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  • 1.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Sracek, Ondra
    Eldvall, Björn
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Asklund, Ragnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Barmen, Gerhard
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Koku, John
    Gustafsson, Jan-Erik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Balfors, Berit Brokking
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Hydrogeochemical study on the contamination of water resources in a part of Tarkwa mining area, Western Ghana2012In: Journal of African Earth Sciences, ISSN 1464-343X, Vol. 66-67, p. 72-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the groundwater chemistry with special concern to metal pollution in selected communities in the Wassa West district, Ghana. In this mining area, 40 ground water samples, mainly from drilled wells, were collected. The groundwaters have generally from neutral to acidic pH values and their Eh values indicate oxidising conditions. The dominating ions are calcium, sodium, and bicarbonate. The metal concentrations in the study area are generally lower than those typically found in mining regions. Only 17 wells show metal concentrations exceeding WHO guidelines for at least one metal. The main contaminants are manganese and iron, but arsenic and aluminium also exceed the guidelines in some wells probably affected by acid mine drainage (AMD). Metal concentrations in the groundwater seem to be controlled by the adsorption processes. Hydrogeochemical modelling indicates supersaturation of groundwater with respect to several mineral phases including iron-hydroxides/oxides, suggesting that adsorption on these minerals may control heavy metal and arsenic concentrations in groundwater. The area is hilly, with many groundwater flow divides that result in several local flow systems. The aquifers therefore are not strongly affected by weathering of minerals due to short groundwater residence times and intense flushing. The local character of groundwater flow systems also prevents a strong impact of acid mine drainage on groundwater systems in a regional scale.

  • 2.
    Coello Midence Balthasar, Zairis Aida
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Insufficient water supply in an urban area - case study: Tegucigalpa, Honduras2011Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Tegucigalpa, the capital of Honduras, has experienced an unsatisfied water demand during the last three decades. The state owned water utility in charge of the water supply of the country, SANAA, has faced this deficit by providing an intermittent water supply. The intermittent water supply has increased the gap between the rich and the poor, who cannot afford water storage facilities. Theories explain water scarcity either by low precipitation or by lack of investment in water structures. This thesis investigates the applicability of both explanations by quantifying the annual precipitation in the sub catchments with water supply potential for Tegucigalpa, and identifying the problems which caused the lack of investment into the water infrastructure. The analysis concluded that even if the annual precipitation is abundant, it is not evenly distributed in time and in space. Furthermore, it is argued that the financial limitations which hindered the lack of investment in water structures originated in the low tariffs imposed, and to the practices of the patronage system.

  • 3.
    Coello Midence Balthasar, Zairis Aida
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Water Management.
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Problems faced by a national water utility in an urban area, a case study: Tegucigalpa, Honduras2011In: Water Resources Managemtn 2011, Riverside, California, USA, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Coello-Balthasar, Zairis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Phumpiu, Patricia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Water Management.
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Gustafsson, Jan-Erik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Water Management.
    Assessment of causes leading to an insufficient water supply in Tegucigalpa, Honduras2011In: WIT Transactions on Ecology and the Environment, ISSN 1743-3541, Vol. 145, p. 27-38Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Diawuo, Felix
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Water Supply of Accra, with Emphasis on Sachet Water.2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project seeks to assess the impact of the sachet water industry on the health, socio-economic and the environmental situation of the inhabitants of Accra, the capital city of Ghana.

    In addressing the situation, the driving forces which have fuelled the shift of consum-er taste from the normal tap water and the traditional hand-tied-ice water products to the plastic sachet water (commonly known in as "Pure Water") are identified. Lack of access to continuous flow of improved water and the perceived poor quality of the urban water supply system as results of poor management structure are identified as some of the factors for the shift in consumers’ taste for plastic sachet and bottled drinking water.

    The quality of the plastic sachet is also assessed through the review of previous research results. These are confirmed by laboratory analysis of about six brands of plastic sachet water and two brands bottled drinking water. The laboratory analysis carried out assessed the microbial, physical and chemical quality of the various samples. To assess the health impacts of the products, the results from the analysis are compared with WHO guideline values and other international guideline values.

    Questionnaires are also administered to ascertain the socio-economic impacts of the products on the life of the young men and women as well sachet water manufacturers.

    From this, some measures are suggested as to how to mitigate the activities of the sachet water business to reduce its negative effects on the health, the environment and the socio-economic status of the inhabitants of the city.

  • 6.
    Gustafsson, Jan-Erik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Intervention: the actors of the European water policy2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Gustafsson, Jan-Erik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Public or Private Management of Water Utilities2007In: Urban Water Management / [ed] Plaza E., The Baltic University Forum Press , 2007, p. 27-32Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Gustafsson, Jan-Erik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Stockholm Water Company is threatened by an ideological saving politics2008In: 7th International Conference Environmental Engineering, Vols 1-3 / [ed] Cygas, D; Froehner, KD, 2008, p. 543-549Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper gives a brief account of the commercialisation of water supply and sanitation provision (the VA-service) in Sweden, and thereafter a detailed analysis of the recent management changes inside the Stockholm Water Company after the general election in September 2006. The paper is based on company protocols, published articles from various sources and the author's informal talks with some of the concerned actors. In the discussion it is argued that the focus on "core business" and the dismantling of the Stockholm Water Company is ideological driven.

  • 9.
    Gustafsson, Jan-Erik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Sweden Higher Education Politics: Independent Universities or Commercialised Universities under the Governance of the European Union2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Gustafsson, Jan-Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Koku, John E.
    Achieving the MDG's in Ghana: Rhetorics or Reality?2007In: ECOSYSTEMS AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT VI, 2007, Vol. 106, p. 331-349Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The original meaning of the concept sustainability or sustainable development might in an altruistic way have referred to building societies based on a sound environmental practice. This paper shows that the structural adjustments programs (SAP), Poverty Reduction Strategies and the Millennium Development goals (MDG's) compel the Ghanian government to favour economic and fiscal sustainability. This neo-liberal policy has led to increasing inequalities, widening regional disparities, migration from rural areas to quickly grown up peri-urban areas basically within a huge informal sector, and unplanned capital formation and development at large, making claims to achieve the MDG's by 2015 illusory. A way forward for Ghana should be to gradually fence off from the world market and learn from the development efforts of the Kwame Nkrumah first independent government.

  • 11.
    Kholoma, Ezekiel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    A Survey of Water Losses – The Case of The Ramotswa Village in Botswana.2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Water-related problems in major populated areas of Botswana continue to grow unabated. At the heart of these problems are escalating demands, dwindling water supplies, deteriorating infrastructures and water losses. Several reports indicate that water managers in this area have been engrossed more on increasing supplies and less on demand management and conservation. The latest construction of the Dikgatlhong Dam is an example of the measures taken to supplement the existing water sources. However, much of the supplied water continues to be lost from the distribution systems of some of the villages. The highest losses have been reported in the Ramotswa village. This study surveyed the causes of the water losses and factors affecting their developments and frequencies. The study’s view was that reducing those losses would improve the system efficiency and save more water for supplies. The data for the study was acquired from reports of earlier studies, field visits and oral interviews administered on the water managers and consumers. Leakages from the Boatle-Ramotswa supply pipeline, service pipes, reservoirs and valves, unmetered fire-fighting consumptions and water theft were identified to be the main sources of the losses. The utility’s loss control activities were inefficient due to the lack of measures for identifying and reducing each individual loss. The study proposed that all the different uses and losses into which the system input volume goes should be identified and measured and measures for controlling each of them be designed and instituted.

  • 12.
    Lykova, Natalia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Gustafsson, Jan-Erik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    A survey of biofuel production potentials in Russia2011In: Scientific Journal of Riga Technical University, Environmental and Climate Technologies, ISSN 1691-5208, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 64-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the abundance of fossil fuel resources in Russia, the development of the renewable energy market there was delayed. Recent technological advancement has led to an increasing interest in biofuel production. The aim of research was to evaluate how biofuels are introduced into the current energy scheme of the country. The potential production of biofuels was estimated based on sustainable approaches which provide solution for carbon emission reduction and environmental benefits. Russia still requires biofuel policy to make biofuels compatible with traditional fossil fuel

  • 13.
    Phumpiu, Patricia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    The Politics of Honduras Water Institutional Reform2008Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The water and sanitation sector has been in the eye of the storm when referring to institutional reforms in Latin America. Concepts and methodologies have been imported from western countries and these have required adjustments of existing policies and the creation of a regulatory framework. Have these adjustments resulted in delivering an efficient implementation? What is the degree of dependence to the top-down approach, when the implementation stage comes into place?This study focuses first on understanding institutional and organisational structure in the Honduran water sector from 1990-2002. Second, the study analyses the changes generated by the institutional reform and evaluates the policy implementation of the institutional reform and their linkage with past performances and the traditional organisational structure from 2003-2006. Third, three exploratory case studies are presented as the outcomes of these institutional and organisational changes.Finally, the controversies of the institutional change are presented as dilemmas. They exposed the strengths, weaknesses and potentiality of the Water Institutional Reform (WIR). The result of the analysis is presented in the conclusions and indicates the weaknesses carried out from the traditional institutional and organisational water sector system. It proves as well that it is not only the rules that constraint the WIR process but the lack of creativity and incentives that individuals in charge -new administrators-, and not only the administration, thrust into the process.

  • 14.
    Phumpiu, Patricia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Water Governance: Policy, Politics and Regulation in Honduras2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Water governance exerts an impact on the socio-politic life of Honduras. For instance, the new legal framework changes institutions. New water organisations are created, and new processes and proceedings are proposed. These times when strategies from developed countries are transferred to developing countries, such as water governance, the need for an evaluation is desirable to disentangle the problems and to look forward at opportunities and find alternatives.

    The journey from government to governance describes the change from the traditional government behaviour towards new governance. In countries like Honduras, as in developing countries, this change describes a complex process in which the imported strategies are conflicting with existing established socio-political patterns. The new water management approach as applied in Honduras needs to take into account the socio-political reality and the availability of resources, if the water governance process would gain relevance. Honduras is a relatively new democratic country after many years of military regime, thus the government needs also to be part of the governance process.

    This doctoral thesis studies and highlights the characteristics of the traditional Honduran government approach, and the effects that the new governance approach has posed in the country. The difficulties emerging from this shift of approaches are discussed, and explored. The research finds support in the exploration of Honduran political and institutional sociological history to elaborate the causes and motives for current governmental attitudes. The research relates to concepts of development strategies, institutionalism and regulation modes.

    This thesis argues that governance has achieved a pseudo empirical implementation in Honduras, and that new mechanisms need to be devised to balance the suggested governance mode using new notions of regulatory space, and the theoretical meta-governance approach, in order to balance between the imported measures and the reality. New governance theoretical notions are exposed to encourage and explore new alternatives for the water governance in the Honduras context. It is necessary to realise that institutional changes occur in a long-term adjustment period in order to build trust among actors and water authorities. Moreover, this thesis deems it pertinent that the government as the voter-elected entity should take the decisive lead of the governance approach.

  • 15.
    Phumpiu, Patricia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Water Institutional Development for the Water Sector in Honduras2005In: Proceedings World Water Week: Workshop 6, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Phumpiu, Patricia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Gustafsson, Jan-Erik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Context matters: Working together with Trade Unions in public water supply2008Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Phumpiu, Patricia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Gustafsson, Jan-Erik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Policy Implementation in the Water and Sanitation Sector- Perspectives for Water Governance in Honduras2005In: Proceedings SIWI World Warter Week, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Phumpiu, Patricia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Gustafsson, Jan-Erik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Reform or Adjustment?: From the Liberal and Neo-liberal Policy Reform Process in Honduras2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Phumpiu, Patricia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Gustafsson, Jan-Erik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Reform or Adjustments?: Processes and Patterns in Honduras2008Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Phumpiu, Patricia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Gustafsson, Jan-Erik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    The Water Governance Reform in Honduras2005In: IWA Conference in Water Economics, Statistics and Finance: Proceedings Book 1, 2005, p. 537-544Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Phumpiu, Patricia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Gustafsson, Jan-Erik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    When are Partnerships a Viable Tool for Development?: Institutions and Partnerships for Water and Sanitation Service in Latin America2009In: Water resources management, ISSN 0920-4741, E-ISSN 1573-1650, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 19-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Partnerships are increasingly becoming unpopular in Latin America, they have narrowly been analysed in the context of the international political agenda and criticized for bringing benefits only to the private sector and not to the public sector and society at large. Nevertheless, there are successful experiences for providing water and sanitation at local level. The questions are: Are local level successful experiences the product of a partnership? Was it necessary to build partnerships to add value to the community presence and informal actors? What are the advantages of partnerships at local and national scale? The case studies presented demonstrate that actors need to have an incentive to work together and to build trust. The context in which they operate is also relevant, and in Latin America it is needed a strong national legal institutional framework if partnerships or any agreement should be an alternative to public delivery of water and sanitation. This paper analyses the context in which water and sanitation is delivered in peri-urban areas based on case studies, identified actions for effective provision and on discussion of the institutional framework options and partnership implementation at local and national level. This paper does not advocate partnerships per se; nor are these seen as the problem.

  • 22. Shofiani, N. E.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Jan-Erik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Privatisation of Municipal Waterworks and Sustainability of Water: A Case Study of Eastern Jakarta., Indonesia2006In: IWA Water and Environmental Management Series: Vol.10 / [ed] Beck, M.B., Speers, A., 2006, p. 205-215Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Climate Change And Water Stress: Gendered Impact And Adaptation In The Hills Of North-Eastern India2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    India is projected to face severe water challenges as a result of climate change. With a large population tied closely to natural resources, this will undermine human development in several ways. The hills in north-eastern India, representing one of the least developed regions of the country, have already been exposed to climate change impacts. Once known to be one of the wettest places of the world, access to water for domestic as well as productive uses is becoming increasingly difficult.

    Gendered impact of these problems is evident as women and children (notably girls) face increasing difficulties in procuring water for domestic use. While earlier enough water used to be available in the vicinity of the village settlement for a greater part of the year, now the situation stands reversed, thereby enhancing their vulnerability in water-procuring tasks, with serious negative implications for their health and economic well-being and development, besides hindering children’s education.

    A number of innovative local strategies are being adopted to address these challenges on the basis of traditional knowledge and technology. For example, women and children venture further and further down the hillslopes in search of new water sources. Another example is community tanks for storing rainwater to be used in the dry season. Roof-top rainwater harvesting is yet another traditionally designed strategy. However given the constraints of context and resources, only some of these innovative strategies turn out to be sustainable that can really help women adapt to the increasing water stress. There is a need to think more deeply on these local options & support women (as well as men) in developing more sustainable adaptive strategies based on their traditional knowledge & experiences. The proposed presentation will discuss the empirical findings of an in-depth field-based participatory research conducted in the region, which will help enhance knowledge and understanding for guiding policy on the issue in the context of hilly and mountainous regions.

  • 24.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Water Management.
    Equitable gender participation in local water governance: An insight into institutional paradoxes2008In: Water resources management, ISSN 0920-4741, E-ISSN 1573-1650, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 925-942Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The participation of local stakeholders in governance of water resources is regarded as inalienable for ensuring efficiency, effectiveness and sustainability. To enhance gender balance in the water governance process, institutions are being designed and executed globally to elicit enhanced participation of women. This paper contends that in the context of local communities, the new institutional framework is divorced from the traditional social institutions that in turn operationalize their resource management systems. Based upon empirical evidence from rural Indian setting, the paper deciphers the paradoxes between the two sets of institutional paradigms and illustrates how these paradoxes at the 'interface' between the local community context and the development strategy lead to problems with effective women's participation. On the basis of the findings, it argues that the institutional paradigm for achieving equitable gender participation in local water governance does not represent a truly 'bottom-up' approach. It further raises the concern that if the institutional paradigm for participation is contradictory to local institutions, then how can the objectives of participation founded thereupon be seen as achievable? The paper proposes the need to design participatory paradigms that are more realistically rooted in community-based institutional frameworks so as to enhance effectiveness of the endeavors.

  • 25.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Water Management.
    Indigenous water management systems: Interpreting symbolic dimensions in common property resource regimes2006In: Society & Natural Resources, ISSN 0894-1920, E-ISSN 1521-0723, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 357-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water is a natural resource subject to management in many small-scale societies as common property. A dominant approach to understanding the sustainability of such common property resource (CPR) management regimes is the rational action model, which assumes that their successful governance is achieved through collective action based on a rationally constructed set of working rules. By presenting a holistic study of indigenous water management system in small-scale community setting in India, this article argues that the relationship between water resources and society extends beyond a materialistic mundane relationship, to incorporate a ''symbolic'' orientation. It concludes that rooted in the cosmology of the society, the indigenous water management system represents a mechanism to reinforce the symbolic constructions and also to fulfill water-related needs that cut across material and nonmaterial realms. The outcomes of the article enhance the understanding of management of CPRs, adding an alternate perspective concerning beliefs and values associated with such resources.

  • 26.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Managing Water pollution in Urban India: Problems and prospects2010In: Proceedings of The Stockholm World Water Week, September 2010 / [ed] Jakob Ericsson and Ingrid Stangberg, Stockholm: Stockholm International Water Institute, SIWI , 2010, p. 414-415Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Role of Socio-Cultural Context in Realization of the Right to Water in India2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Water Management.
    The changing role of women in water management: Myths and realities2006In: Wagadu: a Journal of Transnational Women's & Gender Studies, ISSN 2150-2226, E-ISSN 1545-6196, Vol. Spring, p. 94-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women and water are linked in several ways, an important pragmatic linkage being their role in water management. Several continuous efforts at positively transforming this role have been made during the last three decades, ranging from their improved role as domestic water managers to eliciting their greater participation in water management initiatives at community level. Studies tend to indicate that the anticipated ends of such exercises are universally achievable, in isolation of the prevailing social and cultural contexts where the women are placed. This paper seeks to unfold the realities underlying the universalistic claims regarding a transformed role for women in water management. Considering the importance of 'context' in the construction of gender ideologies and relations, through a micro-level study in the rural Indian context, this paper argues that the transformation of women's role in water management cannot be taken as a universal reality. The findings suggest that the existing role can be effectively modified only when interventions are built upon realistic, workable strategies that are meaningful and acceptable to the women and their communities.

  • 29.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    The Role of Water Quality for Human Health2010Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 30.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Total sanitation efforts in India: Problems and prospects2008In: Abstract Volume, World Water Week in Stockholm, August 17–23, 2008: Progress and Prospects on Water:For a Clean and Healthy Worldwith Special Focus on Sanitation, Stockholm: Stockholm International Water Institute, SIWI , 2008, p. 331-332Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Water management traditions in rural India: Valuing the unvalued2006In: Rural Transformation: Socio-economic Issues / [ed] H. Bhargava and D. Kumar, Hyderabad: Icfai University Press, 2006, p. 111-124Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Women and the Water Framework Directive in North Sweden2006In: Women and Natural Resource Management in the Rural North: Arctic Council Sustainable Development Working Group 2004-2006 / [ed] Sloan, L, Norfold: Forlaget Nora , 2006, p. 150-154Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Water Management.
    Women, Society and Water Technologies: Lessons for Bureaucracy2006In: Gender, Technology and Development, ISSN 0971-8524, E-ISSN 0973-0656, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 341-360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water technologies are increasingly regarded as pivotal to the process of societal development. One arena of importance is the delivery of water to society through  comprehensive water supply programs that aim at ensuring ‘safe’ water for all. The principal target group in these programs is women, whose development is believed to be promoted through improved water facilities offering them greater convenience, better health and  enhanced socio-economic opportunities. These programs can be seen as having three essential aspects, namely technology, people and institutions. Of these, the responsibilities of designing technologies for supplying water, creating institutional frameworks for their execution and implementing the program at the people’s end for their benefit all lie with development bureaucracies. But the extent to which these bureaucracies can be sensitive to the socio-cultural contexts of the communities and the women for whom the program interventions are designed and implemented remains problematic. This article explores the gender dimensions of the socio-cultural context of water and how this may play a role in the adoption and management of improved water technologies. A perspective on the lessons for planning bureaucracies is offered to make the concerned technologies more efficient, effective and sustainable.

  • 34.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Women-centric issues in water resources management in rural India2008In: Advances in Water Quality & Management / [ed] Sudhakar M. Rao, Monto Mani & N. H. Ravindranath, Chennai: Research Publishing Services, 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Water Management.
    Women’s participation in local water governance: Understanding institutional contradictions2006In: Gender, Technology and Development, ISSN 0971-8524, E-ISSN 0973-0656, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 61-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The participation of women in local water governance is currently envisaged as necessary for achieving sustainable management of water resources. Towards this end, institutions are being created in many developing countries enabling the participation of local people in the use and management of resources. How effective is the participation of women as  makers and shapers within local water governance institutions—and how does their participation translate into benefits for their communities? How realistic is this participatory strategy in the traditional rural contexts of the developing world? Based on empirical evidence from rural India, where women do not constitute a homogenous group, this article seeks to explore how social and power differences among them thwart the beneficial effects of water governance in communities. The findings underscore the need to develop a holistic understanding of the institutional factors that differentiate among women and the implications of these on mechanisms of water governance put in place at the local level.

  • 36.
    Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Water Management.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Gustafsson, Jan Erik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Water Management.
    Gender and water management: Some policy reflections2006In: Water Policy, ISSN 1366-7017, E-ISSN 1996-9759, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 183-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of gender concern in water sector is paramount, being seen as the harbinger of greater efficiency and effectiveness as well as equity. Consequently, there has been a continuing trend of designing water management policies with emphasis ranging from promoting participation of women in management of water projects in particular to supporting “gender-balanced” development of the water sector in general. How effective have these policies been in addressing such basic concerns? What are the local water users’ perceptions about effectiveness of the policies in addressing their realistic gendered needs and priorities? While “women” have received much attention, how well does the gender concern in the policies integrate “men”? Do “effectiveness” and “equity” as underlying policy goals reflect the water users’ perceptions as well? The paper attempts to evaluate the existing policies within the context of local communities where these are operational and proposes “facilitation of gender role performance” as a suitable policy alternative.

  • 37.
    Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Gustafsson, Jan-Erik
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Women and modern domestic water supply systems: Need for a holistic perspective2004In: Water resources management, ISSN 0920-4741, E-ISSN 1573-1650, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 237-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As domestic water managers, the strategic need of women has been identified as having access to domestic water sources that are convenient, reliable and located close to home. The need has been addressed through installation of low cost improved water supply systems in different parts of the developing world. While the need of women as domestic water managers has been globally articulated and addressed, perhaps adequate attention has not been drawn to the fact that this role is actually performed within the context of local communities where domestic water management activities are built upon the users' perceived needs to be fulfilled through culturally appropriate means. How do cultural intricacies in local communities influence the water fetching behaviour of women? What is the impact of such factors on the adoption and utilization of modern domestic water supply systems? The paper explores the implications of local cultural realities for the effectiveness of handpump as a modern domestic water supply system arguing that the locally perceived water needs of women are holistic and fail to be adequately addressed through the new source. Consequently, it has been admitted only as an 'add on' source, thereby hindering achievement of the basic objective of bringing women greater comfort, better health and socio-economic empowerment.

  • 38.
    Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Water Management.
    Jacks, G.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Women and community water supply programmes: An analysis from a socio-cultural perspective2005In: Natural resources forum (Print), ISSN 0165-0203, E-ISSN 1477-8947, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 213-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Community water supply programmes are seen as instrumental in achieving the goal of 'safe' water for all. Women, a principal target group of these programmes, are to be benefited with greater convenience, enhanced socio-cultural opportunities and better health for themselves and their families, provided through improved water facilities. Water supply programmes largely consist of three essential components, namely: technology, people and institutions. Although such programmes are intended to benefit women members of local communities, scant attention is paid to the impacts of the socio-cultural context of the community on these programmes. This article explores the influence of social and cultural intricacies on the implementation of community water supply programmes, and assesses their effectiveness. The article offers important lessons for the design and implementation of this type of programme. It concludes that the local sociocultural context sets the stage for programme implementation, being a dynamic factor that determines actual access to water sources, more so than mere physical availability, which is often used as a criterion for programme performance. The article stresses the urgent need to integrate socio-cultural factors as a fourth dimension in designing community water supply programmes, and suggests practical measures for enhancing the effectiveness of such programmes.

  • 39.
    Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Arsenic-safe water for local communities in West Bengal, India: A technological issue or a management challenge?2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, the arsenic menace has come to threaten the lives of several millions in a number of states in India. Of these, the earliest to be reported and perhaps the worst to be affected are the populace living in the state of West Bengal. Until the middle of the 90s, the concern was with developing appropriate ‘hardware’ that can supply arsenic-safe water to the affected communities. By the second half of the 90s, a number of technological options were developed, promising to supply water containing arsenic well below the permissible limit set by the WHO. These various technologies can be conveniently clubbed under the rubric ‘arsenic removal plants’ (ARPs). Other alternatives lately promoted as safe water sources include deep tubewells, treated surface water supply through pipelines and rainwater harvesting. While each of these alternatives has its own strengths and weaknesses within the technological framework, this presentation argues that a common challenge facing them and the users is their management. While the government had commissioned evaluative studies of the ARP technologies quite early, an understanding of the management issues underlying their sustainability and adoption is yet to be developed.

    Based on detailed first hand observations made in a sample of 45 villages in the state, the presentation outlines the major ‘software’ issues confronting the adoption, access, maintenance and sustainability of the different technology options introduced in the local communities of West Bengal for supplying arsenic-safe water. It argued that neglect of the software dimension of the problem has resulted in inadequate attention to interventions that should have otherwise constituted critical components in the arsenic mitigation programmes designed and executed by different agencies in the state – namely, government, non-governmental organizations and international development agencies. The core of the software dimension is identified as lying in the notion of real and effective ‘community participation’.

  • 40.
    Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Ensuring arsenic-safe water supply in local communities: Emergent concerns in West Bengal, India2008In: Groundwater for sustainable Development: Problems, Perspectives and Challenges / [ed] Bhattacharya, P. et al., London: Taylor & Francis , 2008, p. 357-364Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Managing arsenic-safe water supply options in West Bengal, India: Problems and prospects from gender perspective2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While about a decade ago, developing appropriate hardware for mitigating the arsenic menace in West Bengal was the prime concern, today, safe water supply options almost abound in the affected local communities. The government has drafted a detailed program for mitigating the problem and international development agencies are actively supporting the various available options. However, the plight of the people does not seem to have been contained.

    It needs to be increasingly realized that management of the available safe water supply technologies is the critical issue that will determine effectiveness as well as sustainability of the alternatives in the long run. So far, either centrality of the issue has been evaded or else the government has taken over the burden in relation to its own interventions. The community has been largely kept at bay or else involved in a piecemeal approach, without realizing that linkages between technology and society can be complex and intricate and that without effective participation of the users in planning and implementation, mere installation of technologies in the community cannot deliver the goods. The complexity of the linkages is furthered by the gender-based differences between women and men as water users. It is also aggravated by the level and nature of the technology, the major categories being community-level arsenic removal plants, deep tubewells, and treated surface water pipelines on the one hand and domestic water filters on the other. Community level rainwater harvesting is being developed as an additional alternative.

    Based on an ethnographic study conducted in the state, this presentation aims at identifying the problems concerning management of the various kinds of safe water supply technologies introduced in the affected villages in West Bengal. The problems are first analyzed from gender perspective and then suggestions made for an appropriate gender-based approach to ensure effective community participation in the process of managing these alternatives. The recommendations aim at developing a model, which can help promote effectiveness and sustainability of technological options available for arsenic mitigation in local communities.

  • 42.
    Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Women and community water supply programs: An analysis from socio-cultural perspective2005In: Water resouces Journal ST/ESCAP/SER.C, no 217, p. 31-49Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Water Management.
    Koku, John
    Department of Geography and Resource Development, University of Ghana, Legon-Accra.
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Resolving Water Conflicts in Mining Areas of Ghana Through Public Participation: A Communication Perspective2007In: Journal of Creative Communications, ISSN 0973-2586, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 361-382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mining as a sector is vital to a country's economic growth but the impact of the activities on environment can be an important cause of concern. In Wassa West district of Ghana, mining as an industry has been promoted in the recent past, but with significant impact on environmental aspects, especially water, leading to conflicts between the local communities and the mining companies. The practical theory of ‘Trinity of Voice’ (TOV) has been proposed for understanding the community-related intricacies underlying multi-stakeholder decision-making processes and proposing a futuristic course of action for effective public participation in the same. This article attempts to understand the causes underlying the mining-related water conflicts in Ghana using the TOV theory. Using this theory, the article proposes a practical framework for enhanced effective participation of members from local host communities that in turn can enable resolving the existing conflicts and preventing the same in future. 

  • 44.
    Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Singh, Om Prakash
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Anthropology of Water: Perspectives from Traditional Water Management Regime in Rural India2009In: Man in India, ISSN 0025-1569, Vol. 89, no 1-2, p. 215-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water a natural resource, is characterized by multitudes of traits which are distinctively processed by diversified thoughts and beliefs orienting the behaviour-patterns of the people. The present paper highlights the integrated inter-relation between water as a natural sources and human societies. Water works as an essence in human existence and at the sametime it in seen that this particular element of the environment has been specifically moulded by the social-cultural patterns of the people in such a way that it takes the principal role in governing the peoples sacred and secular mode of life-situation. In the perspective of this view-point an attempt has been made here to study the traditional water management system that are still prevalent in Indian villages. This study is engaged to explore the water management pattern in the background of socio-cultural and ritualistic traditions in the caste-oriented villages in Bihar and Madhya Pradesh. Day to day water use by the people and the associated values, norms and taboos open up such a unique dimension which can best be illustrated and analysed through the domain of anthropology of water.

  • 45.
    Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Wickenberg, Per
    Dept. of Sociology of Law, Lund University, Lund.
    Åström, Karsten
    Dept. of Sociology of Law, Lund University, Lund.
    Hydén, Håkan
    Dept. of Sociology of Law, Lund University, Lund.
    Accessing water through a rights-based approach: problems and prospects regarding children2012In: Water Policy, ISSN 1366-7017, E-ISSN 1996-9759, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 298-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The right to water has been recently recognized as a fundamental human right by the United Nations, thereby clarifying its status as 'legally binding', making it 'justiciable' and enforceable. This development has been heralded as a key that holds great potential to change the lives of the billions who still lack access to clean water. Many of those deprived of enjoyment of the right are children, who constitute up to a third of the population in the developing world. What is the value added of the rights-based approach for access to water, especially for children? Would recognition of the right to water as legally binding deliver real benefits to children in improving their access to water? Does it really offer anything new that can help them realize their right to water more effectively? These questions will be explored in this paper using empirical evidence from India, where water has been legally interpreted as a fundamental right, and as a welfare state, where there has been consistent effort on part of the state to improve children's access to water.

  • 46.
    Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Water Management.
    Wickenberg, Per
    Dept. of sociology, Lund University, Lund.
    Åström, Karsten
    Dept. of sociology, Lund University, Lund.
    Hydén, Håkan
    Dept. of sociology, Lund University, Lund.
    Children’s right to water as a contested domain: Gendered reflections from India2008In: Development: Journal of the Society for International Development, ISSN 1011-6370, E-ISSN 1461-7072, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 102-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nandita Singh and her colleagues look at children's right to water in India. They argue for the exercise of the right by children by analyzing the universal normative-legal framework and its difference to the local socio-culturally defined framework. They suggest that defining problems and designing actions only within the normative-legal framework can obscure understanding the critical realities at the right-holders' end. They suggest that interventions at various levels, such as through policy and targeted programmes, have at best provided an ‘enabling environment’, but the process of implementation of children's rights at the right-holders' end is to date an incomplete socio-cultural process.

  • 47.
    Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Wickenberg, Per
    Department of Sociology of Law, Lund University, Lund.
    Åström, Karsten
    Department of Sociology of Law, Lund University, Lund.
    Hydén, Håkan
    Department of Sociology of Law, Lund University, Lund.
    Meeting the Millennium Development Goals through the Human Right to Water: A gendered analysis in India from actor oriented perspective2008In: Meeting global challenges in research cooperation: Proceedings of a conferenceand workshop in Uppsala,May 27–29, 2008 / [ed] Ingrid Karlsson and Kristina Röing de Nowina, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 2008, p. 338-339Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the targets of the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) is to halve the number of people without sustainable access to safe drinking water by 2015. It is believed that one of the ways to add impetus to the ongoing efforts is to explicitly recognize water as a ‘human right’, with a focus on ensuring the right of women and children, who are seen to be the worst sufferers from lack of sustainable water access. It is assumed that focus on the human right to water (HRW) would serve as a means to increase the pressure on governments and international agencies to translate the right into specific national and international legal obligations and responsibilities, thus paving the way for ensuring water access for all (UNESCO, 2006).

    This assumption has been examined by the authors within the scope of two different research projects supported by Sida-Sarec. Using an actor-oriented perspective that further made a distinction between ‘implementation’ and ‘realization’ of human rights, these projects attempt to understand how the globally formulated norms concerning water as a human right get translated into action at the local level. The first project looked at the HRW of women while the second one focuses on the right of children. The research is based upon empirical studies in different parts of India and refers to the right to water situation in areas affected by problems of water quality and quantity.

    The findings of the research indicate that realization of HRW essentially involves dynamics at the ‘third level’ of human rights implementation. This constitutes the interface between the community and the agency where action towards fulfillment of the right is ultimately unfolded. Following the rights-based approach to development, two kinds of actors were identified – the ‘rights-holders’ (women and children) and the ‘duty-bearers’ (government, NGOs, international development agencies). The contextual factors that influence the realization of the HRW of women and children as separate right-holder groups can be classified into two categories: first, the nature of human rights approach adopted by the agency (if any) and second, the socio-cultural factors in the community context that lead to re-construction of the right at the local level. The dynamics of interaction between the two sets of factors are complex and need to be understood as contextual realities. On the whole, the latter have been found to have significant influence on the equitable, effective and sustainable realization of the HRW (Singh, 2008, Singh et al., 2008).

    From the preliminary findings of the research, it can be concluded that mere legislative actions at international and national forums for implementing the HRW may not offer enough benefits towards ensuring progress towards the MDGs. There is a need to explore the dynamics at the ‘third’ level and consider how the learnings can be integrated into the global and state initiatives so as to promote water justice for women and children.

    REFERENCES:

    UNESCO (2006) Water: A shared Responsibility. World Water Development Report 2.

    Singh, N. (2008) Gender and water from human rights perspective: Role of context in translating international norms into local action. Rural Society, 18(3) (forthcoming).

    Singh, N., Wickenberg P., Åström K., Hydén, H. (2008) Children’s right to water as a contested domain: Gendered reflections from India. Development, 51(1):102-107.

  • 48. Songsore, J.
    et al.
    Nabila, J.S.
    Yangyouro, Y.
    Amuah, E.
    Bosque-Hamilton, E.K.
    Etsibah, K.K.
    Gustafsson, Jan-Erik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    State of Environmental Health: Report of the Greater Accra Metropolitan Area 20012005Book (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Suleiman, Lina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    van Well, Lisa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Gustafsson, Jan-Erik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Governance and Privatisation of the Amman Water Utility2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Suleiman, Lina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Van Well, Lisa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Gustafsson, Jan-Erik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Governance of the Amman Water Utility2005In: / [ed] Konstantinos P. Tsagarakis, Routledge, 2005, p. 53-65Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1993 The World Bank assisted the Ministry of Water and Irrigation of Jordan in updating the water sector review and thus began the process of Private Sector Participation (PSP) for service provision. In this paper, three years of privatisation of water and wastewater services is examined and investigated from the stakeholder (input) and the consumer (output) perspective. The goal of the study is to assess the changes that have been taken place to date in relation to the principles of good governance. The results from interviews with stakeholders and questionnaires to consumers show that the privatisation process is so far only showing a few signs of “good” governance. 

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