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  • 1.
    Ekholm, Anders
    et al.
    Lunds Tekniska Högskola.
    Tarandi, Väino
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Häggström, Lars
    Johansson, Bo
    Tyrefors, Bo
    RoadMap för digital information om byggd miljö2010Report (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Eriksson, Kent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Johanson, J.
    Majkgård, A.
    Sharma, D. D.
    Experiential knowledge and cost in the internationalization process2015In: Knowledge, Networks and Power, The Uppsala School of International Business , 2015, p. 41-63Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Eriksson, Per Erik
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet .
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Upphandlingsstrategier för utmanande projektförutsättningar i trånga innerstadsprojekt - En vägledning till byggherrar i Norra Djurgårdsstaden2016Report (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Gajic, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Gelo, Johannes
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Bygglogisik inom industriområde2018Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 5.
    Grahn, Sara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Lind, Hans
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Building and Real Estate Economics.
    Wikforss, Örjan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Byggsektorns förmågor2011Report (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Gustavsson, Tina Karrbom
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    New boundary spanners: Emerging management roles in collaborative construction projects2015In: Procedia Economics and Finance, E-ISSN 2212-5671, Vol. 21, p. 146-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Project management roles and functions, which are standardized and clearly defined in literature, vary in practice. This study explores project management roles and functions in collaborative construction project practice. The findings, which are based on a longitudinal case study of a collaborative construction project, reports that several project management roles emerged during the project process, for example collaboration manager, BIM-manager and cooperation manager. The findings also report associated risks with the emergence of new management roles, for example information overload and misunderstanding. These new managerial roles served both as boundary spanners when creating and maintaining relationships between stakeholders, and as innovators when challenging the traditional and ingrained adversarial construction project practice. The findings contribute to the growing literature on collaborative approaches in construction and to the discussion on the transformation of project management roles and functions.

  • 7.
    Hallberg, Daniel
    et al.
    Research School, Centre for Built Environment, University of Gävle.
    Tarandi, Väino
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    On the use of open bim and 4d visualisation in a predictive life cycle management system for construction works2011In: Journal of Information Technology in Construction (ITcon), ISSN 1874-4753, E-ISSN 1874-4753, Vol. 16, p. 445-466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    :Construction works are in periodical need of performance upgrade such as maintenance, repair and rehabilitation (MR&R). Facility managers are responsible to fulfil this need during the whole life cycle of the construction works in a manner that maximises the economical profit, minimises the environmental impact and keeps the risk of failure at a low level. A prerequisite for efficient facility management (FM) is long-term planning of MR&R actions. This requires management of a large amount of information, a process that includes gathering, storing, processing and presentation of data. With the development of open Building Information Models (open BIM) and standardisation of Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) new possibilities of efficient management of FM information have emerged. Due to its parametric and object-oriented approach, the open BIM-concept rationalises the information management and makes it more cost effective. This paper discusses how open BIM, with the aid of IFC, and Product Life Cycle Support (PLCS) may facilitate the implementation of a predictive Life cycle Management System (LMS) and by that improve the feasibility for adopting long-term and dynamic maintenance strategy in the FM process. A case study on the use of a commercial BIM-based design tool as information repository and media to present life cycle information within the context of the LMS concept on a hospital building is also presented. The case study shows that the build-up of the information becomes simpler, more clear and efficient compared to a traditional database solution, as it is done with parametric objects. However, the basic BIM can not serve for all LMS functions. There is still need for development of a BIM integrated LMS solution that may support prediction of life cycle performance and maintenance needs. Such a solution needs to be communicative to any open BIM software and thus has to be built upon open standards for exchange of building information, e.g. the IFC standard, and life cycle oriented standards like PLCS. Additional focus is put on 4D simulation and visualisation. Simulation and visualisation of long-term performance of buildings is of crucial importance when improving the feasibility for adopting a long-term and dynamic maintenance strategy in the FM process.

  • 8.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Digging wider and deeper – revealing the hegemony and symbolic power of 'project' studies and practice2010In: International Journal of Project Organisation and Management, ISSN 1740-2891, E-ISSN 1740-2905, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building on a brief illustration, this article discusses the need for new empirical fields and methods in project management research. This would not only provide novel insights into project practices and management, but would also entail questioning the hegemony (Gramsci, 1988) of project management and project research. We argue that the hegemony is upheld by, or perhaps even constructed through, the language and the ideal images of the area, developed by project researchers and used by project practitioners; adding to what could be called 'the social power' (Bourdieu, 1991) of those involved in what are called 'projects' and 'project management'. It is also argued that the social power of those familiar with 'projects' and 'project management' is sustained by the silence of all those involved in similar practices, but who do not master the terminology of project work.

  • 9.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Managing Death: Corporate Social Responsibility and Tragedy2009In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 206-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on the true story of the actions of a middle manager in a major industrial company after the unexpected death of one of his employees, while participating in one of the most important social rituals to humans and society - the creation of meaning of death - we take an analytical approach to corporate social responsibility (CSR). This is done by discussing the overlap between CSR and human resource management (HRM). The story induces us to question the upholding of CSR an HRM as separate theoretical fields, since the managerial practice seems to indicate that these have merged into one. Also, the story indicates that the borders between the 'private' and 'public' roles in managerial practice are blurred and that to be a middle manager today is quite complicated. The article finishes with a discussion on why the writing of policies may not be the answer to this problem.

  • 10.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Narratives as artifacts and artifacts as narratives: The touchable and the thinkable2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Organisational Communication and Sustainable Development: ICT´s for mobility2009Book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Project Management2012Book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Projektledning2015Book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Hedborg Bengtsson, Susanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Construction client collaboration for inter-organizational innovation: do too many cooks really spoil the broth?2018Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Our built environment has the power to influence where we live and work, how we transport ourselves, how and what we consume and many other behaviors in our everyday lives, in other words, it has a significant impact on our global environment and economy. Given the notable need for more sustainable development of both the global environment and economy, sustainability has become a critical factor also in the area of urban development. With this as a backdrop, the construction industry and its many actors, such as clients, contractors and suppliers, that collectively drive urban development, play a significant role in creating sustainable development.

    Innovation is a cornerstone to achieve development, so also in the construction industry. However, with its many interrelated organizations, projects and actors, innovation inevitably becomes inter-organizational. From an urban development perspective, inter-organizational innovation will happen in a multi-project context where several construction projects, led and executed by different actors from different organizations, become interdependent and are therefore required to collaborate. In any construction project, the client holds a key position and has been identified as a critical supporter for successful innovation and collaboration. On the back of these dynamics, the purpose of this licentiate thesis is to explore clients’ role in a multi-project context where inter-organizational innovation is initiated to drive sustainable urban development.

    From a contingency perspective, the purpose of this study has been explored through a multiple-case study where coordinated construction logistics, during the study, has been identified as inter-organizational innovation. The study has shown that coordinated construction logistics, developed for a multi-project context, must be developed and implemented differently than in a single project or organization. In other words, coordinated construction logistics can take the form of different types of construction innovation. The construction clients, in this thesis the building developers, are identified as being important to support innovation and collaboration within and between parallel and sequential projects. The study has also shown that different clients behave differently when inter-organizational innovation is present; whilst some are proactive to achieve development, others are hesitant and less supportive for change. The findings suggest that long-term committed clients take a more proactive stand for innovation, for example, by including innovation in their procurement strategies and reflecting on how to best implement it in their projects. Additionally, in a multi-project context, the collaboration between clients is found to be important in order to successfully implement innovation, for example to align procurement strategies with the next-door neighbors and to create opportunities to communicate with each other.

    A theoretical contribution from this thesis is that coordinated construction logistics, which is often seen from a supply-chain management perspective, could be considered as inter-organizational innovation. This conclusion expands the understanding of the empirical phenomenon and its context. Furthermore, adding to the on-going discussion on clients as innovation supporters, their role as a potential innovation supporter is established in a multi-project perspective, but where differences between different types of clients must be taken into account. The multi-project context also implies an increased need for client collaboration, which is often informal, why the clients themselves need to handle all the aspects of collaboration. Tentative findings indicate that in this context time, spatiality, innovation and requirements will affect this collaboration. From a practical side, the findings show that initiating and implementing inter-organizational innovation requires understanding of the context, such as project objectives and the system. For clients and governments active in urban development, the thesis can guide the understanding of the importance of collaboration and choosing procurement strategy for inter-organizational innovation.

  • 15.
    Hedborg Bengtsson, Susanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Coordinated Construction Logistics: an Innovation PerspectiveIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coordinated construction logistics is an increasingly discussed topic in the Swedish construction industry. It is suggested as a mean to increase efficiency in transportation, decrease material usage, coordinate health and safety on-site, etc. There is much research on construction logistics seen from a supply chain management perspective, often highlighting construction logistics as a necessary rational tool to improve efficiency in construction industry. However, could there be other ways to studying this phenomenon? The purpose for this paper is to apply an innovation perspective on empirically found coordinated construction logistics models and explore them as different types of innovation and their change process. The findings suggest that the coordinated construction logistics models should so far be regarded as not fully embedded innovation as they have not yet changed the construction industry’s processes in the way they set out to do. The findings highlight differences between company-based models, project-based models, and system-based models, and suggest that differences in for example development and adoptability should be regarded both when conducting research on and when implementing coordinated construction logistics in practice.

  • 16.
    Hedborg Bengtsson, Susanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Innovation in the construction industry: Factors, actors and the client's role2017In: Association of Researchers in Construction Management, ARCOM - 33rd Annual Conference 2017, Proceeding, Association of Researchers in Construction Management (ARCOM), 2017, p. 104-113Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation in project-based organisations (PBOs), notably in the construction industry, is challenging. Based on a literature review of innovation in PBOs and three empirical cases from the construction industry, this paper explores factors and actors that affect innovation in the 'loosely-coupled' construction industry. The literature review reveals the following factors as important for innovation: solution, initiators, impact, driving forces, development and future aim. When analysing the empirical cases, findings suggest that also the number of interdependent actors affect innovation and that the client's role becomes increasingly important as the number of interdependent actors increases. On generic level tentative findings suggests that there is a difference in scale between process innovations that are systemic or non-systemic dependent upon the number of actors involved. Furthermore, these findings shape directions for future research: to develop better understanding of systemic process innovation in the construction industry; as well as to increase the understanding of how systemic process innovation can diffuse between the interdependent and fragmented actors in the construction industry.

  • 17.
    Hedborg Bengtsson, Susanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Erikssson, Per-Erik
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    Users’ Influence on Inter-organizational Innovation: Mapping the Receptive ContextIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Innovation is constantly present in the construction industry, however, mainly on a single project level. Initiating and implementing inter-organizational innovation in a multi-project context such as in urban development entails large complexity, for example due to the many interdependent projects and users of innovation. The users’ influence on inter-organizational innovation in a multi-project context has not been fully explored. Accordingly, the purpose of this paper is to discuss how users influence inter-organizational innovation in multi-project contexts by mapping the receptiveness for change.

    Design/methodology/approach: A single case study approach was used, where empirical material including semi-structured interviews in combination with meeting observations, document studies and participative workshops. The empirical material, studying inter-organizational innovation in an urban development context, was mapped based on the receptive context for change framework.

    Findings: A receptive context for change was not present in the studied multi-project context. Communication to develop and implement inter-organizational innovation was not sufficient and the clients’ procurement strategies were to a large extent not developed to facilitate inter-organizational innovation. Findings suggest differences in users’ possibility and aim to implement inter-organizational innovation.

    Originality/value: The mapping of the receptive context to influence inter-organizational innovation widens the knowledge base on how inter-organizational innovation may be implemented in the loosely coupled construction industry. Furthermore, the paper adds knowledge to the discussion on clients as innovation supporters, by highlighting the importance of distinguishing between different types of clients.

  • 18. Holm, D. B.
    et al.
    Eriksson, Kent
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Johanson, J.
    Business networks and cooperation in international business relationships2015In: Knowledge, Networks and Power: The Uppsala School of International Business, Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, p. 133-152Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Jansson, Gustav
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Schade, Jutta
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Olofsson, Thomas
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Tarandi, Väino
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    REQUIREMENTS TRANSFORMATION IN CONSTRUCTION DESIGN2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transformation of performance requirements to technical solutions and production parameters is central for architects and engineers in the design process. Construction industry suffers from low efficiency in design, and the information flow creating bottlenecks for the production process. Tracing and managing information through design process needs standards both for requirements and Building Information Models in a life cycle perspective. Structuring functional requirements is of great interest for the construction industry and especially for companies developing industrialised housing system that often have control over the whole manufacturing process. The delivery of a new low-carbon economy in Europe puts pressure on the construction industry to reduce the energy consumption for buildings. Therefore is one national standard for energy requirements tested on a building system and evaluated in an Information and Communication Technology-environment (ICT) that supports the design process for industrialised construction. The result of the research shows that the transformation of requirements to technical solutions needs functionality that supports the design process by using standards for requirements. A rigid building system based on well defined design tasks together with a technical platform, both for spaces and physical elements, work as a backbone for development of ICT support systems. Product Life Cycle Support (PLCS), as a standard that enables flexibility in categorisation of information through the construction design.

  • 20.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Improvising in multi-project settings2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Johansson, Helena
    et al.
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    Persson, Stefan
    Malmgren, Linus
    Tarandi, Väino
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Bremme, Jesper
    IT-stöd för industrielltbyggande i trä2006Report (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    A story of a technical tourist2009In: Guiding and Guided Tours / [ed] Petra Adolfsson, Peter Dobers & Mikael Jonasson, Göteborg: BAS Publishers , 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Boundary Spanning in Construction Projects: Towards A Model for Managing Efficient Collaboration2013In: Proceedings from the 7th Nordic Conference on Construction Economics and Organization: Construction Researchers on Economics and Organisation in the Nordic region (CREON), Akademika Publishing , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Construction project performance is dependent on efficient collaboration and the ability to overcome traditional rigid boundaries between organizations, professions and process stages. This paper is based on an exploratory case study of a contemporary collaborative construction project during both design and production and reports findings on boundary spanning and boundary spanners. The findings propose a typology of boundary spanning in collaborative construction projects: geographical boundary spanning, professional boundary spanning and stakeholder boundary spanning. The findings also report a comprehensive list of boundary spanning roles of importance for boundary spanning to take place. The paper also present directions for further research on management of collaboration in construction projects.

  • 24.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Byggprojekt: Ett skapande kaos?2011In: Byggsektorns förmågor / [ed] Tina Karrbom Gustavsson, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Bättre fly än illa fäkta: En studie av project overload i tre multiprojektmiljöer2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Liminal roles in construction project practice: exploring change through the roles of partnering manager, building logistic specialist and BIM coordinator2018In: Construction Management and Economics, ISSN 0144-6193, E-ISSN 1466-433XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industries have to adapt to changes in external environment. This adaption includes the development of new professional roles that challenge established structures, roles and communities of practice. In order to better understand the unfolding of construction project practice in an increasingly changeful world new professional roles are explored as liminal roles. The studied professional roles are partnering manager, building logistic specialist and BIM coordinator. Liminality is used as framework to understand descriptions of liminal experiences when negotiating boundary interfaces in construction project practice. Findings are both theoretical and practical and suggest that new professional roles practice multi-liminal work and acknowledge tensions that pose challenges for liminal roles to act as change agents.

  • 27.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Liminality Roles in Construction Project Practice: Opportunities and Challenges2016In: Proceedings of the 32nd Annual ARCOM Conference: 5-7 September 2016, Manchester, UK, Association of Researchers in Construction Management / [ed] P W Chan and C J Neilson (Eds.), 2016, Vol. 2, p. 727-736Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Project management handbooks and courses teach structured and standardized ways of organizing and managing projects, including clearly defined project roles. However, projects are no isolated islands and projects in practice continuously develop and change. This is the case in, for example, the project based construction industry, and in which new inter organizational and collaborative work practices have become increasingly common. This paper is based on two case studies and explores developments and changes in construction project practice, in particular the development of new roles. The concept of liminality is used as analytical lens to better understand these new roles. Findings show new and challenging multi liminal roles that origin from other knowledge domains and professional communities of practice, than what is traditional in construction project management. This development poses both opportunities and challenges for the individual project worker and the development of construction industry practices.

  • 28.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Organizing to avoid project overload: The use and risks of narrowing strategies in multi-project practice2016In: International Journal of Project Management, ISSN 0263-7863, E-ISSN 1873-4634, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 94-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While project work can be motivating, stimulating and creative, it can also be frustrating, ambiguous and stressful. Situations of project overload, i.e. situations in which fragmentation, disturbances and disruptions are reoccurring, are common in project-based organizations running many parallel projects. This paper reports findings from an extensive interview study on how project managers and project members working in parallel projects handle project overload by changing their work routines. The results show 1) that project work in practice is organized by using narrowing strategies and 2) that narrowing strategies run the risk of excluding the vital historical and organizational context. The findings have implications for project theory and project practice.

  • 29.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Small talk and heavy metal2009In: Feelings and Business: Essays in Honor of Claes Gustafsson / [ed] Marcus Lindahl & Alf Rehn, Santérus Förlag, 2009, p. 75-86Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Gohary, Hayar
    Borders and border crossing in construction projects2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Gohary, Hayar
    Akademiska Hus, KTH, Sweden.
    Boundary action in construction projects: new collaborative project practices2012In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 364-376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Traditional construction project practice has been based on rigid and impermeable boundaries that have made communication, cooperation and integration a major challenge. However, new collaborative approaches have been developed. This paper aims at adding to knowledge on projects‐as‐practice by interpreting findings from a case study on a contemporary collaborative construction project. The purpose of this paper is to provide knowledge about organizational development in the project‐based construction industry by identifying boundary actions in contemporary collaborative construction practices.Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on an exploratory longitudinal case study approach covering both early design phase and the following production phase, including interviews, participant observation at formal meetings and informal gatherings and internal and external documents. Thus, the methodology used is triangulation and the analysis has followed an interpretative process.Findings – The paper provides empirical insights into three examples of boundary actions of a collaborative construction project: stakeholder boundary action, professional boundary action and geographical boundary action. From a project‐as‐practice perspective, these boundary actions turn out to be interesting renewal initiatives, providing increased understanding of where and how renewal can take place.Research limitations/implications – The findings are based on a single case study and more research on this area is needed. However, the paper shows examples of boundary actions in a contemporary project and thus adds to the knowledge on contemporary projects‐as‐practice.Practical implications – The paper provides implications for construction project managers on examples of renewal arenas.Originality/value – The paper is exploratory and the findings are important for much needed development and renewal of the construction industry.

  • 32.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Hallin, Anette
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Goal seeking and goal oriented projects: trajectories of the temporary organisation2015In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 368-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    – The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the theory development of “temporary

    organizing.”

    Design/methodology/approach

    – The paper advances the theory of the temporary organization by

    applying a process ontological-perspective.

    Findings

    – This research note conceptualizes “the temporary organization” as constantly changing

    across time and space; as shifting between two empirically driven modes:

    “goal seeking” and “goal oriented.” This is done through the shift of the trajectory of the particular “project” at hand.

    Practical implications

    – Based on the theoretical suggestions in the paper, further research is

    encouraged to find empirical support of and to develop its claims.

    Originality/value

    – Despite a call for taking the “organizing”-aspect of temporary organizations

    seriously, there is still a need for theory development of the area. By introducing the concept of “trajectories” into the studies of temporary organizations, the paper builds a theoretical framework through which such studies may be undertaken.

    Keywords

    Trajectory, Projects, Goal oriented, Goal seeking, Temporary organizations,

    Temporary organizing

    Paper type

    Conceptual paper

  • 33.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Hallin, Anette
    Guiding in the City of Tomorrow: Materializing the Future Through Future and Present Components2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 127-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores an intrinsic case of a guided tour of a future city: Stockholm Royal Seaport. Whereas guided city tours usually aim at educating and enlightening those guided about the past and present of the place visited - building the truth claim by relating what is said in the tour to the physical environment of the tour - the case described in this paper offers the opportunity to explore how the urban future is made material to those guided. The study shows that the guide's actions materialized the urban future in two ways: by using future components of the future and by using present components of the future. Based on this analysis, we conclude that both these ways function as ways of confirming the present.

  • 34.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Hallin, Anette
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Guiding in the imaginary city of the future2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Hallin, Anette
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Who are shaping the sustainable cities of tomorrow and how do they do it?2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Hedborg Bengtsson, Susanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Eriksson, Per Erik
    LTU.
    A program perspective on partnering as supply chain integration2017In: Proceedings of the 9th Nordic Conference on Construction Economics and Organization: 13-14 June, 2017 at Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, SWEDEN / [ed] Martine Buser, Göran Lindahl and Christine Räisänen, Lyngby, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Major complex urban development projects are challenging and put pressure on coordination, cooperation and integration between a multitude of various interdependent construction projects and supply chains. While prior studies on supply chain integration mostly concern continuous exchanges in manufacturing industries, there is less research on discontinuous exchanges in project-based supply chains. This knowledge gap has resulted in an increased interest for partnering as supply chain integration in project-based supply chains and there is a conceptual and practical framework developed for understanding partnering as a multidimensional construct including four dimensions of supply chain integration: strength, scope, duration and depth of integration. This framework is useful for investigating separate projects but fails to acknowledge the program perspective including inter-project coordination and the interdependence between different projects and supply chains in the same program.

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how SCI may be achieved across projects within the same program. Findings are drawn from a case study of Stockholm Royal Seaport. Each stage of Stockholm Royal Seaport can be studied as a program including a multitude of interdependent and parallel projects performed within a limited timeframe and a limited area. The findings suggest that supply chain integration between projects is as important as within projects and the theoretical implications suggest an additional dimension to the multidimensional partnering framework when taking a program perspective. Partnering as supply chain integration has a width dimension on program management level that is more challenging to manage since formal procurement and contracting mechanisms are put in place mainly at the project level, not the program level.

  • 37.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Hedborg Bengtsson, Susanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Eriksson, Per-Erik
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    When you don’t have your own block: Horizontal supply chain integration in multi-project contextsIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Task lists as infrastructure: an empirical study of multi-project work2012In: International Journal of Project Organisation and Management, ISSN 1740-2891, E-ISSN 1740-2905, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 272-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multi-project work is fragmented and unpredictable making project professionals continuously facing the risk of experienced control being reduced. In such work settings, there is an increased need for (temporary) sense making structures. In this article, the concept of infrastructure (Bowker and Star, 2002) is applied to multi-project work. The findings, which are based on 43 interviews with multi-project professionals, reveals that task lists are important infrastructures created for supporting sense making, control and prioritising. The task lists reduces ambiguity and uncertainty and thus bridge the gap between organisational demands and individual resources providing room for improvised action.

  • 39.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Samuelson, Olle
    Wikforss, Örjan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Organizing IT in construction: Present state and future challenges in Sweden2012In: Journal of Information Technology in Construction (ITcon), ISSN 1874-4753, E-ISSN 1874-4753, Vol. 17, p. 520-534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The expectations on IT-tools for improved business benefits are still high in Sweden. At the same time there is limited research on IT-tools in the organizational context and thus limited knowledge on the present state of IT in the Swedish construction sector. This article presents recent findings from a combined quantitative and qualitative study on IT, organization and communication in the Swedish construction sector. The purpose is to develop knowledge and understanding of the current situation in Sweden and to elaborate on future challenges. The findings show that the use of IT-tools is widely spread but that the knowledge and understanding of how to benefit from using IT-tools is less developed. The findings also indicate that the use of IT-tools in the production phase needs to be more interactive and proactive. This knowledge is of importance in order to allow informed decision-making in how to integrate IT-tools in the organizing and communication processes in construction projects, as well as how to do investments and develop practices, education and regulations. The conclusion is that project practitioners still search for the benefits of using IT-tools within construction projects.

  • 40.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Zika-Viktorsson, Annika
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Project Overload2008In: International Journal of Project Management, ISSN 0263-7863, E-ISSN 1873-4634, Vol. 3, p. 4-7Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Kiviniemi, Arto
    et al.
    Salford University.
    Tarandi, Väino
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Karlshöj, Jan
    Danmarks Tekniska Universitet.
    Bell, Håvard
    Karud, Ole Jörgen
    Review of the Development andImplementation of IFC compatible BIM2008Report (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Lindblad, Hannes
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Lost in Translation: A case of BIM implementation at a large public client2017Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The technology of Building Information Modelling (BIM) is being introduced to the Architectural, Engineering and Construction (AEC) industry. This industry is generally perceived as being fragmented, having low productivity and with a low rate of innovation. BIM is presented as new paradigm within this industry, enabling inter-organisational collaboration, overall increasing quality while simultaneously lowering costs. But widespread BIM implementation has not yet taken place. In order to increase adoption, public client organisations have been argued to be the actors needed to initiate and drive the implementation of BIM. However, the client perspective of such implementation initiatives has not been the main focus of earlier research.

    In this licentiate thesis the BIM implementation process conducted by the largest infrastructure client in Sweden is analysed. This organisation implements BIM both to benefit their own organisation but also to increase productivity and innovation within the whole infrastructure branch of the AEC-industry. With the purpose of increasing the understanding of technology driven change processes at public client organisations, the BIM implementation at this organisation is analysed as an empirical example. 

    The case study is analysed by a theoretical framework taking inspiration from Actor-Network theory and Sociology of Translation. Based on this analysis the translation process, where key actors are identified and enrolled into using BIM are described. The analysis reveals a complex network of actors linked to the implementation in question. Instead of a single BIM concept, several different and sometimes conflicting interpretations of BIM are simultaneously being translated.

    This licentiate thesis problematizes the role of client organisations in initiating change within a network of actors. The main ways of enrolling actors into using BIM have in the studied case been the development of new demand documents. This strategy has however been problematic as the new demands for BIM have not been accepted as intended within many construction projects. Instead, the results of this thesis argue for the importance of client organisations as negotiators, not only needed to establish demand for a new innovation.

  • 43.
    Lindblad, Hannes
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Organising the Implementation of BIM: A study of a large Swedish client organisation2016In: Building up business operations and theirlogic: Shaping materials and technologies / [ed] Arto Saari, Pekka Huovinen, 2016, Vol. 3, p. 356-367Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building information modelling (BIM) is currently much discussed in the construction industry.It has been brought forward as a way to address the problems with slow increase in productivityperceived in the industry. To support and drive the industrywide implementation of BIM, manylarge public client organisations are currently in the process of implementing BIM. The purposeof this paper is to explore how a large client organization organises their BIM implementation.In order to reach this objective a case study of the BIM implementation process at the largestpublic infrastructure client in Sweden has been conducted. This case study is supplementedwith interviews with the management of the implementation project together with interviewswith project managers in pilot projects implementing BIM. Based on the results of this study, ithas been found that the BIM implementation is mainly focused on the technical requirements tosupport the shift from traditional drawings, to object oriented information. How this shifttowards object oriented information will influence changes to work practices is however notdefined within this implementation project.

  • 44.
    Lindblad, Hannes
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Translating building information modelling: A study of the BIM implementation process at a large Swedish client organisation2016In: Proceedings of the 32nd Annual ARCOM Conference, ARCOM 2016, Association of Researchers in Construction Management , 2016, p. 123-132Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building Information Modelling (BIM) is currently widely discussed within both the construction industry and the academia. There is a view that it is a new paradigm presenting possibilities to address the slow increase in productivity currently perceived in the construction industry. Around the world many governments and public client organisations are developing their implementation processes for BIM. In this paper the largest infrastructure client in Sweden is studied. Based on a Case study, the BIM implementation process at this actor is described. These results serve as an empirical example of how BIM is being implemented in order to improve both productivity and innovation in the construction industry. These results have been analysed inspired by theory of 'sociology of translation'. This study concludes that the main tool used to enrol actors into BIM use is demanding model based delivery of project information. However, less emphasis is put on how these models will influence work practices for both the client's project organisation and contractors and consultants in the projects.

  • 45.
    Lindblad, Hannes
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management.
    Gustavsson, Tina Karrbom
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Receptiveness for change: The case of a public client2017In: Association of Researchers in Construction Management, ARCOM - 33rd Annual Conference 2017, Proceeding, Association of Researchers in Construction Management (ARCOM), 2017, p. 64-72Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The construction industry needs to change to meet the needs for a more sustainable built environment. For industry change to happen, public clients have been suggested to play a key role as change agents because of their power to state requirements when procuring, and due to their role as long-term property owner. This makes receptiveness for change within public client organizations a vital issue for industry change. The aim of this paper is to explore receptiveness for change at a public client organisation by applying the framework of receptive contexts developed by Pettigrew et al., (1994). Based on an empirical case study of a public client's implementation of Building Information Modelling (BIM) during the period between 2013 and 2017, findings indicate that there is a lack of a receptive context, which hamper the public client's ability to take on the role as change agent and drive industry change. The conclusion is that the idea of public client's as change agents also comes with challenges and that there is a need for more studies on how to develop receptiveness in large public organizations.

  • 46.
    Lindblad, Hannes
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Vass, Susanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    BIM implementation and organisational change: A case study of a large Swedish public client2015In: 8TH NORDIC CONFERENCE ON CONSTRUCTION ECONOMICS AND ORGANIZATION, 2015, p. 178-184Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the current trends in the construction industry's effort to increase performance is to implement Building Information Modelling (BIM). Recent research suggests that changes to the work practices and business processes must accompany the implementation process if the desired goals and expectations of implementing IT are to be met. However, there is still limited knowledge on what types of change are required in an organisation as a whole in relation to BIM implementation. The purpose of this study is to explore how a large public client is initiating BIM implementation in their organisation. The main focus is to investigate what types of changes are being proposed to the work practices and processes in relation to BIM implementation. This paper studies the BIM initiation project at a large Swedish public infrastructure client. It is based on a case study involving both interviews and active participation. The findings indicate that the BIM initiation project proposes changes to the routines for how projects are initiated and conducted by introducing the concept of BIM in guiding documents. Yet, how these changes will influence the actual work practices and process is unclear. From these results, it can be argued that the organisation as such is not yet certain of how the implementation of BIM should and will influence the organisation. Rather, the initiation of BIM at the public client is a learning process about BIM and how it can improve productivity in the organisation.

  • 47.
    Löfgren, Alexander
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Mobility in-site: Implementing Mobile Computing in a Construction Enterprise2007In: Communications of the Association for Information Systems, ISSN 1529-3181, E-ISSN 1529-3181, Vol. 20, p. 37-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on an ongoing case study of a mobile computing pilot project at Sweden's largest construction company, Skanska AB. The company has recognized the potential of a mobile computing platform based on the tablet computer user device for construction site management purposes. A global initiative within the company has started with the aim of improving information management and project communication at production site operations with the use of tablet computers. The paper portrays Skanska's ambition towards the creation of usefulness and benefit of the tablet platform for the mobile workforce in the initial development and implementation process.

  • 48. Löwnertz, Kurt
    et al.
    Tarandi, Väino
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Thåström, Olle
    Johansson, Bo
    Jacobsson, Patric
    Lignell, Tomas
    Malmberg, Thomas
    Bygghandlingar 90 Del 8, Digitala leveranser för bygg och förvaltning2008Report (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Parsanezhad, Pouriya
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    A Lifecycle Approach towards Building Information Management: Technical and procedural implications for the facility management and operations sector2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A well-structured and coordinated information management practice is central to promoting efficiency in construction. Building information management encompasses authoring, interpretation, communication, coordination and storage of building information. The benefits envisioned by utilizing IT developments such as Building Information Modelling (BIM) in the facility management and operations (FM&O) sector are estimated to be far greater than in other sectors. There is, however, a gap between the knowledge available in the field of building information management and the actual demands of the architectural, engineering, construction and operation (AECO) industry, especially the FM&O sector.

    The overall aim of this qualitative research is to develop knowledge that conceptualizes the lifecycle supporting implementation of BIM in the AECO industry with a focus on its implications for a BIM-enabled FM&O practice. This applied research comprises a number of summative and formative components: paper 1 investigates the existing and emerging information management systems for the FM&O sector and their characteristics. The focus of paper 2 is narrowed down to the technical requirements on building information management systems; while its temporal scope spans the entire lifecycle of buildings. Paper 3 is a further elaboration on the findings of paper 1 and covers the technical requirements of BIM-implementation in the FM&O sector. Paper 4 investigates workflows – another category of the issues identified in paper 1.

    Paper 1 aims to provide a general understanding of the importance and implications of implementing BIM-enabled systems in the FM&O sector and also identifies the main categories of the issues associated with this approach. This literary paper reports on a basic research with a descriptive approach and builds upon the information from a non-exhaustive set of literature. In this paper, workflows, contracts and information technology have been identified as three categories of the issues associated with implementing BIM-enabled systems in the FM&O sector.

    Paper 2 is also a literary research which draws on the notion of BIM repositories and aims to clarify the technical requirements for a more collaborative building industry as well as depicting the current status of building knowledge management technologies, recent trends and future prospects. Open format BIM repositories have been suggested as the cornerstones of an integrated information management system for AECO firms.

    The aim of paper 3 is twofold: firstly, to summarize the current status of the building information management technologies applied in the facility operation activities and identifying prevailing issues; secondly, to devise some technical solutions for those issues based on a case project. In the first part of this study, a summarized description of information management configurations in eleven projects were extracted from literature and the technical issues within those systems were identified. Moreover, five major categories of contemporary technical solutions for enhancing information transfer from BIM to FM&O software were designated. Then, a narrative and illustrative representation and reconstruction of an IT-implementation project was developed.

    Paper 4 is another literary study which aims to provide the theoretical basis for more focused studies on existing and desired processes in the FM&O sector and their associated information transactions. In this paper, firstly, the more common definitions of the key concepts have been revisited and discussed. Then, the generic types of the processes, activities and organizational roles common to FM&O firms, the types of information required by each actor and how such information are acquired have been presented.

  • 50.
    Parsanezhad, Pouriya
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    An overview of information logistics for FM&O business processes2015In: eWork and eBusiness in Architecture, Engineering and Construction - Proceedings of the 10th European Conference on Product and Process Modelling, ECPPM 2014, CRC Press, 2015, p. 719-725Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systems that warrant a sustained collection, analysis and retrieval of building information are essential to maintain a smooth and steady flow of information across the diversity of actors throughout building lifecycle phases. Benefits of using Building Information Management (BIM) tools for this purpose will not be fully realized unless the Facility Management and Operation (FM&O) activities and processes are adjusted accordingly. This paper aims to provide the theoretic basis for more focused studies on existing and desired processes in the FM&O sector and their associated information transactions. Academic literature as well as empirical studies in the subject area of building information management and workflow processes of the FM&O sector are consulted and analyzed. An overview of the types and taxonomies of generic FM&O activities and processes, disciplinary actors within the sector and their information needs are provided.

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