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  • 1.
    Alcaraz Bosca, Neus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Lean project management. Assessment of project risk management processes2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional methods of project management are not appropriate for complex projects anymore. Since projects are becoming increasingly complex and uncertain, interaction between activities and resources is growing in ways not considered by these methods. Nowadays, managers need more agile project management methods that are able to recognize and deal with uncertainty and to produce the expected results. Lean project management, the most recent approach of lean methodology, appears as an alternative approach capable of dealing with complexity and uncertainty. The latest investigations in the field show that traditional methods are still adequate for simple projects, while lean methods are more appropriate for complex projects.

    This thesis aims to investigate the nature of lean project management and to examine project risk management processes so that managers can assess the complexity of projects before their beginning and decide which method to apply in order to manage them. 

  • 2.
    Alija Fuertes, Miguel Jesús
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Mobile Devices: Dominant Design as a Goal2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Since the beginning of the smartphones in the 80s, the mobile device market has grown and evolved towards devices connected everywhere, with hardware more and more close to computers and laptops than a classic mobile telephone. Nowadays, this market seems to be crowded and some companies seem not to know exactly which step is next. In this manner, a concept appears in the market as a solution or a difficulty to overcome: the dominant design. The thesis aims to establish an analysis and definition of what a dominant design is and how we should understand this concept: which are the costumers’ demands and needs? How can we relate this information with the dominant design? What is the strategy of the firm before designing a device? Do they use a concept similar to a dominant design?. The research base its analysis in a theoretical framework based in innovation and marketing literature, to then compare the model studied with data collected from surveys made to customers, interviews made to workers of the mobile device market, and different new projects on the market. The research finishes with a discussion about the theoretical and the empirical frameworks, and concludes replying the research questions, and defining a dominant design and its current situation in the market.

  • 3. Allvin, M.
    et al.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Zika-Viktorsson, Annika
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Project Overload: A study on work situation in complex industrial organizations2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4. Alvizos, Emmanuel
    et al.
    Angelis, Jannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Servitized capital goods offerings: Why should the customer accept?2012In: Proceedings of the 4th World Conference Production and Operations Management, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Andersson, Dan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Bernhardsson, Martin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Offshore outsourcing to China: The suppliers' perspective on competitive priorities and the role of buyer-supplier interaction mechanisms2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    In the global business environment, outsourcing and offshore outsourcing are strategies forfirms to handle the increasing competition in their specific market segments by utilizing thecapabilities of other firms in order to gain competitive advantages. China has become animportant player on the global market and is an attractive country for Western firms’offshore outsourcing initiatives. Even though outsourcing and offshore outsourcing havebeen discussed in the literature for a long period of time, firms are still not able to reach andfulfill their strategic goals and many offshore outsourcing projects fail. The purpose of thisthesis is to deepen the existing literature regarding offshore outsourcing to China byconsidering the Chinese suppliers’ perspective on competitive priorities, which are thepriorities that firms organize the production by, in order to understand how the buying firmscan be more successful in the Chinese context and reach their strategic goals.

  • 6.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Velanikov, Ivan
    Mairi, Macintyre
    McMahon, Michael
    Naybour, John
    Arkle, Sam
    Reverse servitisation2012In: Proceedings of the 5th European Operations Management Association Service Operations Management Forum, Cambridge, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Araya, Juan Manuel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Value Stream Mapping Adapted to High-Mix, Low-Volume Manufacturing Environments2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This research work proposes a new methodology for implementing Value Stream Mapping, in processes that feature a High-Mix, Low-Volume product base.   The opportunity for adapting the methodology singularly for these types of environments was identified because implementing Value Stream Mapping as proposed in Learning to See features several drawbacks when implemented in High-Mix, Low-Volume.  Although Value Stream Mapping has been proven to enhance many types of processes, its advantages are shrunk if they are implemented in High-Mix, Low-Volume processes.  

    High-Mix, Low-Volume processes are types of processes in which a high variety of finished goods are produced in relatively low amounts.  The high variety of finished goods causes several complications for the implementation of flow.  The difficulties that prevent the flow are the following:

    • The variance in the products: With hundreds, or sometimes thousands of possible finished goods, the number of products causes a non-repetitive process.
    • The variance in the routings:  All of the products that are produced can have completely different process routings, or order of stations it has to visit.  This makes the application of production lines quite difficult.
    • The variance in the cycle times for each process.  Each of the different products can have completely different capacity requirements at a specific machine, which limits the predictability of the process.

     

    This purpose of the thesis is to gather the best practices for controlling and improving High-Mix, Low-Volume processes and merge them with some innovative ideas to create an inclusive Value Stream Mapping methodology which is better fitted with the types of complications in High-Mix, Low-Volume environments.  In parallel, the methodology is tested with the company: Boston Scientific, in their Ureteral Stents manufacturing process.   The real-life experimentation will allow for the fine-tuning of the methodology, in order to truly create impact in the process.

     

     

     

     

  • 8.
    Arbeus, Rickard
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Fransson, Dan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    A Post Announcement Trading Strategy2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has shown that trading strategies based on the Post Earnings Announcement Drift (PEAD), the phenomenon where stock prices tend to drift up (down) for firms that report unexpectedly high (low) earnings, and fundamental analysis, in which financial data is used to evaluate a company's value, can generate risk-adjusted excess returns. The purpose of this report is to investigate whether a combined trading strategy, based on both PEAD and fundamental analysis, can generate higher returns than each trading strategy individually. Standardized Unexpected Earnings (SUE) (Setterberg (2007), Bernard and Thomas (1990), and others) is used to take advantage of the PEAD and the Piotroski (2000) model for fundamental analysis. Observations are made on the Stockholm Stock Exchange from 2002Q3 to 2009Q4. The results show that a combined hedge strategy based on a long position in the highest (SUE) decile with financially strong companies and a short position in the lowest (SUE) decile of financially weak companies on average generate a significant risk-adjusted excess return of 5.6% per quarter (24.2% per year) with 80-day holding period. The dual approach has thus generated an average of 2.6 and 1.6 percentage points higher return per quarter (10.8% and 6.6% per year) than a trading strategy solely based on PEAD or fundamental analysis.

  • 9.
    Bauner, David
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Kappa/Cover essay: Towards a sustainable automotive industry: experiences from thedevelopment of emission control systemsManuscript (Other academic)
  • 10. Bengtsson, Lars
    et al.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Manufacturing outsourcing and its effect on plant performance-lessons for KIBS outsourcing2009In: Journal of evolutionary economics, ISSN 0936-9937, E-ISSN 1432-1386, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 231-257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the proclaimed advantages and popularity of outsourcing manufacturing and knowledge-intensive business services, there are few and mainly contradictory studies of its short- and long-term effects. The main purpose of this paper is to analyze the way in which outsourcing manufacturing and design work relates to performance at plant level. The study is based on a large-scale survey among a representative sample of Swedish engineering plants. The results show no significant effects from outsourcing manufacturing on plant operating performance. The paper further shows that investments in technological and organizational capabilities explain the improvements of performance to a significantly higher extent than does outsourcing. The problems of additional costs and managing dependencies when applying partial outsourcing and separating interdependent key processes provide important insights to the analysis on the effects of outsourcing knowledge-intensive business services (KIBS).

  • 11.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Niss, Camilla
    von Haartman, Robin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Combining Master and Apprentice Roles: Potential for Learning in Distributed Manufacturing Networks2010In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 417-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to explore possible effects for learning when a manufacturing plant takes a double role, as being both master plant and apprentice plant, in a globally distributed industrialization process. Industrialization is here understood as the process of preparing new products for volume manufacturing. Two research questions are addressed. The first is what characterizes the dual roles. The second concerns how the dual roles affect knowledge integration and learning processes, and whether this arrangement facilitates learning between master and apprentice. Based on a study of a global telecom equipment company, the paper provides insights into some of the challenges and effects of dynamic switching of roles. By separating the network function from the strategic role of the plant, the study identifies four options for learning. The case adds to the literature on learning in manufacturing networks and to previous research on how distributed processes affect innovation capability.

  • 12. Bengtsson, Lars
    et al.
    Von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Low-Cost versus Innovation: Contrasting Outsourcing and Integration Strategies in Manufacturing2009In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 35-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses how two different outsourcing manufacturing strategies relate to plant performance and innovation capability when taking into account the organizational integration of design and manufacturing as well as product complexity. The study discriminates between low-cost-oriented outsourcing and innovation-oriented outsourcing. The empirical data used is based on a survey of 267 engineering firms, of which half have outsourced manufacturing. We found that the two outsourcing strategies do have different effects, which illustrates that outsourcing represents a trade-off between improving innovation capability and lowering costs. The study furthermore shows that manufacturing and supplier integration in product design processes is mainly beneficial when applying innovation-oriented outsourcing, and in particular when products and manufacturing processes are complex.

  • 13.
    Berglund, Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Formalisering och yrkeskunnande: en explorativ studie om säkerhetskulturen inom kärnkraftsindustrin2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Like many industries, the nuclear power industry in Sweden is currently facing the challenges of a major generational change. To meet these challenges, alongside the demands for a high level of security, the industry has attempted to standardise its mode of operations as far as possible. Apart from various technological fixes and safety devices, manuals and instructions have been modelled for every conceivable situation, or course of events; documentations and formal systems of co-ordination that become larger and larger, and more and more detailed.

    In high-risk industries there is a tendency to equate learning with changes in external patterns of behaviour, as against fixed standards, typically among operating staff. The acquisition  of professional skill, on the other hand, is the result of participation in practice. From this point of view, rather, learning is the outcome of reflection, upon actual events and experiences. Recurrent training can be used to promote formalisation, but also to explore and reinforce the experience based knowledge of skilled operators; between these approaches, the former prevails.

    Accidents and incidents incessantly put in question what is commonly referred to as the safety culture of various power plants, and subsequent to the misfortunes at Forsmark 1 in 2006, the accident was described as the culmination of a longterm decline in safety culture. The strong requirement for security and control is a cause of formalisation, whereas the need to support reflection as formation of professional skill tends to be omitted. Even so, experience based skill and knowledge remains a substantial consituent of what could be regarded as a dependable safety culture. Codified knowledge must be interpreted and applied in practice. Furthermore, experienced professionals, from encountering a great variety of situations, seem to develop what can be described as the skill of anticipation, and, as shown in connection with the incident at Forsmark 1, an ability to handle the unexpected.

    The urge for formalisation raises certain concerns: that of the primacy of defining the containments of professional skill, the impact and resilience of local knowledge and diversity, and the hollowing out of ability and skill within work-life organisations. The “human factor”, that is the operating staff, is commonly made responsible for established accidents and incidents. Even so, experienced personnel are able to manage a variety of unforeseen events and disturbances, that sometimes occur in high-risk technology industries. At times, on the contrary, the human factor saves technology, instead of the other way around. This study explores the concept of safety culture within the nuclear power industry from an epistemological perspective. It discusses the use of recurrent training, and the role of experience based skill and knowledge in the operating of Swedish power plants. What methods can be employed to support experience based knowledge as an essential complement to standardised work processes, codified knowledge, or benchmark strategies? Principles of formalisation need to be supplemented with a more thorough exploration of professional skill, in which a distinction between behaviour and responsibility can be made.

  • 14.
    Berglund, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Persson, Linn
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Ledarskapskultur: En studie om möjligheter och utmaningar att hantera vid en förändringsprocess2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Tidigare studier om ledarskap har fokuserat på att studera formellt ledarskap ur ett individperspektiv. Detta har sedan utvecklats till studier om ledarskap som en delad process, där ledarskap utarbetas av fler än en person. En relativt ny inriktning inom ledarskapsområdet menar att ledarskap borde studeras som en praktik, där ledarskap uppstår i sociala interaktioner och som en process av kulturskapande. Baserat på dessa antaganden har ett nytt teoretiskt begrepp introducerats, ledarskapskultur. I denna studie bidrar vi med kunskap kring detta nya begrepp, vilka möjligheter och utmaningar en förändrad ledarskapskultur ställs inför och hur dessa kan hanteras.

    Forskningen har genomförts som en fallstudie på Malmen, ett större svenskt metallföretag som nyligen implementerat en ny ledarskapsfilosofi. Undersökningen inleddes med en litteraturstudie, där tidigare och aktuell forskning inom området utformades till studiens teoretiska ramverk. Parallellt med detta har empiri och data samlats in i en kombinerad intervju- och observationsstudie på Malmen.

    Studiens resultat visar att det finns en utmaning för företag med att formulera visioner och värderingar som motsvarar deras strategiska mål. Vidare kunde även konstateras att subkulturer som växer fram inom den gemensamma kulturen bör beaktas, då dessa potentiellt kan hindra en förändring av ledarskapskulturen. Kulturella artefakter utgör både en utmaning och en möjlighet där effekten av dessa beror på utformning och införandet av dessa. Slutligen visar studien att de möjligheter och utmaningar som identifierats kan hanteras genom att skapa identitet och ansluta de anställda till gemensamma visioner och värderingar.

  • 15.
    Bergsten, Andreas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Fackets kulturkris: metaforer som organixationsterapi2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Union representatives today have constantly to discuss and redefine their roles, as established patterns of negotiation and decision-making changes. The Swedish model of collective bargaining and corporatist representation in government has slowly been weakened and unions seek new ways of serving the interests of their members. This study focuses on disagreements and uncertainties in groups of white-collar union representatives concerning purposes and roles.

    The dialogue seminar method, developed at the Royal Institute of Technology, is a tool for practitioners to examine the tacit knowledge that informs their work. Ideas from Ludwig Wittgenstein's later philosophy concerning rule-following and language games figures prominently in the development of this method. In four dialogue seminar series, union representatives from the Swedish white-collar union Sif (Unionen from 2008) have explored their present situation and future challenges. The lack of a common understanding in these seminars is traced to the wider organizational culture and trends in public opinion. A cultural crisis in the union is understood in Wittgenstein's terms of  'captivating pictures' – patterns of thought that remain unchallenged.

    How such pictures captivate and dictate our thinking by way of implicit analogy is further discussed in this study. Elements from psychoanalytic theory are introduced to outline a theory of organizational development based on our innate capacity for analogical thinking. Criticizing a certain naïve rationalism in current mainstream management models, a deliberate use and critique of metaphors is suggested as an organizational therapy for practitioners thus captivated. This draws attention to a vital potential in the use of dialogue, unexploited in organizational practice.

  • 16.
    Bergvall, Sven
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Through the Mirror: Perspectives of Brand Heritage2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of brands in contemporary society has in a fundamental way shifted the earlier balance of power in terms of consumers’ identity, in a sense creating a society where we are what we consume. This change has not only created enormous values centered around everyday brands, but also made brands into cultural objects interacting in a space earlier exclusive to such high-brow areas such as religion, science and the fine arts. As such, brands have become an integral part of our societies, permeating virtually every space of contemporary life. This new role of brands also creates a need to understand how brands interact with culture. This dissertation is focusing on the brand heritage facet of brands, a construct existing both in consumers, as a kind of historical mashup in the consumer’s mind, and brand management which, at least discourse-wise, finds it to be more of a cultural stereotype.

    In order to further the understanding of the phenomenon of brand heritage, this dissertation is using the case of Sony Ericsson to explore how both brand managers and consumers are relating to the brand. At Sony Ericsson, the brand managers are very dual to the brand heritage of their parents, on one hand they are clearly trying to distance themselves from the past by ‘inventing’ difference, on the other, they are embedding sub-brands of Sony into the products to enhance their offering.

    On the consumer side, as the study was conducted in Sweden, it is quite apparent that the heritage of Ericsson still looms over the new brand, unable to break lose from its symbolic universe. While this is by no means inherently bad, it goes to show the difficulties brands have to rapidly shift from one well-established brand identity to another. To elicit information from the consumer respondents photo elicitation was used in order to gain insights into their negotiation of brands deeper than what is usually possible in a ‘normal’ interview setting.

    One outcome of this study was four principles that brand heritage can be seen as formative of brand heritage, the principle of comfort, the local, authenticity, and identity. They act as beacons both for consumers and brand managers as they create a structure for understanding how brand heritage interacts with culture to enable its use both in the brand and consumer identity creation process.

  • 17.
    Bernotat, Knut
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Sandberg, Thomas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Individuell mätning av värmeförbrukning i flerbostadshus i Tyskland: Författningar, tekniker och erfarenheter2006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna rapport visar forskaren Knut Bernotat, KTH, att en 20-procentig reduktion av energianvändningen efter införandet av individuell värmemätning uppnås i normalfallet i Tyskland. Med tanke på att bostäder, lokaler och andra byggnader svarar för cirka 40 procent av Sveriges totala energianvändning så borde en stor del av denna energi kunna sparas. Det tyska exemplet, där lagstiftning ger hyresgästen och konsumenten en stark ställning, visar att det är konsumenterna och miljön som vinner när var och en betalar för sin egen energianvändning.

  • 18.
    Berozashvili, Alex
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Swedish Government’s targeted entrepreneurship policy to encourage entrepreneurship among women: An Evaluation of the program "Support Women Entrepreneurs 2007-2009"2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the situation of female entrepreneurs in Sweden by exploring the Swedish governments adopted, targeted entrepreneurship policy on women entrepreneurs and evaluate the program "Support Women Entrepreneurs 2007-2009" implemented by the Swedish Agency for Economic and Regional Growth. In the program evaluation process qualitative data analyses methods are used. The aim of the evaluation is to measure how planned program/component parts were implemented in practice and whether set goals were accomplished. Overall results from the program evaluation should be considered as positive. The original program plan consisted of six parts, 20 goals, and 34 component parts. Out of the 34 component parts, 18 were acknowledged to have been accomplished, information was not available for 14 component parts and 2 component parts were found not to be accomplished. Due to the program’s complexity in execution, involving different executive layers on national, regional and municipal levels, evaluation process was quite demanding and still it could not represent the highest level of preciseness in evaluating component parts. The most actively executed and successfully implemented part of the program could be considered part four: Attitudes and role-models.

  • 19.
    Blomgren, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Business Development and Entrepreneurship (Closed 20130101).
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Uppvall, Lars
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Educating the new Engineer and Retargeting the Engineering Curriculum for the future Industrial Landscape2011In: INTED2011 Proceedings, 2011, p. 1145-1152Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the former U.S. Secretary of Education expressed it: “We are currently preparing students for jobs and technologies that done yet exist…in order to solve problems we don’t know are problems yet”. This implies a need for Engineering Education to adapt to the fact that the nature of work is changing. This paper discuss how a retargeted Engineering Curriculum can be defined with the help of future pictures of industry. By presenting a different categorization of labor employment statistics new pictures of industry future can be predicted usable when developing the new Engineering Curriculum.

  • 20.
    Blomqvist, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Axelsson, Rickard
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Business Agility2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 21.
    Borhanazad, Arian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Tran, Martin
    Improved Sourcing Flexibility through Strategic Procurement: A Case Study in a Global Manufacturing Company2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background –

    Increase in global competition, technological changes and demanding customers have resulted in more knowledge-intensive, unstable, complicated and an uncertain environment. In order to overcome these demand uncertainties and tough circumstances, manufacturers are required to investigate methods to increase flexibility. To achieve the flexibility improvements, each component of supply chain such as suppliers, manufacturing plants, warehouses, and distributors must possess the potential to be flexible. Theory implies that the main link between company’s upstream supply chain namely suppliers and its own business unit are the sourcing strategy. Usually sourcing practitioners distinguish between sourcing strategies using portfolio models. They normally categorize purchased items based on the strategic importance of the item and characteristics of its supply market. It is a critical issue to explore how different sourcing strategies, for different categories of procured items, can influence sourcing flexibility.

    Purpose–

    The purpose has been diagnosed as to study how the prerequisites of Bombardier’s procurement procedures along with its associated strategies, can affect the flexibility that can

    be provided through sourcing namely sourcing flexibility. This study desires to investigate the concept of sourcing flexibility with considerations on category level. It can be beneficial to investigate how different strategies, related to different categories of procured component, can influence the level of sourcing flexibility specified to that category. This would lead us to two key questions: How can sourcing flexibility be defined in Bombardier and why is it required? How can sourcing strategies influence sourcing flexibility considering different categories of components?

    Methodology–

    To provide appropriate definitions for sourcing flexibility and strategic procurement, this study went through a comprehensive review on the relevant literatures. By a deep analysis, accompanied with several unstructured interviews on one of the undergoing projects in the company, the drivers for the sourcing flexibility have been diagnosed. The procured components have been categorized into four categories of strategic, bottleneck, leverage, and noncritical through 4 different structured quantitative questionnaires. 33 diverse individuals with purchasing and/or engineering background answered those questionnaires. The categorization criteria have been extracted out from two models suggested by Kraljic (1983) and Olsen & Ellram (1997). Four independent components, one from each category, were selected for further observations. Finally, the links between sourcing strategies and sourcing flexibilities were expansively analyzed through 9 semi structured interviews with company’s strategic purchasers and suppliers’ representatives.

    Conclusion–

    Sourcing flexibility can be defined from two perspectives. First one refers to the capability of the focal firm to change the structure of its upstream supply chain. Second aspect refers to the ability of company’s suppliers to provide it with flexibility in three dimensions of delivery, volume and product. Both two aspects along with related dimensions can be measured in three different conditions of required, actual and potential by using range, mobility and uniformity as measuring elements. The results showed that the first perspective has a direct relationship to the sourcing strategies that focal firm may apply for different categories of procured component. Furthermore, the availability of second perspective is highly dependent on the relationship between the focal company and its suppliers, where strategic procurement plays an indispensable role. Based on the results the required level of sourcing flexibility, related to each category, differs significantly with other categories. The findings also suggested that the levels of delivery, volume and product flexibility have a close connection to the diverse strategies and attributes of the four different categories. Additionally they are well dependent on the internal operational capabilities of the suppliers along with the established relationship between buyer and supplier.

    Originality/Value–

    Main portions of previous studies have explored the concepts of sourcing flexibility and strategic procurement separately. Although, there exists some narrow numbers that have analyzed the relationship between sourcing strategies and sourcing flexibility to some limited extent. This study tries to contribute to the existing literature by empirically exploring the principal reasons for companies necessitating to increase sourcing flexibility. It investigates how sourcing flexibility can be improved through strategic procurement. The main contribution is to consider sourcing flexibility from the category perspective. Latter is a subject that has been neglected in the previous literatures. It is extremely hard to find literature which has analyzed sourcing flexibility at the category level. This report analyses the level of sourcing flexibility specified to different categories of strategic, bottleneck, leverage, and noncritical components. It suggests some factors that may influence the

    selection of a specific sourcing flexibility strategy regarding different component categories. Finally, it may introduce some extra elements that can be influential on the level of sourcing flexibility dimensions. Some examples of those influential elements are bargaining power and establishment of a close relationship.

  • 22.
    Botero Marin, Diana Catalina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Orchestrating innovation ecosystems: a case study of a telco wholesaler growing into a global hub for cross-innovation2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Current innovation literature stress the fact that companies seeking to boost their innovation capabilities should open their boundaries and collaborate with partners for bolder and faster value creation. While correct, and in fact frequently practice among several industries, many companies have failed in their attempt to innovate on ecosystem’s settings due mainly to lack of the appropriate management methodologies. Although co-development alliances have become a common practice in the market place, tools and strategies to manage them are quite behind on real execution. Furthermore, companies currently involved in such scenarios have overlook the new conditions of co-creation, failing to yield return over the cost of capital, and losing credibility on their ecosystems. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify practical managerial strategies, process and tools for orchestrating innovation ecosystems in general, and tailored them into real company current practices, in particular.

    In this thesis, a theoretical revision has been carried out in order to understand what innovation ecosystems are, why companies involved in innovation should care about them and what are the essential elements for orchestrating projects breed in that setting, being successful at it. Furthermore, a case study was developed with the purpose of connecting empirical findings to theoretical suggestions, and draw conclusions and recommendations. The company chosen for the analysis is one of the larger international players in their industry; having strong motivations to grow their innovation field, clear objectives to do it on partnership basis, and unquestionable position to claim the role of orchestrator. Moreover, management at this company believed that their innovation partnerships are not fulfilling expectations, and wanted to know how they can improve the way those projects are being managed, while keeping the center of the innovation ecosystem.

    The results show the process to create an orchestration strategy model, and a final proposal for the company under analysis. The case was developed taking into consideration information provided by key processes stakeholders over a series of interviews, and critical observation of the system during a six-month period. Scientific implications contribute in providing a framework for orchestrating innovation ecosystems on a technology-driven industry, while managerial implications contribute in providing the company with a robust model on how to position as a global hub for cross-innovation.          

  • 23.
    Crevani, Lucia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Clearing for Action: Leadership as a Relational Phenomenon2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although leadership is deemed to matter, scholars seldom pay attention to the phenomenon itself, as it is happening. Hence definitions abound, but there is a lack of vocabulary for expressing what leadership is about without ending up talking of individual leaders and/or descriptions of abstract “goodness”. Such an idealised and individualistic construct of leadership has consequences, both in theory and practice, in terms of providing a reductionist account, segregating and putting people in hierarchies, reinforcing the dominance of masculinities, and constraining how leadership is to be performed. Therefore, in order to contribute to our still limited knowledge of leadership beyond ideals and individualised conceptions, the purpose of this thesis is to add to our understanding of leadership as a social phenomenon going on at work and to contribute to developing a vocabulary for it.

    Reading the empirical material more and more closely, produced through an ethnography-inspired approach at two Swedish organisations and consisting of transcripts of interactions and interviews, the initial research question, “how is leadership shared in practice?” is subsequently modified and different strands of theories are applied: shared leadership, postheroic leadership and a radical processual view of leadership. In this way, different understandings of leadership are analysed. As a result, the theoretical concepts of organisational becoming, relational leadership and work practices are combined in an alternative approach. Two leadership practices are thus identified: constructing positions and positioning, and constructing issues. Such an analysis also leads to an alternative way of understanding leadership: leadership as clearing for action. Clearing is both a space, a bounded space, and an action. Therefore it expresses a relational perspective in which there are no stable entities, by suggesting a more dynamic view, at the same time as it also conveys the idea that we are talking about a constrained space.

    I thus define clearing for action as an emergent bounded aggregate of actions and talks that become possible, making others impossible or less probable. Actors and their worlds are constructed in certain ways that expand or contract the space of possible action. The result is a specific reading of leadership to add to the field of leadership studies. In this reading, leadership is an ordinary, repeated, social achievement at work in which possibilities for action and talk are constructed in constrained terms.

     

  • 24.
    Crevani, Lucia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Is there leadership in a fluid world?: The idea of ”Clearing for action” as a possible way of conceptualizing the ongoing production of direction in organizing2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Crevani, Lucia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Leadership, not leaders: Abstract of a study trying a process perspective on leadership2007In: Nordic Academy of Management, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Crevani, Lucia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Leadership or organizing?: Leadership practices in processes of organizational becoming2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Hallin, Anette
    Discourses of gender and inclusion: Using women to make peace sustainable2011In: Nordic Academy of Management conference 2011, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Hallin, Anette
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Narcissistic organization: or business as usual?2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Hallin, Anette
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Entrepreneurship, gender and profession: A research agenda2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Leadership virtues and management knowledge: Questioning the unitary command perspective in leadership research2007In: Moral foundations of management knowledge / [ed] M-L. Djelic & R. Vranceanu, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar , 2007, p. 159-177Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Sustainable Leadership and Management Knowledge:: On collective constructions of leadership2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    We don’t need another hero: Towards the study of leadership as everyday practices2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In all theories of management and organization, leadership has a given central place in enforcing principles, motivating employees and communicating future goals and visions to strive for. Leadership is assumed to make a special, significant and positive contribution to action processes in most organizations, and leadership studies as an academic field has thus been preoccupied with the task of identifying the most successful leadership practices. At the same time, the field of leadership studies has traditionally been leader-centered, i.e. focused on the individual leader and his/hers traits, abilities and actions. Leadership practices have been equated with leaders’ practices, dichotomously separated from those of the ‘others’ in this tradition, the ‘followers’. The aim of this paper is to put forward an alternative perspective, based on the idea that leadership is a natural part of what most people do on an everyday basis in organisations. From this perspective, leadership is a set of social practices organised by people in interaction, practices related to intentional processes of organisational change and development. Empirical data from recent case studies will be used to illustrate the tenets of this alternative perspective

  • 33.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Palm, Kristina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science (closed 20130101).
    Schilling, Annika
    Organising (for)service innovation: formalisation versus creativity2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present and compare two studies on challenges with organising (for) innovation in service-intensive companies. One of the studies reviews the contribution of previous studies to the understanding of managing and organising innovation in service companies. The other is an explorative interview study focusing on how people working in service-intensive organisation in Sweden reason about innovation and the role of co-workers in the innovation process. In both these studies a common and important theme is the potential tension between formalisation and room for creativity. The purpose of this paper is to problematise and discuss this tension between formalised processes and creativity in the context of service-intensive companies. We identify four aspects worth attention in further studies: 1) How can service-intensive companies find a balance between formalisation and room for creativity when organising for innovation?, 2) How does the manufacturing industry influence the service industry in terms of processes, methods and vocabulary related to organising (for) innovation?, 3) How is individual and collective creativity conceptualised and what difference does this have for the organisation (for) innovation in service-intensive firms? and 4) What happens with innovation when the service delivery process is being formalised?

  • 34.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Palm, Kristina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science (closed 20130101).
    Sköld, David
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Utmaningar och kuskapsbehov: Om innovation, ledning och organisering i nio olika tjänsteföretag2009Report (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Shinozaki Lennerfors, Thomas
    Pull yourselves together, old men!: A gendered critique of project managers’ professional ethics in a public sector context2009In: Ephemera : Theory and Politics in Organization, ISSN 2052-1499, E-ISSN 1473-2866, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 113-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Project management is omnipresent, but the growth of project management practices and discourses has suffered – and is still suffering – from a lack of ethical reflection. Moreover, most of the existing literature on project management ethics aims at universality and generalised frameworks. We take a critical stance to such ambitions and draw upon a tradition of thought that relates ethics intrinsically to community practices. We therefore present a rich account of an empirical case, that of the Swedish Road Administration (SRA), where the context –the public sector, the construction industry, the project managers relying on external suppliers – is extremely important in order to understand how ethics is constructed. Drawing on critical perspectives on projects and gender, as well as on feminist ethics, we read the empirical material and show how ethics is constructed in complex and sometimes contradictory and surprising ways. We show how being (or seeming to be) in control becomes a central issue, at the same time as the traditional dichotomy of a masculine ethics versus a feminine ‘ethics of caring’ is problematic as such constructs are fluid and intertwined.

  • 36.
    Cudjoe, Samuel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    How do Companies Reward their Employees2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study is unique considering the location (Africa) and the industrial setting (Gold Mining) from which the research was studied as reward systems had mostly been studied in the North-American and European settings. Thus, the study  considered  rewards from the perspective of the African and its natural resource industries such as the gold mining industry.

     

    The methodology employed in the study was based on a case study approach at Golden Star (Bogoso/Prestea) Limited (GSB/PL) with a population size of 1029 employees combining both qualitative and quantitative data obtained through a questionnaire survey of a 278 sample size and structured interview with the Human Resources and Administration Manager. Thus, the method of data collection represents methodological triangulation and the data obtained from the study represents a primary source of data.

     

    The study revealed that all the three generational groups (Baby Boomers, GEN Xers and   GEN Yers) places higher emphasis or priority on financial incentives (high salary and bonuses) over any other incentives when respondents were asked to indicate the reward they prefer most. But when rewards were considered as a total package profile, greater number of  the baby boomers placed more emphasis or priority on packages with highly flexible pension benefits, long term job security and high internal promotions eventhough the salary and bonus components of the packages (profile) were not that attract. The GEN X and GEN Y groups still maintained their reward package profile preferences based on  high financial incentives, training and learning opportunities, personal growth and career advancement.

     

    The study revealed that aside the high preferences for financial incentives such as high salary and bonuses by all the generational groups, few of the  GEN X and GEN Y also exhibited other preferences such as high personal growth, flexible work schedule, attractive company policy and administration, career advancement, working environment, job security and praises and recognition of which the baby boomers did not indicate any preferences or interest.

     

    The study revealed that all the three generational groups (Baby Boomers, GEN X and GEN Y) consider high salary and bonuses as factor which causes employee dissatisfaction when not satisfied or available but when they are satisfied or available also do not motivate or cause satisfaction and thus  confirming Herzberg Two-Factor theory that  factors such as salary or remuneration, job security, working conditions and company policies  only prevent employee dissatisfaction.

     

    The study revealed that all generational groups (baby boomers, GEN X and GEN Y) consider high salaries and bonuses as factor which could lead to lack of satisfaction and motivation of the employee in his current role or position when not available or satisfied and thus this finding confirm the traditional belief that pay is prime, or in some cases the only source of motivation but contradict Herzberg claim that  pay (high salaries and bonuses) is only an extrinsic factor and that when is available or satisfied, pay does not bring satisfaction and motivation but rather prevents dissatisfaction.

     

    The study revealed that GSB/PL rewards systems basically comprises of extrinsic rewards such as high salary levels (pay increases), a bonus scheme,  training  and learning opportunities, job security, Stock options, Retirement/Pension benefits such as social security and provident fund,  promotions,  attractive company policies and administration, praises and recognition, good working environment, flexible work schedule,  Long service awards and benefits such as housing, Health insurance, Vacation/Annual leave benefits, transportation/bussing service, messing (provision of meals to employees only when at work), and educational benefits (for employees dependants).

     

    The study also revealed that the design and implementation of GSB/PL reward systems involves four distinct phases: assessment, design, execution and evaluation phases.

     

    In the end, a suitable conclusion was drawn and a number of recommendations proposed to be implemented by the mining company in safeguarding the interest of both employees and the employer.

  • 37.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Bengtsson, Lars
    Bessant, John
    Convergence or National Specificity?: Testing the CI Maturity Model across Multiple Countries2007In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 348-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study empirically tests the Continuous Improvement (CI) maturity model across multiple countries. The analysis is based on data from the 2nd International CINet Survey, limited to the situation in Australia, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom. Despite some differences in Continuous Improvement maturity level between countries, findings lend support to the convergence argument. Regardless of national specificity, Continuous Improvement behaviour patterns emerge in a similar fashion, and furthermore, correspond to improved operational performance if adopted. In addition, findings show that other contextual variables such as company size and type of production system are of limited importance. This implies that Continuous Improvement is something that can be implemented and developed successfully if managed properly, irrespective of contextual influences such as those stemming from cultural and industrial factors.

  • 38.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Bengtsson, Lars
    von Haartman, Robin
    Åhlström, Pär
    Supplier selection or collaboration?: Determining factors of performance improvement when outsourcing manufacturing2009In: Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management, ISSN 1478-4092, E-ISSN 1873-6505, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 143-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An empirical study was designed to determine factors of performance improvement when outsourcing manufacturing. Findings from a survey of 136 manufacturing plants in Sweden show that most of them achieve their outsourcing motives, but not without trade-offs. Factors of performance improvements such as economies of scale or operations in low-cost countries can improve one performance dimension, such as product cost, yet negatively impact volume flexibility, speed or product innovation. The results show part characteristics and supplier operating capabilities are more important than supplier relationship strategies when outsourcing manufacturing, meaning that supplier selection trumps supplier collaboration in the make-or-buy decision.

  • 39.
    Damrath, Felix
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Increasing competitiveness of service companies: developing conceptual models for implementing Lean Management in service companies2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Lean management is a philosophy focused on identifying and eliminating waste throughout a product’s entire value stream. It originates from the manufacturing system of Japanese automotive manufacturer Toyota and attracted due to its tremendous success widespread attention worldwide. Lean promises significant benefits in terms of waste reduction, and increased organizational and supply chain communication and integration.Generally, in terms of operations and improvements service companies are far behind manufacturing industries. Transferring Lean management concept from the manufacturing shop floor to services might offer opportunities for improvements. Many manufacturing businesses have improved and profited by the use of Lean management methods and tools. Yet the benefits haven’t been as nearly as impressive for service industries applying Lean management principles.The challenge in applying Lean to services is the lack of widely available references for implementing Lean in a service organization. Although some successful examples of Lean implementations in service businesses could be noticed in the past no standardized framework or general guideline was solidified for implementing Lean management in service organizations. In addition, implementing Lean and achieving the levels of organizational commitment, employee autonomy, and information transparency needed to ensure its success is a complicated task.This paper approaches to develop a conceptual framework for implementing Lean management in service organizations. Based on a sound theoretical foundation of Lean management methods in production and considerations about service management, challenges of implementing Lean in a service environment are derived. Ultimately, a conceptual framework is developed to implement Lean management approach in service businesses using a specific set of Lean tools.

  • 40.
    Dymek, Mikolaj
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Content strategies of the future: Between games and Stories - Crossroads for the video game industry2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The video game industry is the combination of two worlds: technology (IT) and show-biz/media/cultural industries. This paper explores this tension by exposing the shortcomings of the culture economics perspective and its lack of understanding for the unique characteristics of the video game medium, thus subsequently proposing a deeper analysis of the medium by turning to literary theoretical perspectives on games, such as ludology and narratology. Due the lack of technological dimensions in its theoretical framework, narratology is deemed less fruitful as an analytical tool and ludology is preferred. Ludology, with Espen Aarseth's cybertext theory elucidates aspects of "interactivity ", author-medium-reader power relations and the mechanical organization of textual machines, which provides perspectives on practice in the video game industry.

  • 41.
    Dymek, Mikolaj
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Industrial Phantasmagoria: Subcultural Interactive Cinema Meets Mass-Cultural Media of Simulation2010Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The video game industry has in three decades gone from a garage hobby to a global multi-billion euro media industry that challenges the significantly older and established cultural industries. After decades of explosive growth the industry surprisingly finds itself in a crisis – in terms of sales, future trajectories and creative paradigms. The global gaming culture receives substantial attention from society, media and academia – but the industry itself appears in comparison as an enigmatic terra incognita with astonishingly little dedicated research. This thesis aims to amend this situation by presenting a study at the cross-section of the video game industry, game studies, literary theory, cultural industries and business studies. It deals with the following question: how does the global game industry relate to its own product, in terms of communication and media dimensions, and what are the (business) consequences, in terms of production, strategy and commercial/creative innovation, of this relationship?

    This study’s departure point is constituted by a comprehensive description of the industry’s structure, dynamics and processes, based on extensive interviews with industry professionals. It is followed by an examination and comparison of the game industry with other media/cultural industries in relation to their economy and business dynamics. With inconclusive answers regarding the medium-industry relation, this study proceeds by exploring literary theories from the field of game studies, in order to gain insights into the dynamics of medium and industry. Literary theories from ludology and narratology provide rewarding perspectives on this inquiry, since it is found that the ontological dichotomy of simulation vs. respresentation present in the interpretational realm of the game medium is also reflected in the industry and its dynamics. This has pivotal consequences for the analysis of the game industry.

    This study concludes by positing the current critical condition of the industry as an extremely decisive moment in its history: will it become a truly universal mass-medium, or will it continue down its subcultural path? Subcultural “interactive cinema” meets mass-cultural media of simulation – how will the industry evolve?

  • 42.
    Dymek, Mikolaj
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Lennerfors, Thomas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Among pasta-loving mafiosos, drug-selling Columbians and noodle-eating triads: Race, humour and interactive ethics in Grand Theft Auto III2005In: Proceedings of DiGRA 2005 Conference: Changing Views - Worlds in Play, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the intersection of race, humour and interactivity in Grand Theft Auto 3. We argue that video games not only diffuse cultural and symbolic meanings, but also provide new loci for reflection and critique of issues of inter alia race. Two different analytical perspectives are juxtaposed when studying racial issues of GTA3. The first perspective is Critical Race Theory (CRT). The second perspective derives from the phthonic and incongruity theory of humour (Morreall 1986). We will argue that the CRT perspective is consistent with the phthonic theory of humour, while the incongruity theory goes beyond CRT presenting a novel way of interpreting games. This theoretical framework is applied when analysing the controversial game GTA3. By presenting stereotypical images of race in GTA3 as humorous, the player is provided with cues for reflecting and evaluating his/her own perspectives on issues of race.

  • 43.
    Engwall, Mats
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Forslin, Jan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Kaulio, Matti
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Engineering Management for Integration2003In: Proceedings of the ICED´03 International Conference on Engineering Design, Stockholm, Sweden August 19-21, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Fekadu, Abel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Managing supply risks in uncertain market conditions – case studies of companies within the Swedish manufacturing industry2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The application of purchasing theories such as global sourcing, single sourcing or JIT have caused an increased complexity and have given rise to supply risk for organisations within the manufacturing industry. The uncertain market conditions caused by global financial crisis in 2008-2009 led to an unpredictable demand among costumers and weaker financial stability among supplier organisations which substantial influence on manufacturing industry. The new market conditions had given rise to additional factors that had to be taken into consideration when securing supply i.e. given rise to new aspects of supply risks. These new market oriented risk factors required the manufacturing firms to adjust and develop their supply risk management to combat the heightened risk potential. Due to the fact that research in the area of supply risk management was new explained why there was a certain theoretical gap concerning how manufacturing companies have developed their tool and practises. The purpose of the master thesis was to study how have different corporations in the manufacturing sector had managed and adapted their supply risk activities in response to the recent changes in market conditions caused by the fluctuating economy.Theories used to support the study were concepts regarding portfolio management, particularly the Kraljic matrix. Secondly concepts such as supply risk and general risk management theories were used. The theories led to the creation of a research model which was used for an empirical study.The method used to fulfil the purpose were case studies of several companies which were done on a qualitative basis. In order to collect essential empirical data, four manufacturing firms’ representing different markets segments were interviewed.The result of the study showed that manufacturing firms had responded to the impact that the escalated supply risks had created. The overall improvement in attentiveness to the issue had resulted in the establishment of new, and the development of current tools and practises. A specific attribute that had seen changes was the improved buyer-supplier relationship that had been beneficial to diminish the supply risk. Furthermore, the fluctuating prices on raw material and the financial situation of key suppliers had grown in significance and were assessed moreIIcomprehensively. In the end, it would prove more conducive if the measures applied by manufacturing companies were codified and were implemented in a systematically constructed process.

  • 45.
    Flyman, Elin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Nilsson, Christina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Facilitating control in growing organizations: A study of new requirements on systematization2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Organizational growth poses new challenges for top management. In small organizations, coordination and communication is spontaneous and require little structure to be efficient. However, as the organization grows, the increased number of individuals requires a larger amount of coordination and communication.

    In this study, our purpose is to increase understanding of why growing companies are experiencing challenges with coordination as well as to increase organizational control. To fulfill this, we study one organization in particular. In order to find a sustainable solution, we investigate why these challenges are experienced. We argue that addressing the underlying causes for experiencing these challenges is the most effective solution in the way that it ensures that the same challenges do not recur. Therefore, the relationship between the challenges that are articulated by the organization and the underlying causes for the challenges is central to our study.

    Our study shows that our object of study would benefit from an increased internal focus to enable for long-term growth. This finding supports several existing models for organizational growth. Our object of study currently employs few systematized internal processes and is in need of further systematization with regards to several aspects, such as strategy development and implementation and organizational control. Our study further shows that a lack of systematization on a managerial level leads to ambiguities that are translated to the operational level. This explains the discrepancies between the challenges that are expressed by the organization and their underlying causes.

  • 46.
    Ford, Jackie
    et al.
    Bradford University School of Management.
    Cunliffe, Ann L
    Anderson School of Management, University of New Mexico.
    Raelin, Joseph A
    Northeastern University .
    Crevani, Lucia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Harding, Nancy
    Bradford University School of Management.
    Critical approaches to leadership learning and development2012In: CMS Division Showcase Symposion, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Countless managers in the USA, UK and other countries are embarking on leadership learning and development activities to support their roles and identities as leaders (Day, 2011; Storey, 2011).  There is a belief that the deluge of publications and the investment in leadership development will create managers with the skills and characters of leaders, capable of guiding organizations through the crises of the 21st century global market. Such learning and development programs frequently espouse the value of dominant discourses such as transformational leadership, with its ‘heroic’ assumptions that romanticize individual leaders and underestimate the significance of context and relationships. Furthermore, they often neglect critical engagement with the complex conditions, processes and consequences of leadership dynamics in contemporary organizations. Recently, critical (and especially poststructural) approaches to researching and conceptualizing leadership have emerged, which although still being outnumbered by mainstream accounts (Ford, 2006; Ford, Harding and Learmonth, 2008; Jackson and Parry, 2011), are increasingly influential. However, discourses emerging from the more critical approaches have not yet had time to be absorbed into leadership learning and development activities. This symposium brings together critical leadership theorists who will explore ways of changing leadership pedagogy.

  • 47.
    Freilich, Jonatan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Drug R&D Management: Practitioners' Challenges and Knowledge Needs2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    R&D productivity in the pharmaceutical business has gradually decreased during the last decades. While companies are spending more on R&D, fewer drugs are reaching the market. It is said that the cost of bringing a successful drug to the market is now $1 billion, which includes all failure drugs. At the same time, governmental regulations for drugs development have become tighter. Companies are therefore desperately trying to find new ways to develop more innovative drugs more effectively. There is a growing need for more knowledge about Drug R&D Management in the industry, which is the reason for KTH Industrial Economics and Management initiating a research program in this field. The present study is a feasibility study of this research endeavor. It outlines the scope of the field and explores areas for further study. Anchored in interviews with key industrial actors, the aim is to identify which organizational challenges practitioners are presently facing for successful drug R&D management. Four themes of challenges within the business have been identified. These are: Specialization within the R&D Process – There is a trend that different actors specialize within the innovation process of developing new drugs. The concept is to source activities to organizations that have the best capabilities. What are the consequences of this business model? What is the core competence of different actors? Balancing Freedom and Control in R&D Operations – R&D by definition, comprises activities with unknown outcomes. Work in projects most probably takes trajectories that were not originally thought of. Typically the most suitable individuals for performing such activities are scientists with a deep specialization within the field of research. How are freedom and control of work balanced within R&D? What type of control is most suitable? How can scientists be managed? Resource Allocation and Project Portfolio Management – Projects in a project portfolio are dependent on each other and on their environment. The ecology in which a project lives will determine how it is evaluated and financed, and how risk-willing its owners are. There is a need of knowledge to describe how different project environments are organized. Organizing for Knowledge Exchange – Knowledge in biosciences is growing exponentially. Managing knowledge is therefore crucial, but how to do it successfully is the question. Working in big collaborative networks requires companies to manage knowledge outside the boundaries of the firm. There is also a need to bring in knowledge from other industries. The themes can encompass different theoretical disciplines - from a strategic point of view to a cognitive aspect of innovation. This study argues for a comparative multiple case study approach focusing on the preconditions and business logics of different R&D organizations. The cases should look into the different organizational domains of Biotech firms and Big Pharma multinationals, comparing the two business logics and strategies. Innovation in the context of single firms in the pharmaceutical industry can thus be explored and give rise to knowledge through examples of practical problem solving and methodology in drug R&D management.

  • 48.
    Gramenius, Jakob
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Aniander, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Blomgren, Henrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Business Development and Entrepreneurship (Closed 20130101).
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Karlson, Bo
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Wikander, Sten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Praktikfallet Rydab1999Book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Gustafsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Åbo Akademi University.
    Karrbom, Tina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Lillhannus, Ruth
    Åbo Akademi University.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Wikström, Kim
    Åbo Akademi University.
    Fields of Mud: Some Notes on Mass Participant Observation2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Görling, Stefan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Samarbete utan gemensamma mål: Att styra och stimulera innovation2010Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, three of the four largest institutional research funders have the explicit goal to not only support research but also to stimulate economic growth. How this should be done in practice, however, is more uncertain. Often used theories, e.g. triple helix, national innovation systems and clusters, are all based on the notion that different skills and organizations should be combined in dynamic partnerships in order to shorten the time from research to application.

    In this dissertation, I present how an R&D program with the requirement to both produce valuable research results and to stimulate innovation was put into practice. The program is explored from multiple levels of analysis. Based on the case, it is showed how innovation policy acts as an organizing force on its environment and that it affects the organization of R&D activities. This dissertation identifies problems that arise and investigates how the process can be improved in order to meet the objectives of stimulating innovation and growth.

    By applying the ideas of Serres and Luhmann, using the term innovation in these instances can be regarded as a form of parasite, which affects the system as such. I argue that this can be a fruitful way of conceptualizing how we can strive to manage closed systems that are otherwise challenging to govern. We can develop the debate on how to stimulate innovation by shifting the perspective from a sequential top-down process in which policy is being implemented to have a planned effect (and where any deviation constitutes an unsuccessful implementation), to discuss how we can disrupt a system in a particular direction.

    Based on the empirical data, I explore and analyze a number of identified events that will be rewarding for professionals working with similar efforts or are planning further research in this area. Among other things, it is demonstrated how a process perspective can be a rewarding way to study not only structural aspects but also seize the dynamics of the system. I demonstrate that this perspective better allows us to understand which aspects are important for stimulating innovation.

    The dissertation further discusses the concept of dual technologies, intellectual property, applied research and the conflict between different levels of innovation.

     

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