Change search
Refine search result
1234 51 - 100 of 195
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Kong, Na
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Park, JaeHyeung
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Yan, Mingdi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Carbohydrate Functionalization of Few-Layer Graphene through Microwave-Assisted Reaction of Perfluorophenyl AzideManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 52.
    Kong, Na
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Yan, Mingdi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Functionalization of carbon nanomaterials with perfluorophenyl azides and their application in biorecognition2014In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 247Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 53.
    Kong, Na
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Shimpi, Manishkumar R.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Park, Jae Hyeung
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Yan, Mingdi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Carbohydrate conjugation through microwave-assisted functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes using perfluorophenyl azides2015In: Carbohydrate Research, ISSN 0008-6215, E-ISSN 1873-426X, Vol. 405, p. 33-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbohydrate-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were synthesized using microwave-assisted reaction of perfluorophenyl azide with the nanotubes. The results showed that microwave radiation provides a rapid and effective means to covalently attach carbohydrates to SWNTs, producing carbohydrate-SWNT conjugates for biorecognition. The carbohydrate-functionalized SWNTs were furthermore shown to interact specifically with cognate carbohydrate-specific proteins (lectins), resulting in predicted recognition patterns. The carbohydrate-presenting SWNTs constitute a new platform for sensitive protein-or cell recognition, which pave the way for glycoconjugated carbon nanomaterials in biorecognition applications.

  • 54.
    Kong, Na
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Shimpi, Manishkumar R.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Park, Jaehyeung
    Univ Massachusetts, Dept Chem, Lowell, MA 01854 USA..
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Yan, Mingdi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Carbohydrate conjugation through microwave-assisted functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes using perfluorophenyl azides (vol 405, pg 33, 2015)2015In: Carbohydrate Research, ISSN 0008-6215, E-ISSN 1873-426X, Vol. 412, p. 80-80Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Kong, Na
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Shimpi, Manishkumar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Yan, Mingdi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Functionalization of carbohydrate-presenting single-walled carbon nanotubes using microwave-assisted phenylnitrene addition and their biorecognition applications2013In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 245Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 56.
    Kong, Na
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Xie, Sheng
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Zhou, Juan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Menendez, Margarita
    Solis, Dolores
    Park, JaeHyeung
    Proietti, Giampiero
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Yan, Mingdi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry. University of Massachusetts Lowell, United States.
    Catalyst-Free Cycloaddition Reaction for the Synthesis of Glyconanoparticles2016In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 8, no 41, p. 28136-28142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new conjugation method for the immobilization of carbohydrates on nanomaterials was demonstrated simply by mixing perfluorophenyl azide-functionalized silica nanoparticles (SNPs), an amine-derivatized carbohydrate, and phenylacetaldehyde under ambient conditions without any catalyst. The density of carbohydrates on the glyconanoparticles was determined using the quantitative F-19 NMR (F-19 qNMR) technique; for example, the density of D-mannose (Man) on Man-SNPs was 2.5 +/- 0.2 x 10(-16) nmol/nm(2). The glyconanoparticles retained their binding affinity and selectivity toward cognate lectins. The apparent dissociation constant of the glyconanoparticles was measured by a fluorescence competition assay, where the binding affinity of Man-SNPs was almost 4 orders of magnitude higher than that of Man with concanavalin A. Moreover, even with a ligand density of 2.6 times lower than Man-SNPs synthesized by the copper catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition, the binding affinity of Man-SNPs prepared by the current method was more than 4 times higher.

  • 57.
    Kong, Na
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Zhou, Juan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Park, JaeHyeung
    University of Massachusetts, United States .
    Xie, Sheng
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Yan, Mingdi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry. University of Massachusetts, United States .
    Metal-Free Carbohydrate Immobilization on Nanoparticles Using Perfluorophenyl Azide-Based Azide-Aldehyde-Amine CycloadditionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Kong, Na
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Zhou, Juan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Park, JaeHyeung
    University of Massachusetts, United States .
    Xie, Sheng
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Yan, Mingdi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry. University of Massachusetts, United States .
    Quantitative Fluorine NMR To Determine Carbohydrate Density on Glyconanomaterials Synthesized from Perfluorophenyl Azide-Functionalized Silica Nanoparticles by Click Reaction2015In: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 87, no 18, p. 9451-9458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A quantitative fluorine NMR (F-19 qNMR) method was developed to determine the carbohydrate density on glyconanomaterials. Mannose (Man)- and galactose (Gal)-conjugated silica nanoparticles (SNPs) were synthesized from perfluorophenyl azide (PFPA)-functionalized SNPs and propargylated Man or Gal by copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (click reaction). After treating PFPA-SNPs or Man-SNPs with hydrofluoric acid followed by lyophilization, the remaining residues were directly subjected to F-19 NMR analysis. The density of PFPA on PFPA-SNP was determined to be 7.7 +/- 0.2 x 10(-16) nmol/nm(2) and Man on Man-SNP to be 6.4 +/- 0.2 x 10(-16) nmol/nm(2) giving a yield of similar to 83% for the click coupling reaction. The apparent dissociation constant (K-d) of Man-SNPs with fluorescein isothiocyanate(FITC)-concanavalin A (Con A) was determined using a fluorescence competition assay to be 0.289 +/- 0.003 mu M, which represents more than 3 orders of magnitude affinity increase compared to free Man with Con A.

  • 59.
    Kravchenko, Oleksandr
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Timmer, Brian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Biedermann, Maurice
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Inge, Ken
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry. Univ Massachusetts, Dept Chem, Lowell, MA USA..
    Stable CAAC-based complexes in dynamic olefin metathesis2018In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 256Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 60.
    Larsson, Rikard
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Albers, Antonia
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Simons, Adrian
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Tandem Driven Dynamic Self-Inhibition of AcetylcholinesteraseManuscript (Other academic)
  • 61.
    Larsson, Rikard
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Angelin, Marcus
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Vongvilai, Pornrapee
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    ORGN 231-Dynamic catalytic screening of hydrolase substrates from adaptive combinatorial thiolester libraries2006In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 232Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 62.
    Larsson, Rikard
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemistry.
    Pei, Zhichao
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemistry.
    Catalytic Self-Screening of Cholinesterase Substrates from a Dynamic Combinatorial Thioester Library2004In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 43, no 28, p. 3716-3718Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simply the best: Dynamic combinatorial chemistry coupled to enzyme catalysis was used to identify enzyme substrates in a library constructed from a series of thioesters and thiols by transesterification. The library was directly coupled to the catalytic action of acetylcholinesterase, which selectively hydrolyzed the best substrate candidates (see schematic representation). The process allowed rapid identification of discrete substrates.

  • 63.
    Larsson, Rikard
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Dynamic Combinatorial Thiolester Libraries for Efficient Catalytic Self-Screening of Hydrolase Substrates2006In: European Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 1434-193X, E-ISSN 1099-0690, no 1, p. 285-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dynamic combinatorial thiolester libraries were efficiently generated from pools of thiols and acyl functionalities through reversible transthiolesterification in aqueous media at neutral pH. The dynamic features of the library generation were investigated, and the libraries were screened against acetylcholinesterase, clearly demonstrating the catalytic self-screening of its substrates from the constituents. Acetyl- and propionylthiocholine were easily identified as the best substrates for the enzyme, whereas other constituents showed lower efficiency or were inactive. A range of hydrolases was furthermore screened for rapid substrate identification, clearly demonstrating the differences in selectivity. The results show that transthiolesterification is a useful method to generate dynamic libraries, and that the catalytic self -screening concept is highly valuable for substrate identification.

  • 64.
    Larsson, Rikard
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Vongvilai, Pornrapee
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Angelin, Marcus
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Dynamic Combinatorial Resolution2007In: Materials, Membranes and Processes / [ed] G. Nechifor and M.Barboiu, Bucharest: Printech , 2007, p. 30-65Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 65. Madwar, Carolin
    et al.
    Kwan, William Chu
    Deng, Lingquan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Schmidt, Rolf
    Zou, Shan
    Cuccia, Louis A.
    Perfluorophenyl Azide Immobilization Chemistry for Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy of the Concanavalin A/Mannose Interaction2010In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 26, no 22, p. 16677-16680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The versatility of perfluorophenyl azide (PFPA) derivatives makes them useful for attaching a wide variety of biomoleculcs and polymers to surfaces. Herein, it single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) study of the concanavalin A/mannose interaction was carried out using PFPA immobilization chemistry. SMFS of the concanavalin A/mannose interaction yielded in average unbinding force of 70-80 pN for loading rates between 8000 and 40 000 pN/s for mannose surfaces on aminated glass. and an unbinding force of 57 +/- 20 pN at 6960 pN/s for mannose surfaces on gold-coated glass. Dynamic force spectroscopy was used to determine the dissociation rate constant, k(off), for this interaction to be 0.16 s(-1).

  • 66. Martín-Santamaría, Sonsoles
    et al.
    André, Sabine
    Buzamet, Eliza
    Caraballo, Rémi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Fernández-Cureses, Gloria
    Morando, Maria
    Ribeiro, Joao P.
    Ramírez-Gualito, Karla
    de Pascual-Teresa, Beatriz
    Javier Cañada, F.
    Menéndez, Margarita
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Jiménez-Barbero, Jesus
    Solís, Dolores
    Gabius, Hans-Joachim
    Symmetric dithiodigalactoside: strategic combination of binding studies and detection of selectivity between a plant toxin and human lectins2011In: Organic and biomolecular chemistry, ISSN 1477-0520, E-ISSN 1477-0539, Vol. 9, no 15, p. 5445-5455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thioglycosides offer the advantage over O-glycosides to be resistant to hydrolysis. Based on initial evidence of this recognition ability for glycosyldisulfides by screening dynamic combinatorial libraries, we have now systematically studied dithiodigalactoside on a plant toxin (Viscum album agglutinin) and five human lectins (adhesion/growth-regulatory galectins with medical relevance e.g. in tumor progression and spread). Inhibition assays with surface-presented neoglycoprotein and in solution monitored by saturation transfer difference NMR spectroscopy, flanked by epitope mapping, as well as isothermal titration calorimetry revealed binding properties to VAA (K(a): 1560 +/- 20 M (1)). They were reflected by the structural model and the affinity on the level of toxin-exposed cells. In comparison, galectins were considerably less reactive, with intrafamily grading down to very minor reactivity for tandem-repeat-type galectins, as quantitated by radioassays for both domains of galectin-4. Model building indicated contact formation to be restricted to only one galactose moiety, in contrast to thiodigalactoside. The tested glycosyldisulfide exhibits selectivity between the plant toxin and the tested human lectins, and also between these proteins. Therefore, glycosyldisulfides have potential as chemical platform for inhibitor design.

  • 67. Mhaka, Byron
    et al.
    Cukrowska, Ewa
    Bui, Bernadette Tse Sum
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Haupt, Karsten
    Tutu, Hlanganani
    Chimuka, Luke
    Selective extraction of triazine herbicides from food samples based on a combination of a liquid membrane and molecularly imprinted polymers2009In: Journal of Chromatography A, ISSN 0021-9673, E-ISSN 1873-3778, Vol. 1216, no 40, p. 6796-6801Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A selective extraction technique based on the combination of liquid membrane (microporous membrane liquid-liquid extraction) and molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) was applied to triazines herbicides in food samples. Simazine, atrazine and propazine were extracted from aqueous food samples through the hydrophobic porous membrane that was impregnated with toluene, which also formed part of the acceptor phase. In the acceptor phase, the compounds were re-extracted onto MIP particles. The extraction technique was optimised for the amount of molecularly imprinted polymers particles in the organic acceptor phase, extraction time, and type of organic acceptor solvent and desorption solvent. An extraction time of 90 min and 50 mg of MIP were found to be optimum parameters. Toluene as the acceptor phase was found to give higher triazines binding onto MIP particles compared to hexane and combinations of diethyl ether and hexane. 90% methanol in water was found to be the best desorption solvent compared to acetonitrile, methanol and water. The selectivity of the technique was demonstrated by extracting spiked lettuce and apple extracts where clean chromatograms were obtained compared to liquid membrane extraction alone or to the microporous membrane liquid-liquid extraction - non-imprinted polymer combination. The MIP showed a certain degree of group specificity and the extraction efficiency in lettuce extract was 79% (0.72) for simazine. 98% (1.55) for atrazine and 86% (3.08) for propazine.

  • 68. Nemulenzi, Olga
    et al.
    Mhaka, Byron
    Cukrowska, Ewa
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Tutu, Hlanganani
    Chimuka, Luke
    Potential of combining of liquid membranes and molecularly imprinted polymers in extraction of 17 beta-estradiol from aqueous samples2009In: Journal of Separation Science, ISSN 1615-9306, E-ISSN 1615-9314, Vol. 32, no 11, p. 1941-1948Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential of combination of liquid membranes (microporous membrane liquid-liquid extraction) and molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) was performed using 17 beta-estradiol (E2) as model compound. The model compound was extracted from aqueous sample through a hydrophobic porous membrane that was impregnated with hexane/ethyl acetate (3:2), which also formed part of the acceptor phase. In the acceptor phase, the compound was bound onto MIP particles that were also part of the organic phase. The potential of such combination was optimised for the type and amount of MIP particles in the organic acceptor phase, the extraction time, and the type of organic acceptor solvent. Ultrasound assisted binding of E2 onto MIP particles was also investigated. MIPs prepared by precipitation polymerization were found to be superior to those prepared by bulk polymerization. Increase in the extraction time and the amount of MIP particles in the acceptor phase led to more E2 binding onto the MIP particles. Hexane/ethyl acetate (3:2) as an organic acceptor was found to give higher E2 binding onto MIP particles compared to toluene, diethyl ether, and hexane. Ultrasound was furthermore found to increase the binding of E2 onto MIP particles. The selectivity of the technique was demonstrated by extracting wastewater and where clean chromatograms were obtained compared to liquid membrane extractions (SLMs) alone.

  • 69.
    Neranon, Kitjanit
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Hao, Nanjing
    University of Massachusetts, United States..
    Chen, Xuan
    University of Massachusetts, United States..
    Manuguri, Sesha
    University of Auckland, Auckland.
    Yan, Mingdi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Ciprofloxacin-presenting Liposomes for Enhanced Antibacterial ActivityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 70.
    Neranon, Kitjanit
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Assembly of synthetic capsids2014In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 247Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 71.
    Neranon, Kitjanit
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Constitutional Dynamics of Bipyridine-Metal Complex SystemsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 72.
    Neranon, Kitjanit
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Design, Synthesis and Self-Assembly of Functional Amphiphilic Dendrimers and MetallodendrimersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 73.
    Neranon, Kitjanit
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Constitutional Dynamic Coordination Systems Based on Fe-II, Co-II, Ni-II, Cu-II, and Zn-II2016In: European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 1434-1948, E-ISSN 1099-1948, no 24, p. 3950-3956Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The self-adaptation of constitutional dynamic systems based on selective coordination between 5,5-dimethyl-2,2-bipyridine and deuterium-labeled 4,4-dimethyl-2,2-bipyridine to Fe-II, Co-II, Ni-II, Cu-II, or Zn-II has been evaluated by ESI-MS in methanol. The equilibration rates of the systems proved dependent on the metal species, following the order Zn-II > Cu-II > Co-II > Ni-II > Fe-II, where Zn-II resulted in rapid rearrangement of the original homoleptic complexes. The heteroleptic complexes were favored in the systems with Co-II, Cu-II and Zn-II, whereas the homoleptic complexes were more pronounced with Fe-II and Ni-II.

  • 74.
    Neranon, Kitjanit
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Rapid, regioselective deuteration of dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridines via microwave-assistance2015In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 5, p. 2684-2688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Isotopically pure [D6]-dimethyl-2,2′-bipyridine derivatives were selectively and rapidly formed using microwave-assisted regioselective deuteration of the methyl moieties of the parent bipyridine in a deuterium oxide solution. For instance, [D6]-4,4′-dimethyl-2,2′-bipyridine was formed in quantitative yield within 15 minutes, in a simple and convenient process.

  • 75.
    Neranon, Kitjanit
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Ramström, OlofKTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Self-Assembly of Supramolecular Capsules Based on FeII-Dendrimer Complexes2014Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 76.
    Neranon, Kitjanit
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Stimuli-Responsive, Multivalent Glycodendrimer/Metalloglycodendrimer Assemblies for Targeted DeliveryManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 77.
    Neranon, Kitjanit
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Åslund, Mattias
    Draupner Innovations, Årsta, Sweden.
    Karalius, Antanas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Yan, Min
    Xu, Hao
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics. Department of Applied Physics, Science for Life Laboratory.
    Fu, Ying
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Petermann, Ingemar
    Nanoelectronics, Acreo Swedish ICT AB, Kista, Sweden.
    Björk, Per
    Nanoelectronics, Acreo Swedish ICT AB, Kista, Sweden.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Laser-induced, Surface Plasmon-enhanced Two-photon Excitation for Efficient Chemical Functionalization of Nanostructured Gold SurfacesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 78.
    Norberg, Oscar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Deng, Lingquan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Aastrup, Teodor
    Yan, Mingdi
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Photo-Click Immobilization on Quartz Crystal Microbalance Sensors for Selective Carbohydrate-Protein Interaction Analyses2011In: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 83, no 3, p. 1000-1007Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A photoclick method based on azide photoligation and Cu-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition has been evaluated for the immobilization of carbohydrates to polymeric materials. The biomolecular recognition properties of the materials have been investigated with regard to applicable polymeric substrates and selectivity of protein binding. The method was used to functionalize a range of polymeric surfaces (polystyrene, polyacrylamide, poly(ethylene glycol), poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline), and polypropene) with various carbohydrate structures (based on alpha-D-mannose, beta-D-galactose, and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosamine). The functionalized surfaces were evaluated in real-time studies of protein-carbohydrate interactions using a quartz crystal microbalance flow through system with a series of different carbohydrate-binding proteins (lectins). The method proved to be robust and versatile, resulting in a range of efficient sensors showing high and predictable protein selectivities.

  • 79.
    Norberg, Oscar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Deng, Lingquan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Yan, Mingdi
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Photo-Click Immobilization of Carbohydrates on Polymeric Surfaces - A Quick Method to Functionalize Surfaces for Biomolecular Recognition Studies2009In: Bioconjugate chemistry, ISSN 1043-1802, E-ISSN 1520-4812, Vol. 20, no 12, p. 2364-2370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Methods to rapidly functionalize specific polymeric surfaces with alkynes, which can subsequently be linked to azide-containing carbohydrates, are presented. The methods comprise two main concepts: azide photoligation and Cu-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. 2-Azidoethyl-functionalized CL-D-mannopyranoside was synthesized and covalently attached to alkyne-functionalized polymeric surfaces using the techniques. The protein recognition properties of the carbollydrate-presenting surfaces were evaluated using quartz crystal microbalance biosensor instrumentation.

  • 80.
    Norberg, Oscar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Fauquet, Germain
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Saur, Ann-Kathrin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Aastrup, Teodor
    Attana AB.
    Yan, Mingdi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Synthesis and Binding Affinity Analysis of α1-2- and α1-6-O/S-linked Dimannosides for the Elucidation of Sulfur in Glycosidic Bonds using Quartz Crystal Microbalance SensorsArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Synthetic routes towards α1-2- and α1-6-linked dimannosides with S- or O-glycosidic bonds are presented. A glycosylation method was developed in which a sulfhydryl glycosyl acceptor was coupled to a 1-O-acetyl-glycosyl donor under Lewis acid catalysis. Final debenzylation of the S-linked dimannosides were accomplished through Birch reduction in high yields. The protein recognition properties of the synthesized dimannosides were then evaluated in a competition binding assay with the model lectin Con A, to investigate the effect of sulfur in the glycosidic bonds. Mannose-presenting surfaces were produced according to a previously reported Photo-Click immobilization method and the subsequent binding study was performed in an automated QCM flow through instrumentation. The recorded EC50-values correlated well to previously reported binding affinities for the O-linked dimannosides. Results were in agreement with known binding affinities, where the S-analogs displayed slightly weaker binding and a positive apparent cooperativity.

  • 81.
    Norberg, Oscar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Lee, Irene H.
    Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts.
    Aastrup, Teodor
    Attana AB.
    Yan, Mingdi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Photogenerated lectin sensors produced by thiol-ene/yne photo-click chemistry in aqueous solution2012In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 51-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The photoinitiated radical reactions between thiols and alkenes/alkynes (thiol-ene and thiol-yne chemistry) have been applied to a functionalization methodology to produce carbohydrate-presenting surfaces for analyses of biomolecular interactions. Polymer-coated quartz surfaces were functionalized with alkenes or alkynes in a straightforward photochemical procedure utilizing perfluorophenylazide (PFPA) chemistry. The alkene/alkyne surfaces were subsequently allowed to react with carbohydrate thiols in water under UV-irradiation. The reaction can be carried out in a drop of water directly on the surface without photoinitiator, and any disulfide side products were easily washed away after the functionalization process. The resulting carbohydrate-presenting surfaces were evaluated in real-time studies of protein-carbohydrate interactions using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) flow-through system with recurring injections of selected lectins, with intermediate regeneration steps using low pH buffer. The resulting methodology proved fast, efficient and scalable to high-throughput analysis formats, and the produced surfaces showed significant protein binding with expected selectivities of the lectins used in the study.

  • 82.
    Norberg, Oscar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Wu, Bin
    Thota, Niranjan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Ge, Jian-Tao
    Fauquet, Germain
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Saur, Ann-Kathrin
    Aastrup, Teodor
    Dong, Hai
    Yan, Mingdi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry. Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts Lowell, 1 University Ave., MA, 01854 Lowell, USA.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry. Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts Lowell, 1 University Ave., MA, 01854 Lowell, USA.
    Synthesis and binding affinity analysis of alpha 1-2-and alpha 1-6-O/S-linked dimannosides for the elucidation of sulfur in glycosidic bonds using quartz crystal microbalance sensors2017In: Carbohydrate Research, ISSN 0008-6215, E-ISSN 1873-426X, Vol. 452, p. 35-42Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of sulfur in glycosidic bonds has been evaluated using quartz crystal microbalance methodology. Synthetic routes towards alpha 1-2- and alpha 1-6-linked dimannosides with S-or O-glycosidic bonds have been developed, and the recognition properties assessed in competition binding assays with the cognate lectin concanavalin A. Mannose-presenting QCM sensors were produced using photoinitiated, nitrenemediated immobilization methods, and the subsequent binding study was performed in an automated flow-through instrumentation, and correlated with data from isothermal titration calorimetry. The recorded Kd-values corresponded well with reported binding affinities for the O-linked dimannosides with affinities for the alpha 1-2-linked dimannosides in the lower micromolar range. The S-linked analogs showed slightly disparate effects, where the alpha 1-6-linked analog showed weaker affinity than the O-linked dimannoside, as well as positive apparent cooperativity, whereas the alpha 1-2-analog displayed very similar binding compared to the O-linked structure. 

  • 83.
    Pei, Yuxin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Yu, Hui
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Pei, Zhichao
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Theurer, Matthias
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Ammer, Carolin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    André, Sabine
    Gabius, Hans-Joachim
    Yan, Mingdi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Photoderivatized polymer thin films at quartz crystal microbalance surfaces: Sensors for carbohydrate-protein interactions2007In: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 79, no 18, p. 6897-6902Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Photoderivatized polymer-coated gold surfaces have been developed following a perfluorophenylazide-based double ligation strategy. Gold-plated quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) crystals were initially covalently functionalized with a monolayer of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), using photo-or thermolytic nitrene formation and insertion. The polymer surfaces were subsequently used as substrates for photoinsertion of carbohydrate-derivatized photoprobes, yielding different recognition motifs for selective protein binding. The resulting robust and biocompatible sensor surfaces were applied to a flow-through QCM instrument for monitoring lectin-carbohydrate interactions in real time. The results clearly show the predicted lectin selectivity, demonstrating the applicability of the approach.

  • 84. Pei, Z
    et al.
    Larsson, R
    Aastrup, T
    Anderson, H
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Chemistry.
    Rapid screening of glycosyldisulfide lectin inhibitors from a dynamic combinatorial library2005In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 230, p. U690-U690Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 85.
    Pei, Zhichao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Aastrup, Teodor
    Anderson, Henrik
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Redox-Responsive and Calcium-Dependent Switching of Glycosyldisulfide Interactions with Concanavalin A2005In: Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters, ISSN 0960-894X, E-ISSN 1090-2120, Vol. 15, p. 2707-2710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glycosyldisulfides can interact efficiently with carbohydrate-binding entities. This has been shown for a range of thiosaccharide dimers when tested for their effects against the lectin Concanavalin A using a modified quartz crystal microbalance-technique. Contrary to the thiosaccharide monomers, showing no significant binding up to 10 mM, several of the dimers showed IC50-values in the low millimolar range. Three of the glycosyldisulfides tested also displayed very high positive apparent cooperativity effects that were found to be both calcium-dependent and redox-responsive.

  • 86.
    Pei, Zhichao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Aastrup, Teodor
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Study of Real-time Lectin–Carbohydrate Interactions on the Surface of a Quartz Crystal Microbalance2005In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 60-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor system for lectin-carbohydrate interactions has been developed. Yeast mannan was immobilised on polystyrene-coated quartz crystals, and interactions tested with the lectin concanavalin A (Con A). The biosensor could be easily operated, where mannan immobilisation and all binding analyses were performed in real-time using a flow-through system. The apparent binding constant for yeast mannan to Con A was estimated to be 0.4 μM, well in accordance to reported literature values. In addition, the effective concentration values (EC50-values) for a series of mannose/mannoside ligands, acting as competitors to the mannan/Con A interaction, were determined to range from 0.18 to 5.3 mM, in good correlation with a related enzyme-labelled lectin assay (ELLA) protocol

  • 87.
    Pei, Zhichao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Dong, Hai
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Caraballo, Rémi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Synthesis of Positional Thiol Analogs of β-D-Galactopyranose2007In: European Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 1434-193X, E-ISSN 1099-0690, Vol. 29, p. 4927-4934Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Approaches toward the synthesis of thio- beta -D -galactose derivatives are described. These compounds were prepared from the parent carbohydrates: D-galactose, methyl P-D-galactoside and methyl P-D-glucoside, respectively. It was found that not only the strategies of protecting group introduction and selective deprotection, but also the choices of solvent and nucleophilic reagent concentration were crucial to allow the efficient introduction of sulfur at different positions of the galactose ring. The effects from the solvent, the nucleophilic reagent concentration, and the protecting group patterns have been investigated. The results clearly show that ester protecting groups play highly important roles for the synthesis of thio-containing carbohydrates, requiring nonpolar solvents to suppress the neighboring group participation. For the Lattrell-Dax (nitrite -mediated) inversion reaction, employed in the synthetic route to the 2-thio-beta-D-galactoside, intramolecular nucleophilic attack, as well as stronger stereospecific ester activation, are necessary to overcome hindrance from 4,6-O-benzylidene protection.

  • 88.
    Pei, Zhichao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Dong, Hai
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Solvent-dependent, kinetically controlled stereoselective synthesis of 3- and 4- thioglycosides2005In: Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0022-3263, E-ISSN 1520-6904, Vol. 70, no 17, p. 6952-6955Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Facile approaches to prepare 3- and 4-thioglycosides of the galacto, gulo, and gluco type from the parent triflates are presented. The dependencies of the solvent and the protecting group pattern, as well as the configuration of the neighboring and leaving groups, have been studied for these reactions. The results clearly show that the efficient stereo-selective synthesis of methyl 3-thin-galactoside depends highly on the solvent and the nucleophile concentration.

  • 89.
    Pei, Zhichao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Larsson, Rikard
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Aastrup, Teodor
    Attana AB.
    Anderson, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Ångström Laboratory, Solid State Electronics.
    Lehn, Jean-Marie
    ISIS-Université Louis Pasteur.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Quartz crystal microbalance bioaffinity sensor for rapid identification of glycosyldisulfide lectin inhibitors from a dynamic combinatorial library2006In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 42-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbohydrate-lectin,interactions were probed with dynamic combinatorial libraries, using the plant lectin Concanavalin A as target species. The dynamic combinatorial libraries were generated from a pool of thiol components through reversible thiol-disulfide interchange, and screened using a simple and efficient method based on a quartz crystal microbalance setup. It was found that dimers based on 1-thio- and 6-thin-mannose analogues were the most active inhibitors. Furthermore, the results clearly show that the 6-thio-mannose possess unique characteristics compared to its oxygen-containing counterpart.

  • 90.
    Pei, Zhichao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Pei, Yuxin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Yu, Hui
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Theurer, Matthias
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    André, Sabine
    Gabius, Hans-Joachim
    Yan, Mingdi
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Photoderivatized QCM Surfaces for the Study of Real-Time Lectin-Carbohydrate InteractionsArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 91.
    Pei, Zhichao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Yu, Hui
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Theurer, Matthias
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Waldén, Annelie
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Yan, Mingdi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Photogenerated Carbohydrate Microarrays2007In: ChemBioChem (Print), ISSN 1439-4227, E-ISSN 1439-7633, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 166-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemical Equation Presented) Sugars in a row. A new strategy for carbohydrate microarrays based on photochemical ligation of perfluorophenylazide-derivatized carbohydrates to PEO surfaces is presented. It constitutes a controllable and robust method of array fabrication, on the carbohydrate chemistry and on the surface-chemistry levels, and the resulting carbohydrate arrays can be efficiently used to reveal the recognition patterns of carbohydrate-binding proteins.

  • 92.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Chemistry.
    Dynamic catalytic library generation and screening.2005In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 229, p. U329-U329Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 93.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Dynamic Combinatorial Resolution2007In: Latvian Journal of Chemistry, ISSN 0868-8249, Vol. 4, p. 263-269Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 94.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Synthesis and selection of functional and structural monomers2005In: Molecularly Imprinted Materials: Science and Technology, New York: Taylor & Francis , 2005, p. 49-67Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 95.
    Ramström, Olof
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Amorim, Luis
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Caraballo, Rémi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Norberg, Oscar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry: Ligands for Biomolecules2010In: Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry, Weinheim, Germany: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA , 2010Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 96.
    Ramström, Olof
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemistry.
    Bunyapaiboonsri, T.
    Lohmann, S.
    Lehn, J. M.
    Chemical biology of dynamic combinatorial libraries2002In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - General Subjects, ISSN 0304-4165, E-ISSN 1872-8006, Vol. 1572, no 03-feb, p. 178-186Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) is a recently introduced supramolecular approach to generate libraries of chemical compounds based on reversible exchange processes. The building elements are spontaneously and reversibly assembled to virtually encompass all possible combinations, allowing for simple one-step generation of complex libraries. The method has been applied to a variety of combinatorial systems, ranging from synthetic models to materials science and drug discovery, and enables the establishment of adaptive processes due to the dynamic interchange of the library constituents and its evolution toward the best fit to the target. In particular, it has the potential to become a useful tool in the direct screening of ligands to a chosen receptor without extensive prior knowledge of the site structure, and several biological systems have been targeted. In the vast field of glycoscience, the concept may find special perspective in response to the highly complex nature of carbohydrate-protein interactions. This chapter summarises studies that have been performed using DCC in biological systems, with special emphasis on glycoscience.

  • 97.
    Ramström, Olof
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemistry.
    Lehn, J. M.
    Drug discovery by dynamic combinatorial libraries2002In: Nature reviews. Drug discovery, ISSN 1474-1776, E-ISSN 1474-1784, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 26-36Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dynamic combinatorial chemistry is a recently introduced supramolecular approach that uses self-assembly processes to generate libraries of chemical compounds. In contrast to the stepwise methodology of classical combinatorial techniques, dynamic combinatorial chemistry allows for the generation of libraries based on the continuous interconversion between the library constituents. Spontaneous assembly of the building blocks through reversible chemical reactions virtually encompasses all possible combinations, and allows the establishment of adaptive processes owing to the dynamic interchange of the library constituents. Addition of the target ligand or receptor creates a driving force that favours the formation of the best-binding constituent - a self-screening process that is capable, in principle, of accelerating the identification of lead compounds for drug discovery.

  • 98.
    Ramström, Olof
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemistry.
    Lehn, J. M.
    In situ generation and screening of a dynamic combinatorial carbohydrate library against concanavalin A2000In: ChemBioChem (Print), ISSN 1439-4227, E-ISSN 1439-7633, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 41-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) is a recently introduced approach that is based on the generation of combinatorial libraries by reversible interconversion of the library constitutents. In this study, the implementation of such libraries on carbohydrate-lectin interactions was examined. The dynamic carbohydrate libraries were generated from a small set (four or six compounds) of initial carbohydrate dimers through mild disulfide interchange, and selection was performed under two conditions defining either adaptive or pre-equilibrated libraries. Upon initiation, libraries were formed that contained comparable amounts of 10 or 21 individual dimeric species, dynamically interchanging during the scrambling process. They were probed with respect to binding to the plant lectin concanavalin A, either present during library generation or added after equilibration. The libraries could be generated easily both in the presence and absence of the receptor, and a bis-mannose structure was preferentially bound and selected from the mixture. Scrambling of the library in the presence of the receptor resulted in slightly higher yields than when the receptor was added after scrambling, indicating that the receptor to some extent acts as a thermodynamic trap during library generation. The present results illustrate the extention of the DCC approach to carbohydrate recognition groups, the generation of isoenergetic dynamic libraries, and the implementation of either adaptive or pre-equilibrated procedures.

  • 99.
    Ramström, Olof
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Lehn, Jean-Marie
    Dynamic ligand assembly for medicinal chemistry2007In: Comprehensive Medicinal Chemistry II / [ed] Triggle, D.; Taylor, J., Oxford, UK: Elsevier, Ltd , 2007, p. 959-976Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 100.
    Ramström, Olof
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemistry.
    Lohmann, S.
    Bunyapaiboonsri, T.
    Lehn, J. M.
    Dynamic combinatorial carbohydrate libraries: Probing the binding site of the concanavalin A lectin2004In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 10, no 7, p. 1711-1715Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) has emerged as an efficient approach to receptor/ligand identification based on the generation of combinatorial libraries by reversible interconversion of the library constituents. In this study, the implementation of such libraries on carbohydrate-lectin interactions was examined with the plant lectin Concanavalin A as a target species. Dynamic carbohydrate libraries were generated from a pool of carbohydrate aldehydes and hydrazide linker/scaffold components through re- versible acylhydrazone exchange, resulting in libraries containing up to 474 constituents. Dynamic deconvolution allowed the efficient identification of the structural features required for binding to Concanavalin A and the selection of a strong binder, a tritopic mannoside, showing an IC50-value of 22 mum.

1234 51 - 100 of 195
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf