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  • 51. Eriksson, Ola
    et al.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Ekvall, Tomas
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Life cycle assessment of fuels for district heating: A comparison of waste incineration, biomass- and natural gas combustion2007In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 1346-1362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this consequential life cycle assessment (LCA) is to compare district heating based on waste incineration with combustion of biomass or natural gas. The study comprises two options for energy recovery (combined heat and power (CHP) or heat only), two alternatives for external, marginal electricity generation (fossil lean or intense), and two alternatives for the alternative waste management (landfill disposal or material recovery). A secondary objective was to test a combination of dynamic energy system modelling and LCA by combining the concept of complex marginal electricity production in a static, environmental systems analysis. Furthermore, we wanted to increase the methodological knowledge about how waste can be environmentally compared to other fuels in district-heat production. The results indicate that combustion of biofuel in a CHP is environmentally favourable and robust with respect to the avoided type of electricity and waste management. Waste incineration is often (but not always) the preferable choice when incineration substitutes landfill disposal of waste. It is however, never the best choice (and often the worst) when incineration substitutes recycling. A natural gas fired CHP is an alternative of interest if marginal electricity has a high fossil content. However, if the marginal electricity is mainly based on non-fossil sources, natural gas is in general worse than biofuels.

  • 52.
    Fauré, Eléonore
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Arushanyan, Yevgeniya
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Ekener, Elisabeth
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Miliutenko, Sofiia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Methods for assessing future scenarios from a sustainability perspective2017In: European Journal of Futures Research, ISSN 2195-4194, E-ISSN 2195-2248, Vol. 5, no 1, article id UNSP 17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Future scenarios are often used to address long-term challenges characterised by uncertainty and complexity, as they can help explore different alternative future pathways. Scenarios can therefore be a useful tool to support policy and guide action towards sustainability. But what sustainability aspects are put forward in scenarios and how are they assessed? This paper aims to explore how to assess future scenarios, categorised according to Borjeson et al. (Futures 38: 723-739, 2006) i.e. predictive, explorative and normative scenarios. By conducting a literature review and a document analysis, we map tools and methods that are currently used to assess environmental and social sustainability aspects in scenarios. We also draw on experiences from methods for impact assessments of Swedish municipal comprehensive plans, which can be considered as future scenarios. We identify whether some sustainability aspects are less recurrent than others in the reviewed assessments or even left out. We find that there is no single tool that can be used to assess scenarios. Some quantitative tools based on databases may be more suitable for assessing scenarios within a shorter time horizon, whereas qualitative assessment methods might better fit the purpose of long-term transformative scenarios. We also find that assessment frameworks may be useful to guide the assessment, as to what its intended purpose is and which sustainability aspects to include. Finally we discuss whether further assessment tools are needed in order to include a wider array of potential environmental or social consequences of the content of scenarios.

  • 53.
    Fauré, Eléonore
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Dawkins, Elena
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. Stockholm Environment Institute, Box 24218, Stockholm, 10451, Sweden.
    Wood, Richard
    NTNU, Dept Energy & Proc Engn, Program Ind Ecol, Trondheim, Norway..
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Palm, Viveka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. Stat Sweden, Dept Reg & Environm, SCB, Box 24300, S-10451 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Persson, Linn
    Stockholm Environm Inst, Box 24218, S-10451 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Schmidt, Sarah
    NTNU, Dept Energy & Proc Engn, Program Ind Ecol, Trondheim, Norway..
    Environmental pressure from Swedish consumption - The largest contributing producer countries, products and services2019In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 231, p. 698-713Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to produce goods and services that are consumed in Sweden, natural resources are extracted and pollutants are emitted in many other countries. This paper presents an analysis of the goods and services consumed in Sweden that cause the largest environmental pressures in terms of resource use and emissions, identifying in which countries or regions these pressures occur. The results have been calculated using a hybrid model developed in the PRINCE project combining the multi-regional input-output database EXIOBASE with data from the Swedish economic and environmental accounts. The following environmental pressures are analysed: Use of Land, Water and Material resources, Emissions of Greenhouse gases (GHG), Sulphur dioxides (SO2), Nitrogen oxides (NOx), and Particulate Matters (PM 2.5 and 10). The product groups are those goods and services bought for private or public consumption and capital investments, as listed in the Swedish economic accounts. The results show that Sweden is a net importer of all embodied environmental pressures, except for land use and material use. The most important product groups across environmental pressures are construction, food products and direct emissions from households (except for sulphur dioxide emissions and material use for the latter). Other product groups that are found to have environmental pressures across several indicators are wholesale and retail services, architecture and engineering, dwellings, motor vehicles and machinery and equipment. However, for the three natural resource pressures Use of Water, Land and Material resources, agricultural products are a relatively important product group along with products from forestry for the last two indicators. A considerable proportion of the environmental pressure occurs in Sweden, but when comparing those of domestic origin and that occurring internationally, the majority of all pressures for Swedish consumption occur abroad (except for land use). Other countries stand out as particularly important as origins of pressure for Swedish consumption, most notably China, which is among the top five countries for emissions to air, as well as blue water and material use. Other highly relevant countries or regions are Rest of Asia and Pacific (i.e. Asia and Pacific except Indonesia, Taiwan, Australia, India, South Korea, China and Japan), Russia, Germany as well as Denmark and Spain for certain product groups and environmental pressure combinations. This pattern of geographically spread pressures caused by Swedish consumption indicates the need for addressing the pressures at various levels of collaboration: national, within the European Union, bilateral and international.

  • 54.
    Fauré, Eléonore
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Dawkins, Elena
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Wood, Richard
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Palm, Viveka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Persson, Linn
    Schmidt, Sarah
    Environmental pressure from Swedish consumption – The largest contributing producer countries, products and servicesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to produce goods and services that are consumed in Sweden, natural resources are extracted and pollutants are emitted in many other countries. This paper presents an analysis of the goods and services consumed in Sweden that cause the largest environmental pressures in terms of resource use and emissions, identifying in which countries or regions these pressures occur. The results have been calculated using a hybrid model developed in the PRINCE project combining the multi-regional input-output database EXIOBASE with data from the Swedish economic and environmental accounts. The following environmental pressures are analysed: Use of Land, Water and Material resources, Emissions of Greenhouse gases (GHG), Sulphur dioxides (SO2), Nitrogen oxides (NOx), and Particulate Matters (PM 2.5 and 10). The product groups are those goods and services bought for private or public consumption and capital investments, as listed in the Swedish economic accounts. The results show that Sweden is a net importer of all embodied environmental pressures, except for land use and material use. The most important product groups across environmental pressures are construction, food products and direct emissions from households (except for sulphur dioxide emissions and material use for the latter). Other product groups that are found to have environmental pressures across several indicators are wholesale and retail services, architecture and engineering, dwellings, motor vehicles and machinery and equipment. However, for the three natural resource pressures Use of Water, Land and Material resources, agricultural products are a relatively important product group along with products from forestry for the last two indicators. A considerable proportion of the environmental pressure occurs in Sweden, but when comparing those of domestic origin and that occurring internationally, the majority of all pressures for Swedish consumption occur abroad (except for land use). Other countries stand out as particularly important as origins of pressure for Swedish consumption, most notably China, which is among the top five countries for emissions to air, as well as blue water and material use. Other highly relevant countries or regions are Rest of Asia and Pacific (i.e. Asia and Pacific except Indonesia, Taiwan, Australia, India, South Korea, China and Japan), Russia, Germany as well as Denmark and Spain for certain product groups and environmental pressure combinations. This pattern of geographically spread pressures caused by Swedish consumption indicates the need for addressing the pressures at various levels of collaboration: national, within the European Union, bilateral and international.

  • 55.
    Fauré, Eléonore
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Four low-carbon futures for a Swedish society beyond GDP growth2019In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 236, article id UNSP 117595Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes how different backcasting scenarios for developments beyond traditional GDP growth 2050, in Sweden may fulfil a climate goal corresponding to keeping global warming to a maximum 1.5 degrees C with 50% likelihood. This corresponds to a 92% decrease of greenhouse gas emissions from Swedish consumption from today's level. The four scenarios illustrate different strategies: 1) collaborative economy, 2) local self-sufficiency, 3) automation for quality of life and 4) circular economy in the welfare state. The aim is to further hone and quantify the scenario narratives with a focus on greenhouse gas emissions occurring as a result of Swedish consumption, both private and public. The results show that the climate target can be met in all scenarios but this requires radical sector-specific as well as general changes, including decarbonisation, technology development, increased efficiencies, innovative practices and reduced demand. The mix of these strategies varies for different sectors and different scenarios, but all are needed to reach the climate goals. As we assume that Sweden is fossil-free 2050, particular areas of attention are diets, travel, emission intensities in other countries and the level of imports. Potential implications for other environmental goals, land use and biodiversity as well as the potential magnitude of negative emissions technologies, although uncertain and limited, that could offset some additional greenhouse gas emissions are discussed.

  • 56.
    Fauré, Eléonore
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Low-carbon futures for a Swedish society beyond GDP growthManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes how different backcasting scenarios for developments beyond traditional GDP growth 2050,  in Sweden may fulfill a climate goal corresponding to keeping global warming to a maximum 1.5 degrees with 50% likelihood. This corresponds to  a 92% decrease of GHG emissions from Swedish consumption from today’s level. The four scenarios illustrate different strategies: 1) collaborative economy, 2) local self-sufficiency, 3) automation for quality of life and 4) circular economy in the welfare state. The aim is to further precise and quantify the scenario narratives with a focus on GHG emissions occurring as a result of Swedish consumption, both private and public. Preliminary results show that, as we assume that Sweden is fossil-free 2050, particular areas of attention are diets, air travel, emission intensities in other countries and the level of imports.. Potential implications for other environmental goals are discussed.

  • 57.
    Fauré, Eléonore
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Palm, Viveka
    SCB, Department for Regions and environment, Statistics Sweden.
    Persson, Linn
    Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Schmidt, Sarah
    NTNU, Program for Industrial Ecology, Department of Energy and Process Engineering, Trondheim, Norway.
    Wood, Richard
    NTNU, Program for Industrial Ecology, Department of Energy and Process Engineering, Trondheim, Norway.
    Environmental pressure from Swedish consumption: - the largest contributing producer countries, products and servicesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to produce goods and services that are consumed in Sweden, natural resources are extracted and pollutants are emitted in many other countries. This paper presents an analysis of which products and services cause the largest environmental pressures in terms of resource use and emissions and in which countries or regions these pressures occur. The results have been calculated using a hybrid model developed in the PRINCE project combining the multi-regional input-output database Exiobase with data from the Swedish economic and environmental accounts. The following environmental pressures are analysed: Use of Land, Water and Material resources, Emissions of Greenhouse gases (GHG), Sulphur dioxides (SO2), Nitrogen oxides (NOx), and Particulate Matters (PM 2.5 and 10). The product groups include a range of goods and services bought for private or public consumption and investments. The results show that Sweden is a net importer of all embodied environmental pressures, except for land use and material use. The most important product groups across environmental pressures are construction, food products and direct emissions from households (except for sulphur dioxide emissions and material use for the latter). Other recurrent product groups across several indicators are wholesale and retail services, architecture and engineering, dwellings, motor vehicles and machinery and equipment. However, for the three natural resource pressures Use of Water, Land and Material resources, agricultural products are a relatively important product group along with products from forestry for the last two indicators. The environmental pressures occur to a large degree in Sweden but also some other countries stand out as particularly important. One significant country is China, which is among the top ten countries for all indicators. Other highly relevant countries or regions are Rest of Asia and Pacific, Russia, Denmark, Germany and Spain. This variation indicates the need to work on policies at various levels: national, EU, bilateral and international.

  • 58.
    Fauré, Eléonore
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Hornborg, Alf
    Four sustainability goals in a Swedish low-growth/degrowth contextManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Continual environmental degradation and an unfair distribution of environmental burdens and benefits are two great challenges for humanity.

    Economic growth is often taken for granted when planning for the future.  However, it is often argued that maintaining economic growth is in conflict with keeping human activities adjusted to ecological boundaries and finite resources, at least for the more-developed countries.  With this paper we present sustainability goals for building and planning in Sweden 2050 in a context of limited or even negative economic growth. The sustainability goals should ensure that all groups in society have sufficient resources and a good life within planetary boundaries. The goals are set at a national level but in a global context. We select four goals, two environmental goals related to climate change and land use and two social goals, related to welfare and participation. Our results show that achieving the sustainability goals, especially for land use and climate, will require significant reductions of Sweden's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and land use compared to today's level. Regarding the social goals, these are in many aspects reasonably well fulfilled in Sweden today although many challenges remain in order to ensure similar opportunities for all Swedish residents. The main challenge, however, is to ensure that these goals are fulfilled even within environmental limits and if economic growth should halt or become negative.

     

     

    Key words: Sustainability goals; Degrowth; Environmental Justice; Futures studies.

  • 59.
    Fauré, Eléonore
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Hornborg, Alf
    Lund University, Department of Human Geography and the Human Ecology Division.
    Four Sustainability Goals in a Swedish Low-Growth/Degrowth Context2016In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 8, no 1080Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Continual environmental degradation and an unfair distribution of environmental burdens and benefits are two great challenges for humanity. Economic growth is often taken for granted when planning for the future. However, it is often argued that maintaining economic growth conflicts with keeping human activities adjusted to ecological boundaries and finite resources, at least for the more-developed countries. With this paper, we present sustainability goals for building and planning in Sweden to be achieved by 2050 in a context of limited or even negative economic growth. These goals should ensure that all groups in society have sufficient resources and a good life within planetary boundaries. We select four goals in a participatory process: two environmental goals related to climate change and land use and two social goals related to welfare and participation. Our results show that achieving the environmental goals will require significant reductions of Sweden’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and land use compared to today’s levels. Regarding the social goals, these are, in many aspects, reasonably well fulfilled in Sweden today, although disparities remain between groups of citizens. The main challenge, however, is to ensure that these goals are fulfilled even within environmental limits and if economic growth should halt.

  • 60.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    A world with CO2-caps: Electricity production in consequential assessments2008In: The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, ISSN 0948-3349, E-ISSN 1614-7502, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 365-367Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 61.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Analytical Tools for Environmental Design and Management in a Systems Perspective: N. Wrisberg and H.A. Udo de Haes (Eds.)2005In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 13, no 8, p. 867-868Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 62.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Avfallsförbränning – en klimatpolitisk gökunge2017In: Ny Teknik, ISSN 0550-8754Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 63.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Bygg färre vägar och parkeringsplatser2014In: Dagens ETC, no 24/3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Nu finns en gyllene chans att bygga färre p-platser och vägar. Det ligger väl i linje med flera olika trender när det gäller stadsutveckling.

  • 64.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Exergy Analysis for Characterizing Use of Natural resources in Life Cycle Assessment and Other Environmental Systems Analysis Tools2011In: Proceedings of 2nd Internationals Exergy, Life Cycle Assessment and Sustainability Workshop and Symposium / [ed] Koroneos, C.J., Rovas, D.C., and Dompros, A.T, 2011, p. 31-31Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 65.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Exergy as a measure ofresource use in LCA and other sustainability assessment methods2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased waste valorization should lead to savings of natural resources. But different types of valorization  can  lead  to  different  types  of  savings and  there  may  therefore  be  a  need  for comparing different types of resources uses. Exergy use has been suggested as a measure for resource use in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and other sustainability assessment methods. It is an interesting approach since it can describe both energetic resources as well as metal ores and other materials that have a chemical exergy in the same units. The aim of this paper is to contribute to the discussion on different approaches to measure the use of resources in  LCA and other environmental systems analysis tools by  illustrating the use of the thermodynamic approach  in case  studies  and  comparing  the  results  with  other  approaches.  We  will  also discuss  advantages  and  disadvantages  of  different  approaches.  The  results  show  that  the different methods  produce  strikingly  different  results  when  applied  to  case  studies.  This indicates  the  need  to further  discuss methods  for describing  resource  use.  The  study  also demonstrates the feasibility of the thermodynamic approach. It is suggested that the results are reasonable  and  that  the  thermodynamic  approach  is  developed  from  a  solid  scientific  basis. When  compared  to  other  methods  it  is  interesting  to  note  that  the  exergy  approach  captures most resources that are considered important by other methods. When analysing the results it becomes apparent that the composition of the ores can have  an influence  of the results.  It is thus  of  interest  to develop  more  ore-specific  data. It  would  also  be  of  interest  to  further develop exergy use as a method for assessing a broader range of resources including land and water.

  • 66.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Finanskris och klimatkris – paralleller och kopplingar2010Report (Other academic)
  • 67.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Framtiden värderas för lågt.2017In: Miljö & UtvecklingArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 68.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Gör en ny översiktsplan för Stockholm2011In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 2011-08-22Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 69.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    KTH-professor: Minska inte miljökraven, Miljödepartementet!2012In: Miljöaktuellt, ISSN 0345-763X, no 2012-07-01Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 70.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Life Cycle Assessment and Waste management: Lessons for Industry and Policy Makers2010In: 3rd International Conference on Engineering for waste and biomass valorization, 2010, p. 144-144Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 71.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Låt inte kärnkraftsbolagen betala för lite för avfallet2016In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 2016-01-19Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 72.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Miljöåtgärder har hårdare krav på kostnadseffektivitet2015In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 2015-11-23Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 73.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Nya styrmedel behövs för att minska plastens miljöpåverkan.2018In: Aktuell hållbarhetArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 74.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Några reflektioner på rapporten "Underlag till utvärdering av producentansvaret för förpackningar"2007Report (Other academic)
  • 75.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Ovetenskapligt förneka klimatförändringar.2018In: Dagens NyheterArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 76.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Paradoxerna som gör att vi inte kan hantera klimatfrågan2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 77.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Plast ska inte eldas!2016In: Aktuell Hållbarhet, ISSN 2002-3200, no 2016-04-12Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 78.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Plastförbränning ger avfallssektorn klimatproblem2017In: Ny Teknik, ISSN 0550-8754Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 79.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Regeringen glömmer miljökonsekvenserna2006In: MiljöaktuelltArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 80.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Stora brister i förslaget om nanosäkerhet2014In: Ny Teknik, no 7/5Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Produkter som innehåller farliga nanomaterial kan få stor spridning under lång tid innan de upptäcks. Statens förslag på hur hanteringen ska bli säkrare är långt ifrån tillräckligt, enligt professor Göran Finnveden på KTH.

  • 81.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Särskilt yttrande2005In: En bra skatt?: beskattning av avfall som förbränns, Stockholm: Fritzes, 2005, p. 363-365Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 82.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    The resource debate needs to continue2005In: The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, ISSN 0948-3349, E-ISSN 1614-7502, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 372-372Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 83.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Underskottet för kärnkraften fortsätter att öka2016In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 2016-01-25Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 84.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    University-wide integration of sustainable development in education2017In: Educating for Sustainable Development, 2017 Sustainable Campus Best Practices from ISCN and GULF Universities, International Sustainable Campus Network , 2017Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 85.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Vi hotar klimatet2013In: OsqledarenArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 86.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Vi måste agera nu – risken är oacceptabel2010In: Ny teknik, ISSN 0550-8754, no 13-10-2010Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 87.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Weighting in LCA Based on Ecotaxes: Development of a Method and Experiences for Case Studies2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 88.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Alverbro, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Hochschorner, Elisabeth
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Hägvall, J
    A Life Cycle Assessment of Destruction of Ammunition2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 89.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Alverbro, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Hochschorner, Elisabeth
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Hägvall, J
    Environmental Aspects of Disposal of Ammunition2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 90.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Arushanyan, Yevgeniya
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Brandao, Miguel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. Department of Bioeconomy and Systems Analysis, Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation, Czartoryskich 8 Str., 24-100 Pulawy, Poland.
    Exergy as a Measure of Resource Use in Life Cycle Assessment and Other Sustainability Assessment Tools2016In: Resources, E-ISSN 2079-9276, Vol. 5, no 3, article id 23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A thermodynamic approach based on exergy use has been suggested as a measure for the use of resources in Life Cycle Assessment and other sustainability assessment methods. It is a relevant approach since it can capture energy resources, as well as metal ores and other materials that have a chemical exergy expressed in the same units. The aim of this paper is to illustrate the use of the thermodynamic approach in case studies and to compare the results with other approaches, and thus contribute to the discussion of how to measure resource use. The two case studies are the recycling of ferrous waste and the production and use of a laptop. The results show that the different methods produce strikingly different results when applied to case studies, which indicates the need to further discuss methods for assessing resource use. The study also demonstrates the feasibility of the thermodynamic approach. It identifies the importance of both energy resources, as well as metals. We argue that the thermodynamic approach is developed from a solid scientific basis and produces results that are relevant for decision-making. The exergy approach captures most resources that are considered important by other methods. Furthermore, the composition of the ores is shown to have an influence on the results. The thermodynamic approach could also be further developed for assessing a broader range of biotic and abiotic resources, including land and water.

  • 91.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Berggren, C
    Brunsson, N
    Cerin, P
    Corvellec, H
    Eckerman, I
    Eldh, C
    Falkemark, G
    Frändberg, L
    Gössling, S
    Hahn, T
    Jakobsson, S
    Jansson, J.O
    Kaijser, A
    Laestadius, S
    Lundqvist, P
    Murray, R
    Mähler, K.-G
    Nilsson, J.H
    Odhnoff, J
    Ohlsson, E
    Ribbing, P
    Rodhe, H
    Strandberg, L.-G
    Söderbaum, P
    Trygger, C
    Vilhelmsson, B
    Övermark, I
    Därför säger vi nej till ”Förbifart Stockholm”2008In: Aftonbladet, ISSN 1103-9000Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 92.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Berggren, C
    Falkenmark, G
    Jansson, JO
    Murray, R
    Hellre nytt avstamp för järnväg2008In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 31 maj 2008Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 93.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Bisaillon, M.
    Noring, Maria
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Stenmarck, A.
    Sundberg, J.
    Sundqvist, J. -O
    Tyskeng, Sara
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Developing and evaluating new policy instruments for sustainable waste management2012In: International Journal of Environment and Sustainable Development (IJESD), ISSN 1474-6778, E-ISSN 1478-7466, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 19-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to suggest a number of interesting policy instruments that can make the Swedish waste management system more sustainable. Approximately 60 suggestions for policy instruments were gathered through a number of workshops with stakeholders. These were further prioritised in a workshop with stakeholders and by the research team resulting in a list of 15 instruments: information to citizens and companies; tax on raw materials; weight-based waste collection fee; environmentally differentiated waste collection fee; waste minimisation in enterprises; 'Advertising brochures - yes, please!'; recycling certificates; developed collection systems; tax on incineration of waste from fossil fuels; tax on incineration of waste; including waste in green certificates for electricity production; tax on hazardous substances; labelling of goods with hazardous substances; improved control by authorities; differentiated VAT and ban on incineration of recyclable materials. Several policy instruments are needed that can complement each other.

  • 94.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Bisaillon, M
    Noring, Maria
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Stenmarck, Å
    Sundberg, J
    Sundqvist, J.-O
    Tyskeng, Sara
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Developing and Evaluating New Policy Instruments for Sustainable Waste management2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 95.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Bisaillon, M
    Noring, Maria
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Stenmarck, Å
    Sundberg, J
    Sundqvist, J-O
    Tyskeng, Sara
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    New policy instruments for a sustainable waste management?2010In: Proceedings of Global Waste management Symposium, 3-6 October 2010, San Antonio, Texas, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 96.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Bisaillon, M
    Noring, Maria
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Stenmarck, Å
    Sundberg, J
    Sundqvist, J-O
    Tyskeng, Sara
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Nya styrmedel inom avfallsområdet?2009Report (Other academic)
  • 97.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Carlsson, A
    Palm, V
    Wadeskog, A
    Energy indicators for Integrated Product Policy (IPP) in a life-cycle perspective2007In: Proceedings of the 14th SETAC-Europe LCA Case Study Symposium, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 98.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Carlsson Reich, Markus
    Eriksson, Ola
    Sörblom, Adrienne
    Robusta och flexibla strategier för utnyttjande av energi ur avfall2005Report (Other academic)
  • 99.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Ekvall, T
    Moberg, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Models for waste management: Possibilities and limitations2006In: Proceedings of the ISWA/DAKOFA Congress, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 100.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Moberg, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Ekvall, Tomas
    Environmental and economic assessment methods for waste management decision-support: possibilities and limitations2007In: Waste Management & Research, ISSN 0734-242X, E-ISSN 1096-3669, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 263-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A large number of methods and approaches that can be used for supporting waste management decisions at different levels in society have been developed. In this paper an overview of methods is provided and preliminary guidelines for the choice of methods are presented. The methods introduced include: Environmental Impact Assessment, Strategic Environmental Assessment, Life Cycle Assessment, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Cost-effectiveness Analysis, Life-cycle Costing, Risk Assessment, Material Flow Accounting, Substance Flow Analysis, Energy Analysis, Exergy Analysis, Entropy Analysis, Environmental Management Systems, and Environmental Auditing, The characteristics used are the types of impacts included, the objects under study and whether the method is procedural or analytical The different methods can be described as systems analysis methods. Waste management systems thinking is receiving increasing attention. This is, for example, evidenced by the suggested thematic strategy on waste by the European Commission where life-cycle analysis and life-cycle thinking get prominent positions. Indeed, life-cycle analyses have been shown to provide policy-relevant and consistent results. However, it is also clear that the studies will always be open to criticism since they are simplifications of reality and include uncertainties. This is something all systems analysis methods have in common. Assumptions can be challenged and it may be difficult to generalize from case studies to policies. This suggests that if decisions are going to be made, they are likely to be made on a less than perfect basis.

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