyang 110169, Peoples R China.;Northeastern Univ Qinhuangdao, Qinhuangdao 066004, Hebei, Peoples R China..
    Yao, Zhong
    Beihang Univ, Sch Econ & Management, 37 Xueyuan Rd, Beijing 100191, Peoples R China..
    Chang, Fangyuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Technology in Health Care.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    An RFID-based medical waste transportation management system: assessment of a new model on a hospital in China2020In: Fresenius Environmental Bulletin, ISSN 1018-4619, E-ISSN 1610-2304, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 773-784Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In certain parts of the world, medical waste is often stolen and sold during transportation, resulting in disease transmission and environmental pollution, which seriously affect people's health. Consequently, guaranteeing a safe and correct delivery of medical waste has a significant meaning. This article analyzes the problems of medical waste transportation management in Beijing Haidian Hospital. To assess the impact of deploying RFID technology, we established a transportation model, which includes three business modules: temporary storage and distribution, loading and transportation, uploading and disposal. At the same time, the role of such transportation model in solving problems was evaluated. On the basis of this, the social and economic benefits of the technical model are discussed and the shortcomings of the research are analyzed. We found that the RFID technology model could solve the problems existing in the transportation process of medical waste to a certain extent, and implement safe transportation management of medical waste. It provides some guidance on the practical application of the technical model.

  • 64.
    Liu, Hao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science. Northeastern Univ Qinhuangdao, Qinhuangdao 066004, Hebei, Peoples R China.
    Yao, Zhong
    Beihang Univ, Sch Econ & Management, Beijing 100191, Peoples R China..
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Research on transportation management model of COVID-19 medical waste: a case study in Beijing, China2023In: Environmental Science and Pollution Research, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 30, no 57, p. 120284-120299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the COVID-19 pandemic, disposable masks, protective clothing, gloves, and nasopharyngeal swabs collected by nucleic acid testing formed a large amount of medical waste. Medical waste has strict temporary storage time requirements in hospitals, which need to be transported to medical waste disposal plants within the specified time. However, as most of disposal plants are far away from downtown, they also need to be responsible for the transportation and disposal of medical waste in many hospitals, and put forward higher requirement for transportation routes. Rapid and safe disposal of all types of medical waste generated by COVID-19 is crucial to the prevention and control of the epidemic. This paper designs the transportation route optimization model using Anylogic simulation software based on the regional distribution of 118 tertiary hospitals and 2 large medical waste disposal plants in Beijing, China. At the same time, transportation routes of 118 tertiary hospitals in the morning peak, evening peak, all-day, and ordinary periods were simulated based on the Beijing traffic index in 2017. On this basis, through the analysis of the simulation data, the selection of medical waste transport routes for 118 tertiary hospitals in the morning peak, evening peak, all day, and ordinary periods is further clarified, so as to ensure that medical waste can be transported to the medical waste disposal plant in the shortest time. The shortest path and fastest speed transport mode, medical waste transport data set, and the selection of transport mode of 118 tertiary hospitals formed by this research provide certain reference experience for the rapid and safe transport of medical waste during the epidemic period, and also provides corresponding data support for medical waste transportation management in the post-epidemic era and medical waste transportation decision-making when facing major public health problems.

  • 65.
    Liu, Zhuhuan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Kringos, Nicole
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Identifying actor and stakeholder complexity for sustainability transition in the transportation sector: a case study in SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Given its fragmented nature and tendency towards natural monopolies, how to systematically kick off or manage the sustainability transition in the transport sector remains unknown. The Digital Transport Southern Stockholm project established an ideal testbed for sustainable transportation transition within a defined area. As part of the project, this study presented real-life examples of the potential opportunities and challenges in an innovation-driven and sustainability-oriented transportation project. Inspired by the success of participatory approaches in assisting system thinking in the field of business management, this research work combined backcasting and game simulation methods to collect and connect the stakeholder perspectives, further addressing uncertainties and providing guidance for navigating the actor and stakeholder complexities inherent during the transition. The results disclosed the missing top-down and bottom-up dimensions in the traditional decision-making structure and emphasized the crucial role of communication and collaboration between sectors with consistent policies, incentives, and fiscal support.

  • 66. Lo, J. C.
    et al.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Measuring group situation awareness in a multiactor gaming simulation: A pilot study of railway and passenger traffic operators2013In: Proc Hum Factors Ergon Soc, 2013, p. 177-181Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides initial results for the gaming simulation design and measurement of group situation awareness (SA) through a low-tech multi-actor board gaming simulation for the Dutch railway operation. Group situation awareness is measured in this study, as railway operations consist of many dyadic teams and predominantly unique roles. Gaming simulations are herein defined as a simulation of a system using gaming methods, in which humans take part. This particular type of gaming simulation provides a relative fast and low-cost alternative to measure situation awareness in a multi-actor environment compared to the traditional human-in-the-loop-like simulator environment for SA measurements. However, due to variations in their abstraction level, exploration is needed on the validity for measurements of situation awareness in these environments. Thus, the main aim in this study is to determine whether, and if so, how, group SA can be measured in gaming simulations up to a quality that provides significant data for research. The results show potential for SA measurements in low-tech board gaming simulations, although improvement is needed with regards to the different validity types for gaming simulation. This may be achieved through the explicit use of gaming simulation design principles for SA. Future work should focus on further validation and research on the theoretical implications of group situation awareness.

  • 67. Lo, J. C.
    et al.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan A.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Gaming simulation design for individual and team situation awareness2014In: Frontiers in Gaming Simulation: 44th International Simulation and Gaming Association Conference, ISAGA 2013 and 17th IFIP WG 5.7 Workshop on Experimental Interactive Learning in Industrial Management, Stockholm, Sweden, June 24-28, 2013. Revised Selected Papers, Springer, 2014, p. 121-128Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Situation awareness is a key concept in understanding operator behaviour. Shortly, it can be described as knowing what is going on. For the past decades, human-in-the-loop simulators have been the traditional type of gaming simulations for studying or training situation awareness. The overall characteristic of gaming simulations is that they are a simulation of a system using gaming methods in which humans take part. Depending on a range of design choices, these gaming simulations take upon different visualizations and approaches to simulate aspects of the real world. Thus, a fundamental question is: what are the minimal requirements of a game to ensure natural levels of (team) situation awareness? This paper aims to capture and define the boundaries and limitations of gaming simulation design, in which the situation awareness of individuals and teams can be simulated and measured.

  • 68. Lo, J. C.
    et al.
    Sehic, E.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan A.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Explicit or implicit situation awareness?: Situation awareness measurements of train traffic controllers in a monitoring mode2014In: ECCOMAS Thematic Conference - COMPDYN 2011: 3rd International Conference on Computational Methods in Structural Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering: An IACM Special Interest Conference, Programme, 2014, Vol. 8532 LNAI, p. 511-521Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Railway traffic control faces the challenge of ensuring a high infrastructure capacity to maintain a constant train traffic flow. The current study assesses the situation awareness (SA), as a predictor of decision-making, of train traffic controllers to gain novel insights in their cognition. This study puts emphasis on levels of implicit and explicit situation awareness in a monitoring mode, through measures of SAGAT, MARS and performance. A human-in-the-loop simulator, called the PRL game is used to simulate the workspace of train traffic controllers. Initial findings indicate rather low levels of explicit SA, on the contrary to higher subjective SA scores through MARS and observer ratings, and a high performance on the punctuality and unplanned stops of trains.

  • 69.
    Lo, Julia C.
    et al.
    Prorail, Dept Innovat & Dev, Moreelsepk 3, NL-3511 EP Utrecht, Netherlands.;Delft Univ Technol, Fac Technol Policy & Management, Delft, Netherlands..
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics. Delft Univ Technol, Fac Technol Policy & Management, Delft, Netherlands.
    Assessing network cognition in the Dutch railway system: insights into network situation awareness and workload using social network analysis2020In: Cognition, Technology & Work, ISSN 1435-5558, E-ISSN 1435-5566, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 57-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study takes upon a group cognition perspective and investigates the cognition of railway traffic operations, in particular railway traffic and passenger traffic control. A table-top simulation environment is used to conduct the study, in which its design principles are elaborated upon. Network cognition is operationalized through communication content and flow and studied through social network analysis (SNA). SNA centrality metrics, such as degree, closeness and betweenness, are assessed in these networks. As part of the study, two cases are compared where operational procedures for disruption mitigation are varied. The dependent variables are the different types of communication network structures that are conceptualized for communication flow and semantic network structures for communication content. Although the quantitative comparisons between the two operational procedures regarding their communication flow and semantic networks showed no significant differences, this study provides a methodology to compare different conditions.

  • 70.
    Lo, Julia C.
    et al.
    Delft Univ Technol, Fac Techol Policy & Management, Delft, Netherlands..
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Situation Awareness Measurement Techniques for Gaming Simulations: An Overview and Application for Railway Traffic Controllers2013In: 2013 IEEE INTERNATIONAL MULTI-DISCIPLINARY CONFERENCE ON COGNITIVE METHODS IN SITUATION AWARENESS AND DECISION SUPPORT (COGSIMA), IEEE , 2013, p. 238-245Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides an extended gaming simulation framework and methods overview for the selection and development of situation awareness (SA) measurement techniques in gaming simulations. Gaming simulations are here defined as a simulation of a system through the use of gaming methods. Unlike SA measurements in human-in-the-loop simulators like cockpits, measurements for situation awareness in multi-actor gaming simulation environments are little investigated as a methodological approach. The aim of the framework is to bridge the gap between the theoretical implications of gaming simulations design elements and SA measurement techniques. Secondly, to provide key elements in game design and evaluation for the development of situation awareness measurement techniques. The framework is applied to determine a set of situation awareness measurement techniques for Dutch railway traffic controllers, in which the Dutch railway sector is increasingly using gaming simulation methods to investigate influences of new innovations for the railway system before innovations are put into the operations. Different sets of situation awareness measurement techniques for individuals and team/groups in railway traffic control are selected.

  • 71. Lo, Julia C.
    et al.
    Pluyter, Kari R.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan A.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Individual Markers of Resilience in Train Traffic Control: The Role of Operators' Goals and Strategic Mental Models and Implications for Variation, Expertise, and Performance2016In: Human Factors, ISSN 0018-7208, E-ISSN 1547-8181, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 80-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine individual markers of resilience and obtain quantitative insights into the understanding and the implications of variation and expertise levels in train traffic operators' goals and strategic mental models and their impact on performance. Background: The Dutch railways are one of the world's most heavy utilized railway networks and have been identified to be weak in system and organizational resilience. Method: Twenty-two train traffic controllers enacted two scenarios in a human-in-the-loop simulator. Their experience, goals, strategic mental models, and performance were assessed through questionnaires and simulator logs. Goals were operationalized through performance indicators and strategic mental models through train completion strategies. Results: A variation was found between operators for both self-reported primary performance indicators and completion strategies. Further, the primary goal of only 14% of the operators reflected the primary organizational goal (i.e., arrival punctuality). An incongruence was also found between train traffic controllers' self-reported performance indicators and objective performance in a more disrupted condition. The level of experience tends to affect performance differently. Conclusion: There is a gap between primary organizational goals and preferred individual goals. Further, the relative strong diversity in primary operator goals and strategic mental models indicates weak resilience at the individual level. Application: With recent and upcoming large-scale changes throughout the sociotechnical space of the railway infrastructure organization, the findings are useful to facilitate future railway traffic control and the development of a resilient system.

  • 72. Lo, Julia C.
    et al.
    Sehic, Emdzad
    Brookhuis, Karel A.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan A.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering. Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Explicit or implicit situation awareness?: Measuring the situation awareness of train traffic controllers2016In: Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, ISSN 1369-8478, E-ISSN 1873-5517, Vol. 43, p. 325-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research on situation awareness (SA) predominantly focused on its explicit, reasoned, conscious features rather than on the implicit, intuitive, unconscious aspects that are often identified with expert operators. This research investigated implicit levels of SA of train traffic controllers (TTCs) in order to contribute to the body of knowledge on rail human factors research and SA. A novel approach was used to uncover levels of implicit SA through a set of three analyses: (1) fairly low SAGAT values with correlations between SAGAT scores and multiple performance indicators; (2) negative correlations between work experience and SAGAT scores; and (3) structurally lower level-1 SA (perception) scores in comparison to level-2 SA (comprehension) scores in accordance with Endsley's three-level model. Two studies were conducted: A pilot study which focused on SA measurements with TTCs in a monitoring mode (N = 9) and the main study, which involved TTCs from another control center (N = 20) and three different disrupted conditions. In the pilot study, SA was measured through the situation-awareness global assessment technique (SAGAT), perceived SA and observed SA, and performance was measured through punctuality and unplanned stops of trains before red signals. In the main study, SA was measured through SAGAT, and perceived SA and multiple performance indicators, such as arrival and departure punctuality and platform consistency, were assessed. In both studies, the set of three analyses showed consistent and persistent indications of the presence of implicit SA. Endsley's three-level model and related SAGAT method can be constrained by the presence of these intuitive, unconscious processes and inconsistent findings on correlations between SAGAT scores and performance. These findings provide insights into the SA of TTCs in the Netherlands and can support the development of training programs and/or the design of a new traffic management system.

  • 73. Lo, Julia C.
    et al.
    Sehic, Emdzad
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Measuring Mental Workload With Low-Cost and Wearable Sensors: Insights Into the Accuracy, Obtrusiveness, and Research Usability of Three Instruments2017In: Journal of Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making, ISSN 1555-3434, E-ISSN 2169-5032, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 323-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The affordability of wearable psychophysiological sensors has led to opportunities to measure the mental workload of operators in complex sociotechnical systems in ways that are more objective and less obtrusive. This study primarily focuses on the sensors themselves by investigating low-cost and wearable sensors in terms of their accuracy, obtrusiveness, and usability for research purposes. Two sensors were assessed on their accuracy as tools to measure mental workload through heart rate variability (HRV): the E3 from Empatica and the emWave Pro from HeartMath. The BioPatch from Zephyr Technology, which is an U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved device, was used as a gold standard to compare the data obtained from the other 2 devices regarding their accuracy on HRV. Linear dependencies for 6 of 10 HRV parameters were found between the emWave and BioPatch data and for 1 of 10 for the E3 sensor. In terms of research usability, both the E3 and the BioPatch had difficulty acquiring either sufficiently high data recording confidence values or normal distributions. However, the BioPatch output files do not require postprocessing, which reduces costs and effort in the analysis stage. None of the sensors was perceived as obtrusive by the participants.

  • 74.
    Lo, Julia C.
    et al.
    ProRail, Dept Innovat & Dev, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Sehic, Emdzad
    Meijer, Sebastiaan A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics. Delft Univ Technol, Fac Technol Policy & Management, Delft, Netherlands.
    Balancing organizational and academic research: Investigating train affic Controller's geographical workspace design and team situation areness using gaming simulations2019In: Journal of Rail Transport Planning & Management, ISSN 2210-9706, E-ISSN 2210-9714, Vol. 10, p. 34-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In innovating and designing new concepts in the railway sector, the tch railway infrastructure manager ProRail uses different types of mulations to identify and tackle possible bottlenecks in future frastructure design. Computer simulation tools are used in earlier ages of the design process, followed by the application of gaming mulations where the design is fine tuned together with railway traffic erators before it is put into operation. This study focuses on oviding insights into the use of a human-in-the-loop simulator in ich an organizational research question investigates the impact of ltiple geographical workspace designs, while in parallel human factors search is conducted to investigate the concept of team situation areness from an academic research interest. Finding a balance between e practical and academic implications in one research design and its ndings does not rely on a trivial approach. The current article aims contribute on several levels: (1) to illustrate the balance between search for practice and research for academia through the applications gaming simulations; (2) to illustrate the use of gaming simulations r railway traffic operations and (3) to provide insights in team SA velopment in railway traffic operations using gaming simulations.

  • 75. Lo, Julia
    et al.
    Van den Hoogen, Jop
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Using gaming simulation experiments to test railway innovations: Implications for validity2013In: Proceedings of the 2013 Winter Simulation Conference - Simulation: Making Decisions in a Complex World, WSC 2013, IEEE conference proceedings, 2013, p. 1766-1777Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gaming simulation in the railway sector often uses the same conceptual model as in computer simulation, and enables operators to interact with this model during a simulation run. Therefore, gaming simulation validation poses different challenges. This paper aims to answer the question to what extent gaming simulation can be used as an experimental research setting, due to its loosely demarcated experimental features. Focusing on validity issues, we study five cases in which the Dutch railway sector used gaming simulation to test innovations in a controlled environment. The results show that in addition to traditional external validity issues, human game players inherently open up this controlled environment, bringing in many confounding variables. By signaling what the specific validity threats are, this paper strives to improve gaming simulation for testing innovations that tackle social and technical elements of a system.

  • 76. Lukosch, H.
    et al.
    Van Bussel, R.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan A.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    A serious game design combining simulation and sandbox approaches2014In: Frontiers in Gaming Simulation: 44th International Simulation and Gaming Association Conference, ISAGA 2013 and 17th IFIP WG 5.7 Workshop on Experimental Interactive Learning in Industrial Management, Stockholm, Sweden, June 24-28, 2013. Revised Selected Papers, Springer, 2014, p. 52-59Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has proven the usefulness of serious gaming for learning and advancing motivation by a combination of visuals, audio, text, and entertaining elements. Nevertheless, a broadly accepted, practical instructional design approach to serious games does not yet exist, especially when focusing on vocational edu-cation. The authors introduce a new instructional design model developed for this massive field of education, and argue some advantages compared to other design approaches. The first application is presented in mechanics mechatronics edu-cation to illustrate the close match of timing and provision of information that the instructional design model prescribes and how this has been translated to a rigidly structured serious game design. The structured approach answers the learning needs of applicable knowledge within the target group. It combines advantages of gaming simulations related to the transfer of knowledge from and to the workplace with a sandbox approach, an integrated fun-part of the game, which is aiming at motivating the students in in the best possible way.

  • 77. Lukosch, Heide
    et al.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Van Bussel, Roy
    A Game Design Framework for vocational education2012In: International Journal of Human and Social Sciences, ISSN 1307-8046, Vol. 6, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 78.
    Lukosch, Heide
    et al.
    Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management, Delft University of Technology, Delft 2600 GA, The Netherlands.
    Van Bussel, Roy
    Centre of Expertise Kenteq, Olympia 6-8, NP 1213, Hilversum, The Netherlands .
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Hybrid Instructional Design for Serious Gaming2013In: Journal of Communication and Computer, ISSN 1548-7709, Vol. 10, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Serious games have proven to be a useful instrument to engage learners and increase motivation. Nevertheless, a broadly accepted, practical instructional design approach to serious games does not exist. In this paper, we introduce the use of an instructional design model that has not been applied to serious games yet, and has some advantages compared to other design approaches. We present the case of mechanics mechatronics education to illustrate the close match with timing and role of knowledge and information that the instructional design model prescribes and how this has been translated to a rigidly structured game design. The structured approach answers the learning needs of applicable knowledge within the target group. It combines advantages of simulations with strengths of entertainment games to foster learner’s motivation in the best possible way. A prototype of the game will be evaluated along a well-respected evaluation method within an advanced test setting including test and control group.

  • 79.
    Magal Shreenath, Vinutha
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Opening the search space for the design of a future transport system using ‘big data’2017In: 15th International Conference on Computers in Urban Planning and Urban Management, 2017, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2017, Vol. Part F4, p. 247-261Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The advent of ‘big data’ already enables a wide range of conveniences to citizens. However, the dominant utilization of this data for systematic improvement is geared towards operations such as informing on real-time events in cities. The impact of big data on the long-term planning and design purposes in cities is still unclear. This chapter presents an application of big data where locations, suitable for deploying charging infrastructure for vehicles, are mined. We conducted an experiment to observe the impact of this information on designs of Electrical Road Systems (ERS). Results prove that insights mined from big data outside the design process do influence the designing process and the resulting designs. Therefore it seems promising to further explore this influence on the quality of designing.

  • 80. Mannaerts, Aster
    et al.
    Van Daalen, Els
    van Luipen, J.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Supporting policy analysis in the Dutch rail sector using System Dynamics2013In: Proceedings of the System Dynamics conference 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With a sizeable expected growth of demand for rail transport in the Netherlands in the coming decades, and limited resources for expansion of the rail network, intensified utilization of the infrastructure is to be expected. To adequately manage this growth, appropriate tools for policy analysis are needed. The possibilities and pitfalls of using System Dynamics for policy analysis in the Dutch rail system have been explored by performing a modelling study into the interrelations of modal split, mobility and operations using System Dynamics. Additional scrutiny is placed on the method, because of the unstructuredness of many problems in the rail sector, and decision-making in a network type environment. Results show that the reliability of infrastructure is a major component in the extent of delays. Furthermore, the effect of unreliability in a train trip and the characteristics of a car trip are important for the choice between train and car. Although classical policy analysis has proven to be possible, modelling the operational part of the system has proven challenging due to the spatial and discrete characteristics of parts of the system. Recommendations are given to improve the model and model use to better suit the unstructuredness of the problems.

  • 81.
    Marzano, Luca
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Dan, A.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tendler, S.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Darwich, Adam S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    De Petris, L.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lewensohn, R.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    A Comparative Analysis between Real-World Data and Clinical Trials to Evaluate Differences in Outcomes for SCLC Patients2023In: Journal of Thoracic Oncology, ISSN 1556-0864, E-ISSN 1556-1380, Vol. 18, no 11, p. S697-S697Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 82.
    Marzano, Luca
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Darwich, Adam S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Sven, Lethvall
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Falk, Nina
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bodeby, Patrik
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Diagnosing an overcrowded emergency department from its Electronic Health Records2024In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 9955Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emergency department overcrowding is a complex problem that persists globally. Data of visits constitute an opportunity to understand its dynamics. However, the gap between the collected information and the real-life clinical processes, and the lack of a whole-system perspective, still constitute a relevant limitation. An analytical pipeline was developed to analyse one-year of production data following the patients that came from the ED (n = 49,938) at Uppsala University Hospital (Uppsala, Sweden) by involving clinical experts in all the steps of the analysis. The key internal issues to the ED were the high volume of generic or non-specific diagnoses from non-urgent visits, and the delayed decision regarding hospital admission caused by several imaging assessments and lack of hospital beds. Furthermore, the external pressure of high frequent re-visits of geriatric, psychiatric, and patients with unspecified diagnoses dramatically contributed to the overcrowding. Our work demonstrates that through analysis of production data of the ED patient flow and participation of clinical experts in the pipeline, it was possible to identify systemic issues and directions for solutions. A critical factor was to take a whole systems perspective, as it opened the scope to the boundary effects of inflow and outflow in the whole healthcare system.

  • 83.
    Marzano, Luca
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Darwich, Adam S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Tendler, Salomon
    Department of Oncology‐Pathology Karolinska Institutet and the Thoracic Oncology Center, Karolinska University Hospital Stockholm Sweden.
    Dan, Asaf
    Department of Oncology‐Pathology Karolinska Institutet and the Thoracic Oncology Center, Karolinska University Hospital Stockholm Sweden.
    Lewensohn, Rolf
    Department of Oncology‐Pathology Karolinska Institutet and the Thoracic Oncology Center, Karolinska University Hospital Stockholm Sweden.
    De Petris, Luigi
    Department of Oncology‐Pathology Karolinska Institutet and the Thoracic Oncology Center, Karolinska University Hospital Stockholm Sweden.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    A novel analytical framework for risk stratification of real‐world data using machine learning: A small cell lung cancer study2022In: Clinical and Translational Science, ISSN 1752-8054, E-ISSN 1752-8062, Vol. 15, no 10, p. 2437-2447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent studies, small cell lung cancer (SCLC) treatment guidelines based on Veterans’ Administration Lung Study Group limited/extensive disease staging and resulted in broad and inseparable prognostic subgroups. Evidence suggests that the eight versions of tumor, node, and metastasis (TNM) staging can play an important role to address this issue. The aim of the present study was to improve the detection of prognostic subgroups from a real-word data (RWD) cohort of patients and analyze their patterns using a development pipeline with thoracic oncologists and machine learning methods. The method detected subgroups of patients informing unsupervised learning (partition around medoids) including the impact of covariates on prognosis (Cox regression and random survival forest). An analysis was carried out using patients with SCLC (n = 636) with stage IIIA–IVB according to TNM classification. The analysis yielded k = 7 compacted and well-separated clusters of patients. Performance status (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group-Performance Status), lactate dehydrogenase, spreading of metastasis, cancer stage, and CRP were the baselines that characterized the subgroups. The selected clustering method outperformed standard clustering techniques, which were not capable of detecting meaningful subgroups. From the analysis of cluster treatment decisions, we showed the potential of future RWD applications to understand disease, develop individualized therapies, and improve healthcare decision making.

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  • 84.
    Marzano, Luca
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Dan, Asaf
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and the Thoracic Oncology Center, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tendler, Salomon
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and the Thoracic Oncology Center, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    De Petris, Luigi
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and the Thoracic Oncology Center, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lewensohn, Rolf
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and the Thoracic Oncology Center, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Darwich, Adam S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Application of Process Mining for Modelling Small Cell Lung Cancer Prognosis2023In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, ISSN 0926-9630, E-ISSN 1879-8365, Vol. 302, p. 18-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Process mining is a relatively new method that connects data science and process modelling. In the past years a series of applications with health care production data have been presented in process discovery, conformance check and system enhancement. In this paper we apply process mining on clinical oncological data with the purpose of studying survival outcomes and chemotherapy treatment decision in a real-world cohort of small cell lung cancer patients treated at Karolinska University Hospital (Stockholm, Sweden). The results highlighted the potential role of process mining in oncology to study prognosis and survival outcomes with longitudinal models directly extracted from clinical data derived from healthcare.

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    fulltext
  • 85.
    Meershoek, Cees
    et al.
    Delft University of Technology.
    Kortmann, Rens
    Delft University of Technology.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    Delft University of Technology.
    Subrahmanian, Eswaran
    Delft University of Technology.
    Verbraeck, Alexander
    Delft University of Technology.
    The Culture Driven Game Design Method: Adapting serious games to the players’ culture2013In: Integrating Cultures: Formal Models and Agent-Based Simulation / [ed] Dignum, V., Dignum, Frank, Ferber, J., Stratulat, T., Springer, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Players of serious games are culturally sensitive agents; by interacting with the game and other players they bring their own culture into the game. This can result in conflicting behaviour that hampers the players to reach the objectives of the game. It is therefore necessary that the design of the game architecture is adjusted to the players’ culture. Currently, game designers typically adjust serious games to their players’ culture by playtesting with their target group. However, since playtesting demands a lot of time, incurs high costs and may spoil the client’s first impression of the game, playtesting is not always possible or desirable. This chapter presents an alternative to playtesting which we call the Culture Driven Game Design Method. This method provides a tool to assess and represent the players’ culture as well as a set of guidelines to process this assessment and avoid conflicts between the players’ culture and the architecture of the game.

  • 86.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Gaming Simulations for Railways: Lessons Learned from Modeling Six Games for the Dutch Infrastructure Management2012In: Infrastructure Design, Signalling and Security in Railway / [ed] Xavier Perpinya, Rijeka: InTech, 2012, p. 275-294Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 87.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Introducing gaming simulation in the Dutch railways2012In: Transport Research Arena 2012 / [ed] Papaioannou, P, London, United Kingdom, 2012, p. 41-51Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation in the Dutch railways in the domain of capacity management and traffic control is increasingly difficult to implement because of the large interconnectedness of all processes and separation into different institutions and organizations. Meanwhile there is a push for quality improvements leading to more robustness and resilience as well as a significant capacity increase. In the years 2009 - 2010, the gaming group of Delft University of Technology was asked to introduce gaming simulation methodology at ProRail, the Netherlands' rail infrastructure manager, to support innovation projects. Three initial trial projects ran so successful that the organization asked the Delft researchers to identify where in the organization large-scale implementation of gaming simulation methodology would be most promising. Based upon a series of interviews through the organization, ProRail and TU Delft jointly formulated a four-year research and implementation proposal that is now in operation. The first gaming session in this new collaboration proved the essence of the fit of gaming simulation for innovation at the Dutch railways. Unique for gaming simulation is the highly detailed simulation of both the more technical and process variables of rail infrastructures as the decision and communication function of real people in their real roles. The method does not assume models of decision-making but draws upon the real-world knowledge of professionals in the operation. The paper gives lessons learned on methodological challenges resulting from the four projects described.

  • 88.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    Delft University of Technology, Delft, the Netherlands .
    Testing hypotheses using gaming simulation: qualitative and qualitative research in supply chains and networks2010In: Planspiele - Entwicklungen und Perspektiven: Rückblick auf den Deutschen Planspielpreis 2010 / [ed] Friedrich Trautwein, Norderstedt , 2010Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 89.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    Wageningen University.
    The impact of the netchain laboratory: gaming for insight in netchains2004In: PhD-conference Mansholt Graduate School, Wageningen University, The Netherlands, 2 June 2004, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 90.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    Delft University of Technology, Delft, the Netherlands .
    The organisation of transactions: studying supply networks using gaming simulation2009Book (Other academic)
  • 91.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics. Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    The Power of Sponges: Comparing High-Tech and Low-Tech Gaming for Innovation2015In: Journal Simulation & Gaming, ISSN 1046-8781, E-ISSN 1552-826X, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 512-535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Innovation in transport systems has a need for simulated environments to experiment with new configurations, ideas, and solutions. Gaming is one such environment. This article applies the approach to the context of capacity allocation and traffic control innovation in the Dutch railway system. Both high-tech and low-tech games are built and applied. Aim and method. By comparing cases using low-tech and high-tech games for innovation in a related bundle of projects in the railway sector, this article aims to identify different patterns emerging from a retrospective cross case comparison. The cases aimed at testing and assessing various ideas about the innovation process through high- and low-tech gaming. Results. The high-tech cases were used to generate more quantitative data, for purposes where a concept had to be tested that has been formulated at a higher level of detail. It shows that, despite the higher precision, fidelity of high-tech simulators was not necessarily better than that of low-tech cases. None of the cases were set up to formally accept or reject hypotheses, but followed the typical innovation logic of testing and assessing ideas early in the process. Conclusions. The numerous qualitative data, gathered during the gaming sessions, illustrated the benefits and drawbacks of high- and low-tech gaming. The real world decisions made by the client, based on the gaming sessions, show that the scope of the project was broader than merely an intervention in an existing transport system. Low-tech games showed to be useful for dealing with rapid systems development (prototyping). They allow flexible role settings, varying rules, and resources. High-tech games did not provide obvious fidelity advantages, but yielded more quantitative data suitable for analysis. Recommendations. The article identifies the need for a new methodological approach: gaming supporting system/organization design.

  • 92.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    The Power of Sponges: High-tech and Low-tech Gaming Simulation for the Dutch Railways2012In: Journal Simulation & Gaming, ISSN 1046-8781, E-ISSN 1552-826XArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 93.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    Wageningen University.
    The usefulness of chain games2004In: Proceedings of the 8th international Workshop of the IFIP WG 5.7, May 24-27, 2004 / [ed] R.Smeds, J.O.Riis, G.J. Hofstede, S.A. Meijer, Wageningen: Wageningen University , 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 94.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    et al.
    Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Hofstede, Gert Jan
    Wageningen University.
    Collecting empirical data with games2007In: Organizing and Learning through Gaming and Simulation / [ed] Vincent Peters, Marleen van de Westerlaken, Nijmegen: Radboud University , 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 95.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Hofstede, Gert Jan
    Wageningen University.
    Gaming simulation as a research method:  reflecting on two studies in supply chains in networks2009In: Learn to Game - Game to Learn / [ed] GY Kin & Y Cai, Singapore: National University Singapore , 2009, p. 1-19Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 96.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Hofstede, Gert Jan
    Wageningen University.
    Simulation games for improving the human orientation of production management2003In: Current trends in production management: Proceedings of IFIP WG 5.7 Working conference on human aspects in production management,, Shaker Verlag, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 97.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    et al.
    Wageningen University.
    Hofstede, Gert Jan
    Wageningen University.
    Simulations and simulation games in agro and health care2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 98.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Hofstede, Gert Jan
    Logistics, Decisions and Informatics, Wageningen University.
    The Trust and Tracing game2003In: Proceedings of the 7th international Workshop of the IFIP WG 5.7, May 22-24, 2003. / [ed] J.O. Riis, R.Smeds, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 99.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    et al.
    Wageningen University.
    Hofstede, Gert Jan
    Wageningen University.
    Beers, George
    Wageningen University.
    Omta, S.W.F. (Onno)
    Wageningen University.
    The netchain laboratory2004In: Proceedings of the 6th international conference on chain and network management in agribusiness and the food industry / [ed] H.J. Bremmers, S.W.F. Omta, J.H. Trienekens, E.F.M. Wubben, Wageningen: Wageningen Academic Publishers, 2004, p. 541-549Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The netchain laboratory is a new place to experiment with netchains. It focuses on the institutional and socio-economic environment of netchains, and on governance mechanisms in particular. The integration of social and societal factors in the institutional economics theory is studied using real humans playing a role in a simulated netchain. This paper describes the conceptual framework of the laboratory, the conceptual game developed that underlies all case-specific simulation games and some of the current experiences with the laboratory.

  • 100.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    et al.
    Wageningen University, Information Technology Group.
    Hofstede, Gert Jan
    Wageningen University.
    Beers, George
    Wageningen University.
    Omta, S.W.F. (Onno)
    Wageningen University.
    The organization of transactions: research with the Trust and Tracing game2008In: Journal on Chain and Network Science, ISSN 1569-1829, E-ISSN 1875-0931, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents empirical results of research on the influence of social aspects onthe organization of transactions in the domain of chains and networks. The researchmethod used was a gaming simulation called the Trust and Tracing game in which participants trade commodity goods with a hidden quality attribute. Previous sessions of this gaming simulation identified a list of variables for further investigation (Meijer et al., 2006). The use of gaming simulation as data gathering tool for quantitative research in supply chains and networks is a proof-of-principle. This paper shows results from 27 newly conducted sessions and previously unused data from 3 older sessions. Tests confirmed the use of network and market modes of organization. Pre-existing social relations influenced the course of the action in the sessions. Being socially embedded was not beneficial for the score on the performance indicators money and points. Thehypothesized reduction in measurable transaction costs when there was high trustbetween the participants could not be found. Further analysis revealed that participants are able to suspect cheats in a session based on other factors than tracing. Testing hypotheses with data gathered in a gaming simulation proved feasible. Experiences withthe methodology used are discussed.

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