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  • 1.
    ABBASSI, BEHRANG
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    HULTLING JACOBSEN, JOHANNES
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    A Managerial Perspective on Uncertainty and Commitment in Organizational Change2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Organizational change has during the last decades become a common practice among corporations in every major market. Change has ironically become a constant, which has put an emphasis on organizations to master the practice of change management. In addition to becoming a more and more relevant practice, change initiatives are hard to carry through with little, or even any, financial success, according to prevalent research. The purpose of this master’s thesis, conducted at The Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) and in collaboration with a large company going through a major organizational change, was investigating the notion of uncertainty and commitment, as well as the relationship between the two, amongst managers within the context of organizational change.

    The thesis, which is a qualitative study, has been based on 14 interviews with mid-level managers at a company, referred to in the thesis as Case Company. Furthermore, the thesis has used prevalent research in order to segment, delimit and analyze the empirical data. The findings have shown that the drivers of commitment; namely understanding; belief and involvement, and the mitigating factors of uncertainty; information sharing and control, do in fact have interlinking causalities. In short, information sharing furthers understanding, which in turn affects the belief in the change initiatives. Moreover, involvement gives employees, managers included, a sense of control, which reduces feelings of uncertainty. The findings have also shown that there exist factors, which are not underlined by prevalent research, that heavily affect the communicating and information sharing processes of change initiatives. These factors are primarily the involvement and power possessed by unions and worker’s councils. The research has also shown that both current theory and practice do not consider the long-term adverse effect of organizational change to the extent we argue that it mandates. These adverse effects are referred to in the thesis, as well as prevalent theor, as survivor’s syndrome, which can be summarized as the residual effects of a change on the members of the organization that remain.

    The thesis has given fruit to possible areas of improvement for Case Company, which  ncludes, among others, the information sharing process and long-term adverse effects of organizational change. Moreover, the thesis has also highlighted potential segmentations and focus areas of future research, which include observing how commitment to the proposed change compared to the commitment to the organization changes as organizational change makes its presence felt.

  • 2.
    ADUT, JONATHAN
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Applying agile approaches in public construction and civil engineering projects: A study to identify opportunities for a more flexible projectmanagement process2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In an ever-evolving business climate, with new projects emerging like never before, the need for efficient project management within all areas is highly stressed. The core of any project management is to carefully plan, organise, motivate and control resources to achieve a desired outcome and to meet project objectives. Traditional project management provides a project design frame that is uniformly constructed to apply to almost any type of project. Working with project phases in traditional C&CE projects have a tendency to be too rigid and time consuming for today's dynamic business environment.

    Project management of today is no longer about managing the sequence of steps required to complete the project on time. It is about systematically incorporating the voice of the customer, creating a disciplined way of prioritising effort and resolving trade-offs, working concurrently on all aspects of the project in multi-functional teams. Studying the concept of Agile Project Management allows for just that.

    Agile approaches allow the project management process to be a vivid and continuously updated. Agile project management provides project managers with methods, tools and approaches to aid both the project manager and project client to engage in a more efficient manner, allowing for more open communication, feedback sessions and the notion of pursuing a shared goal towards successful project management.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether project management within the C&CE industry – which so far mostly has been carried out in a traditional way – could benefit from utilising agile approaches. By studying both traditional project management and observing how projects were run at WSP Management, as well as interviewing experienced senior project managers, the identification of possible agile approaches was identified.

    Combining the foundation of knowledge about the traditional sense of project management with agile theory, value & principles and interviews with agile experts – it became evident that the possibilities of utilising and benefitting from agile approaches in the C&CE industry is viable.

  • 3. Ahlberg, Beth Maina
    et al.
    Maina, Faith
    Kubai, Anne
    Khamasi, Wanjiku
    Ekman, Marianne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Lundqvist-Persson, Cristina
    "A child, a tree": Challenges in building collaborative relations in a community research project in a Kenyan context2016In: Action Research, ISSN 1476-7503, E-ISSN 1741-2617, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 257-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper highlights the potential for basing participatory action research on priorities identified by communities. The case builds on a research project by the Social Science Medicine Africa Network (Soma-net) focusing on AIDS prevention among school youth in Kajiado in Kenya during 2003-2006. It became clear from that study just how complex it is to promote open communication on issues of sexuality considered critical for sexual health promotion. Towards the end of that study a spin-off in the form of a concept a child, a tree or tree planting evolved and the research thereafter continued as a partnership between the school community and the researchers. The focus then was on understanding how health promotion could be integrated into other aspects of community life. The concept and tree planting when implemented created a sense of ownership among the pupils largely because they were placed at the centre of the development activities. The story illuminates the nature of change developing in the course of the project, but also the challenges and complexity of creating and maintaining collaborative relations in the face of cultural and gender power dynamics and interventions imposed from outside the community.

  • 4.
    Allmér, Gustaf
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Joakim, Svantesson
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    How internal factors influence the work towards increased energy performance: A case study in a Swedish construction company2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    För  att  minska Europas klimatpåverkan ställer Sveriges regering och Europeiska Unionen allt högre krav på byggindustrin gällande energiprestandan i nybyggda flerbostadshus, då bostadssektorn idag står för en betydande del av Sveriges totala energiförbrukning. Byggföretagen jobbar numera för förbättrad energiprestanda i nybyggda bostäder, men skillnaden från projekt till projekt kan vara mycket stor. Man har i tidigare forskning studerat de externa faktorer som påverkar hur långt man är villig att gå energimässigt i bostadsprojekt, men lite forskning har bedrivits kring de interna faktorerna.

    Detta examensarbete har därför till syfte att identifiera dessa interna faktorer och även förklara varför de påverkar processen. För att studera detta har en fallstudie utförts på ett svenskt byggföretag där aktörer inom stora delar av den interna byggprocessen finns representerade. Semi strukturerade intervjuer genomfördes för att ge en så utförlig bild som  möjligt av processen och de faktorer som påverkar den. Intervjudatan sorterades, reducerades och analyserades genom stöd av ett teoretiskt ramverk. I detta ingår teorier från tidigare studier och olika Knowledge Managementteorier, vilka används för att tolka och förstå de faktorer som iakttagits. 

    Studiens resultat innefattar en redogörelse för viktiga observerade interna faktorer som påverkar processen i fallstudieföretaget mot mer energieffektiva flerbostadshus. Exempel på dessa är: individers kunskap och åsikt om ökad energiprestanda, tidpunkten i projektet då energifrågan lyfts upp, hur kunskap återvinns inom företaget, hur man följer upp energiberäkningar och val av medium för att dela kunskap. Många av de faktorer som identifierats är kopplade till vilken attityd och strategi  ledningen  väljer för energifrågan.  Den attityd som uppifrån förmedlas kommer också att antas av aktörerna i processen, och man har här möjligheten  att göra ett val i hur mycket man som företag vill satsa på fortsatt förbättrad energiprestanda.

  • 5.
    Allmér, Gustaf
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Svantesson, Joakim
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    How Internal Factors Influence the WorkTowards Increased Energy Performance: A case study in a Swedish construction company2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In order to reduce the climate impact of Europe, the Swedish government and the European Union present increasingly stricter requirements for the construction industry regarding energy performance of newly built apartment buildings. The housing sector ccounts fora  considerablepart  of the energy demand in Sweden. While construction companies work withimprovements  of the energy performance, the difference from one project to another can very significantly. Earlier studies have examined external factors influencing  how far companies are prepared  to go regarding  energy performance, but little has been researched   regarding the internal factors.

    The purpose  of this thesis is therefore to identify these internal factors  but also to explain  why they influence the process. To examine this, a case study was conducted on a Swedish construction company where large parts of the actors within  the internal construction process were represented. Semi structured interviews  were conducted in order to get a  detailed picture of the process and the factors influencing it. The interview data was  sorted, reduced and analyzed  through support of a theoretical framework. In this framework,  theories from earlier studies were included, together with different Knowledge Management-theories, which were used to facilitate the interpreting and understanding of the factors that  had been observed.

    The results of the study suggest  that there are internal factors influencing the process, in the case company, towards  increased energy performance in apartment buildings. Examples of the factors are:  individual interest and opinion, point in time when the energy issue was lifted, how knowledge is reused, follow up of calculations and choice of medium for knowledge transfer. Many of these identified factors are connected to the attitude and strategy regarding energy questions that the upper management choses to communicate. Actors in the process will adopt the attitude that is communicated, and this creates a possibility for the company  to make a choice regarding how much effort should be put into continued improved energy  performance.

  • 6.
    Arabzadeh, Daniel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    How to Stay Aligned Rather than Becoming Fragmented: The Importance of Knowledge Management in Flexible Working2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Although the fundamental settings for the global business landscape has evolved throughout history in areas such as social, economic, political and demographical trends, companies  are still experiencing the same challenges in performing within the traditional criteria: profitability, customer satisfaction, market share, and innovation. Corporations have to constantly adapt to the changing market (Microsoft, 2005).

    In the current economic climate an increasingly more common change management program, has become flexible working. Flexible working in accordance with Oseland and Webber (2012) implies for many corporations a radical change on the entire organizational structure. What characterizes flexible working is the top management support for employees to be flexible regarding their working hours and working locations as long as they do their job.

    However, the flexible working change management program is not entirely without risks. Working remotely, also known as teleworking or telecommuting, may cause negative social implications among the workforce and could in the long-term lead to cultural cannibalization(Bailey and Kurland, 1999). In order to respond to risk of organizational fragmentation in flexible work systems that are embossed by distance, previous research show the importance  of managing the intellectual assets in order to promote collaboration and communication (Fontaine et al, 2000). Through an on-site case study at Microsoft Sweden, a new adopter of flexible working, this paper aimed to identify the factors that affect knowledge management in a flexible working organization. Recommendations were also to be made on how a flexible working organization should respond to the risk of organizational fragmentation.

    The qualitative study at Microsoft Sweden, including 18 semi-structured interviews and a review of previous research, show that the following factors are driving knowledge management in flexible working companies: distance, performance measurement, enabling technology, the office, the structure in codification and the alignment.

    This research study shows that top managers in flexible working companies must work to spread awareness regarding the importance of knowledge management in flexible working success. Moreover, training must be distributed to employees on the what knowledge should be transferred, how it is done, why it is done, and ultimately top management must foster a culture that care why they are needed to share their knowledge. Mentorship programs are recommended for new recruits. Another important factor is the need for revising the performance measurement process. Improperly defined measurements will lead the organization to succumb to cannibalizing internal competition in flexible working. The research have also shown that flexible working companies need to refine their codification structure and embrace a codification process that actually works as a knowledge sharing tool instead of individual note-taking. Top management can’t allow any lacking in the usage of the flexible working enabling technology. There are an increasing need of team building in flexible working and top management must be sure to invest in developing team spirit and connectedness among the workforce. However, the most important recommendation is that leaders must lead as example on how employees should work in a flexible working organization, and more importantly, how they should share their knowledge. The research suggests that if the recommendations are followed, this will help flexible working organizations stay aligned rather than become fragmented. Future research include, a larger scale study regarding the drivers of knowledge management in flexible working, and an in-depth study regarding each of the produced factors: the distance, the performance measurement, the enabling technology, the office, the structure in codification and the leadership. A more comprehensive action plan on how to respond to each of factors needs to be developed.

  • 7.
    Berggren, Max
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Wiklund, Johanna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Conditions for Collaborative Creativity in Mobile Multi-Locational Work Systems: A managerial perspective on supporting collaborative creativity in a virtualized setting2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The increasingly virtualized work life, brought on by increased demand on flexibility and work- life balance as well as technological development, has changed the way we work. At the same time the need for organizations to be creative in order to compete on the expanding market has grown. This is a fact that increases the need for groups to be creative through collaboration. Hence, this study investigates how collaborative creativity can be created in Mobile Multi-Locational Work Systems, from a managerial point of view.

    The existing theoretical body of knowledge on collaborative creativity and virtual structures, such as Mobile Multi-Locational Work Systems, points to communication as an area of key importance. When further investigating the factor of communication, two sub-areas were identified; Social Factors and Coordination. Moreover the role of leadership in collaborative creativity implies that managers have an important role in creating conditions for collaborative creativity.

    In order to investigate how collaborative creativity can be stimulated in Mobile Multi-Locational Work Systems, managerial perceptions of work within such a system were collected through interviews at our case company, Microsoft AB. The organization had implemented a Mobile Multi- Locational Work Systems called the New World of Work, allowing employees to work flexibly. Results imply that Mobile Multi-Locational Work Systems affect conditions for collaborative creativity in both stimulating and inhibiting manners. The system implementation appears to increase group external communication across organizational boundaries. It likely increases the amount of ideas and knowledge available, which is positive for collaborative creativity. However, handling factors related to communication, social factors and work coordination within work groups appears to be critical in facilitating collaborative creativity as they appear to be affected by the Mobile Multi-Locational Work System implementation. Results indicate that if managers allows freedom with responsibility, provides a clear framework, creates forums for social and work interaction, coaches their employees and acts as role models it is likely that they will stimulate collaborative creativity in their team.

  • 8.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Gaddefors, Johan
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Provoking identities: Entrepreneurship and emerging identity positions in rural development2016In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 28, no 1-2, p. 76-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses entrepreneurship in a depleted community in transition. The purpose is to develop knowledge about how discourses are used in the positioning of identity in regional development. The concept positioning illustrates how identities are provoked, challenged, negotiated and moved into identity positions that break away from the idea of imitating successful and wealthy regions; instead, locality, place and history emerge as important resources from where local actors obtain agency and recognize new opportunities. Ethnographic data of a single case were collected over a six-year period between 2005 and 2010. The longitudinal nature of the study made it possible to incorporate how local stakeholders took on new identity positions, while handling their inspiration as well as their frustration. Results show how rural change was conditioned by discourses and how entrepreneurship challenged and reframed dominating structures through interaction between entrepreneurship and community. Four discourses, expressed as dichotomies available to people in this depleted community, illustrate the interactive process of positioning: change vs. traditions, rational vs. irrational, spectacular vs. mundane and individual vs. collective. The results support research emphasizing perspectives that acknowledge interaction between entrepreneurship and context as well as discursive aspects of regional development.

  • 9.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Consumption of entrepreneurs, consumption of entrepreneurship: Bloggers, influencers and socialites in a post-feminist economy2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the wake of the neoliberal turn, discourses on the ‘the women entrepreneur’ who starts up and manages her own company, has been stretched to include ‘the entrepreneurial women’, who affirms already achieved gender equality and thus find feminist activism less necessary to pursue (McRobbie, 2004; Gill, 2007). Entrepreneurship emphasis onindividualism, choice, and empowerment offers women postfeminist subject positions (Lewis, 2014). Wo/men’s independence has turned into an entrepreneurial class achievement (Gill, 2014), which is attained through consumption and a critical gaze on the self (Tasker & Negra, 2007). It has been reported that women’s magazines have dropped feminist content and nowadays offer women space for both self-revaluation and self-actualization (McRobbie, 2004, 2009, 2011, HolmerNadesan& Trethewey, 2000; Bröckling, 2010) Boundaries become blurred, including the male/female division, whilst the autonomous male subject of liberal polity (‘the economic man’) is turned into an invisible template (Hekman2004).  

    In this paper, we study this emerging terrain by turning to popular bloggers’ sites asking what kind of subject positions that are promoted. Our empirical data consist of blog posts, podcasts, social media interactions and interviews with a number of professional Swedish bloggers/influencers/entrepreneurs, both male and female. 

    What is common for all these entrepreneurs is that they have built up thriving and multi-faceted businesses around their personas – centering on a constant sharing of their personal lives in combination with positioning themselves as socialites and experts on matters such as fashion, interior decoration, media trends, travel – and entrepreneurship. The base – usually a blog site or a weekly podcast – has been expanded by all sorts of other activities; e.g., book publishing, TV shows, stage performances, beauty products, clothing lines and magazines.

    Feminism is an integrated part of all this, but in a ‘girlpower-ish’ sense where women can be independent and successful by their own making. In one sense, their subject positioning signifies a departure from the ethos of usefulness and discipline of classic neoliberalism (cfBerglund et al, 2017); they are to be admired because of their consumption, they are to be consumed themselves as signifiers of effectiveness, success, style and family happiness. But they are also avid promoters of classic entrepreneurial virtues; their lifestyles are within reach if you work hard, consume the right products and services, care for your career and your family at the same time. It is subject positions void of structural aspects of society (such as class), void of political conflict and void of problematisationof consumption in relation to sustainability issues.

    Our empirical examples are clearly related to recent claims that the neoliberal turn have unearthed the entrepreneurial “active, freely choosing, self-reinventing subject of postfeminism”(Gill and Scharff, 2011, p. 7). This subject may however take different shapes whereby it is more suitable to talk about how entrepreneurship discourses underpin a reconfiguration of femininity, thus offering women a variety of ‘outfits’. What these subjects share, except expecting undisputed economic freedom, is the wish (or need) to continuously self-actualise and transform, take responsibility, exercise (often conflicting) choices, in a world without radical or upsetting politics (Lewis et al, 2017). The entrepreneurial subject of neoliberalism and the self-fashioning postfeminist subject breed each other.

  • 10.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholms Universitet, Stockholm Business School.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Fostering the enterprising self: Gendered notions of entrepreneurship in Swedish school education2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm Business School, Stockholm University.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Responsibilising the next generation: Fostering the enterprising self through de-mobilising gender2017In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 892-915Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, our interest is in what subjectivities are fostered among schoolchildren through the recent introduction of entrepreneurship initiatives in primary and secondary school. The educational terrain is but one example where entrepreneurship has been discursively transformed during recent decades from the notion of starting businesses into a general approach to life itself in the advancement of neoliberal societies. The inherently elitist and excluding position of the entrepreneurial subject is now offered to all and sundry. While entrepreneurship pedagogy is explicitly intended to be gender neutral and inclusive of all such identities traditionally suppressed in the entrepreneurship discourse, we ask what kind of enterprising selves are mobilised and de-mobilised here. Second, in what way are these seemingly ‘gender-neutral’ enterprising selves gendered? Our analysis of three recent and dominating entrepreneurial initiatives in the Swedish school system emphasises the need for activation, performativity and responsibility. The analysis also shows that gender is indeed silenced in these initiatives but is at the same time productive through being subtly present in the promotion of a ‘neo-masculine’, active, technology-oriented and responsible subject. Entrepreneurship is presented as being equally available for all and something everyone should aspire to, yet the initiatives still sustain the suppression and marginalisation of women and femininities. The initiatives specifically promote a responsible and adaptive masculine subject position while notions of rebellious entrepreneurship and non-entrepreneurial domestic positions are mobilised out of the picture.

  • 12.
    Bergman, Lovisa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Lukins, Adams
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    A qualitative study of the determinants for nurse turnover Analyzed from the theoretical perspective of the psychological contract2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Job turnover amongst nurses is a current issue not only in Sweden but globally. Not only is it expensive and inefficient for hospitals and employers to have a high employee turnover, but the turnover might also result in vacant nursing positions which force patient slots to shut down, resulting in that fewer patients receive treatment and that the patient safety decreases. In order to cope with the issues that spring from a high turnover, retention measures has to be taken within the organization. By conducting ten observations at an infectious disease department at a Swedish university hospital in combination to an extensive meta-analysis of existing turnover models, a model for nurse turnover was developed. By understanding the dynamics of the healthcare industry and the department under study, four themes were identified that contributed to intentions to stay or leave an employment: “Contextual setting”, “Culture and norms”, “Personal factors”, and “Critical events”. The model was later used as a foundation for the analysis and synthesis of eight in-depth interviews with nurses and two in-depth interviews with nurse managers. The nurses’ work environment was studied in regard to the theoretical concept “Psychological contract”. Findings showed that prosocial motives laid the ground when nurses chose their profession, and that strong affective commitment such as group coherence was highly emphasized as the most motivating factor to remain within the organization. It was also shown that breaches to the psychological contract limited the nurses’ organizational commitment levels. Discrepancy between expectations and fulfilment of educational opportunities and specialized job roles caused breaches to the relational psychological contract, and consequently caused reasons for turnover. Findings also imply that nurses are governed by professional commitment rather than organizational commitment.

  • 13.
    Blomquist, Tomas
    et al.
    Umeå Universitet.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Ny sjukvårdsteknologi och dess konsekvenser för arbetsorganisation och arbetstillfredsställelse: En fallstudie av stötvågsbehandling av njurstensbesvär1994In: Tjänstesektorn som arbetsplats / [ed] Johann Packendorff, Umeå: Handelshögskolan vid Umeå Universitet , 1994, 1, p. 1-30Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    BLOMSTRAND, ERICA
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    SANG, EBBA
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    A Piquant Element in a Male-Dominated World: A study of women and career in the ICT Industry2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    During recent years, countries and societies around the world have acknowledged questions regarding gender equality and diversity, and these issues are nowadays put on the agenda for both governments and business executives. Knowledge about gender equality and its positive effects has spread down to organizations and individuals, and existing research about gender equality is often built upon or put in relation to the phenomena of organizational culture. The Swedish society and especially the Swedish ICT industry have acknowledged the importance of having a gender-balanced organization, but for many organizations the question stays as a thought of mind and small or few actions are made to change the current .gender-balanced The purpose of the thesis is to identify and discuss aspects of gender equality for companies within the ICT industry, and to examine how an organization’s culture is involved in current imbalance of gender distribution. The research question is formulated as follows: Which opportunities and downfalls exist for women’s career development within the ICT industry? One of the starting points of the study is that gender is seen as a social construction, and that gender is created through society structures, segregation and hierarchy. This creates gendered power relations in society that are intertwined with organizational power relations. Further, the study builds upon the fact that organizations should be seen as gendered because of the power perspective and the belief that conditions are different for men and women and that there is a constant amount of power that needs to be shared. A case study of a specific region in an international ICT company has been carried out by mapping the company’s gender structure, and by conducting interviews with employees within the region. The conclusion is that career development within the company is gendered and based on male prerequisites and working conditions, which constitutes a downfall for women’s career development.

  • 15.
    Cicmil, Svetlana
    et al.
    University of the West of England.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    The project (management) discourse and its consequences: On vulnerability and un-sustainability in project-based work2016In: New technology, work and employment, ISSN 0268-1072, E-ISSN 1468-005X, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 58-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we examine how the discourses related to project-based work and management are drawn upon in the organising of contemporary work, and the implications they have for project workers. We are interested in how project workers and projectified organisations become vulnerable to decline, decay and exhaustion and why they continue to participate in, and so sustain, projectification processes. The critical perspective taken here, in combination with our empirical material from the ICT sector, surfaces an irreversible decline of the coping capacity of project workers and draws attention to the addictive perception of resilience imposed on and internalised by them as a condition of success and longevity. Under those circumstances, resilience is made sense of and internalised as coping with vulnerability by letting some elements of life being destroyed; thus re-emerging as existentially vulnerable rather than avoiding or resisting the structures and processes that perpetuate vulnerability.

  • 16.
    Cicmil, Svetlana
    et al.
    University of the West of England.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Vulnerable projectification2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    Mälardalen University.
    Ekman, Marianne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Leadership cultures and discursive hybridisation: On the cultural production of leadership in higher education reforms2015In: International Journal of Public Leadership, ISSN 2056-4929, Vol. 11, no 3/4, p. 147-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of leadership culture and analyse how leadership cultures are produced in higher education reforms, in a hybridised discursive context of traditional academic values and emerging managerialism and leaderism.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Building on a perspective on leadership as a cultural phenomenon emerging in processes in which societal, sectorial and professional discursive resources are invoked, this study adds to earlier studies on how notions of leadership are involved in the transformation of higher education organisations. To this end, the method combines a traditional qualitative study of change initiatives over a long period of time with participative observation. Focusing on two vignettes, the analysis centres on how several discursive resources are drawn upon in daily interaction.

    Findings

    The emergence of hybrid leadership cultures in which several discursive resources are drawn upon in daily interaction is illustrated. This paper emphasises how hybrid cultures develop through confirmation, re-formulation and rejection of discursive influences.

    Research limitations/implications

    An extended empirical material would enable further understanding of what cultural constructions of leadership that become confirmed, re-formulated or rejected. International comparisons would also enrich the analysis.

    Practical implications

    This paper may influence leadership, leadership development and change initiatives in higher education organization.

    Originality/value

    The perspective proposed builds on recent developments in leadership studies and expands the means for focusing on social processes rather than individuals.

  • 18.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Ekman, Marianne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Leadership cultures in transition: On the cultural construction of leadership in university change processes2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In contemporary organizational research, the development of leadership norms andideal in public sector reform has been a recurring theme. The current changeprocesses in the higher education sector is in this paper analysed as the changes inleadership cultures, i.e. as processes in which discursive understandings ofleadership are drawn upon in the construction of norms, ideals and practices relatedto the production of organisational direction. The aim of this paper is thus to analyseleadership cultures under production in the reforms of higher education, in adiscursive context of increased managerialism and leaderism. Building on aperspective on leadership as a cultural phenomenon emerging in interactionprocesses in which societal, sectorial and professional discursive resources areinvoked, we intend to add to earlier studies on how notions of leadership are involvedin the transformation of higher education organisations. This perspective does notonly allow a more fine-grained analysis of how these transformations unfold –involving not only clear discursive clashes but also instances of hybrid cultures andcreeping changes in the discursive resources drawn upon – but also a criticalanalysis of changed power relations as ‘truths’ on professionalism and leadership aregradually re-formulated. Departing from two vignettes from sessions with juniortenure track participants at a Swedish university, our analysis centres on theemergence of hybrid leadership cultures in which several discursive resources aredrawn upon in daily interaction. Where earlier research often tends to handle therelation between traditional academic/bureaucratic discourses and emergentmanagerialist/leaderist ones as a clear and distinct shift, we emphasise how hybridcultures develop through confirmation, re-formulation and rejection of discursiveinfluences.

  • 19.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Ledarskap bortom idén om den ensamma hjälten2013In: Leda mot det nya: En forskningsantologi om chefskap och innovation / [ed] Martin Kreuger, Lucia Crevani, Kristina Larsen, Stockholm: Vinnova , 2013, 1, p. 43-60Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Otaliga teorier har försökt beskriva det optimala ledarskapet. Men i regel lämnar de ändå en utgångspunkt orörd, nämligen föreställningen om att den goda ledaren är en enskild person med särskilda utförsgåvor. Denna heroiska grundsyn på chefskapet stämmer illa med verkligheten och leder tanken fel. Det är därför hög tid att överge hjältemytenoch i stället betrakta ledarskapet som en gemensam process där alla aktörer bidrar med olika grad av medledarskap, skriver Lucia Crevani, Monica Lindgren och Johann Packendorff vid KTH.

  • 20.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Towards process studies of project leadership2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we draw on current research in the general field of leadership studies in order to suggest that process per-spectives are relevant and rewarding for inquiry into project leadership. Departing from a process ontology we argue that project leadership can be studied as series of social activities and events in which actors, projects and organizational contexts are all in constant an mutually interacting flux, rather than as traits, styles and competences of individual project managers. From such a per-spective, project leadership is seen as the ongoing social production of direction through construction and re-construction of actors’ space of action. This involves processes of continuous construction and reconstruction of (1) past project activities and events, (2) positions and areas of responsibility related to the project, (3) discarded, ongoing and future issues to be dealt with in the project, and (4) temporal rhythm and pace. Drawing on an in-depth ethnographic case study of an organizational change project, we show how the space of action and hence the direction of the project is in constant flux and becoming.

  • 21.
    Ekman, Marianne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Ahlberg, B. M.
    Incremental innovations in organizational performance in health care2010In: Learning Regional Innovation: Scandinavian Models, Palgrave Macmillan, 2010, p. 104-119Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter we present a case of how the concept of patient-centred care moved from a concept generally defined in national policy documents to a concept as a point of orientation, and how it became a conceptual innovation in practice. The emphasis was on integrated forms of organization such as team work, networking and development coalition. Local-regional knowledge resources emerged as critically significant because this is knowledge linked to practice, which could, therefore, operate ‘on line’ and do things from inside the process rather than from afar. The case is built on the idea that the learning necessary to provide the concept with a specific content emerges only through launching efforts to make the concept real in specific situations. It demonstrates that these efforts do not take the form of simple ‘application’. Rather, they demand rethinking about what is already known, a process that leads to renewed understanding of the concept. The concept of patient-centred care was used to enable broad-based involvement, mobilization and learning as the basis for innovation. © Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2011.

  • 22.
    Ekman, Marianne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Wahl, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Gendered recognition practices and the perpetuation of vulnerability: A study in Swedish universities2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In current critical research on work life in the higher education sector, analyses often revolve around neoliberal managerialism as contrasted to traditional professional academic values (cf. Henkel, 1997; Deem, 2004; Ekman et al, 2017). Academics are both faced with expectations to uphold the integrity of academic values in their research and teaching, whilst at the same time performing and ’careering’ in accordance with managerialist reforms (Clarke & Knights, 2015).

    Knights & Clarke (2014) analyse insecurity as a central aspect of identity in academics, conceptualizing academic life as a ‘bittersweet symphony’ populated by imposters (self- doubt and low self-esteem despite adequate performance), aspirants (under-recognised in relation to their inner sense of excellence) and existentialists (questioning the meaning of work and maintaining a sense of anxiety over their contributions to wider society). Another example is provided by Bristow et al (2017) who identify how early career-academics within CMS play on three narratives – diplomatic, combative and idealistic – by which they both resist and reproduce the ethos of business school neoliberalism in which they are embedded. Academics’ identity construction thus in different ways tend to position them as vulnerable selves (Cicmil et al, 2016), that is, as existentially exposed to the risks associated with projectified careers, macho-style management and a high degree of self-responsibility (Loveday, 2018).

    In addition, a number of earlier studies has also pointed out the highly gendered nature of how academic work is organized, how recruitment and promotion processes unfold etc. (cf. (cf. Hush, 2001; Mählck, 2003; van den Brink & Benschop, 2012).

    In this study we will focus on recognition practices (how recognition repeatedly tend to happen or not happen in local/cultural contexts, and thus also become the expectation on what may happen in future interactions) and their consequences for identity construction

    1

    and sense of vulnerability thus seem central to advance the above insights. Recognition practices thus involve not only what and whom is recognized or not for something, but also in what settings certain practices are legitimate or not, and how they are publicly displayed in social interaction.

    We suggest that

    • recognition practices are an important yet under-researched aspect of academic

      identity construction processes

    • recognition practices are gendered, i.e. we perform gender in our ways of

      - conferring and receiving recognition,- constructing what recognition may mean in different local/cultural contexts, - constructing when it is to be conferred/received or not,- constructing how it is appropriately played out how in social interaction.

    • recognition practices tend to sustain vulnerability among academics, but in different ways for men and women.

  • 23.
    Ekman, Marianne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Fragmented meritocratisation: On mobilisation and demobilisation of gender in higher education2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Ekman, Marianne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Universities need leadership, academics need management: discursive tensions and voids in the deregulation of Swedish higher education legislation2018In: Higher Education, ISSN 0018-1560, E-ISSN 1573-174X, Vol. 75, no 2, p. 299-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inthisarticle,wediscusshow‘managerialist’and‘leaderist’discourses(O’Reillyand Reed Public Administration 88:960–978, 2010; Organization Studies 32:1079–1101, 2011) are drawn upon in the context of the deregulation of Swedish higher education. As of 2011, there has been new legislation that frames Swedish universities as ‘autonomous’ and transfers most of the regulative responsibilities from the government level to university vice-chancellors. The aim of this article is to inquire into how tensions within and between managerialist and leaderist discourse are handled in the promotion of New Public Management reforms and the conse- quences thereof in terms of how leadership in the higher education sector is constructed. We analyse how these discourses are employed in the core documents leading up to the 2010 Riksdag decision to enact most of the proposed deregulations, and the subsequent evaluation undertaken by the social democratic government that took over in 2014. Based in this analysis, we suggest that the texts indeed draw upon notions of leadership and leaders as necessary for Swedish universities to survive and thrive in the future, but that the envisaged practise of this ‘strong leadership’ can either be characterised as a discursive void or described in terms of de- personalised, instrumental managerial surveillance and control. 

  • 25.
    Enjalbert, Tiphaine
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management. Ecole Centrale Paris.
    Evolution of the governance of projects within a program2013Student paper second term, 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis is discussed the evolution of the governance for the projects constituting a program. The different kinds of programs are first presented. A strong focus is given to the analysis of the actors of the governance and their role. A literature review of these characteristics for project and program governance shows the important role of the sponsor and the manager of the project.

    A case study of a global program in the luxury group LVMH has been realized for this thesis. This program, called Sapphire consists of the worldwide implementation of a Swiftnet platform in the affiliate of the group. This platform enables to realize secure payments and to receive account statements every day. One characteristics of the program implementation is that the mother houses implementation is handled by a project unit in the holding company. The implementations in the affiliates of the mother houses are then managed by the mother house itself.

    The main conclusions were:

    - The perspective of a first implementation is a governance one from the holding company toward the mother house. However, it shifts to a support perspective between the holding company and the mother house for the next implementation.

    - The project manager moves from the holding company to the mother house. The broker and the steward are thus in the mother house for the affiliate implementation. This practice enables LVMH to keep a small program team whose role becomes like the one of a program management office.

    - The project unit thus has first a managerial role which is transformed to a support role. However, it remains able to take decisions in case of potential failures

    The degree of generalizability of this study is finally addressed. This evolution of the governance could also be observed in other temporary programs like ERP implementations.

  • 26.
    ERIKA JOHNELS, ERIKA
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    MURRAY, SARA
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    The Complexity of Implementing aGrassroots Project, whilst being anExternal Resource: A case study in the Gambia2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Many strategies have been developed to change the inequalities in the world. However, the traditional theoriesand approaches to combat poverty seem to be inefficient. This thesis will discuss the necessity for higher local involvement and participation to create sustainable development. One of the approaches that this study has examined further is the one of grassroots organisations. The study is showing on some complexities and possibilities for this approach, including local motivation and leadership. This has been done during a field study in the Gambia and a benchmark in Senegal in cooperation with two organisations, Grassroots Alliance and the Hunger Project.

  • 27.
    ERIKSSON, KAROLINA
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    MIHLZÉN, ANNA
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Lean: A one-size-fits–all philosophy?: A study of how organizational structures affect a Lean implementation2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Many argue that the philosophy of Lean is equally applicable to all settings, everywhere. In this master thesis we question this belief and examine whether Lean is a one-size-fits-all philosophy by investigating if a Lean implementation is equally suitable for different types of organizational structures?

    Lean is an extensive concept, ranging from an operational shop-floor level to a company wide strategic level. We argue that the full benefits of Lean only can be reached when an organization has implemented Lean on a strategic level, and thus it is interesting to question how the transition from the operational to the strategic level can be done? In this thesis we present a

    LevelUp-model, which can be used to manage this transition. The model presents a step-by-step guide of how to implement the five principles of Lean thinking by the use of the Value Stream Mapping (VSM) tool.

    Not all types of organizational structures are suitable for taking on this transition. We have found that certain organizational structures can inhibit, or even prevent, the implementation of Lean on a strategic level. Organizational aspects such as many hierarchical levels, a strong silo-focus, a traditional management accounting system and short term-focus hinder the transition in different ways. Many of these aspects are characteristics of matrix and conglomerate structures, which make these structures specifically inappropriate for the transition. Just as a t-shirt may fit better on certain body shapes, the Lean philosophy is better fitted to certain organizational structures. Therefore we argue that Lean is in fact not a one-size-fits-all philosophy.

    Keywords:

     

  • 28.
    Eriksson, Robert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Marklund, Alexander
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Production control in hospital departments: Improving coordination through better optimization of IT-support tools at Astrid Lindgren Children´s Hospital, a Case Study at the Pediatric Oncology department2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A challenge for healthcare organizations is that operational efficiency suffers from variation in production. This is because variation in healthcare is hard to predict and the methods and IT-support tools for handling variation are suboptimal. The concept of production control can be used to describe the coordination of activities so that healthcare can be delivered on time, of adequate quality and at a reasonable cost, and thus includes the use of IT-support tools to handle variation.

    The objective of this report is to suggest improvements for production control in hospital departments through the development of a prototype for a new IT-support tool. In order to achieve this, a case study was conducted at the pediatric oncology department at Karolinska University Hospital (KS). The case study includes observations and interviews to investigate production control at department Q84, as well as associated roles and IT-support tools.

    Four IT-support tools were identified at the department, two of which were used interchangeably. Due to lack of integration between these systems and the fact that one system contained data manually synchronized from the other, handling changes required double labor. An improvement suggestion is therefore presented, consisting of a prototype which demonstrates that production control can be improved by automating the maintenance of a system at the department while fulfilling the organization’s information security policy. The development of the prototype was aligned with the lean philosophy which KS strives to adopt.

    Through an investigation of the production system, a role for production control and associated IT-support tools at a hospital department can be identified and analyzed and through the prototyping of an IT-support tool for production control, improvements and optimizations can be made.

  • 29.
    Fegin, Elin
    et al.
    Ratio.
    Stern, Charlotta
    Stockholms universitet.
    Wennberg, Karl
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Kompetensförsörjningen i svenska företag: Rätt kompetens, verktyg, tid, stöd och strategier för att finna kompetensen?2013Report (Other academic)
  • 30.
    FENG, JOANNA
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Impact of university innovation systemon a medical institution: A case study of KI Innovation at Karolinska Institutet2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    KI Innovation at Karolinska Institutet (KI) is a university innovation system that was initiated to bring more of the research conducted at the medical university to benefit society through commercialization and making these research findings medically applicable. It has the mission to bridge the gap between academia and business, and to facilitate the process and communication of technology-transfer. Such a system has existed since 1995, and this study conducted in 2008-2009 has the purpose of finding out if and how this system has had an impact on the level of commercialization at the university.

    Three departments at KI were selected to be studied; MBB, OnkPat and MTC. The study employed three different approaches:

    1. A quantitative study of the amount of patents that has been filed by researchers that were employed at these three departments during the period of 1995 – 2005.

    2. A survey was conducted amongst the then currently employed researchers in 2008 at the same three departments, to find out their knowledge and attitude towards the innovation system.

    3. In-depth interviews with three people that worked within the innovation system, and three researchers that have put their research through the system.

    The findings show that the patent-approach proved to be somewhat inconclusive due to low level of patents filed through KI Innovation, as the system was new during the study period. One couldn’t conclude that these patent activities are solely credited to the system, or how the external business and market forces at the time impacted on the level of innovation overall. The survey gives insight of the mindset of the researchers, their view of commercialization and the impact of the innovation system in place at their university. Most researchers were positive and curious, but were not always aware of the possibility of innovation from their own research. The in-depth interviews make clear that there is a knowledge gap towards patenting, as the researchers have publishing their research as their foremost incentive, which collides with patenting and hence commercialization.

  • 31.
    FLENING, ELIAS
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Reading Different Reading Different: On how Diversity Management is written in Sweden2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Organizations in Sweden today engage increasingly with the management concept of diversity management (DM) in order to address several, and often competing, issues. These include, hiring talent from a broader recruitment pool to gain access to more competence  and/or mirror certain markets or clients, making sure that all organizational members canuse their multiple competencies as to fully utilize them through building an inclusive culture, legal compliance with anti-discrimination legislation, gaining social credibility and trust, Achieving a socially just organization; finding new ways to foster wanted behavior in order to increase performance. Diversity and its management is contested terrain where these and other issues are discursively constructed by various actors with different interests, and in attempting to explore how diversity as an organizational concept is understood in Sweden today I analyze a Swedish practitioner handbook on implementing diversity management using reflexive discourse analysis (RDA). A framework based on questions and dilemmas previously identified in DM is used to explore the discursive landscape in the handbook, which is then analyzed to tentatively say something about the organizational reality in which it was written, and what this in extension might tell us about diversity management in Sweden today.

    The book was found to first frame diversity as defined by a half-open set of simple categories of differences (e.g. gender, age, ethnicity, religion, education, disability) and as motivated by a business-case that saw the instrumental utility of diversity for organizational performance gains as its purpose. But this framing of how diversity was to be understood was then found to legitimize and house an pragmatic implementation of diversity that was marked by discourse of social justice and change, rather than domination and economical utility, and as such the book was interpreted as using the concept of diversity as a kind of discursive Trojan horse to legitimize action and agendas based on ideals of equality and social justice in a context that is generally dominated by business case discourses.

     

  • 32.
    FOLKE, MATTIAS
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Investment Evaluation for Small ScaleInformation Systems2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a set of factors to consider when conducting investment evaluations for small scale IT systems. These factors have been derived by combining information from an extensive literature review, a single case study and an external expert. The literature review uses prior research on evaluation of large scale investments to inform and constrain the single case study. The single case study adds depth to the analysis by combining technical and operational perspectives from senior management, middle management and the general workforce. Ultimately an expert was consulted to evaluate the generalizability of the findings from the single case study, before the final list of factors was compiled. These factors should not be applied formulaically, as one of the main findings of this study is the diversity and complexity of small scale IT projects, preventing the application of general models. Instead, decision makers are encouraged to use these factors as a complement to their own experience, and to maintain close communication with potential stakeholders throughout the decision process.

  • 33.
    Franzén, Daniel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Large Swedish industrial companies: Farsightedness in business and sustainability strategies2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Industry facilitates the economic development of nations and acquisition of human wealth. Parallel to the global spread of industry, the world is facing rapid population growth. Simultaneously, formerly impoverished populations are approaching middle class standards of living with corresponding increases in levels of consumption. If the populations and consumption levels of societies continue to grow at the expected pace we will face a future environmental crises in the long-term and the world’s environmental resources will not be adequate to meet coming needs. Societies, together with industry, must transform to become sustainable in order to tackle one of our world’s most pressing challenges.Governments and organizations are now pushing industrial companies to meet this challenge and integrate sustainability into their businesses in order to put the economy on the pathway to a sustainable transformation. The World Business Council for Sustainable Development has a vision with formulated conditions that must be met before year 2050 to meet this challenge. But in order to unlock the full potential of sustainable growth, one must also understand the farsightedness of company leaders. The aim of this study is to examine how farsighted Swedish industries are both related to business and sustainability strategies. The main questions for this thesis are: How farsighted are the longest-term strategies/tasks/visions of the Chief Executive Officers (CEOs)? How farsighted are the longest-term tasks that the CEO delegate to members of the management team? How farsighted are the longest-term sustainability strategy of the company? And finally, who in the organization is responsible for the longest-term sustainability strategy/task/vision?The thesis focuses on finding out if their farsightedness in sustainability strategies match with their other business strategies. Eight large Swedish industrial companies were investigated using interviews with their CEOs.The results show a very large difference between companies in the farsightedness measured with time-span of business strategy and sustainability strategy. The time-span of the tasks that the CEOs delegate to the management team also differ substantially between companies. Moreover, the study revealed that all of the studied companies place the ultimate responsibility for sustainability with the CEO and that the farsightedness in sustainability match with the companies’ business strategies. The research show that all eight companies do match their farsightedness in sustainability with business.

  • 34.
    Frid, Johanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Nordanås, Frida
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Creating a Values-Aligned Workplace:How to Work with Values in GrowingConsulting Firms2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research implies that a common denominator for successful corporations ishaving shared values. Several research has studied the importance of leadership,communication and recruitment when working with values in organizations. However,there are no specific studies on how to work with company values in growingconsulting firms. Therefore, it is of interest to explore the organizational barriers andenablers within growing consulting firms that need to be considered to create andmaintain a desired culture based on the company values.The purpose of this study is to evaluate and analyze how growing consulting firmsshould work with company values. To determine the specific circumstances forgrowing consulting firms, the barriers and enablers for such organizations werestudied. The study was based on a case study made on a growing technology basedconsulting company. At the case study company, qualitative data was gathered throughsemi-structured interviews.The most important barriers found in this study were regarding leadership,communication, recruitment, follow-up and concretization challenges. The employeesat the case company experienced flaws in leadership and communication. Furthermore,recruitment turned out to be a big issue when growing organically. Moreover, it wasunderstood that no follow-up was made relating to the company values, which makes ithard to evaluate the organizations values-alignment. In addition, one aspect that wasidentified, that causes problems for the other aspects as well, was the importance ofconcretizing the company values. This study affirm previous research of how to workwith values. However, this study contributes by emphasizing which aspects should begiven more focus when working with values in growing consulting firms.

  • 35.
    FRIE, FELIX
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    HAMMMARLUND, GUSTAV
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Exploring the Encounter of ContinuousDeployment and the Financial Industry2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The digitisation of the financial markets has led to IT becoming a vitalpart of financial institutions. The principles and practices of ContinuousDeployment (CD) are utilised to increase innovation through flexibilityand swiftness at many IT companies. This thesis explores the encounterof CD and the financial industry through participant observations andsemi-structured interviews with developers.We find in our study that practitioners in the financial industry usepractices that are part of a CD process. The specialisation of the systemsthat is evident in the industry could be considered a barrier for theadoption of a CD process. However, improved transparency that maycome as a result of CD is well aligned with the demands that are evidentin the industry. Furthermore, the requirement for code reviews mightimpact the ability to attain a continuous process, as it must be a manual.

  • 36.
    Geschwind, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Söderlind, Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Magnell, Marie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    The teaching-research nexus in engineering education: A case study2015In: Proceedings of the 43rd SEFI Annual Conference 2015 - Diversity in Engineering Education: An Opportunity to Face the New Trends of Engineering, SEFI 2015, European Society for Engineering Education (SEFI) , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The topic of this paper has been teaching-research links at a Swedish Technical University. In summary, the policy documents analysed present the ideal of a close link between research and teaching. However, this link is presented at an overall level, thus not in detail how this link is expected to be accomplished and performed. Moreover, it is presumed that research will have a positive influence on education based solely on the fact that all faculty members will do both research and teaching. Another aspect worth noting is the fact that the link is assumed to be established already in first cycle.

  • 37.
    GÓMEZ GÓMEZ, MIGUEL
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    The role of the business incubator manager.: A case study of management techniquesin needs identification2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Business incubators have been established around the world in order to assist the new wave of entrepreneurs  in  starting  and  growing  their  start-ups.  With  time,  new  mechanisms  and initiatives are put in practice by the managers of these centers aiming at delivering a better support  to  these  new  ventures.  This  research  exposes  and  analyzes  the  management techniques  in  the  four  pre-established  business  incubator  components;  pre-incubation, selection, business support and networking; In order to reach a detailed understanding of these management techniques in incubators, interviews with managers of 7 Swedish business incubators were performed, with special curiosity in how these try to seek and meet the entrepreneurs’ needs.  The analysis was done by a case study interacting with managers and business advisors in order to explain the subjective meaning of these management techniques and depict what the managers are becoming in the social phenomena which take place in these institutions.

    Furthermore, the needs of the entrepreneurs are evolving along time due to the increasing competition  and  dynamism  of  the  markets  and  new  entry  factors  such  as  internet  and globalization. Therefore, managers have acquired new dimensions as entrepreneur helpers in order to fulfill the new challenges and obstacles the entrepreneurs have to overcome. This research ends with a discussion based in a set of roles attributable to the managers of these organizations, studying how this professional has developed his/her profile towards a higher performance in driving both, the business incubator and the assistance delivered to his/her

     

    tenants. Through this study, it has been observed that managers accomplish tasks which go further than being mere advisors or problem solvers. Nowadays, these professionals motivate a  better  schedule  of  their  tenants’  activities  wearing  the  hat  as  project  managers;  offer emotional support by becoming friends or peers; or acquire the role of event host in order to interconnect their fostered firms aiming at increasing their knowledge by sharing experiences while identifying their difficulties.

  • 38.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalens Högskola.
    Crevani, Lucia
    Mälardalens Högskola.
    Cicmil, Svetlana
    University of the West of England.
    Hogdson, Damian
    Alliance Manchester Business School.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Making Projects Critical 9: Call for Papers2018Other (Other academic)
  • 39.
    HALLIN, KATTARINA
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    HOLLINGWORTH, HELENE
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Minding the gap: A study of aspects that influencesvirtual leadership2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In order to meet this growing demand of globalization, business relationships are growing   moreand more virtual, with people having little or no face-to-face contact and instead resorting to the use of information communication technology (ICT) for daily interactions. In order for companies to remain successful they need to adapt their way of working to the increasing multi- nationality, virtual complexity of organizations today.

    Therefore, this study has focused on investigating what aspects that can influence virtual leadership, in this complex context. This has been done by performing a case study at one multinational organization that employs virtual leadership.

    Overall the results indicate that there are many aspects that may influence the practice of virtual leadership. The nature of trust in virtual work from this study coincided with much of previous research in the field, as well as the importance of communication and presence. It was also found that change and uncertainty in the organization could negatively influence virtual leadership while an open organization culture could positively influence it. Culture was found to influence virtual communication, and virtual leadership to some extent.

    The most important find was that the perception of virtual leadership varied greatly when addressing the project manager or the personnel manager. One of the biggest conclusions drawn from the result of the study was the importance of educating people in virtual communication  and leadership, as not knowing the nature of virtual communication may lead to a negative perception of it.

  • 40.
    HANNAH BJÖRK, HANNAH
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    FORSBERG, LINA
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    How to succeed with value-based pricing: A case study of how a Swedish OEM is working with price strategy in the context of globalization2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s world, change is faster than ever with rapid technological development and increasing global competition. The effects of globalization have led to more intense international competition when competitors originate from different parts of the world. Thanks to the use of new information technology, transparency has increased and made it possible for customers to compare products and prices between suppliers and prices in different markets and also buy cross-border. This puts pressure on companies to differentiate and develop their competitive advantage. Pricing could be such an advantage. Organizations

    need to develop pricing strategies well adapted to meet these external changes and remain profitable. Value-based pricing strategy has proven to help companies to move away from discussions about pricing and instead focus on the unique value the company’s offerings can provide the customers. This is also the pricing strategy that creates the best opportunities to maximize the profit in every sales situation.

    Therefore, this study has investigated how OEMs work with value-based pricing strategy and pricing processes in the context of globalization and ICT.

     

    This has been done by conducting a case study at the company Atlas Copco in Sickla, Sweden, that is market leader within sustainable production solutions. The case study consisted of interviews with, and a questionnaire sent out to, managers at Atlas Copco, Industrial Technique, General Industry, involved in the pricing process.

     

    The results indicate that Atlas Copco strive to work with value-based pricing and are somewhat taken into consideration global trends affecting pricing and working internally with factors affecting pricing. Furthermore, the findings suggest that in order to use value-based pricing in the context of globalization, the company should state and implement a clear pricing strategy, decentralize pricing authority, provide the sales organizations with guidelines, training and communication platforms and work to move away from commodities.

     

    The findings of this study have implication both in a theoretical and industrial aspect. From the theoretical aspect, the findings contributes to the existing research about value-based pricing, a research area which is usually fragmented and mostly describes what value-based pricing is, not how it is used, especially not in a global context. This study contributes with a case showing how OEMs are working with value-based pricing, taking into consideration both global trends and internal factors. From the industrial aspect, the results from this study give OEMs competitive advantage through following the findings about what internal and external factors to consider when working with their pricing strategy.

  • 41. Hearn, J.
    et al.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Jyrkinen, M.
    Sexualities and/in 'Critical' management studies2015In: The Routledge Companion to Critical Management Studies, Taylor & Francis, 2015, p. 124-139Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Hermelin, Sebastian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Stangesjö, Daniel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    The importance of communicating vision, goal and strategy in a consultancy firm: A case study2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the case of company, Kompany, and the event, where one of Kompany’s commissions with one of their clients ended, due to problems arising in the areas of accounting practices-, organisational communication, organisational culture and the power distribution within the company. Hence, the study aims to create an understanding of why the commission ended and if the factors associated to this event are also inherent in the organisation as a whole.

     

    This study investigates the use of accounting practice as a language to describe communication problems that can arise due to cross-professional barriers between engineers and economists. Furthermore, communication is evaluated through the lens of organisational culture and power distribution as to see how these affect each other, and if there is any distinction between them.

     

    This study concludes that an organisation’s culture and its vision, goal and strategy greatly depends on each other. Having no communicated vision, goal or strategy affects the organisational culture in a negative way, and vice versa, ultimately affecting the way a company conducts its business’ and the overall success of the company. In the case of Kompany, this is their current situation, no formal vision, goal or strategy is formulated, hence not communicated within the organisation. As such, this might be the factor that, in the event, led to the situation where Kompany’s commission with one of their biggest clients, ended. These findings can also be used to gain an insight into similar problems, experiences by other companies in the IT-consultancy sector. 

  • 43.
    HODELL, ANTON
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Nilsson, Carl
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Digital Disruption – Exploring Innovation inStockholm based FinTech companies2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    FinTech (Financial Technology) companies are specialized actors combining financial serviceswith software technology. In recent years FinTech companies have emerged as a majordisruptive force in the financial industry. Rapid technological and societal developments havecreated new market opportunities which established banks have been slow to act on. Instead,FinTech companies are changing the climate in the financial sector by offering highly innovativeproducts and services. Stockholm has established itself as one of the leading FinTech scenes inEurope, and has given birth to successful FinTech companies such as Klarna and iZettle.Previous research on FinTechs’ innovation capabilities has been scarce. The purpose of thisstudy has therefore been to explore the innovation processes of FinTech companies based inStockholm. Seven semi-structured interviews were conducted with people responsible forinnovation and product development in prominent Stockholm FinTech companies.Based on a thematic analysis of the interview results, five key components of FinTechcompanies’ innovation processes and associated drivers are identified. First, the companiesexperience an initial abundance of ideas driven by a mentality that challenges existing marketconventions. Second, the companies have a user-centered outlook driven by strong initial visionsof how user needs can fulfilled in a better way. Third, the FinTech companies prioritizesimplifying user experiences, driven by increasing modularization in the financial industry.Fourth, the companies have a proactive stance to undefined regulation, driven by the possibilityof gaining first mover advantages. Fifth, FinTech companies are able to achieve high degree ofradical innovation by innovating on meanings users see in their products and services, driven bythe recent changes in technological context. Future research may include banks’ responses toFinTech as well as an investigation of the effects of regulatory changes on innovation in thesector.

  • 44.
    Hodgson, Damian
    et al.
    Manchester Business School.
    Canonico, Paolo
    University of Naples.
    Case, Peter
    University of the West of England.
    Cicmil, Svetlana
    University of the West of England.
    De Nito, Ernesto
    Università degli Studi "Magna Græcia" di Catanzaro.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    All on a promise: Critical studies of projects and project management: Call for papers2010Other (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Hodgson, Damian E
    et al.
    Alliance Manchester Business School.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Cicmil, Svetlana
    University of the West of England.
    The politics of projects in technology-intensive work2016In: New technology, work and employment, ISSN 0268-1072, E-ISSN 1468-005X, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 1-3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Hodgson, Damian
    et al.
    Manchester Business School.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Cicmil, Svetlana
    University of the West of England.
    The politics of projects in technology-intensive work: Special issue call for papers in New Technology, Work and Employment2014Other (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Höök, Pia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Linghag, Sophie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management. Karlstads universitet.
    Regnö, Klara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Wahl, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Könsmärkta villkor styr synen på kvinnligt och manligt chefskap2013In: Leda mot det nya: En forskningsantologi om chefskap och innovation / [ed] Martin Kreuger, Lucia Crevani, Kristina Larsen, Stockholm: Vinnova , 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    et al.
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm, HHS.
    Höök, Pia
    Wahl, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Women as power resources: Putting theory into practice2014In: Women in STEM careers: International perspectives on increasing workforce participation, advancement and leadership / [ed] Diana Bilimoria and Linley Lord, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014, 1, p. 126-145Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this chapter is to contribute to our knowledge of working for gender equality in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) organizations by describing the design and perspective of a specific women only change project involving women engineers in a manufacturing company and in a technical university. The results of the project will be analyzed and discussed in relation to implications for work for change. Although most individuals in Sweden are positive towards gender equality on a rhetorical level, men and women face different conditions in the labor market. For example, the labor market is gender segregated with women and men mainly working in women and male dominated professions respectively. Men also dominate in higher positions in organizations and there continues to exist a wage gap between men and women (Hagberg et al., 1995; SOU, 1994, p._3; SOU, 2003, p._16; Statistics Sweden, 2012). Women engineers do not face the same conditions as men when pursuing a career in industry nor in academia. Among engineering students starting 2011, 28 percent were women, 72 percent were men (Statistics Sweden, 2011). The proportion of women PhDs in engineering, manufacturing and construction was 29 percent in 2006 and the proportion of women professors in engineering and technology was 8.3 percent in 2007. The proportion of women with an engineering background among researchers in industry was 25 percent in 2006 (Husu and Koskinen, 2010) and only six out of 146 engineers in executive teams among large listed technical companies (42 in total) are women (Ahlbom, 2010).

  • 49.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    et al.
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm, HHS.
    Linghag, Sophie
    Karlstad universitet.
    Regnö, Klara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Wahl, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Ökad medvetenhet men långsam förändring: om kvinnor och män på ledande  positioner i svenskt näringsliv2014 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Tienari, J.
    ’This is just the way it is’: Executive search and gendered careers2015In: Handbook of Gendered Careers in Management: Getting In, Getting On, Getting Out, Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd. , 2015, p. 123-139Chapter in book (Other academic)
123 1 - 50 of 121
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