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  • 51.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Acceptable premises. An epistemic approach to an informal logic problem.2006In: History and Philosophy of Logic, ISSN 0144-5340, E-ISSN 1464-5149, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 209-210Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 52.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Aesthetic functionalism2005In: Contemporary Aesthetics, ISSN 1932-8478, E-ISSN 1932-8478, Vol. 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the strongest version of aesthetic functionalism, aesthetic value is completely determined by and therefore reducible to practical function. According to the opposite view, function and aesthetic value are completely independent of each other. Both these views are shown to be untenable, and instead aesthetic dualism is defended. By this, I mean that some aesthetic judgments that can legitimately be made about an object refer to it under descriptions of its practical function, whereas others refer to it, for instance, under descriptions of its physical appearance. Since valuations of the former type are in most cases positively correlated with satisfaction of functional requirements, this amounts to a defense of a radically weakened version of aesthetic functionalism.

  • 53.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    AGM contraction is not reconstructible as a descriptor operation2017In: Journal of logic and computation (Print), ISSN 0955-792X, E-ISSN 1465-363X, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 1133-1141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Centrolinear belief revision is based on a linear ordering of a set consisting of the belief sets that are potential outcomes of changes in belief. The outcome of any particular change is equal to the highest-ranked among those belief sets that satisfy the success condition of the change in question. In previous work, it has been shown that all transitively relational partial meet revisions are reconstructible as centrolinear operations. Here it is shown that transitively relational partial meet contraction is not in general reconstructible as a centrolinear operation. It is argued that neither partial meet contraction nor the centrolinear operation is a plausible representation of belief contraction. Other ways to represent how we give up beliefs should be explored.

  • 54.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    ALARA: What is Reasonably Achievable?2013In: Social and Ethical Aspects of Radiation Risk Management, Volume 19 (Radioactivity in the Environment), Elsevier, 2013, p. 143-155Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    "As low as practicable", "as low as reasonably practicable", and "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA) are closely related principles that have been introduced into radiation protection where they supplement other principles such as justification of exposures and individual dose limits. ALARA has been interpreted differently in different practical applications. Four major issues of interpretation are identified and discussed: (1) Does ALARA require exposures to be "as low as possible" or does is require an "optimal balance" that it is undesirable to deviate from in either direction? (2) Should ALARA be applied even to very low doses or is there a dose level below which it is not applicable? (3) Should ALARA-based compromises between radiation protection and economic considerations be made separately for each company, or should they be made in a unified manner for a whole branch of industry or perhaps even for society as a whole? (4) Can ALARA be operationalized with cost-benefit calculations, and if it can, should it be based on standard monetary values for preventing a fatality or on higher such values?

  • 55.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Alternativmedicinens globala dominans2011In: Folkvett, ISSN 0283-0795Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 56.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    An Agenda for the Ethics of Risk2009In: The Ethics of Technological Risk / [ed] Lotte Asveld and Sabine Roeser, London: Earthscan , 2009, p. 11-23Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    An Axiomatic Characterization of Base-Generated Multiple Partial Meet Contraction2012In: Studies in Logic, ISSN 1674-3202, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper combines two generalizations of the AGM (AlchourrónGärdenforsMakinson) framework for belief contraction, namely (1) base-generated contraction, in whichchanges on the belief set are generated from changes on an underlying belief base, and (2) multi-ple contraction, in which several sentences are removed at one and the same time. An operationthat combines the two generalizations,base-generated multiple partial meet contraction, is in-troduced and axiomatically characterized

  • 58.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Analytic Philosophy2009In: Theoria, ISSN 0040-5825, E-ISSN 1755-2567Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 59.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Anthropology and risk2019In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 532-533Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 60.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure.
    Belief revision from an epistemological point of view2004In: Handbook of epistemology / [ed] Ilkka Niiniluoto, Matti Sintonen, and Jan Wolenski, Kluwer , 2004, p. 255-279Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Bentham and the Shoemaker2009In: Theoria, ISSN 0040-5825, E-ISSN 1755-2567Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Bevisning i vetenskap och juridik: Kan man bevisa att något är ofarligt?2010In: Koll på kemikalier: Rättsliga förändringar,möjligheter och förändringar / [ed] Jonas Ebbesson, David Langlet, Iustus Förlag AB , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 63.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Blockage Contraction2013In: Journal of Philosophical Logic, ISSN 0022-3611, E-ISSN 1573-0433, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 415-442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blockage contraction is an operation of belief contraction that acts directly on the outcome set, i.e. the set of logically closed subsets of the original belief set K that are potential contraction outcomes. Blocking is represented by a binary relation on the outcome set. If a potential outcome X blocks another potential outcome Y, and X does not imply the sentence p to be contracted, then Y not equal aEuro parts per thousand K A center dot p. The contraction outcome K A center dot p is equal to the (unique) inclusion-maximal unblocked element of the outcome set that does not imply p. Conditions on the blocking relation are specified that ensure the existence of such a unique inclusion-maximal set for all sentences p. Blockage contraction is axiomatically characterized and its relations to AGM-style operations are investigated. In a finite-based framework, every transitively relational partial meet contraction is also a blockage contraction.

  • 64.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Blockage Revision2015In: Journal of Logic, Language and Information, ISSN 0925-8531, E-ISSN 1572-9583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blockage revision is a version of descriptor revision, i.e. belief change in which a belief set K is changed with inputs whose success conditions are metalinguistic expressions containing the belief predicate (Formula presented.). This is a highly general framework that allows a single revision operator (Formula presented.) to take inputs corresponding to sentential revision ((Formula presented.)), contraction ((Formula presented.)) as well as more complex and composite operations. In blockage revision, such an operation is based on a relation (Formula presented.) of blockage among the set of potential outcomes. (Formula presented.) signifies that if X satisfies the success condition of a belief change, then Y cannot be its outcome. The properties of blockage revision are investigated, and conditions on the blocking relation are specified that characterize various properties of the resulting operation of change.

  • 65.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Bluffen med öronljus2011In: Folkvett, ISSN 0283-0795Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 66.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Bootstrap Contraction2013In: Studia Logica: An International Journal for Symbolic Logic, ISSN 0039-3215, E-ISSN 1572-8730, Vol. 101, no 5, p. 1013-1029Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We can often specify how we would contract by a certain sentence by saying that this contraction would coincide with some other contraction that we know how to perform. We can for instance clarify that our contraction by p&q would coincide with our contraction by p, or by q, or by {p, q}. In a framework where the set of potential outcomes is known, some contractions are "self-evident" in the sense that there is only one serious candidate that can be the outcome of such a contraction. Contraction by a specific contractee (sentence or set of sentences to be contracted) is bootstrapped if it is specified by saying that it coincides with some such self-evident contraction. For a wide range of (multiple) contraction operators, contractions by any contractee can be bootstrapped. This means that the selection mechanism (selection function, incision function, etc.) can be replaced by a function called a bootstrapping selector that assigns to each contractee some "self-evident" contractee that yields the same outcome. With bootstrapping we can eliminate traditional extralogical components in contraction (e.g., selection functions) and replace them by bootstrapping selectors that reflect more closely the ways in which we actually reason and argue about belief contraction.

  • 67.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy.
    Category-specified value statements2006In: Synthese, ISSN 0039-7857, E-ISSN 1573-0964, Vol. 148, no 2, p. 425-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A value statement such as she is a good teacher is categoryspecified, i.e., the criteria of evaluation are specified as those that are applicable to a given category, in this case the category of teachers. In this study of categoryspecified value statements, certain categories are identified that cannot be used to specify value aspects. Special attention is paid to categories that are constituted by functional characteristics. The logical properties of value statements that refer to such categories are shown to differ significantly from the corresponding properties in social choice theory.

  • 68.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Changing the Scientific Corpus2010In: Belief Revision Meets Philosophy of Science / [ed] Erik J. Olsson and Sebastian Enqvist, Dordrecht: Springer, 2010, p. 43-58Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, Superseded Departments, History of Science and Technology.
    Choosing priority-setting criteria for carcinogens2001In: Human and Ecological Risk Assessment, ISSN 1080-7039, E-ISSN 1549-7860, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 475-491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For priority-setting purposes, simple criteria are needed to estimate, provisionally, the inherent properties of potential carcinogens for which adequate data are not available. Expected utility analysis is used to evaluate three such criteria from a decision-theoretic point of view: (1) the species criterion, which assigns lower priority to experimental than to epidemiological carcinogens, (2) the genotoxicity criterion, which prioritizes substances known to be genotoxic, and (3) the potency criterion, which apportions priorities according to carcinogenic potencies that are derived from animal experiments. The outcome of this analysis is favorable to the potency criterion. It is concluded that considerations of potency should have a much more prominent role than what they have in current regulatory practice.

  • 70.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy.
    Coherence in epistemology and belief revision2006In: Philosophical Studies, ISSN 0031-8116, E-ISSN 1573-0883, Vol. 128, no 1, p. 93-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A general theory of coherence is proposed, in which systemic and relational coherence are shown to be interdefinable. When this theory is applied to sets of sentences, it turns out that logical closure obscures the distinctions that are needed for a meaningful analysis of coherence. It is concluded that references to all beliefs in coherentist phrases such as all beliefs support each other have to be modified so that merely derived beliefs are excluded. Therefore, in order to avoid absurd conclusions, coherentists have to accept a weak version of epistemic priority, that sorts out merely derived beliefs. Furthermore, it is shown that in belief revision theory, coherence cannot be adequately represented by logical closure, but has to be represented separately.

  • 71. Hansson, Sven Ove
    Coherentist contraction2000In: Journal of Philosophical Logic, ISSN 0022-3611, E-ISSN 1573-0433, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 315-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A model of coherentist belief contraction is constructed. The outcome of belief contraction is required to be one of the coherent subsets of the original belief set, and a set of plausible properties is proposed for this set of coherent subsets. The contraction operators obtained in this way are shown to coincide with well-known belief base operations. This connection between coherentist and foundationalist approaches to belief change has important implications for the philosophical interpretation of models of belief change.

  • 72.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Condensed Examples in Philosophy2006In: Theoria, ISSN 0040-5825, E-ISSN 1755-2567, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 97-99Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 73.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy.
    Contraction based on sentential selection2007In: Journal of logic and computation (Print), ISSN 0955-792X, E-ISSN 1465-363X, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 479-498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The properties of full meet contraction are investigated, and it is shown to be a useful building-block in the construction of composite contraction operators. This is followed by a detailed investigation of specified meet contraction, i.e. the operation divided by such that K divided by p = K similar to f(p), where similar to is full meet contraction and f is a function from sentences to sentences. A number of realistic examples of belief contraction are discussed, and it is shown how the properties of contraction differ according to how the sentence to be contracted is situated in the structure of the belief state. Some plausible properties of f are proposed, and it is shown how they correspond to properties of the contraction operator.

  • 74.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Coping with the unpredictable effects of future technologies2011In: Philosophy and Technology, ISSN 2210-5433, Vol. 24, p. 137-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Available methods such as technology assessment and risk analysis have failed to predict the effects of technological choices. We need to give up the futile predictive ambitions of previous approaches and instead base decisions on systematic studies of alternative future developments. It will then be necessary to cope with mere possibility arguments, i.e., arguments in which a conclusion is drawn from a mere possibility that a course of action may have certain consequences. A five-step procedure is proposed for the assessment of such arguments. It includes (1) a search for mere possibility arguments pointing in different directions, (2) a scientific evaluation that may lead to the specification or refutation of some of these arguments, (3) two symmetry tests, (4) evaluation of the seriousness of the arguments in terms of novelty, spatio-temporal unlimitedness and interference with complex systems, and (5) hypothetical retrospection that aims at finding a course of action that will be defensible in retrospect.

  • 75.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Cost-benefit analysis: philosophical issues2010In: The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics Online, Palgrave Macmillan , 2010Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cost–benefit analysis (CBA) gives rise to a whole range of philosophical issues. The most discussed among these is the status of economic values that are assigned to assets conceived as incommensurable with money, such as a human life or the continued existence of an animal species. CBA also involves other contentious assumptions, for instance that a disadvantage affecting one person can be fully compensated for by an advantage affecting some other person. Another controversial issue is whether a CBA should cover all aspects in a decision or rather leave out certain issues (such as justice) so that they can instead be treated separately.

  • 76.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Cutting the Gordian Knot of Demarcation2009In: International Studies in the Philosophy of Science, ISSN 0269-8595, E-ISSN 1469-9281, Vol. 23, p. 237-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A definition of pseudoscience is proposed, according to which a statement is pseudoscientific if and only if it (1) pertains to an issue within the domains of science, (2) is not epistemically warranted, and (3) is part of a doctrine whose major proponents try to create the impression that it is epistemically warranted. This approach has the advantage of separating the definition of pseudoscience from the justification of the claim that science represents the most epistemically warranted statements. The definition is used to explain why proponents of widely divergent criteria for the demarcation between science and pseudoscience tend to be in almost complete agreement on the particular demarcations that should presumably be based on these general criteria.

  • 77.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Dealing with climate science denialism: experiences from confrontations with other forms of pseudoscience2018In: Climate Policy, ISSN 1469-3062, E-ISSN 1752-7457, Vol. 18, no 9, p. 1094-1102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate science denialism is a form of pseudoscience. This contribution provides proposals for how to counter it, based on previous research on the demarcation between science and pseudoscience and on the author’s experience of tackling other forms of pseudoscience. Science denialism has much in common with other variants of pseudoscience, but it also has characteristics of its own. In particular, it is much more prone than other forms of pseudoscience to seek conflicts with genuine science. Like other science denialists, those attacking climate science have fabricated a large number of fake controversies in issues where there is no authentic scientific controversy. The defence of climate science against science denial has to take this into account. There is no reason to accept the denialists’ agenda or to treat their claims as legitimate alternatives to science. Climate science should primarily be presented to the public in ways that are independent of denialist activities, rather than reactively in response to those activities. Disclosures of the strategies, motives and funding of denialism are important contributions to the public understanding of the fake controversies. It is also important to document the scientific consensus and make it known. The public defence of climate science is an important and urgent undertaking, and active contributions by as many scientists as possible are needed. Key policy insights Climate science denialism is a form of pseudoscience, and much can be learned from confrontations with other types of pseudoscience. The creation of fake controversies is a key strategy of climate science denialism. It is important to expose this strategy and not to accept denialists’ choice of an agenda. ‘Equal time’ arrangements should be rejected since they put the truthful side at a disadvantage. It takes more time to refute a single lie than to deliver ten new ones. The experience from fighting tobacco science denialism shows that it is highly efficient to expose the hidden operations, funding and motives behind denialism. As many scientists as possible should take part in the public defence of climate science. This is one of the best ways to show our consensus. 

  • 78.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Decision Theory: An Overview2011In: International Encyclopedia of Statistical Science / [ed] Miodrag Lovric, Springer, 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 79.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Decomposition of multiple AGM contraction: possibility and impossibility results2014In: Logic journal of the IGPL (Print), ISSN 1367-0751, E-ISSN 1368-9894, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 696-710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Partial meet contraction, the standard operation of contraction in AGM theory, can straightforwardly be generalized to contractions with sets of sentences instead of single sentences as inputs (multiple contraction). The conditions under which multiple contraction can be reconstructed as the intersection of several contractions by single sentences are investigated. Although such reconstruction is possible in some special cases, the major result is that in the general case, full reconstruction is not possible. Therefore, multiple contraction adds to the expressive power of belief revision theory. It is concluded that this result highlights the importance of studying multiple belief change, and multiple conclusion logic in general.

  • 80.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Defining pseudoscience and science2013In: Philosophy of Pseudoscience: Reconsidering the Demarcation Problem / [ed] Massimo Pigliucci, Maarten Boudry, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2013, p. 61-77Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 81.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Defining Technical Function2006In: Studies in history and philosophy of science, ISSN 0039-3681, E-ISSN 1879-2510, Vol. 37, p. 19-22Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 82.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    De-Marginalizing the Philosophy of Technology2012In: Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology, ISSN 1091-8264, E-ISSN 1091-8264, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 89-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Five examples are given of major philosophical discussions in which technology needs to be taken into account. In the philosophy of science, the notion of mechanism has a central role. It has a technological origin, and its interpretation has links to technology. In the philosophy of mind, a series of technological analogues have had a deep influence on our understanding of human cognition: automata and watches, telegraphy and telephony, and most recently computers. The discussion on free will largely concerns, in Locke's words, whether we can "put morality and mechanism together." Notions of computation and automata that have been abstracted from the behavior of technological devices are key concepts both in logic and in the philosophy of mathematics. Finally, bioethics is largely concerned with the ethical issues that new technologies give rise to in healthcare. As these examples show, there is no lack of technology-related subject matter in philosophy, but there is a lack of sustained attention to it.

  • 83.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Deontic diversity2014In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743, E-ISSN 1611-3349, Vol. 8554 LNAI, p. 5-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is commonly assumed that deontic logic concerns "the" logic of normative concepts. However, a close look at actual usage shows that the structural patterns of deontic notions differ between different usages. Some of these differences are difficult to discern in natural language, but may be easier to keep apart with the more precise tools of a formal language. We should use the resources of deontic logic to discover and distinguish between different meanings of the deontic terms in natural language. Some of the ingrained disagreements on postulates in deontic logic may be resolvable if we recognize that the different viewpoints correspond to different meanings of the normative terms of ordinary language.

  • 84.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Descriptor Revision2014In: Studia Logica: An International Journal for Symbolic Logic, ISSN 0039-3215, E-ISSN 1572-8730, Vol. 102, no 5, p. 955-980Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A descriptor is a set of sentences that are truth-functional combinations of expressions of the form , where is a metalinguistic belief predicate and p a sentence in the object language in which beliefs are expressed. Descriptor revision (denoted ) is an operation of belief change that takes us from a belief set K to a new belief set where is a descriptor representing the success condition. Previously studied operations of belief change are special cases of descriptor revision, hence sentential revision can be represented as , contraction as , multiple contraction as , replacement as , etc. General models of descriptor revision are constructed and axiomatically characterized. The common selection mechanisms of AGM style belief change cannot be used, but they can be replaced by choice functions operating directly on the set of potential outcomes (available belief sets). The restrictions of this construction to sentential revision () and sentential contraction give rise to operations with plausible properties that are also studied in some some detail.

  • 85.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Det förflutnas magi2006In: Folkvett : organ för Vetenskap och folkbildning, ISSN 0283-0795, no 1Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 86.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Do we Need a Special Ethics for Research?2011In: Science and Engineering Ethics, ISSN 1353-3452, E-ISSN 1471-5546, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 21-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research is subject to more stringent ethical requirements than most other human activities, and a procedure that is otherwise allowed may be forbidden in research. Hence, risk-taking is more restricted in scientific research than in most non-research contexts, and privacy is better protected in scientific questionnaires than in marketing surveys. Potential arguments for this difference are scrutinized. The case in its favour appears to be weak. A stronger case can be made in favour of a difference in the opposite direction: If perilous or otherwise problematic activities have to be performed it is usually better to perform them in a research context where they are properly evaluated so that guidance is obtained for the future. However, retreating from current ethical demands on research is not a desirable direction to go. Instead, research ethics can serve to inspire the introduction of more stringent ethical principles in other social sectors.

  • 87.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy.
    Do We Need Second-Order Probabilities?2008In: Dialectica, ISSN 0012-2017, E-ISSN 1746-8361, Vol. 62, no 4, p. 525-533Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although it has often been claimed that all the information contained in second-order probabilities can be contained in first-order probabilities, no practical recipe for the elimination of second-order probabilities without loss of information seems to have been presented. Here, such an elimination method is introduced for repeatable events. However, its application comes at the price of losses in cognitive realism. In spite of their technical eliminability, second-order probabilities are useful because they can provide models of important features of the world that are cognitively more plausible than those that can be obtained with single-level probabilities.

  • 88.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Economic (ir)rationality in risk analysis2006In: Economics and Philosophy, ISSN 0266-2671, E-ISSN 1474-0028, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 231-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mainstream risk analysis deviates in at least two important respects from the rationality ideal of mainstream economics. First, expected utility maximization is not applied in a consistent way. It is applied to endodoxastic uncertainty, i.e. the uncertainty (or risk) expressed in a risk assessment, but in many cases not to metadoxastic uncertainty, i.e. uncertainty about which of several competing assessments is correct. Instead, a common approach to metadoxastic uncertainty is to only take the most plausible assessment into account. This will typically lead to risk-prone deviations from risk-neutrality Secondly, risks and benefits for different persons are added to form a total value of risk. Such calculations are used to support the view that one should accept being exposed to a risk if it brings greater benefits for others. This is in stark contrast to modern Paretian welfare economics, that refrains from interindividual comparisons and does not require people to accept a disadvantage because it brings a larger advantage for others.

  • 89.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Editorial: A Dialogue on Definitions2007In: Theoria, ISSN 0040-5825, E-ISSN 1755-2567Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 90.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Editorial: A Dialogue on Logic2006In: Theoria, ISSN 0040-5825, E-ISSN 1755-2567Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 91.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Editorial: Against Programmatic Ignorance2007In: Theoria, ISSN 0040-5825, E-ISSN 1755-2567, Vol. 73, no 2, p. 95-97Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 92.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure.
    Editorial: Good Philosophy2004In: Theoria, ISSN 0040-5817, E-ISSN 1558-5816, Vol. 70, no 1, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 93.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Editorial notice2010In: Theoria, ISSN 0040-5825, E-ISSN 1755-2567Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 94.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Editorial: Philosophers and Intellectuals2005In: Theoria, ISSN 0040-5825, E-ISSN 1755-2567, Vol. 71, no 3, p. 201-202Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 95.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Editorial: Philosophical Schools2006In: Theoria, ISSN 0040-5825, E-ISSN 1755-2567Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 96.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Editorial: Philosophical Seminars2005In: Theoria, ISSN 0040-5825, E-ISSN 1755-2567, Vol. 71, no 2, p. 89-91Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 97.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Editorial: Philosophical Terminology2005In: Theoria, ISSN 0040-5825, E-ISSN 1755-2567, Vol. 71, no 4, p. 291-293Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 98.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure.
    Editorial: Popular philosophy2004In: Theoria, ISSN 0040-5817, E-ISSN 1558-5816, Vol. 70, no 2-3, p. 117-118Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 99.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Editorial: Rationality and Emotions2007In: Theoria, ISSN 0040-5825, E-ISSN 1755-2567Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 100.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Editorial: The Modal Status of Philosophy2006In: Theoria, ISSN 0040-5825, E-ISSN 1755-2567, Vol. 72, no 3, p. 173-176Article in journal (Other academic)
1234567 51 - 100 of 402
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