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  • 1.
    Anstey, Tim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Architectural Technologies.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Hughes, Rolf
    Konstfack.
    Architecture and Authorship2007Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Architecture and Authorship comprises 16 essays that explore issues of authorship, attribution and intellectual property in architecture. The book examines how individual architects and movements, from the fifteenth century onwards, have endeavoured to maintain their status by defending what they see as their own unique territory—the origins and intentions of their work, and their signature style.

  • 2.
    Bonnevier, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Behind Straight Curtains: Towards a queer feminist theory of architecture2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis presents theatrical queer feminist interpretations of architecture staged within a series of architectural scenes: architect Eileen Gray’s building E.1027 in the south of France (1926-29); author Natalie Barney’s literary salon at 20 rue Jacob, Paris (1909-1968); and author Selma Lagerlöf’s former home and memorial estate Mårbacka, situated in mid-west Sweden and transformed between 1919 and 1923. Interpreted as queer performative acts, or enactments of architecture, these cases bring into play the interconnectedness of material container, the setting, the deeds and the actors. A broad aim of the thesis is to explore the role played by architecture in the social and cultural constructions of bodies, in particular in relation to gender and sexuality. Architecture is investigated as one of the subjectivating norms that constitute gender performativity. The thesis is thus not only about but also operates through enactment. It masquerades as a series of lectures written in the form of scripted drama. The aim of this formal experiment is not only to explicate and critique from a detached perspective but also to represent architecture in the process of being enacted. Architecture is investigated not only as a theoretical metaphor but also as a concrete material practice always entangled with subject positions. With this exploration into the queerness and the theatricality of architecture, Behind Straight Curtains seeks to affect both the analysis and enactment of architecture and contribute to an architectural shift towards a built environment that does not simply repeat repressive structures but attempts to resist discrimination and dismantle hierarchies.

  • 3.
    Bonnevier, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Blonda hus, vita masker2003In: Artes, Vol. 2003(29):2, s.106-114Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Bonnevier, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Ett rum för queerutopin: Eileen Gray skapade ett hus för det normöverskridande livet2003In: Bang, Vol. 2003:3/4, s. 45-48Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Bonnevier, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Manhaftiga paviljonger, fjolliga dekorationer2007In: Rum, ISSN 1650-1330, Vol. 6, p. 64-69Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Bonnevier, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Mårbacka drag king2007In: Bang, ISSN 1102-4593, Vol. 2, p. 12-16Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Bonnevier, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Out of the Salon: With Natalie Barney towards a critically queer architecture2007In: Critical Architecture, Routledge Taylor & Francis Group , 2007, p. 200-205Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Bonnevier, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Samlade tankar om självbyggeri2009In: Årsbok / Arkitekturmuseet, ISSN 0280-2686, p. 8-17Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Bonnevier, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Sköna hem: Eileen Gray-koden dechiffrerad2005In: Arkitektur: byggnad, interiör, plan, landskap, ISSN 0004-2021, Vol. 105, no 1, p. 28-39Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Bonnevier, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Ut ur Salongen: keep the fire burning! Om den gränslösa Salongen2005In: Femkul, ISSN 1652-6376, Vol. 1, p. 12-15Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Burroughs, Brady
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Architects in Formation: Architectural Flirtations2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Burroughs, Brady
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Architectural Flirtations: A Love Storey2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Formulated as a feminist project, written as a pulp fiction, Architectural Flirtations: A Love Storey begins with our claim that the architectural discipline is centered around a culture of critique, which is based in what bell hooks calls “a system of imperialist, white supremacist, heterosexist, capitalist, patriarchy,” and that the values instilled by this culture not only begin with, but are reinforced and reproduced by, the education of young architects.

    Sounds serious. Right?

    In a move toward a more vulnerable, ethical and empowering culture of architecture, the project aims to displace the culture of critique, by questioning and undermining relationships of power and privilege through practices that are explicitly critical, queer feminist, and Campy. In other words, it takes seriously, in an uncertain, improper and playful way, what is usually deemed unserious within the architectural discipline, in order to undermine the usual order of things.

    All of the (love) storeys take place on March 21st, the spring equinox, in and around a 1977 collaborative row house project called Case Unifamiliari in Mozzo, Italy, designed by Aldo Rossi and Attilio Pizzigoni. Beda Ring, PhD researcher, constructs a Campy renovation of one of these row houses, full of theatricality, humor, and significant otherness; while architectural pedagogue, Brady Burroughs, guides a student group from KTH in an Architecture and Gender course; and Henri T. Beall, practicing architect, attends to the details upstairs.

  • 13.
    Burroughs, Brady
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Architectural Flirtations, formerly known as critique2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With this chapter, I aim to briefly describe and position the key concepts that form the central idea of my forthcoming dissertation, I hate architecture <3: Architectural Flirtations, formerly known as critique. It explores the words I use in the (working) title, “architectural”, “flirtations” and “critique,” in relation to ideas about architects and their formation, staked out by Dana Cuff in her chapter “The Making of an Architect” from 1991.[1] Although it was written almost 25 years ago, around the time of my own design education, I am struck by the degree to which my Master’s architecture students still recognize elements of their own education in Cuff’s text, when reading it together as recently as March 2014. Cuff writes, “The ethos of a profession is born in schools.”[2]  For me, it’s obvious that the effects are lasting! In revisiting the central aspects that contribute to making a culture of architects, what Cuff describes as ‘enculturation’, “…a process that transforms layperson into architect through the knowledge, experience, and authority gained over the course of a career,” with a specific focus on education, I propose an intentional and continuous displacing of “the center,” as a strategy to “clear ground” for more ethical, socially-conscious and generous architectural conversations.[3]

     

    Situated within what Jane Rendell describes as one of the five thematics of current feminist critical spatial practices- performativity, my work is most often a joining of feminist, literary and architectural disciplines with a theatrical guise.[iv] In a re-application within the context of the culture of architecture, I take Gavin Butt’s call for scholarly flirtation seriously, while Susan Sontag’s ideas on Camp are revived for their ability to “dethrone the serious” and for their strong relation to queer performativity. To instigate a different mode of operation from what Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick labels as the “paranoia” of critique and critical theorists, I look to Sara Ahmed’s act of “reorienting” or decentering that I believe the architectural flirt can achieve.[v] bell hooks describes engaged pedagogical settings, not as so-called ”safe spaces” where everyone agrees, but rather as spaces that “know how to cope in situations of risk.”[vi] Flirtation is risky, and architectural flirtations complicate things, in order to resist habit and offer another ”way of doing things” and ”alternative ways of understanding.”

    [1] Cuff, 109-154.

    [2] Cuff, 43.

    [3] Cuff, 153.

    [iv] Rendell, 37.

    [v] Sedgwick, 131. Ahmed, 552-554.

    [vi] hooks, 87.

  • 14.
    Burroughs, Brady
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Architectural Flirtations, formerly known as critique: Dethroning the serious to clear ground for generous architectural conversations2017In: Feminist Futures of Spatial Practice: Materialisms, Activisms, Dialogues, Pedagogies, Projections / [ed] Meike Schalk, Thérèse Kristiansson and Ramia Mazé, Baunach, Germany: AADR-Art Architecture Design Research , 2017, p. 225-237Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, I aim to briefly describe and position the key concepts that form the central idea of my recently published dissertation Architectural Flirtations: A Love Storey. I explore the terms architectural, flirtations and critique, in relation to ideas about architects and their formation, staked out by architect and theorist, Dana Cuff in her chapter “The Making of an Architect” from 1991. Cuff writes: “The ethos of a profession is born in schools.”  For me, it’s obvious that the effects are lasting! Although written almost 25 years ago, around the time of my own design education, I am struck by the degree to which my masters architecture students still recognize elements of their own education in Cuff’s text when reading it together in March 2014. In revisiting the central aspects that contribute to making a culture of architects, what Cuff describes as enculturation, “a process that transforms layperson into architect through the knowledge, experience, and authority gained over the course of a career,” with a specific focus on education, I propose an intentional and continuous displacing of what I call the center. This strategy, what I call architectural flirtations, involves clearing ground for more ethical, socially conscious, and generous architectural conversations.

  • 15.
    Burroughs, Brady
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    I hate architecture <32014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Burroughs, Brady
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Meditations on lesbians who meditate on Lesvos: an exploration on the role of vulnerability, desire and empowerment in the inhabitation of lesbian space2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    At the end of the beach in the tiny Greek village Skala Eressos, Lesvos, Sappho’s birthplace, stands the main blue-stuccoed building of Zorba the Buddha - the beachfront café where The Skala Women’s Rock Group gather every morning at 10 am for their daily swim and breakfast. From this place, springs a series of spaces where lesbian women bath together.

    Through short fictional meditations on specific situations encountered within this context, this paper looks at how our most vulnerable, passionate and empowering moments affect and transform the spaces we inhabit. Key theoretical references are bell hooks’ writing on spirituality and community building, Sara Ahmed’s ideas on orientation and inhabitation in describing systems of social norms, and Monique Wittig’s The Lesbian Body as an important fictional source of inspiration.

    This work explores affect in the inhabitation of space and fictional modes of writing as a critical methodology, to examine contemporary sites of study in an ethically responsible way.

  • 17.
    Burroughs, Brady
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    The Architecture of Flirting with Death2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Burroughs, Brady
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Vanity (Fair), Conflict, Dreams and Drama on an Ordinary Day at The Beastlet: On the Possibilities of Critical Pedagogies2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The project brief called for a sanctuary for mythical creatures and visitor facilities in a rural landscape in southeast Sweden, with alternating assignments of collective and individual efforts, constantly negotiating positions within critical fictions. A group of master’s level architecture students adamantly refused their roles as “the architects” and insisted on designing their entire studio project in the guise of their imaginary humanimal counterparts, voicing a strong belief in the necessity to design from the positions of the residents of the proposed sanctuary, The Beastlet. This act and expression of dissent, allowed for all of the vanity, conflict, dreams and drama of everyday life to take up space and matter, within the individual proposals and the sanctuary as a whole.

    During the Fall term of 2011, the Critical Studies Design Studio at KTH in Stockholm, Sweden, led by myself and my colleague Katarina Bonnevier, used fictional modes of writing and dialogical interventions as critical methodologies in two closely related studio projects, with the underlying theme ANIMALS. In the first course, Feminist Design Tools, the students developed fictive humanimal characters through fable writing, a series of design exercises and a folly- a small scale spatial “conversation piece”. The students were then asked to continue working with their characters in the second course, Dialogical Interventions, by collectively proposing a sanctuary for these mythical creatures. The intention of the animal theme and the use of fictive characters, based on a platform of feminist and queer theory, allowed the group to investigate notions such as normativity, ‘otherness’ and exclusion in a more direct way, by creating some distance between these notions and their direct relation to our human selves. Likewise, it encouraged, engaged and empowered the participants to reflect upon their own positions as students and as architects, and to actively make choices and demands in relation to their own learning environments and working methods.

    This paper looks at the students’ interpretation and negotiation of the given project brief, which raised questions about perceived problems within the education and practice of architecture; specifically, normative notions and methodologies, practices of exclusion, and the legitimacy and ethics of speaking for others. Further, this paper reflects on the possibilities of critical pedagogies to transform practices of spatial production, and as feminist bell hooks writes in her trilogy on teaching, to establish an “education as the practice of freedom”, where the classroom, or in this case the studio, becomes a place of resistance to oppressive hierarchies and structures.Texts used within the studio course, such as Sara Ahmed’s The Phenomenology of Whiteness, Rosi Braidotti’s Nomadic Subjects and Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick’s Touching Feeling serve as theoretical references in discussing the students’ exploration of subjectivity, agency and the negotiation of positions through theatricality. In THIS critical fiction, a simulated article for Vanity Fair, the students’ characters speak directly from The Beastlet, while “the architect” plays the role of the evil counterpart.

  • 19.
    Erixon Aalto, Hanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Projecting Urban Natures: Investigating integrative approaches to urban development and nature conservation2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Projecting Urban Natures is a compilation thesis in critical studies in architecture. It comprises three journal articles and four design proposals in which I have taken an active part. The point of departure for this thesis is the renewed emphasis on social-ecological interaction and resilience that is currently taking place within ecological systems science, and the opportunities that these paradigmatic insights in turn have opened up within urbanism and design. The thesis argues that although they are promising, these emerging integrative frameworks are seldom brought into mainstream planning and urban design practice. Instead, the structuring of “nature” and “city” into a dualistic balance relationship still permeates not only the general planning discourse, but also makes its way into planning documents, notably influencing distinctions between professions. In response, this thesis sets out to rethink and explore more integrated approaches to human/nature relationships, through the utilization of design-based and transdisciplinary research methods. While this core aim of the thesis remains the same throughout the work, the task is approached from different perspectives: through different constellations of collaborative work as well as through parallel case-based explorations that emphasize the relational, anti-essentialist and situated articulation of values of urban natures and how these forces come into play. The work has been propelled through workshop-based, site-specific, and experimental design processes with professionals and researchers from the fields of e.g. systems ecology, natural resource management, political ecology, urban design, architecture, and landscape design, as well as planners, developers, local interest groups, and NGOs. Specifically, projects performed within this thesis include: Nature as an Infrastructural Potential – An Urban Strategy for Järvafältet; Kymlinge UrbanNatur together with NOD, Wingårdhs, MUST and Storylab; Årsta Urban Natures with James Corner Field Operations and Buro Happold; and Albano Resilient Campus — a collaboration between Stockholm Resilience Centre, KTH and KIT.

  • 20.
    Fagerström, Katrin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Architecture Forgetting Colour: Crystal Palace and Impressionism2005In: AIC Colour 05. The 10th Congress of the International Colour Association: Proceedings Book. Part I / [ed] Juan L. Nieves, Javier Hernández-Andrés, Granada: AIC, International Colour Association , 2005, p. 201-204Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ephemeral architecture of the World Fairs was important for the architectural history of the 20th Century. When the architectural theoretician Sigfried Giedion in 1941 regards the conception of space in modern architecture portended in Crystal Palace he notes the iron and the glass but not the architectural colour scheme. The colour scheme of the architect Owen Jones may be regarded as an early example of impressionism – or neo-impressionism; movements which in painting were of great importance to later art movements including architecture. The Swedish architectural historian Elias Cornell emhasised the impact of the colour scheme on the perception of space in Crystal Palace in his doctoral thesis of 1952 and in 1977 the American architectural theoretician David Van Zanten uses the term impressionist colour for its colour scheme. This paper discusses the significance of architectural impressionism by a comparison between the descriptions of Giedion, Cornell and Van Zanten using studies of impressionism and neo-impressionism.

  • 21.
    Fagerström, Katrin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Brutal Colours – The Swedish Pavilion at the Paris Expo 19372008In: Colour – Effects & Affects: Book of Abstracts / [ed] Karin Fridell Anter, Iman Kortbawi, Stockholm: AIC. International Colour Association , 2008, p. 41-42Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Frichot, Helene
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Matthew Barney's cremaster cycle revisited: Towards post-human becomings of man2015In: Angelaki, ISSN 0969-725X, E-ISSN 1469-2899, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 55-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is now well over a decade since the artist Matthew Barney's epic work the Cremaster Cycle was completed. This essay returns to the post-human becomings of man that populate Barney's elaborately cross-referenced, aesthetic pluriverse, in particular addressing how the man-form labours amidst and on his environment-worlds, inclusive of the architectural augmentations that assist in the production of such worlds. Revisiting Barney's Cremaster Cycle now offers the opportunity to ask what becomes of the exclusionary and exhaustive world-making performances of the Anthrop once he has placed extreme stress on himself and his mental, social and environmental ecologies, so that any mutual support system is brought to the threshold of exhaustion.

  • 23.
    Frichot, Helene
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    The Practice Turn in Architecture: Brussels after 19682017In: arq Architecture research quarterly, ISSN 1359-1355, E-ISSN 1474-0516, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 193-195Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Conexa, Conjuncta, Disjuncta: What can a monument do?2012In: Future Anterior, ISSN 1549-9715, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 74-86Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Deleuze and Memorial Culture: Desire, Singular Memory, and the Politics of Trauma2012In: Future anterior: journal of historic preservation - history, theory & criticism, ISSN 1549-9715, E-ISSN 1934-6026, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 74-86Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Deleuze and the story of the superfold2013In: Deleuze and Architecture / [ed] Hélène Frichot, Stephen Loo, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2013, 1, p. 79-95Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gilles Deleuze’s concept of the fold has inspired much architectural experimentation in terms of novel form-making, or fold-making writ large at the scale of buildings and even urban environments. With what can be called the rise of a new biological paradigm in architecture, the concept of the fold, while less explicitly evident, continues to promise novel approaches to form-making, and is also suggestive of a way in which architecture can conjoin with a life within the folds. Contemporary avant-garde architects now claim that one day soon buildings will respond to life criteria, by becoming something akin to building-organisms. A definition of life is broadly appropriated from the life sciences, and the models that it uses to map life in process range from the scale of the cells that cluster as organisms to the organization of ecological systems. The resulting focus on generative digital models, which borrow from genetics, evolutionary theory, and so forth, continues to draw on the aesthetics of Deleuze and Félix Guattari. I will argue that an emphasis on an aesthetics of life that is directed toward architectural formal ends, and which calls upon an array of interdisciplinary sources including biology, computer science and philosophy, risks forgetting the ethical and political importance of simultaneously pursuing an ethics of immanence, or else what Guattari has called an ecosophy. The drawing of the diagram of the fold also designates a tremulous site of battle that pertains to life, how it is defined and how it is transforming, especially in societies of control. In the Appendix of his book Foucault, Deleuze describes what he calls the Superfold, a concept by which he speculates on a life within the folds that goes beyond the human organism as well as beyond the silicon-based machine: A life within the folds in profound contact with the outside of thought is not all that it seems. I will conclude the essay with a discussion of this marginal concept of the superfold and its implications for the ground that is shared between architecture and philosophy.

  • 27.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Design Thinking in the Beehive2011In: Artichoke, ISSN 1442-0953, Vol. 36, p. 97-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Desire and Identity: The Architecture of Chancellor and Patrick2011In: Architecture Australia, ISSN 0003-8725, Vol. May/June, no 3, p. 17-18Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The scene that is set describes a serene Victoria enjoying her post-war prosperity together with the pleasures of a bay-side leisure lifestyle. This is an age in which the Victorian citizen, the everyman, can feel sure of his place in the work-a-day world, and then return home to large helpings of meat and three veg prepared by the wife. There persists, more or less imperceptibly, the quiet murmur of a fading indigenous race, whose children and land have been stolen, but little matter, this is now a resolutely white Australia. Whiteness has been so thoroughly internalised into the nation’s psyche that the white Australia policy has been allowed to cautiously ease. Even with the considerable post-war push for immigration – populate or perish – the newcomers are mostly European, and the newsreels show images of smiling blond women, and smart, healthy young men in stylish sunglasses alighting from large ocean liners. There are dams to be built, and primary and secondary industry to consider. This is also an era within which mainstream television is just being introduced, and all the living room picture windows, one by one, up and down the block, begin to flicker and glow after dinner time as families gather around the televisual hearth to hear news from elsewhere.

    It is during this period, from the early to the mid-1950’s, that experimental young Australian practices such as Chancellor and Patrick look with great admiration toward the new architecture emerging out of Europe, and the international flowering of modernism. 

  • 29.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Drawing, Thinking, Doing: From Diagram Work to the Superfold2011In: Access: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies, ISSN 0111-8889, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1998, when the names Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari still exuded a seductive attraction for architectural thinkers and practitioners, Any Magazine, edited by Cynthia C. Davidson, published an edition entitled Diagram Work, which was guest edited by architects Ben van Berkal and Caroline Bos. The diagram work in question drew predominantly on the philosophical thought of Deleuze and Guattari, especially their version of the diagram, or ‘diagrammatic’, as mobilised in their book A Thousand Plateaus where the diagram is also referred to as an ‘abstract machine’. This essay will present a series of different ways in which the concept of the diagram can be argued to be at work in Deleuze, and Deleuze and Guattari’s ethico-aesthetics. Their speculative, projective and radically creative employment of the diagram will also allow me to present a discussion of Deleuze’s concept of the ‘Superfold’, which he introduces briefly in the Appendix of his book Foucault. I will conclude by discussing the relevance of the concept of the Superfold with regard to computational architectures and (post)digital diagrammatic processes, and also as a concept that alerts us to the risk of assuming too much about our relationship with diagrammatic forces. 

  • 30.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    On Finding Oneself Spinozist: Refuge, Beatitude and the Any-Space-Whatever2009In: Gilles Deleuze: Image and Text / [ed] Charles J. Stivale, Eugene W. Holland, Daniel W. Smith, London: Continuum Press , 2009, p. 247-263Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Return to the Fold: An Aesthetics of the Infinitesimal2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With this paper I plan to go in search of an aesthetics of the infinitely small that is to be discovered in the creases and pockets, the material pleats and immaterial inflections of Gilles Deleuze’s concept of the fold. I will also follow Michel Serres’s involutions, his narrative envelopments and developments, in insisting that we do not yet know what a fold can do. The aesthetic domain I will frame, perhaps predictably, belongs to the discipline of architecture and contemporary design research being undertaken by way of computation into living systems and how architecture too may one day become life-like. In the past, throughout the 1990’s especially, architects were renowned for their formal explorations of the fold, even though many of the aesthetic results remained reified versions of the fold that obscured the infinitely porous peristaltic movements, whorls and maelstroms, and worlds within worlds, as well as the pliable materiality offered up by this concept. This is not to discount the fascinating architectural forms that sometimes emerged from all this activity. Now the name of Deleuze is rarely heard amongst (post) digital architects who, as Bruno Latour points out, consume theoretical concepts rapaciously: “they eat a theory for breakfast then go and get another one”, Latour provocatively suggests. Certainly, in the milieu of architecture there would appear to be the implicit assumption that the concept of the fold has been exhausted: this is an assumption I plan to counter with this paper. 

  • 32.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    What can we learn form the Bubble Man and his Atmospheric Ecologies2011In: IDEA Journal, ISSN 1445-5412, p. 102-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With this essay I present the fragile thought-image of the soap-bubble to venture an augmented understanding of what an atmospheric ecology might be, what it might include, and how it might contribute to a thinking of interiors. In contemporary digital design the soap-bubble or soap film is most often investigated for what it can tell us about material behaviour, and how an understanding of material behaviour as it occurs in ‘Nature’ can be innovatively applied to design problems. Soap film can be studied in terms of what it tells us about surface tension and minimal distribution of material, which then allows the designer to better understand tensile structures. It also contributes to an understanding of cell walls (from the scale of the microscopic to the macroscopic), and how an interior condition responds to the pressure of an exterior condition.Appropriated from nature through a process of biomimicry the behaviour of soap film and soap-bubbles has been broadly used to test speculative design schemes and also to generate new digital techniques and technologies. I propose to liberate the thought-figure of the soap-bubble from this set of technical studies and applications in order to extend an understanding of how it can be used to frame atmospheric ecologies, especially after the manner in which soap-bubbles cluster and froth. Ecology here must be understood in an expanded sense that encompasses not just naturally occurring systems, championed by special interest groups that fight for a specific environmental niche, but also subjective and social ecologies, and how these different systems remain profoundly intertwined. I draw on the work of Peter Sloterdijk, Jakob von Uexküll, and also Gregory Bateson to offer other visions of what an atmospheric ecology might be, and how it can offer us more open definitions of the interiors in which we need to find a way to survive. 

  • 33.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    When Things Get Wild2011In: KERB: Journal of Landscape Architecture, ISSN 1324-8049, Vol. 19, p. 56-59Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    When Things Get Wild: An Introduction to R&Sie2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Frichot, Hélène
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Loo, StephenUniversity of Tasmania.
    Deleuze and Architecture2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How is it that the legacy of the French philosopher Deleuze has lasted so long and impacted so greatly on both the practice and theorising of architecture? The uptake of the philosophy of Gilles Deleuze in architectural theory and practice since the 1980’s has been fast, furious and multifarious. From ubiquitous formal translations of the process of ‘folding,’ to differences between ‘smooth’ and ‘striated’ space, to appropriations of concepts such as ‘immanence’ and the ‘virtual’ in digital architecture, the consumption of Deleuzian philosophy has fuelled a generation of architectural thinking, and is manifest in the design of a global range of contemporary built environments. The work of Deleuze, and his collaboration with psychoanalyst, Félix Guattari, has also, importantly, alerted Architecture to crucial ecological, political and social problems, with which the discipline must continue to grapple.

    Deleuze and Architecture provides critical genealogies of Deleuze’s influence in architecture, as well as critical commentaries on, and evidence for, the ongoing relevance of this philosopher to the discipline. Fifteen essays by a current generation of key interdisciplinary scholars reflect upon the following questions: What is a critical history of Deleuze’s influence in architecture? How has Deleuze’s work challenged architecture’s disciplinary construction, and how, through novel readings of Deleuze, has the discipline of architecture contributed to philosophical thinking? How does an engagement in the philosophy of Deleuze contribute to an architectural understanding of the complex politics of space of our increasingly networked world? How can a rethinking of Deleuze’s philosophy enable new ethical, ecological and participatory approaches to architecture? 

  • 36.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Architecture and the dilemma of identity: a study of the ’weak subject’ in Marcel Proust1997In: The interpretation of culture and the culture of interpretation / editors: Eva Hemmungs Wirtén and Erik Peurell, Vol. S. [63]-86Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Att drömma om regnbågens slut och horisontens faktiska vara.1996In: Arkitektur, Vol. 1996:2, s. 49-51 : ill.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Automata, perspective and music: poetic instruments in the written garden of Salomon de Caus1995Book (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Fluttering butterflies, a dusty road, and a muddy stone: Criticality in distraction2007In: Critical Architecture / [ed] Jane Rendell, Jonathan Hill, Murray Fraser, Mark Dorrian, London: Routledge, 2007, 1, p. 135-142Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    “Buildings are appropriated in a twofold manner: by use and by perceptions –or rather by touch and sight. Such appropriation cannot be understood in terms of the attentive concentration of a tourist before a famous building.”[1]

     

    In this passage of “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction” Walter Benjamin suggests that the experience of architecture points humanity to a very particular and acutely relevant mode of appropriation, ‘mastered’ by habit and by impressions caught in ‘an incidental fashion’. His observation, that architecture shies away from attentive contemplation, and demands to be perceived rather as a back-drop to life than as an object in life, points to an interesting dilemma facing the architectural critic: If the object under debate, architecture, offers itself as a mere background event, appropriated primarily by habitual use and occasionally by attentive visual perception, how are we to capture it? How could such an delicate phenomena be scrutinized if it cannot be held firmly before the eyes of the reader? It appears nearly impossible to represent and to critically engage with. Yet, as architectural critics, we are challenged and inspired to experiment with this condition. We construct in different ways temporary frames or lenses through which a critical point can be perceived. The phenomena of architecture often then comes into focus, for a moment, then fades away again.

     

    My contribution to the ‘Critical Architecture’ volume is propositional: it performs a mode of writing in architecture which consciously address the dilemma of capturing an architecture, or other spatial phenomena, for the purposes of a critical engagement with the reader, while essentially remaining ‘out of focus’ (in the margin).

     

    The essay takes place in Haga Park, Stockholm. This park constitutes one of the most interesting examples of 18th century landscape gardening in Stockholm. The sites have however been chosen on the basis of rather vague (unimportant) personal memories from my own ‘distracted’ uses of this park as a child and teenager. Memories of past use are thus called forth by writing, in an attempt to ‘defocus’ the scholarly gaze of the grown-up critic. It is approached as an actual and a remembered place. The park is written as a site of everyday experience, not in the eighteenth century, not for Stockholmers today, but for myself (here ‘the distracted critic’). What is the Haga Park that follows me around? - the remembered place that I store in my mind, a place which expands, evolves, even disappears in part, as her time and life goes on.

     

    The author of the essay relates to the reader an account of a Haga Park that obliges the reader to follow her train of thought, which moves between remembered and present time, as well as reflecting on the particular mode in which it is being told and why. It addresses the notion of distracted experience and its critical and political function for Walter Benjamin. The text thus make a double-layered performance. The particular effect of distractedness here is the allowance it makes for the telling of parallel stories, and of making observations sometimes by association rather than argument or narrative.[2] There is thus ample space for the reader herself to assume a critical position in relation to the landscape that is written for her imagination. But the narrating voice also carefully guides the reader among these impressions and creates a critical space where some conclusions are drawn and arguments are put forward.

     

    In what way might the resulting text convey a distracted mode of experience? By drawing on personal memories and experiences as a primary source, the author can only hope that the resulting account might bear a significant relation to potential readers who can recognize in it ways of experiencing and understanding particular places and landscapes. The choice of such an auto-biographical method is based on a recognition of the importance of a cultural specificity in any discussion of spatial experience.[3] While these kinds of sources in some sense are always unique, the process of writing them, giving in some sense a ‘faithful’ account, is of course wholly dependent on  mediation. As soon as a memory is evoked and retold, it is severed from any original ‘impression’, which is also the only way that it may ever become useful. The distracted nature of the essay is also present in the way that it makes use of both a particular place, Haga Park, and a particular person’s experiences, the authors, without having any ambition of giving any complete or truly exhaustive account of either. It employs them merely to point at and give materiality to certain phenomena and experiences, which in turn demands the evocation of a certain interest in both the specific park and the author. The reading act might then in itself provoke a certain uneasiness, another level of distraction, which has to be carefully balanced (and obviously also stops some readers from ever reading through).

     

    _____

     

    1. Walter Benjamin “ The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction” in Illuminations, Schocken Books, 1968, p 240.

     

    [2] If one might write in such a way that brings to the surface several phenomena at once, and at the same time the presence of a distracted subject amidst all this, a text that reflects the filmic effect Benjamin relates, could be a possible result. This is not undone. Even Benjamin had several examples among his contemporaries. Virginia Woolf’s stream-of-consciousness writing in novels such as The Waves, Mrs Dalloway, Jacob’s Room for example, appear to be aiming for a similar effect. At the same time her essay-writing allows for considerably less distraction.

    [3] Other modes of working with such a specificity (experience grounded in a named, gendered etc, subject) may be through discussing characters from, film, literature etc, or documentary characters, based on interviews, and relating the accounts of other individuals thaw we know or come to know.

  • 40.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Four essays framed: (questions of imagination, interpretation and representation in architecture)1997Book (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Handbok för framtidens arkitektur2001Book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    In the corner of perception: Spatial experience in distraction2005In: arq Architecture research quarterly, ISSN 1359-1355, E-ISSN 1474-0516, Vol. 9, p. 245-254Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Nature’s lovers: Design and Authorship in the 18th century landscape garden2007In: Architecture and authorship / [ed] Tim Anstey, Katja Grillner, Rolf Hughes, London: Black Dog Publishing, 2007Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    När arkitektur är arkitektur är arkitektur konst2001In: Det transparenta huset: Om glas och ljus i konst och arkitektur ... / [ed] Tomas Lauri, Stockholm: Statens konstråd , 2001Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Reflective depth on the surface of reality: thesis project1995Book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    The primacy of perplexion: working architecture through a distracted order of experience : part I - fictional reality in search...1995In: Nordisk arkitekturforskning, Vol. 1995 (8:1), s. 55-67 : ill.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    The primacy of perplexion: working architecture through a distracted order of experience : part II - fictional selves in search...1995In: Nordisk arkitekturforskning, Vol. 1995 (8:2), s. 85-107 . ill.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Tomaskyrkan i Vällingby: en analys av Peter Celsings byggnad : proseminarieuppsats i Konstvetenskap vid Stockholms universite...1992Book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    UR Samtiden - Humanisterna och framtidssamhället [Elektronisk resurs]: Kan humanisterna förändra samhället?2011Other (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Grillner, Katja
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Glembrandt, PerWallenstein, Sven-Olov
    Startpunkter: experimentell forskning inom arkitektur och design = Beginnings : experimental research in architecture and design2005Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    01.AKAD – EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH IN ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN – BEGINNINGS is the first in a series of publications from AKAD, which aim to provoke, promote and discuss new and critically experimental research by architecture and design. This first book is structured around four themes arising from projects initiated within AKAD with financial support from the Swedish Research Council. It includes critical essays and presentations of experimental design and writing projects. The contributors are architects, designers and scholars based in Sweden, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Ireland, Italy, Switzerland, UK, and USA.

12 1 - 50 of 98
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