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  • 1. Young, J. P.
    et al.
    Forsberg, Lars E.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Parallel and Scientific Computing Institute, PSCI.
    Simulating activations with cytoarchitecture2005In: Anatomy and Embryology, ISSN 0340-2061, E-ISSN 1432-0568, Vol. 210, no 5-6, p. 407-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cytoarchitectonic delineation of areas in post-mortem human brains provides the precise location of these areas. It has been possible to study the size and location of areas between post-mortem brains with multi-subject cytoarchitectonic data. If the structure-function relationship is assumed to be a one-to-one mapping for the purposes of inter-subject variability, then functional areas in the cortex will also adhere to the structure, and therefore, the location and size of cytoarchitectonic areas in the brain. Thus, it is possible to use the cytoarchitectonic data as being representative of the size and location of functional activations. Under this assumption, we simulated activations in cytoarchitectonic areas from ten post-mortem brains in this study. We then treated these data as we would a normal PET experiment. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate a standard PET image analysis on a simulated ten-subject PET study using cytoarchitecture to localize the activations. By doing so, we simulate activations with real inter-subject variability with the size and location of each area. Significant activations were obtained for activations simulated in areas 3a and 3b. A voxel-wise conjunction between simulated data and experimental data was made to better determine the underlying areas activated by the experimental tasks. This study presents a novel technique for demonstrating the effect of standard image analysis on the location and size of simulated activations as determined by cytoarchitectonic data from multiple subjects. Furthermore, this technique has been applied to better determine the underlying areas activated in an experiment.

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