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  • 1. Brismar, Torkel B.
    et al.
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Gustafsson, Björn
    Härmark, Johan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Structural Biotechnology.
    Barrefelt, Åsa
    Kothapalli, Satya V. V. N.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Neuronic Engineering.
    Margheritelli, Silvia
    Oddo, Letizia
    Caidahl, Kenneth
    Hebert, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Structural Biotechnology.
    Paradossi, Gaio
    Magnetite Nanoparticles Can Be Coupled to Microbubbles to Support Multimodal Imaging2012In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 1390-1399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microbubbles (MBs) are commonly used as injectable ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) in modern ultrasonography. Polymer-shelled UCAs present additional potentialities with respect to marketed lipid-shelled UCAs. They are more robust; that is, they have longer shelf and circulation life, and surface modifications are quite easily accomplished to obtain enhanced targeting and local drug delivery. The next generation of UCAs will be required to support not only ultrasound-based imaging methods but also other complementary diagnostic approaches such as magnetic resonance imaging or computer tomography. This work addresses the features of MBs that could function as contrast agents for both ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. The results indicate that the introduction of iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) in the poly(vinyl alcohol) shell or on the external surface of the MBs does not greatly decrease the echogenicity of the host MBs compared with the unmodified one. The presence of SPIONs provides enough magnetic susceptibility to the MBs to accomplish good detectability both in vitro and in vivo. The distribution of SPIONs on the shell and their aggregation state seem to be key factors for the optimization of the transverse relaxation rate.

  • 2.
    Broomé, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Maksuti, Elira
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Bjällmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Frenckner, Björn
    Janerot-Sjöberg, Birgitta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Closed-loop real-time simulation model of hemodynamics and oxygen transport in the cardiovascular system2013In: Biomedical engineering online, ISSN 1475-925X, E-ISSN 1475-925X, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 69-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Computer technology enables realistic simulation of cardiovascular physiology. The increasing number of clinical surgical and medical treatment options imposes a need for better understanding of patient-specific pathology and outcome prediction. Methods: A distributed lumped parameter real-time closed-loop model with 26 vascular segments, cardiac modelling with time-varying elastance functions and gradually opening and closing valves, the pericardium, intrathoracic pressure, the atrial and ventricular septum, various pathological states and including oxygen transport has been developed. Results: Model output is pressure, volume, flow and oxygen saturation from every cardiac and vascular compartment. The model produces relevant clinical output and validation of quantitative data in normal physiology and qualitative directions in simulation of pathological states show good agreement with published data. Conclusion: The results show that it is possible to build a clinically relevant real-time computer simulation model of the normal adult cardiovascular system. It is suggested that understanding qualitative interaction between physiological parameters in health and disease may be improved by using the model, although further model development and validation is needed for quantitative patient-specific outcome prediction.

  • 3. Broomé, Michael
    et al.
    Maksuti, Elira
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Waldenström, Anders
    Bjällmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Simulation of arterial hypertension and progressive arteriosclerosis with a 0-D multipurpose cardiovascular model2013In: CMBE13: 3rd International Conference on Computational & Mathematical Biomedical Engineering, 2013, p. 433-436Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of systemic vascular resistance and progressive stiffening/arteriosclerosis inthe vascular tree on arterial blood pressure is explored in a 0D cardiovascular simulationmodel. Pulse pressure is both sensitive and specific for increases in stiffness and meanarterial pressure both sensitive and specific for changes in vascular resistance.

  • 4. Capece, Sabrina
    et al.
    Chiessi, Ester
    Cavalli, Roberta
    Giustetto, Pierangela
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Paradossi, Gaio
    A general strategy for obtaining biodegradable polymer shelled microbubbles as theranostic devices2013In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 49, no 51, p. 5763-5765Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fabrication of multifunctional ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) has been recently addressed by several research groups. A versatile strategy for the synthesis of UCA precursors in the form of biodegradable vesicles with a biocompatible crosslinked polymer shell is described. Upon ultrasound irradiation, acoustic droplet vaporization transforms such particles into microbubbles behaving as UCAs. This proof of concept entails the features of a potential theranostic microdevice.

  • 5. Capese, Sabrina
    et al.
    Chiessi, E.
    Cavalli, R.
    Giustetto, P.
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Paradossi, Gaio
    Diapartimento di Chimica, Università di Roma Tor Vergata.
    A general strategy for the obtainment of biodegradable polymer shelled microbubbles as theranostic device2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Fabrication of multifunctional ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) has been addressed by many research groups.1,2 Recently a poly(vinyl alcohol) shelled microbubble 3 has shown a remarkable chemical and physical stability and versatility for the surface functionalization, leading to a platform for multimodality imaging (ultrasounds, magnetic resonance, single photon emission computer tomography) and targeting inflammation and tumours4. In this contribution we present a new strategy for the synthesis of UCAs precursors in the form of vesicles with a biodegradable crosslinked polymer shell.

    Methods

    Deposition of methacryloyl-derivative of hydrophilic and biodegradable polymers as dextran (DexMA50) or hyaluronic acid (HAMA30) on a lipid vesicle with a liquid perfluoropentane core, 5,6 followed by a photopolymerization of the methacrylate moiety allows the obtainment of polymer shelled vesicles.

    Results

    Lipid shelled vesicles with a perfluorocarbon (PFC) core (Figure 1a) undergo an acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV),7 upon ultrasounds (US) irradiation, transforming such particles into ultrasound effective microbubbles (Fig 1b). The process is reversible as the US are switched off (Fig 1c). In the “microbubble” state, i.e. during US irradiation, the system is echogenic at low mechanical index, allowing their use as UCAs. In this contribution we show that additional functions can be implemented into the microbubbles. For example, we demonstrated the possibility to obtain shells with a thermoreversible behaviour.

    Conclusions

    This new class of polymer shelled vesicles/microbubbles entails features desired in a potential theranostic microdevice.

  • 6.
    Eiken, Ola
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    McDonnell, Adam C.
    Keramidas, Michail E.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Kölegård, Roger
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Lind, Britta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Mekjavic, Igor B.
    Lunar habitat simulation2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging. Karolinska Institutet (KI), CLINTEC – Division of Medical Imaging and Technology.
    Contrast agent for early diagnostics and monitoring of progression of liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma)2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Adrian, Gonon
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Janerot Sjöberg, Birgitta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    In search of the optimal ultrasound heart perfusion imaging platform2015In: Journal of ultrasound in medicine, ISSN 0278-4297, E-ISSN 1550-9613, Vol. 34, no 9, p. 1599-1605Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    Quantification of the myocardial perfusion by contrast echocardiography (CEC) remains a challenge. Existing imaging phantoms used to evaluate the performance of ultrasound scanners do not comply with perfusion basics in the myocardium, where perfusion and motion are inherently coupled.

    Methods

    To contribute towards an improvement, we developed a CEC perfusion imaging platform based on isolated rat heart coupled to the ultrasound scanner. Perfusion was assessed using three different types of contrast agent: dextran-based Promiten®, phospholipid-shelled SonoVue®, and polymer-shelled MB-pH5-RT. The myocardial video-intensity was monitored over time from contrast administration to peak and two characteristic constants were calculated using exponential fit (A representing capillary volume and b representing inflow velocity).

    Results

    Acquired experimental evidence demonstrates that the application of all three types of contrast agent allow ultrasonic estimation of myocardial perfusion in the isolated rat heart. Video-intensity maps show that an increase in contrast concentration increases the late plateau values, A, mimicking increased capillary volume. Estimated values of the flow, proportional to Axb, increase when the pressure of the perfusate column increases from 80 to 110 cm of water. This finding is in agreement with the true values of the coronary flow increase measured by the flowmeter attached to the aortic cannula.

    Conclusions

    The described CEC perfusion imaging platform holds promise for standardized evaluation and optimization of ultrasound contrast perfusion imaging where real time inflow curves at low acoustic power semi-quantitatively reflect coronary flow.

  • 9.
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging. Karolinska Institutet (KI), CLINTEC – Division of Medical Imaging and Technology.
    Adrian, Gonon
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska University Hospital.
    Weitzberg, Eddie
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet.
    Lundberg, Jon
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, .
    Harmark, Johan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Structural Biotechnology.
    Cerroni, Barbara
    Department of Chemical Sciences and Technologies, University of Rome Tor Vergata.
    Paradossi, Gaio
    Diapartimento di Chimica, Università di Roma Tor Vergata.
    Janerot Sjöberg, Birgitta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging. CLINTEC, Department of Medical Imaging and Technology, Karolinska Institute.
    Ultrasound contrast agent loaded with nitric oxide as a theranostic microdevice: Theranostic contrast agent loaded with nitric oxide2015In: Drug Design, Development and Therapy, ISSN 1177-8881, E-ISSN 1177-8881, Vol. 9, p. 2409-2419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study describes novel multifunctional polymer-shelled microbubbles (MBs) loaded with nitric oxide (NO) for integrated therapeutic and diagnostic applications, i.e. theranostics, of myocardial ischemia. We used gas filled MBs with an average diameter of 4 µm stabilized by a biocompatible shell of poly(vinyl)alcohol. In vitro acoustic tests showed a sufficient enhancement of the backscattered power (20 dB) acquired from the MBs suspension. The values of attenuation coefficient (0.8 dB/cm MHz) and phase velocities (1517 m/s) were comparable to those reported for the soft tissue. Moreover, polymer MBs demonstrate increased stability compared to clinically approved contrast agents with fracture threshold of about 900 kPa. In vitro chemiluminescence measurements demonstrated that dry powder of NO-loaded MBs releases its gas content in about 2 hours following an exponential decay profile with an exponential time constant equal 36 min. The application of high power ultrasound pulse (MI=1.2) on the MBs resuspended in saline decreases the exponential time constant from 55 to 4 min in air saturated solution and from 17 to 10 min in degased solution. Thus, ultrasound-triggered release of NO is achieved. Cytotoxicity tests indicate that phagocytosis of the MBs by macrophages starts within 6 to 8 hours. This is suitable time for initial diagnostics, treatment and monitoring of the therapeutic effect using single injection of the proposed multifunctional MBs.

  • 10.
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Kothapalli, Veeravenkata S.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Gonon, Adrian
    Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden .
    Janerot Sjöberg, Birgitta
    CLINTEC, Department of Medical Imaging and Technology, Karolinska Institute.
    Ultrasound contrast agent loaded with nitric oxide as a theranostic microdevise for myocardial ischemia2013In: European Heart Journal Cardiovascular Imaging: Abstracts of EUROECHO 2013 The Seventeenth Annual Meeting of the European Association of Echocardiography, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) accounts for 1/3 of total global deaths worldwide. The most widespread CVD is ischemic heart disease. It is the leading cause of death in both genders, equally diagnosed in developed and developing countries with mortality exponentially increasing with age. Efforts of healthcare system should be primary focused on prevention, timely detection, efficient differentiation and instant treatment of the disease.

  • 11.
    Janerot Sjöberg, Birgitta
    et al.
    CLINTEC, Department of Medical Imaging and Technology, Karolinska Institute.
    Gonon, Adrian
    tutet (KI), Dept of Medicine.
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging. Karolinska Institutet (KI), CLINTEC – Division of Medical Imaging and Technology.
    In Search of the Optimal Ultrasound Heart Perfusion Imaging Platform2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Johnson, Jonas
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    The Cardiac State Diagram: A new method for assessing cardiac mechanics2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Kothapalli, Satya V. V. N.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Paradossi, Gaio
    Dynamic and Structural Behavior of Magnetic PVA-Shelled Microbubbles: Acoustic Characterization2013In: IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium / [ed] Dr. AHMAD SAFARI, 2013, p. 1509-1512Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Combination of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPOINs) and the polymer-shelled microbubble (MB) are proposed to be a contrast agent for both magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging. The introduction of nanoparticles into MBs changes the material properties of encapsulating shell, which further influences on MBs performance as an ultrasound contrast agent. Magnetic MBs were prepared in two following strategies: 1. SPIONs were attached on the surface of MBs (Type A) and 2. SPIONs were physically entrapped in the MBs shell during the initial formation of PVA shell (Type B). A modified Church model was used to fit the attenuation coefficient spectra acquired experimentally. This allowed to recalculate the viscoelastic properties, i.e. storage and loss modulus, and dynamical properties, i.e. resonance frequency and damping coefficient of two types of magnetic MBs. The cross-correlation analysis of the time-domain response from the MBs suspension was used to identify pressure threshold at which MBs shell fractures. Higher values of both viscoelastic and dynamic characteristic were identified for MBs Type B. The estimated total damping ratio above 1 suggested that the MBs Type B behave as an overdamped harmonic oscillator whereas MBs Type A with total damping ratio below 1 possess underdamped harmonic oscillator nature. The predicted resonance frequencies are approximately 13 and 27 MHz for MBs Type A and B respectively. Moreover, the fracture pressure threshold measurements revealed that, higher peak negative pressure is required to fracture MBs Type B than Type A. When the driving pulse consists of 12 cycles, pressure threshold was 1.1 MPa and 1.3 MPa for MBs Type A and B respectively. In conclusion, MBs with nanoparticles loaded on the surface (Type A) appear to be more acoustically active, demonstrate lower resonance frequency, damping and fracture pressure threshold, than MBs with nanoparticles incorporated in the shell (Type B).

  • 14.
    Kothapalli, Veera Venkata Satya Naray
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Faridi, Asim
    Wiklund, Martin
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging. Karolinska Institutet (KI), CLINTEC – Division of Medical Imaging and Technology.
    On-chip actuation of polymer shelled microbubbles2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Kothapalli, Veeravenkata S.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Oddo, L.
    Paradossi, G.
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Assessment of the viscoelastic and oscillation properties of a nanoengineered-shelled multimodality contrast agentManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Kothapalli, Veeravenkata Satya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Paradossi, Gaio
    Diapartimento di Chimica, Università di Roma Tor Vergata.
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging. Karolinska Institutet (KI), CLINTEC – Division of Medical Imaging and Technology.
    Dynamic and Structural behavior of Magnetized PVA-shelled Microbubbles: Acoustic Characterization2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Kothapalli, VeeraVenkata Satyanarayana
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Ultrasound Contrast Agents Loaded with Magnetic Nanoparticles: Acoustic and Mechanical Characterization2013Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The current methodologies in body scanning diagnostic uses different simultaneous imaging modalities like Ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), single photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). The field requires combination of different modalities for effective use in clinical diagnostics. Such incorporation of different modalities has already been achieved. For example, PET-CT hybrid scanner is designed to acquire align functional and anatomical images and recently US-MRI scanner has successfully shown to improve diagnosis of prostate cancer. The non ionizing radiation hybrid US-MRI is of great interest in health care industry. Further these US and MRI modalities uses different contrast agents like micro-sized gas bubbles (MBs) encapsulated by surfactant for US and superparamagnetic nanoparticles for MRI imaging modalities to further enables new diagnostic opportunities and therapeutic applications. Recently in our 3MiCRON project, we have developed the multimodal contrast agent that could be supported for both US and MRI. This was achieved by coating the magnetic nanoparticles to the poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) surfactant shelled MBs. The nanoparticles in the shell effect the structure can alter the MBs performance as an ultrasound contrast agent. The present thesis is conducted to examine the acoustic and mechanical properties of such multimodal contrast agents.

    These multimodal contrast agents were prepared by coating the surface of PVA-shelled MBs by two following strategies: (1) The superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nano-particles (SPIONs) were chemically anchored to the surface of poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) shelled MBs namely MBs-chem and (2) in the second strategy the SPIONs were physical entrapped into the PVA shell while formation of PVA surface on the gas bubble were named as MBs-phys. To understand the scattering efficiency and viscoelastic properties of these modified agents, we investigated the backscattering power, attenuation coefficient and phase velocity measurements. Our acoustic experimental results indicate that both the modified MBs and non-modified plain PVA-shelled ultrasound contrast agents have the same echogenic response. The investigation of mechanical properties of modified MBs revealed that the attached SPIONs on the PVA shell has reduced the stiffness of MBs-chem shell, while, the SPIONs inside the shell has increased MBs-phys stiffness. As a result, MBs-chem exhibits soft shell behavior under ultrasound exposure than both MBs-phys. Finally, the images were obtained through the MRI investigations at the department of Radiology, Karolinksa Institute, has demonstrated that both MB types have enough magnetic susceptibility that further provides good detectability in vitro and in vivo. As an outlook, the modified magnetic gas bubbles, i.e. both MBs-chem and MBs-phys can be proposed as a potential contrast agent for both US and MR imaging and can be further utilized in potential therapeutic applications.

  • 18.
    Larsson, Matilda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Kremer, F.
    Heyde, B.
    Widman, Erik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    D'Hooge, J.
    Carotid strain estimation using an ultrasound-based speckle tracking algorithm2012In: 2012 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS), IEEE , 2012, p. 1394-1397Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carotid strain imaging using ultrasound-based speckle tracking has showed potential in risk stratification of cardiovascular diseases. However, assessing strain in the artery wall and in atherosclerotic plaques is challenging because of small dimensions and low deformations in relation to the applied ultrasound wavelength. High-resolution ultrasound has potential to improve the speckle tracking performance by increasing spatial resolution. The aim of this study was to compare carotid strain estimation by speckle tracking using standard clinical ultrasound and high-resolution ultrasound in an experimental setup. Ultrasound long-axis images were obtained using a standard clinical ultrasound system (Vivid7) and a high-resolution ultrasound system (Vevo2100) in dynamic phantoms mimicking the carotid artery. Speckle tracking was performed to estimate radial and longitudinal strain whereas sonomicrometry was used as reference. The results showed a significant better performance for speckle tracking applied on images from the high-resolution system compared to the standard clinical system.

  • 19.
    Larsson, Matilda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Verbrugghe, Peter
    KU Leuven.
    Smoljkić, Marija
    KU Leuven.
    Heyde, Brecht
    KU Leuven.
    Famaey, Nele
    KU Leuven.
    Herijgers, Paul
    KU Leuven.
    D'hooge, Jan
    KU Leuven.
    Assessment of longitudinal strain in the Carotid artery wall using ultrasound-based Speckle tracking - validation in a sheep model2013In: Proceedings of the IEEE International Ultrasonics symposium, 2013, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessment of strain in the longitudinal direction of the arterial wall has been suggested to improve the evaluation of arterial stiffness and atherosclerosis. Recently, we showed the feasibility of ultrasound speckle tracking to assess carotid longitudinal strain in-silico and in-vitro. However, validation in the more challenging in-vivo setting is still lacking. The aim of this study was to validate longitudinal strain assessment in the common carotid artery (CCA) in an animal setup. The left CCAs of five sheep were exposed during Isoflurane anesthesia and sonomicrometry crystals were sutured onto the artery wall to obtain reference longitudinal strain. Ultrasound long-axis images were recorded at baseline and hypertension (Phenylephrine) and an in-house speckle tracking algorithm was applied to estimate longitudinal strain. The estimated strain curves varied cyclically throughout the cardiac cycles, showing a lengthening of the arterial segment in systole. A significant correlation between peak systolic estimated and reference strain was found (r=0.95, p < 0.001). The results indicate the feasibility of arterial longitudinal strain assessment in-vivo using ultrasound speckle tracking.

  • 20.
    Maksuti, Elira
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Carlsson, Marcus
    Lund University, Skane University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Clinical Physiology, Lund, Sweden..
    Arheden, Håkan
    Lund University, Skane University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Clinical Physiology, Lund, Sweden..
    Kovács, Sándor J.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA..
    Broomé, Michael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Ugander, Martin
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska Institutet, and Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hydraulic forces contribute to left ventricular diastolic filling2016Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Myocardial active relaxation and restoring forces are known determinants of left ventricular (LV) diastolic function. We hypothesize the existence of an additional mechanism involved in LV filling, namely, a hydraulic force contributing to the longitudinal motion of the atrioventricular (AV) plane. A prerequisite for the presence of a net hydraulic force during diastole is that the atrial short-axis area (ASA) is smaller than the ventricular short-axis area (VSA). We aimed (a) to illustrate this mechanism in an analogous physical model, (b) to measure the ASA and VSA throughout the cardiac cycle in healthy volunteers using cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging, and (c) to calculate the magnitude of the hydraulic force. The physical model illustrated that the anatomical difference between ASA and VSA provides the basis for generating a hydraulic force during diastole. In volunteers, VSA was greater than ASA during 75-100% of diastole. The hydraulic force was the same order of magnitude as the peak driving force of LV (1-3N vs 5-10N). Hydraulic forces are a consequence of left heart anatomy and aid LV diastolic filling. These findings suggest that the relationship between ASA and VSA, and the resulting hydraulic forces, should be considered when characterizing diastolic function and dysfunction. 

  • 21.
    Maksuti, Elira
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Johnson, Jonas
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Bjällmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Broomé, Michael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging. Karolinska Institutet Department of Physiology and Pharmacology.
    Physical modeling of the heart with the atrioventricular plane as a piston unit2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiac models do not often take the atrioventricular (AV) interactioninto account, even though medicalimaging and clinical studies have shown that the heart pumps with minorouter volume changes throughout the cardiac cycle and with backand forthlongitudinal movements in the AVregion. We present a novel cardiac model based on physical modeling of the heart withthe AV-plane asa piston unit. Model simulationsgeneratedrealistic outputsforpressures and flows as well asAV-piston velocity, emphasizing the relevance of myocardial longitudinal movements in cardiac function

  • 22. Mekjavic, I. B.
    et al.
    McDonnell, A. C.
    Keramidas, Michail E.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Kolegard, Roger
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Lind, Britta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Eiken, Ola
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
    Lunar habitat simulation2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Poehlman, Melanie
    et al.
    University Baureight.
    Kothapalli, Veera Venkata Satya Naray
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging. Karolinska Institutet (KI), CLINTEC – Division of Medical Imaging and Technology.
    Härmark, Johan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Structural Biotechnology.
    Hebert, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Structural Biotechnology.
    Philipp, A.
    Hoeller, Roland
    Seuss, M.
    Magerithelli, S.
    Paradossi, Gaio
    Diapartimento di Chimica, Università di Roma Tor Vergata.
    Fery, Andreas
    Magnetic microbubbles for multimodality imaging: the importance of the shell structure for low and high frequency mechanics2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing interest in magnetic microbubbles (MBs) for simultaneous enhanced ultrasound (US) and enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to support well-established imaging procedures as well as new emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications. However, the development of hybrid contrast agents is challenging, because their design needs to satisfy a variety of requirements such as a sufficient stability of the probe for the circulation within the cardiovascular system, the production of an adequate US echo signal and a reasonable reduced relaxation time of nearby located protons. The studied magnetic MBs consist of an air-filled core, which is encapsulated by a soft hydrogel-like shell composed of poly(vinyl alcohol) and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs)[1]. Two strategies were used to combine magnetic nanoparticles with the polymeric shell: SPIONs were either covalently attached to the shell surface via a post-chemical treatment or embedded physically inside the shell during the MBs’ synthesis. In particular, we were interested on the impact of the used SPIONs integration strategy on low and high frequency mechanics of the magnetic MBs. Therefore, we used a straightforward characterization of the MBs on the single particle level to correlate the synthesis with the MBs’ morphological properties and low frequency mechanics that were studied in quasi-static force measurements with atomic force microscopy. High frequency mechanics were investigated by exposure of an ensemble of MBs to an acoustic field. By further correlation of low and high frequency mechanics, we were able to bridge the gap between synthesis and the MBs macroscopic properties relevant for their application. The shown approach offers the possibility to sustainable design and optimize complex probes based on an improved understanding of structure/property relations.

  • 24. Poehlmann, Melanie
    et al.
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Kothapalli, Satya V.V.N.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Härmark, Johan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Structural Biotechnology.
    Hebert, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Structural Biotechnology.
    Philipp, Alexandra
    Hoeller, Roland
    Seuss, Maximilian
    Kuttner, Christian
    Margheritelli, Silvia
    Paradossi, Gaio
    Frey, Andreas
    On the interplay of shell structure with low- and high-frequency mechanics of multifunctional magnetic microbubbles2014In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, E-ISSN 1744-6848, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 214-226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polymer-shelled magnetic microbubbles have great potential as hybrid contrast agents for ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. In this work, we studied US/MRI contrast agents based on air-filled poly(vinyl alcohol)-shelled microbubbles combined with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). The SPIONs are integrated either physically or chemically into the polymeric shell of the microbubbles (MBs). As a result, two different designs of a hybrid contrast agent are obtained. With the physical approach, SPIONs are embedded inside the polymeric shell and with the chemical approach SPIONs are covalently linked to the shell surface. The structural design of hybrid probes is important, because it strongly determines the contrast agent's response in the considered imaging methods. In particular, we were interested how structural differences affect the shell's mechanical properties, which play a key role for the MBs' US imaging performance. Therefore, we thoroughly characterized the MBs' geometric features and investigated low-frequency mechanics by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and high-frequency mechanics by using acoustic tests. Thus, we were able to quantify the impact of the used SPIONs integration method on the shell's elastic modulus, shear modulus and shear viscosity. In summary, the suggested approach contributes to an improved understanding of structure-property relations in US-active hybrid contrast agents and thus provides the basis for their sustainable development and optimization.

  • 25.
    Prabhakaran, Gokulraj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Imaging Memory Encoding in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) using fMRI2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 26. Sahlen, A.
    et al.
    Abdula, G.
    Norman, M.
    Manouras, Aristomenis
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Lund, L. H.
    Shahgaldi, Kambiz
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Winter, Reidar
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Altered arterial haemodynamics during exercise in elderly female hypertensives with poor stroke volume reserve2011In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 32, p. 10-11Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27. Sciallero, Claudia
    et al.
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Kothapalli, Satya V. V. N.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Oddo, Letizia
    Trucco, Andrea
    Acoustic characterization and contrast imaging of microbubbles encapsulated by polymeric shells coated or filled with magnetic nanoparticles2013In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 134, no 5, p. 3918-3930Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The combination of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with polymeric air-filled microbubbles is used to produce two types of multimodal contrast agents to enhance medical ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. The nanoparticles are either covalently linked to the shell or physically entrapped into the shell. In this paper, the characterization of the acoustic properties (backscattered power, fracturing pressure, attenuation and dispersion of the ultrasonic wave) and ultrasound imaging of the two types of magnetic microbubbles are presented. In vitro B-mode images are generated using a medical ultrasound scanner by applying a nonconventional signal processing technique that is suitable to detect polymeric bubbles and based on the combination of multipulse excitation and chirp coding. Even if both types of microbubbles can be considered to be effective ultrasound contrast agents, the different structure of the shell loaded with nanoparticles has a pronounced effect on the echogenicity and the detection sensitivity of the imaging technique. The best results are obtained using microbubbles that are externally coated with nanoparticles. A backscattered power of 20 dB was achieved at lower concentration, and an increment of 8 dB in the contrast-to-tissue ratio was observed with respect to the more rigid microbubbles with particles entrapped into the shell.

  • 28.
    Tibbelin, Sandra
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    HyperSPECT: a new instrument for high resolution single photon emission computed tomography2013Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 29. Westholm, Carl
    et al.
    Johnson, Jonas
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Winter, Reidar
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    The prognostic value of mechanical left ventricular dyssynchrony in patients with acute coronary syndrome2013In: Cardiovascular Ultrasound, ISSN 1476-7120, E-ISSN 1476-7120, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 35-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Echocardiography is a well-established tool for risk stratification in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). ACS has significant impact on LV dyssynchrony, and detrimental effects on systolic function and long term outcome. The aims of this study were to determine whether LV dyssynchrony carries any predictive information in an unselected ACS population and to evaluate if it has any incremental value to the information given from conventional echocardiographic measurements. Methods: The study included 227 consecutive ACS patients. Primary endpoint was the composite of death, new MI, or rehospitalisation due to heart failure. Dyssynchrony was measured as intersegmental variation of time to peak strain, the post systolic index (PSI) and myocardial performance index (MPI) with the standard deviation and difference between lowest and highest value (delta) expressing the amount of dyssynchrony. Septal-lateral delay was also tested. All dyssynchrony parameters were compared with Ejection fraction (EF). Results: The median follow up time was 53 months. 85 patients reached the combined endpoint. Patients with and without a subsequent combined endpoint differed significantly regarding calculated SD: s and delta-value for PSI, time to peak 2D-strain and MPI but not regarding septal-lateral delay. In ROC-analysis none of the dyssynchrony parameters had larger AUC than EF. When adjusting for traditional risk factors none of the dyssynchrony parameters remained associated with outcome, whereas EF still did. Conclusion: LV dyssynchrony seem to have significant prognostic information in patient with acute coronary syndrome but in comparison to conventional parameters such as EF there is no incremental value of this information.

  • 30.
    Widman, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Caidahl, Kenneth
    D’hooge, Jan
    Heyde, Brecht
    Larsson, Matilda
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    ULTRASOUND SPECKLE TRACKING STRAIN ESTIMATION IN CAROTID ARTERY PLAQUE PHANTOM WITH SONOMICROMETRY VALIDATION2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]
    1. 1.  Introduction

    Carotid artery plaque characterization is critical for the prevention of ischemic events. Since plaque stiffness has shown to correlate with plaque vulnerability, quantification of plaque strain throughout the heart cycle would be a useful diagnostic tool. Our previous work encompassed the development and validation of a 2D speckle tracking (ST) algorithm to evaluate arterial stiffness by measuring strain in the carotid artery wall in silico, in vitro, and in vivo. The focus of previous studies has been to quantify plaque strain in the radial direction but lack validation against a ground truth measurement. Our objective was to validate radial and longitudinal strain in plaques via sonomicrometry (sono), and compare the measured plaque and arterial wall strain.

     

    1. 2.  Method

    Three carotid artery phantoms with soft wall inclusions, mimicking a vulnerable plaque, were constructed (10% polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), 3% graphite) by exposing the vessel and plaque to three and one freeze-thaw cycles (12h freeze, 12h thaw) respectively, see Fig. 1a. The phantoms were embedded in a tissue mimicking mixture (3% Agar, 4% graphite) at approximately 1cm depth with a pump (CompuFlow 1000 MR) connected to the phantom lumen simulating the carotid blood flow. B-mode cineloops (GE Vivid E9, 9LD linear transducer, 10 MHz, 42 fps) recorded the vessel movement at 20 and 30 mL/s peak flows. The radial and longitudinal deformation of the plaque and vessel wall was estimated by an in house 2D ST (kernel size 5x2 wavelengths) algorithm throughout two consecutive cycles. The region of interest was adjusted according to the plaque size. Sono crystals were placed on the plaque and vessel wall and used as a reference of truth.

     

    1. 3.  Results

    Fig. 1b and 1c show sample radial and longitudinal strain curves of a phantom with 20mL/s lumen flow with good agreement between sono and ST. A strong correlation was found at radial (r=0.67, p=0.03) and longitudinal peak systolic strain (r=0.84, p<0.001) between sono and ST. The plaque exhibited 47,3% (SD 27,4%) greater radial and 62,3% (SD 83,5%) longitudinal peak strain than the arterial wall when measured with ST. These preliminary data show that it is possible to measure radial and longitudinal strain in plaques; however, more extensive analysis is required as is the feasibility in vivo.

     

  • 31.
    Widman, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Caidahl, Kenneth
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Heyde, Brecht
    KU Leuven.
    D’hooge, Jan
    KU Leuven.
    Larsson, Matilda
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Speckle tracking strain estimation of a carotid artery plaque phantom - Validation via sonomicrometry2013In: 2013 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS), IEEE conference proceedings, 2013, , p. 4p. 1757-1760Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current clinical ultrasound-based methods for plaque characterization are limited to visual assessment of plaque echogenicity creating demand for quantitative diagnostic tools. Our objective was to validate radial and longitudinal speckle tracking (ST) strain in phantom plaques via sonomicrometry (sono), and to compare the peak plaque and arterial wall strain. Four carotid artery gel-phantoms with a soft wall inclusion, mimicking a vulnerable plaque, were constructed. The phantoms were connected to a programmable pump simulating a carotid flow. Cineloops were acquired using a GE Vivid E9 where radial and longitudinal strain were calculated using a normalized cross-correlation ST algorithm. The region of interest was adjusted according to the plaque size. Sonomicrometry was used as a reference measurement. The correlation between estimated mean peak strain and the reference peak strain was r = 0.96 (p < 0.001) radially and r = 0.75 (p ≤ 0.005) longitudinally. The soft plaque exhibited 35.1% (SD 16.9%) greater radial (p < 0.001) and 88.6% (SD 72.0%) greater longitudinal (p < 0.001) peak strain than the arterial wall when measured with speckle tracking. It was possible to estimate plaque strain by ST and to distinguish a soft plaque from the vessel wall via strain measurements.

  • 32.
    Widman, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Maksuti, Elira
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Larsson, Matilda
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Bjällmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Caidahl, K.
    D'Hooge, J.
    Shear wave elastography for characterization of carotid artery plaques-A feasibility study in an experimental setup2012In: 2012 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS), IEEE , 2012, p. 6562400-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Characterization of vulnerable plaques in the carotid artery is critical for the prevention of ischemic stroke. However, ultrasound-based methods for plaque characterization used in the clinics today are limited to visual assessment and evaluation of plaque echogenicity. Shear Wave Elastography (SWE) is a new tissue characterization technique based on radiation force-induced shear wave propagation with potential use in plaque vulnerability assessment. The purpose of this study was to develop an experimental setup to test the feasibility of SWE for carotid plaque characterization. A carotid artery phantom with a soft inclusion in the wall, mimicking a vulnerable plaque, was constructed (10% polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), 3% graphite) by exposing the vessel and plaque to three and one freeze-thaw cycles (6h freeze, 6h thaw) respectively. An Aixplorer SWE system (Supersonic Imagine) was used to measure the shear wave speed (cT) in the vessel wall and plaque. The Young's modulus (E) was then calculated via the Moens-Korteweg (M-K) equation. For comparison, eight cylinders (d = 4 cm, h = 4 cm) were constructed for mechanical testing from the same PVA batch, of which four were exposed to three freeze-thaw cycles (mimicking the vessel wall) and four to one freeze-thaw cycle (mimicking the plaque). The Young's moduli for the cylinders were obtained via a displacement controlled mechanical compression test (Instron 5567) by applying 5% strain. The mean shear wave speed was 2.6 (±0.7) m/s in the vessel wall, 1.8 (±0.7) m/s in the plaque, resulting in Evessel = 11.5 (±0.5) kPa, Eplaque = 4.3 (±0.5) kPa. The compression tests resulted in E = 64.2 (±11.1) kPa in the hard cylinder and E = 9.7 (±3.1) kPa in the soft cylinder. The results showed that it was possible to distinguish between the arterial wall and the plaque. The disagreement between mechanical testing and SWE can be explained by the fact that the shear wave does not propagate monochromatically in cylindrical geometry. To achieve a better calculation of the elastic modulus, the frequency dependency of the shear wave velocity must be considered.

  • 33.
    Widman, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Maksuti, Elira
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Larsson, Matilda
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Bjällmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Nordenfur, Tim
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Caidahl, Kenneth
    D’hooge, Jan
    SHEAR WAVE ELASTOGRAPHY OF THE ARTERIAL WALL – WHERE WE ARE TODAY2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]
    1. 1.  Introduction

    Shear Wave Elastography (SWE) is a recently developed noninvasive method for elastography assessment using ultrasound. The technique consists of sending an acoustic radiation force (pushing sequence) into the tissue that in turn generates an orthogonal low frequency propagating shear wave. The shear wave propagation is measured real time by high speed B-mode imaging. From the B-mode images, the shear wave is tracked via normalized cross-correlation and the speed is calculated, which is used to generate an elasticity map of the tissue’s shear modulus. To date, the technique has mostly been used in large homogeneous tissues such as breast and liver where it successfully detects lesions and tumors that are easily missed with normal B-mode ultrasound [1]. SWE could potentially be applied in vascular applications to assess elasticity of the arterial wall to characterize the stiffness as an early indicator of cardiac disease. Furthermore, SWE could aid in the characterization of plaques in the carotid artery, which is critical for the prevention of ischemic stroke

    1. 2.  Methods and Results

    An initial study was performed using an Aixplorer SWE system (Supersonic Imagine, France) to measure the shear modulus in a polyvinyl alcohol phantom (PVA) vessel with a plaque inclusion (Figure 1). It was possible to distinguish the softer inclusion mean shear wave speed (2.1 m/s) from the arterial wall (3.5 m/s) on the SWE colour-map, but the Young’s Modulus calculation of the arterial wall (E=19.8 kPa) did not match the measured Young’s Modulus (E=53.1 kPa) from comparative mechanical testing.

    We have begun implementing various pushing sequences (single unfocused push, single focused push, line push, comb push) on a programmable ultrasound machine (Verasonics, USA) using a linear transducer (Philips L7-4) in a homogeneous PVA phantom. An algorithm for one dimensional cross-correlation tracking and shear wave speed estimation has been developed and initially tested in an experimental setup

    1. 3.  Discussion

    According to our initial results, it is possible that SWE could be applied in vascular applications. However, the initial mechanical testing vs. SWE comparison indicated that further development to the post processing is needed before applying it on the carotid artery, which is a heterogeneous tissue with other wave propagation properties than e.g. breast tissue. The carotid artery has a difficult geometry to study for several reasons. The intima-media complex is very thin (< 1mm), and the vessel wall is not stationary. Furthermore, the cylindrical shape of the artery produces complex wave reflections within the arterial wall, which result in a polychromatic propagation of the shear wave. A few studies have applied techniques based on SWE to the arterial wall with promising results and a pilot study demonstrating the feasibility of the technique in-vivo has been published [2]. Still, a considerable effort is needed to validate and optimize the technique for the clinical vascular setting.

  • 34.
    Zheng, Miaomiao
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Ultrasound Contrast Agents: Fabrication, size distribution and visualization2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Ultrasound contrast agents composed of micro-bubble filled with gas are introduced to increase the backscattered power from blood. Their intravenously injection results in the improved contrast in the images.

    The aim of this master thesis project is to manufacture MB suspension at varied temperature and shear forces and to inspect the size distribution and concentration of the PVA-shelled micro-bubble with standard methods according to the developed protocol. A pulser-receiver (Panametrics PR 5072) setup combined with two transducers (2.25 MHz and 5 MHz) was used to investigate the backscattered enhancement of the micro-bubble suspension.

    Images were collected with transmission optical microscope (OLYMPUS IX71) with the aid of counting chamber. The diameter and concentration of the micro-bubbles were analyzed by Image J. The pulser-receiver setup was used to test the acoustic response.

    The mean diameter of micro-bubbles was from 2.03 to 4.38 µm with a standard deviation between 0.40 and 1.12 µm and the micro-bubble concentration varied from 0.07× to 5.22× MBs/ml. The enhancement of the ultrasound backscattered power was greater than 20 dB or even reached 30 dB when the energy was increased. 

1 - 34 of 34
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