Change search
Refine search result
1 - 31 of 31
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Björkman, Beyza
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    English as the lingua franca of engineering: the morphosyntax of academic speech events2008In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1654-6970, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 103-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    English today is frequently used as an international means of communication among its non-native speakers from different L1 backgrounds. Research on English as a lingua franca (ELF) has already revealed commonalities and common processes from a variety of settings. It is important that research continues and that lingua franca usage in different environments is described to find ways to optimize communication. This paper will focus on the morphosyntax of spoken ELF, reporting the results of a study that investigates spoken lingua franca English in tertiary education (engineering) in Sweden, where English is increasingly becoming the language of instruction. The morphosyntax of non-native-like usage is investigated in dialogic and monologic speech events. Cases of non-native-like usage are grouped as ‘disturbing’, i.e. causing comprehension problems and ‘non-disturbing’, i.e. causing no comprehension problems. Findings from this corpus-based study show that the most consistent idiosyncrasies in lingua franca usage in this setting are observed in redundant features of the language and that there is very little disturbance, i.e. breakdown in communication. Engineers seem to opt for function and reciprocal intelligibility over redundant features of the language and accuracy when they speak English in academic contexts.

  • 2.
    Björkman, Beyza
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    "So you think you can ELF?": English as a lingua franca as the medium of instruction2010In: Hermes - Journal of Language and Communication Studies, ISSN 0904-1699, E-ISSN 1903-1785, Vol. 45, p. 77-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports the findings of a study on spoken English as a lingua franca (ELF) in Swedish higher education. The aim has been to investigate the role pragmatic strategies play in content lectures where English is a lingua franca, i.e. a vehicular language. The findings show that lecturers in ELF settings make less frequent use of pragmatic strategies than students, who deploy these strategies frequently in group-work projects. Earlier stages of the present study showed that despite frequent non-standardness at the morphosyntax level, there is very little overt disturbance in student group-work (Björkman 2008 a and b/2009b), most likely owing to a variety of communicative strategies used during interaction and the questions raised (Björkman, 2009a). It seems reasonable to assume that, in the absence of appropriate strategies and questions that serve as real-time signals of disturbance, there is an increased risk for covert disturbance in lectures. This view complies with the findings of earlier studies on the importance of such strategies (Mauranen 2006, Airey 2009:79, Hellekjær 2010). The findings imply that the effectiveness of a speaker of English in academic ELF settings is determined primarily by the speaker’s pragmatic ability and less by his/her proficiency. There are important implications of these findings for lecturers who need to operate in ELF settings. First, increasing interactivity by using pragmatic strategies sufficiently frequently appears critical for those involved in English-medium education. It is also important that awareness is raised on target language usage in lecturing in English. Such awareness-raising can be achieved at the macro level by clearly-written language policies that include training for teachers and students who both need to be equipped with the skills needed to cope with the complexities of such settings, and at the micro level, by in-house training and courses that could be administered to both teachers and students.

  • 3.
    Brunsberg, Sandra
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    Shaw, Philip
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    The mathematical English of Swedish undergraduates: assimilation and adaptation2005In: Språk på tvärs: Rapport från ASLA:s höstsymposium Södertörn, 11–12 november 2004 / [ed] Boel De Geer, Anna Malmbjer, Uppsala: Svenska föreningen för tillämpad språkvetenskap, ASLA , 2005, p. 119-130.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4. Caudery, T.
    et al.
    Petersen, M.
    Shaw, Philip
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    The Language Environments of Exchange Students at Scandinavian Universities2007In: Researching Content and Language Integration in Higher Education / [ed] Wilkinson, R.; Zegers, V., University of Maastricht , 2007, p. 233-250Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exchange students who come to Scandinavia are often motivated by an intention to improve their proficiency in English rather than the local language. They take academic classes conducted in English and may find themselves living in a lingua-franca English bubble, acculturated to an international-student subculture. A few do break out of the bubble, learn the local language, and experience the local culture. Here we report on a project intended identify the factors leading to successful learning of both English and the local languages. 70 students at each of four institutions, two in Sweden, two in Denmark, were interviewed three times over a semester and asked to complete simple language tests. English proficiency improved in most cases, Swedish/Danish was only learnt by those with good initial English and appropriate motivation. As expected, contact with local students was limited. Institutional policies can probably influence these outcomes.

  • 5. Caudery, T.
    et al.
    Petersen, M.
    Shaw, Philip
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    The motivations of exchange students at Scandinavian universities2008In: Students, Staff and Academic Mobility in Higher Education / [ed] Byram, M.; Dervin, F., Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Press , 2008, p. 114-130Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6. Gillaerts, P.
    et al.
    Shaw, Philip
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    Introduction: Genre and Norm2006In: The Map and the Landscape: Norm and reality in genre studies / [ed] Gillaerts, P.; Shaw, P., Bern: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2006, p. 1-14Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Hincks, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication (closed 2011-01-01).
    Measures and perceptions of liveliness in student presentation speech: A proposal for an automatic feedback mechanism2005In: Systeme, ISSN 1022-9280, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 575-591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes prosodic variables in a corpus of eighteen oral presentations made by students of Technical English, all of whom were native speakers of Swedish. The focus is on the extent to which speakers were able to use their voices in a lively manner, and the hypothesis tested is that speakers who had high pitch variation as they spoke would be perceived as livelier speakers. A metric (termed PVQ), derived from the standard deviation in fundamental frequency, is proposed as a measure of pitch variation. Composite listener ratings of liveliness for nine 10-s samples of speech per speaker correlate strongly (r = .83, n = 18, p < .01) with the PVQ metric. Liveliness ratings for individual 10-s samples of speech show moderate but significant (n = 81, p < .01) correlations: r = .70 for males and r = .64 for females. The paper also investigates rate of speech and fluency variables in this corpus of L2 English. An application for this research is in presentation skills training, where computer feedback could be provided for speaking rate and the extent to which speakers have been able to use their voices in an engaging manner.

  • 8.
    Hincks, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication (closed 2011-01-01).
    Measuring liveliness in presentation speech2005In: Proceedings of Interspeech 2005, Lisbon, 2005, p. 765-768Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes that speech analysis be used to quantifyprosodic variables in presentation speech, and reports theresults of a perception test of speaker liveliness. The test materialwas taken from a corpus of oral presentations made by18 Swedish native students of Technical English. Livelinessratings from a panel of eight judges correlated strongly withnormalized standard deviation of F0 and, for female speakers,with mean length of runs, which is the number of syllablesbetween pauses of >250 ms. An application of these findingswould be in the development of a feedback mechanism for theprosody of public speaking.

  • 9.
    Hincks, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication (closed 2011-01-01).
    Presenting in English and Swedish2005In: Proceedings of Fonetik 2005, Göteborg, 2005, p. 45-48Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on a comparison of prosodicvariables from oral presentations in a first andsecond language. Five Swedish natives whospeak English at the advanced-intermediatelevel were recorded as they made the samepresentation twice, once in English and once inSwedish. Though it was expected that speakerswould use more pitch variation when theyspoke Swedish, three of the five speakersshowed no significant difference between thetwo languages. All speakers spoke more quicklyin Swedish, the mean being 20% faster.

  • 10.
    Hincks, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication (closed 2011-01-01).
    Presenting in English or Swedish: Differences in speaking rate2008In: Proceedings of Fonetik 2008 / [ed] Eriksson, A.; Lindh, J., Gothenburg: Gothenburg University Department of Linguistics, 2008, p. 21-24Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper attempts to quantify differences in speaking rates in first and second languages, in the context of the growth of English as a lingua franca, where more L2 speakers than ever be-fore are using English to perform tasks in their working environments. One such task is the oral presentation. The subjects in this study were fourteen fluent English second language speakers who held the same oral presentation twice, once in English and once in their native Swedish. The temporal variables of phrase length (mean length of runs in syllables) and speaking rate in syllables per second were cal-culated for each language. Speaking rate was found to be 23% slower when using the second language, and phrase length was found to be 24% shorter.

  • 11.
    Hincks, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication (closed 2011-01-01).
    Processing the prosody of oral presentations2004In: Proc InSTIL/ICALL2004 NLP and Speech Technologies in Advanced Language Learning / [ed] Delmonte, R.; Delcloque, P.; Tonellli, S., Venice, Italy, 2004, p. 63-66Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Standard advice to people preparing to speak in public is to use a “lively” voice. A lively voice is described as one that varies in intonation, rhythm and loudness: qualities that can be analyzed using speech analysis software. This paper reports on a study analyzing pitch variation as a measure of speaker liveliness. A potential application of this approach for analysis would be for rehearsing or assessing the prosody of oral presentations. While public speaking can be intimidating even to native speakers, second language users are especially challenged, particularly when it comes to using their voices in a prosodically engaging manner.The material is a database of audio recordings of twenty 10-minute student oral presentations, where all speakers were college-age Swedes studying Technical English. The speech has been processed using the analysis software WaveSurfer for pitch extraction. Speaker liveliness has been measured as the standard deviation from the mean fundamental frequency over 10-second periods of speech. The standard deviations have been normal¬ized (by division with the mean frequency) to obtain a value termed the pitch dynamism quotient (PDQ). Mean values (for ten minutes of speech) of PDQ per speaker range from a low of 0.11 to a high of 0.235. Individual values for 10-second segments range from lows of 0.06 to highs of 0.36.

  • 12.
    Hincks, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    Speaking rate and information content in English lingua franca oral presentations2010In: English for specific purposes (New York, N.Y.), ISSN 0889-4906, E-ISSN 1873-1937, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 4-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper quantifies differences in speaking rates in a first and second language, and examines the effects of slower rates on the speakers' abilities to convey information. The participants were 14 fluent (CEF B2/C1) English L2 speakers who held the same oral presentation twice, once in English and once in their native Swedish. The temporal variables of mean length of runs and speaking rate in syllables per second were calculated for each language. Speaking rate was found to be 23% slower when using English. The slower rate of speech was found to significantly reduce the information content of the presentations when speaking time was held constant. Implications for teaching as European universities adopt English as a medium of instruction are discussed.

  • 13.
    Hincks, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication (closed 2011-01-01).
    Standard deviation of F0 in student monologue2004In: Proc of The XVIIth Swedish Phonetics Conference, Fonetik 2004, Stockholm University, 2004, p. 132-135Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Twenty ten-minute oral presentations made by Swedish students speaking English have been analyzed with respect to the standard deviation of F0 over long stretches of speech. Values have been normalized by division with the mean. Results show a strong correlation between pro-ficiency in English and pitch variation for male speakers but not for females. The results also identify monotone and disfluent speakers.

  • 14.
    Hincks, Rebecca
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    Edlund, Jens
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT.
    PROMOTING INCREASED PITCH VARIATION IN ORAL PRESENTATIONS WITH TRANSIENT VISUAL FEEDBACK2009In: Language Learning & Technology, ISSN 1094-3501, E-ISSN 1094-3501, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 32-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates learner response to a novel kind of intonation feedback generated from speech analysis. Instead of displays of pitch curves, our feedback is flashing lights that show how much pitch variation the speaker has produced. The variable used to generate the feedback is the standard deviation of fundamental frequency as measured in semitones. Flat speech causes the system to show yellow lights, while more expressive speech that has used pitch to give focus to any part of an utterance generates green lights. Participants in the study were 14 Chinese students of English at intermediate and advanced levels. A group that received visual feedback was compared with a group that received audio feedback. Pitch variation was measured at four stages: in a baseline oral presentation; for the first and second halves of three hours of training; and finally in the production of a new oral presentation. Both groups increased their pitch variation with training, and the effect lasted after the training had ended. The test group showed a significantly higher increase than the control group, indicating that the feedback is effective. These positive results imply that the feedback could be beneficially used in a system for practicing oral presentations.

  • 15.
    Hincks, Rebecca
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication (closed 2011-01-01).
    Edlund, Jens
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Transient visual feedback on pitch variation for Chinese speakers of English2009In: Proc. of Fonetik 2009, Stockholm, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on an experimental study comparing two groups of seven Chinese students of English who practiced oral presentations with computer feedback. Both groups imitated teacher models and could listen to recordings of their own production. The test group was also shown flashing lights that responded to the standard deviation of the fundamental frequency over the previous two seconds. The speech of the test group increased significantly more in pitch variation than the control group. These positive results suggest that this novel type of feedback could be used in training systems for speakers who have a tendency to speak in a monotone when making oral presentations.

  • 16.
    Hincks, Rebecca
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    Edlund, Jens
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Using speech technology to promote increased pitch variation in oral presentations2009In: Proc. of SLaTE Workshop on Speech and Language Technology in Education, Wroxall, UK, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on an experimental study comparing two groups of seven Chinese students of English who practiced oral presentations with computer feedback. Both groups imitated teacher models and could listen to recordings of their own production. The test group was also shown flashing lights that responded to the standard deviation of the fundamental frequency over the previous two seconds. The speech of the test group increased significantly more in pitch variation than the control group. These positive results suggest that this novel type of feedback could be used in training systems for speakers who have a tendency to speak in a monotone when making oral presentations.

  • 17. Mcmillion, A.
    et al.
    Shaw, Philip
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    Reading Comprehension in Advanced L2 Users of English2008In: Linguistic diversity and Sustainable development / [ed] Lainio, J.; Leppännen, A., ASLA , 2008, p. 209-224Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Nordberg, Richard
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    Shaw, Philip
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    Norms and power in learner genres and workplace genres2006In: The Map and the Landscape: Norms and Practices in Genre / [ed] Gillaerts, P.; Shaw, P., Bern: Lang Publishing, Incorporated , 2006, p. 219-235Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19. Pecorari, Diane
    et al.
    Shaw, Philip
    Malmström, Hans
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    Irvine, Aileen
    English Textbooks in Parallel-Language Tertiary Education2011In: TESOL quarterly (Print), ISSN 0039-8322, E-ISSN 1545-7249, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 313-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tertiary education in many countries is increasingly bilingual, with English used in parallel with the national language, particularly as a reading language. This article describes the results of a survey of student attitudes toward, and reading practices regarding, English language textbooks. Over 1,000 students at three Swedish universities responded to a questionnaire asking about their experiences with English textbooks. Textbooks written in English were generally unpopular, and the perception was widespread that they placed a greater burden on students. However, respondents were divided about whether their reading behavior and their learning outcomes were affected by having a textbook in English, and about whether English texts were desirable. The findings of this study have implications for teaching practices in contexts in which students are asked to read, or are being prepared to read, in a second language. Implications for the English as a foreign language or English as a second language classroom are discussed.

  • 20.
    Shaw, Philip
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    Engelska som lingua franca och som internationellt vetenskapsspråk2008In: Vetenskapsengelska - med svensk kvalitet? / [ed] Jansson, E., Stockholm: Språkrådet , 2008, p. 21-34Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Shaw, Philip
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication (closed 2011-01-01).
    English for Specific Purposes2006In: ESSE Messenger, ISSN 2518-3567, Vol. 15, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Shaw, Philip
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    Evaluative language in evaluative and promotional genres2006In: Variation in business and economics discourse: diachronic and genre perspectives / [ed] Gabriella Del Lungo Camiciotti; Marina Dossena; Belinda Crawford Camiciottoli, Officina Edizioni: Rom , 2006, p. 152-165Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Shaw, Philip
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    Introductory Remarks2007In: Language and discipline perspectives on academic discourse / [ed] Fløttum, K., Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2007, p. 2-13Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Shaw, Philip
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    Relations between text and mathematics across disciplines2006In: Academic Discourse across Disciplines / [ed] Hyland, K.; Bondi, M., Bern: Peter Lang , 2006, p. 103-122Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Shaw, Philip
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    Spelling, accent and identity in computer-mediated communication2008In: English Today, ISSN 0266-0784, E-ISSN 1474-0567, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 42-49Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Shaw, Philip
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    Benson, C.
    Brunsberg, Sandra
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    Duhs, R.
    Minugh, D.
    Preparing for international masters degrees at Stockholm University and the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm2008In: ESP in Higher European Education: Integrating Language and Content / [ed] Fortanet, I.; Räisänen, Ch., Amsterdam: Benjamins , 2008Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27. Trosborg, A.
    et al.
    Shaw, Philip
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    Acquiring prescriptive business pragmatics: The Case of Customer Complaint Handling2005In: Business Discourse: Texts and Context / [ed] Trosborg, A.; Joergensen, P. E., Bern: Peter Lang , 2005, p. 185-224Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 28. Trosborg, A.
    et al.
    Shaw, Philip
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    Deductive and inductive methods in the teaching of business pragmatics: not an ‘either/or’!2008In: Institutional Discourse in cross-cultural contexts / [ed] Gelutykens, R.; Kraft, B., München: Lincom Europa , 2008, p. 193-220Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29. Vall, Bärbel
    et al.
    Arango-Alegría, David
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    La alegría de leer2006Book (Other academic)
  • 30. Waara, Elin
    et al.
    Shaw, Philip
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    Male and Female Witnesses’ Speech in Swedish Criminal Trials2006In: Hermes - Journal of Language and Communication Studies, ISSN 0904-1699, E-ISSN 1903-1785, Vol. 36, p. 129-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present quantitative study focuses on witnesses’ speech in Swedish criminal trials,more specifi cally on potential differences between men’s and women’s language styles.Since the 1970s, research on language and gender has been divided into three mainapproaches towards the relationship between men’s and women’s language use: thedefi cit approach, the dominance approach and the cultural approach. The presentstudy uses the more recent dynamic approach to show how gender is acted out in eachsituation taking into account a number of factors, e.g. context. The aim of our workis fi rst and foremost to study the possible correlation between the witnesses’ genderand language in the courtroom context and then to investigate if income and/or levelof education provide better explanations for possible variation by looking at a broadrange of linguistic variables. The results show no statistically signifi cant gender orsocial status differences in the witnesses’ speech. However, when comparing the resultsof the testifying police offi cers accidentally included in the study with the rest of thewitnesses, the differences turned out to be signifi cant. This shows that, in this case,factors such as previous courtroom experience and familiarity with the context wereprobably more infl uential on the speech of the informants than gender, income andeducation, in conformity with the assumptions of the dynamic approach.

  • 31.
    Wik, Preben
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Speech Technology, CTT.
    Hincks, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Language and Communication.
    Hirschberg, Julia
    Department of Computer Science, Columbia University, USA.
    Responses to Ville: A virtual language teacher for Swedish2009In: Proc. of SLaTE Workshop on Speech and Language Technology in Education, Wroxall, England, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of novel capabilities have been designed to extend the repertoire of Ville, a virtual language teacher for Swedish, created at the Centre for Speech technology at KTH. These capabilities were tested by twenty-seven language students at KTH. This paper reports on qualitative surveys and quantitative performance from these sessions which suggest some general lessons for automated language training.

1 - 31 of 31
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf