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  • 51.
    Sun, Qie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Xu, Bo
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Wennersten, Ronald
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Brandt, Nils
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Yang, Qirui
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Sustainability of CDM projects: An experimental study using AHP2010Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Two CDM projects were compared in terms of their impacts on SD, using the popular AHP method. Two experimental groups of post-graduate students performed the assessment and both found that the HFC23 decomposition project studied was a bigger contributor to SD than the hydropower project, although the details differed. The outcome could have been different if the assessment had been performed by real stakeholders and decision-makers instead of students. Nevertheless, the study confirmed that AHP can be a useful method for decision-making especially in a complex situation relating to SD. However, some weaknesses of the AHP method were identified. These, inter alia, included: (1) the final results depended heavily on the participants in the assessment; (2) only a limited number of alternatives can be considered; and (3) the final results are difficult to use elsewhere.

  • 52.
    Tayyeba, Omid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Olsson, Monika
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Brandt, Nils
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    The best MSW treatment option by considering greenhouse gas emissions reduction: a case study in Georgia2011In: Waste Management & Research, ISSN 0734-242X, E-ISSN 1096-3669, Vol. 29, no 8, p. 823-833Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The grave concern over climate change and new economic incentives such as the clean development mechanism (CDM) have given more weight to the potential of projects for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In the Adjara solid waste management project, even though the need for reductions in GHG emissions is acknowledged, it is not one of the key factors for selecting the most appropriate treatment method. This study addresses the benefit of various solid waste treatment methods that could be used in the Adjara project in terms of reducing GHG emissions. Seven different options for solid waste treatment are examined: open dumping as the baseline case, four options for landfill technology (no provision of landfill gas capture, landfill gas capture with open flare system, with enclosed flare system and with electricity generation), composting and anaerobic digestion with electricity production. CDM methodologies were used to quantify the amount of reductions for the scenarios. The study concludes sanitary landfill with capture and burning of landfill gas by an enclosed flare system could satisfy the requirements, including GHG reduction potential. The findings were tested for uncertainty and sensitivity by varying the data on composition and amount of waste and were found to be robust.

  • 53.
    Wu, Jiechen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Brandt, Nils
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Malmström, Maria E.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Climate change effects on nitrogen loading to urban lakes: The case of Råcksta Träsk, Stockholm, Sweden2013In: Proceedings of the 6th International Perspectives on Water Resources & the Environment, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nutrient loads to aquatic recipients can be expected to change due to climate change. In this work, we focus on nitrogen loads to the lake Råcksta Träsk in Stockholm, Sweden as an example of an urban ecosystem. A substance flow model is developed to describe the sources and pathways of nitrogen at present. A feed-back table approach is applied to indicate potential climate change effects on nitrogen source strengths and processes in pathways, using existing regional climate change scenarios. The tentative results indicate that biological, hydrological, meteorological and biogeochemical effects and change in human behavior as response to climate change may lead to altered nitrogen flows through an urban catchment.

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  • 54.
    Xu, Bo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Sun, Qie
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Wennersten, Ronald
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Brandt, Nils
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    An Analysis of China's Carbon Dioxide Mitigation Target2014In: Sustainable Development, ISSN 0968-0802, E-ISSN 1099-1719, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 113-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Chinese government has announced a national mitigation target towards sustainable development of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions per unit GDP (CO2/GDP) by 40-45% by 2020 compared with the 2005 level. This paper analyses China's CO2 strategic mitigation target and suggests possible ways to reduce CO2/GDP. The mitigation target of reducing CO2 intensity in terms of GDP is ambitious and would greatly reduce CO2 emissions compared with business as usual (BAU) in China. However, it would not prevent an increase in absolute CO2 emissions and therefore a more ambitious target, e.g. a larger reduction goal for CO2/GDP, is still needed. Promoting energy structure by more ambitious economic instruments to increase the proportion of renewable energy and replace coal consumption with oil and gas, and improving energy efficiency by applied advanced technologies, are both necessary measures. Special attention should be given to improving technologies in the manufacturing sector owing to its high energy consumption and low energy use efficiency.

  • 55.
    Xu, Bo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Wennersten, Ronald
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Brandt, Nils
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Sun, Qie
    A projected turning point in China's CO2 emissions - an Environmental Kuznets Curve analysis2012In: International Journal of Global Warming (IJGW), ISSN 1758-2083, E-ISSN 1758-2091, Vol. 4, no 3-4, p. 317-329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the possible existence fan Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) relationship between China's carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions per capita (CO2/capita) and GDP per capita (GDP/capita) during the period 1980-2008. The timing of the turning point in China's CO2/capita can be further estimated if an EKC relationship exists. In regression results, a natural logarithm-quadratic relationship was found between CO2/capita and GDP/capita, which supports the EKC hypothesis. However, China's CO2 emissions are still on a growing track until around 2078 in empirical analysis. More importantly, CO2 emissions will not spontaneously decrease if China continues to develop its economy without adopting instruments for mitigating climate change. China's wealth gap and China's role in international trade are discussed as two possible factors to affect EKC hypothesis. Therefore, reduction in domestic income inequality and negotiations to allocate responsibilities between China and developed countries for CO2 emissions associated with China's exports arc suggested as further efforts.

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  • 56.
    Zapico, Jorge L.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Brandt, Nils
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Environmental Metrics The Main Opportunity from ICT for Industrial Ecology2010In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 703-706Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Zapico Lamela, Jorge Luis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Kjelkerud, David
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Berggren, Henrik
    Turpeinen, Marko
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Nils, Brandt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Carbon.to: Improving the understanding of carbon dioxide information2010In: Proceedings of the 24th International Conference on Informatics for Environmental Protection., Aachen, Germany: Shaker Verlag , 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We are nowadays increasingly presented with information about greenhouse gases in our everyday life. However there seems to be a gap between this increase in the exposure to carbon dioxide information and the understanding of how to interpret it, making behavioral change difficult. This article presents examples of how different applications have dealt with this problem by representing the carbon dioxide information in different ways. Based on the existing examples, an application called carbon.to was developed and released. This service tries to improve the understanding of carbon dioxide information by simulation in a playful way. Feedback from the users points towards that the gap in understanding existed and that carbon.to was successful in helping closing it.

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    fulltext
  • 58.
    Zapico Lamela, Jorge Luis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Turpeinen, Marko
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Brandt, Nils
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Greenalytics: A tool for mash-up life cycle assessment of websites2010In: Proceedings of the 24th International Conference on Informatics for Environmental Protection., Aachen, Germany: Shaker Verlag , 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The environmental impact of internet is growing, reaching an estimated 1.4% of world greenhouse emissions. This impact is hidden for both users and web developers. Understanding and analyzing the environmental footprint of a website is not an easy task. The impacts are distributed through multiple hardware networks and a global user base, making the individual impacts difficult to allocate. This article presents the development of a functional application for generating automatic life cycle assessments for web sites based on mashing-up information. This application has the aim of making the impact of websites visible, allowing the instant analysis of their carbon footprint using existing analytics data and presenting it in an understandable and transparent way. The development process is presented with detailed information about how the calculations are performed. The results are discussed around two different cases, focusing on the challenges of calculating the server side impact and the possibilities for improvement.

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    fulltext
12 51 - 58 of 58
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