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  • 1.
    ALIN, SIMON
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    RYBO, FRIDA
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Naturtoalett2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Manure and human urine has a similar mixture of NPK, short for nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium, but only a small fraction of the urine in the toilets is utilized today. A problem is the nitrogen that is released when urine is drying, which creates ammonia that leads to bad smells.The Swedish Agriculture University has found a solution to this, a chemical process where the nitrogen is tied.

    In almost every toilet, urine and faeces are mixed and in many toilets waste is transported with huge amounts of water which needs an energy-consuming treatment plant. Harvest Moon has taken use of the chemical process of the Swedish Agriculture University and developed a dehydration unit that transforms urine to manure. The company has given the task to use their dehydration unit and develop an independent public toilet that does not need electricity or a water supply and has a small environmental impact.

    To define the market needs, renters of portable toilets and their customers were interviewed. This gave the insight that transportation of the portable toilets is an issue for technically advanced products. However, national parks and other natural sites usually has permanent installations without electricity or water supply, which suits the project better. Today, national parks often use composting toilets which are not able to compost the waste when there is a big amount of visitors. That leads to bad smells and the need of frequent service. A white space was found on the market for a toilet that is capable of handling many visitors but which does not rely on a well developed infrastructure and has a small environmental impact.

    To make use of the nutrition, urine and faeces needs to be separated. On existing toilets, this is solved by letting the toilet have an urine bowl in the front of the toilet. Interviews with toilet operators at National Parks showed that the existing urine separating devices rarely works in public toilets because paper and other litter is placed in the urine bowl, which prevents the urine flow and the bowl overflows. In addition to this problem, other options regarding flushing, containers for faeces, preventing urine in the faeces container and leading urine were investigated.

    To divide the urine, a vertical grid underneath the front of the toilet seat is used. It works as a splash protector and collects urine. Neither paper or faeces hits the grid thanks to its position. To prevent visitors to stand up and pee into the faeces, a gap that moves when the visitors are sitting down was discussed. That idea was rejected and instead a urinal was placed on the back of the house and signs that explains the positive environmental effects of using the toilet the proper way were placed on the wall. How this will be work out in reality have not been tried out, but considering that many visitors want to take care of the nature, which has been been confirmed by national park managers, it is considered a reasonable solution.

    The dehydration is driven by solar panels and the urine is dehydrated in scalable filter cassettes.The environmental impact of the product has not been quantified but the fact that the product is able to work without electricity or water supply and that NPK is circulated are good prerequisites for a small environmental impact.

  • 2.
    Andersen, Filip
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Lagergren, Pontus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Compliance i verkligheten: En fallstudie av ÅF PRS2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Antalet miljödirektiv fortsätter att öka och de befintliga kompletteras regelbundet med nya krav och regler. ÅF har tillsammans med industrin och dess leverantörer utvecklat ett verktyg, ÅF PRS, för att handskas med de problem direktiven skapar för företagen. Syftet med detta arbete var att identifiera företags nuvarande processer för hantering av direktiven REACH, RoHS och ErP och föreslå förbättringar av PRS i linje med det som identifierats.

    10 företag valdes ut baserat på omsättning och antalet anställda. Ett krav var att de skulle vara verksamma på den svenska marknaden. Bland företagen återfanns både sådana verksamma inom industrin och detaljhandeln. Metoden som valdes för arbetet var kvalitativa intervjuer av ansvariga inom miljöområdet.

    PRS, Product Regulatory Support, är ett webbaserat verktyg för företag att samla in information från sina leverantörer. Det hjälper företagen genom att automatisera insamlingen av information och möjliggör för företagen att snabbt få överblick om dess produkter är compliant – uppfyller lagar och regler.

    Studien visade att företag inom detaljhandeln kommit längre i sitt arbete med complaince än de inom industrin. Detaljhandelsföretagen menade att de kommit långt i sitt arbete och att de flesta av de produkter de sålde uppfyllde de olika direktiven. Bland industriföretagen var processen att implementera miljöarbetet i organisationen mycket olika långt gånget. Det fanns exempel på dem som precis startat men även ett som ansåg sig ha full information om alla sina inköpta artiklar.

    Analysen av det insamlade materialet visade tydligt att ÅF PRS fyller ett syfte på marknaden. Intervjuerna visade dock att verktyget kunde utvecklas ytterligare för att bemöta de olika företagens behov och företagsstrukturer. 

  • 3.
    Broms, Loove
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Storyforming: Experiments in creating discursive engagements between people, things and environments2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis introduces and critically reflects on a design programme, Storyforming, that explores ways to design objects and places to enrich daily life narratives. Using an experimental design approach, the goal is to exemplify and explore this idea with discursive artefacts that, through their physical and temporal form, act as catalysts in the construction of meaningful experiences.

    In the current sustainability discourse, behavioural change has been pointed out as a key factor in achieving a sustainable society. Historically, design has been very effective in increasing production and consumption behaviours by creating new types of needs and, in a way, manufacturing desire (Forty, 1986). Drawing on this, the overarching aim of this thesis is the investigation of the ways design, through a suggested programme, can afford alternative types of meaningful experiences in contrast to the prevailing consumer culture.

    The empirical work reported in the thesis stems from several research projects looking into the matter of energy use in relation to design. In addition, two of the projects have been carried out in the author’s own design practice. Some concepts are explored more in-depth—involving events such as field studies, situated interviews, workshops, prototype building, design interventions in the form of domestication probes, and contextual studies ranging from a few weeks up to a year—while other concepts exist only as sketches or photo montages. The diversity of these concepts, the design experiments, helps span a design space becoming a new provisional design programme. The idea for this programme has evolved from observations and reflections made throughout the experiments presented in the thesis.

    The general results are the suggested approach of Storyforming, which focuses on the design of artefacts supporting daily narratives that can be used to create engagement, meaning, and alternative values applicable to the discourse of sustainable behaviour.

    Specific contributions are the selection of design experiments. In the thesis, the experiments have first been examined from the perspective of stories and forming as a basis for the new programme formulation. Through this articulation of the programme, the experiments are revisited through three leitmotifs, part of the provisional programme focusing on different properties related to the aspect of forming. From the perspective of the user, these themes—seeing and accessing designs, exploring and expressing complexity, and sharing experiences and negotiating use—are finally elaborated on in relation to other theoretical concepts as well as their implications for future research.

  • 4.
    Broms, Loove
    et al.
    Interactive Institute.
    Bång, Magnus
    Interactive Institute.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Persuasive Engagement: Exploiting Lifestyle as a Driving Force to Promote Energy-aware Use Patterns and Behaviours2009In: Undisciplined! Proceedings of the Design Research Society Conference 2008, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electricity consumption has been rising significantly in the western world the last decades and this has affected the environment negatively. Efficient use and more energy conservative usage patterns could be ways to approach this problem. However, electricity has for a long time actively been hidden away and it is rarely thought of unless it ceases to exist. From the perspective of critical design, we have been working to find methods to visualise electricity and electricity consumption in everyday life to promote environmentally positive behavioural change. In this paper, we are looking at how aspects of lifestyles can be used in design as central driving forces that could lead to changed behaviour. Attempts to promote behavioural changes related to energy consumption might be successfully carried out when people are offered desirable alternatives that are engaging and that do not impose a perceived extra burden in their everyday life. This argument is exemplified through two design concepts, the AWARE Laundry Lamp and the Energy Plant, which are examples on how to increase people’s energy awareness and offer them means for reducing their energy consumption in the home. Both prototypes are inspired by current trends in lifestyle as well as actual observed user behaviour.

  • 5.
    Broms, Loove
    et al.
    Interactive Institute.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Bång, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    The Energy AWARE Clock: Incorporating Electricity Use in the Social Interactions of Everyday Life2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New interfaces to the energy system can facilitate changes of habits and provide means to control the household’s use of energy. In this paper, we look at energy use and such interfaces in the home from a socio- technical perspective. We describe how interviews and user observations can be used in combination with the theory of domestication to inform and inspire the design of interfaces to the energy system. As a result of our approach, we present the Energy AWARE Clock, an example of a new type of electricity meter that challenges the norm of how the electricity system is typically represented in the home. The Energy AWARE Clock makes use of a clock metaphor to visualise electricity-use in relation to time in everyday life. Energy-awareness products always challenge domestic social patterns and it is important to consider these aspects in the design process to find successful solutions for the future. 

  • 6.
    Broms, Loove
    et al.
    Interactive Intstitute.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    Interactive Institute.
    Bång, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    Nyblom, Åsa
    Interactive Institute.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Coffee Maker Patterns and the Design of Energy Feedback Artefacts2010In: DIS '10 Proceedings of the 8th ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, 2010, p. 93-102Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Smart electricity meters and home displays are being installed in people’s homes with the assumption that households will make the necessary efforts to reduce their electricity consumption. However, present solutions do not sufficiently account for the social implications of design. There is a potential for greater savings if we can better understand how such designs affect behaviour. In this paper, we describe our design of an energy awareness artefact – the Energy AWARE Clock – and discuss it in relation to behavioural processes in the home. A user study is carried out to study the deployment of the prototype in real domestic contexts for three months. Results indicate that the Energy AWARE Clock played a significant role in drawing households’ attention to their electricity use. It became a natural part of the household and conceptions of electricity became naturalized into informants’ everyday language.

  • 7.
    Broms, Loove
    et al.
    Interactive Institute.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    Interactive Institute.
    Bång, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    Nyblom, Åsa
    Interactive Institute.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Days in the life of the Energy Aware Clock2011In: Design Research Journal, ISSN 2000-639X, E-ISSN 2000-3080, no 1, p. 30-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a potential for greater electricity savings if we can better understand how design affects behaviour. This paper describes om design of an energy awareness artefact - the Energy AWARE Clock- and discusses it in relation to behavioural processes in the home. The Energy AWARE Clock showed to play a significant role in drawing households' attention to their electricity use. It became a natural part of the household and conceptions of electricity became natmalized into informants' everyday language.

  • 8. Börjesson, E.
    et al.
    Isaksson, A.
    Ilstedt, S.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Ehrnberger, K.
    KTH.
    Visualizing gender-norm-critical design and innovation2016In: Research Handbook on Gender and Innovation, Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd. , 2016, p. 252-273Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    DE GEER, DANIEL
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    LAVRELL, MIKAELA
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    AR-glasögon för personer med kognitiva svårigheter2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Dementia is a collective name for brain damage that affects the brain's function of processing information and knowledge. Today, there are about 160 000 people with dementia in Sweden and even when possible means are many, they are insufficient in their support. The purpose of this project was to develop a hardware that would be adapted to an Augmented Reality (AR) aid for people with dementia to provide the conditions for a more independent life, and increase physical and mental well-being. The AR aid is developed by memoARand is supposed to provide support in everyday life through navigation, face recognition, reminders, action, cooking and conversation. By adapting existing knowledge in dementia and AR technology, the aid would be effectively integrated into a product in the form of Augmented Reality glasses. As preliminary work, literature studies, questionnaires, medical reports and lectures that examined dementia have been investigated and common problem areas identified. Meetings with the Dementia Association have also been made to get a first-hand perspective on the practical measures that are being used today and how they affect the everyday lives of a person with dementia.

    The technical part of the work has been investigated by making a “State of the art” where existing models have been studied, from which both the recurring components present in all the products that are needed for the technology to work properly, to the components with technical purpose specific to different attributes.

    Typical of dementia diseases is impairment of memory, language, perception of time and orientation, but research showed that support for orientation would have the greatest impact both physically and mentally and was therefore the function that became the main focus of the project. User friendliness and discretion were very important to the target group, which was the basis for the evaluations of the technology.

    This resulted in three concepts that could then be combined into a conceptual selection, tailored to the needs of the target group. The final concept was a pair of glasses with an intuitive user interface in the form of voice control and simple buttons and a discrete design that provides sight correction and bypasses some hearing deficiencies.

  • 10.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    TILLBLIVELSER: En trasslig berättelse om design som normkritisk praktik2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing awareness of norm-critical perspectives (in society, academia and industry) brings with it the need to develop methods to ensure they can be implemented in practice. This thesis discusses how the role of design contributes to and maintains norms, and shows how design as a norm critical practice has great potential to bridge the gap between theory and practice in norm-critical work. This potential lies in using design as a peda-gogic tool that can concretize and make understandable what would otherwise be perceived as complex, unclear or remote. The thesis pays special attention to the role of artefacts in the creation of the stories of the world. The discursive design thing is introduced as a tool to visualize norms and to create discussion. The three-dimensional, physical thing exposes us to a more diverse experience of norms than when we just address them in words or pictures.The empirical work in this thesis stems from five research projects that differ from each other and were carried out under varied conditions. The projects have tackled a range of problems and power relationships. However, together they draw a complex picture of how norms arise, overlap and constantly change over time, place and space – and how design can be used to support or disrupt this process.By revisiting the projects, it becomes clear how the researcher’s position and actions (or non-actions) shape the norm development process. This results in an insight that meaning can not be construc-ted from an outside perspective, but is a constant ”becoming” that occurs in an entanglement of relationships arising between different bodies, both human and non-human. As a norm critical perspective implies paying attention to power relationships, it also assumes a power critical approach to the production of meaning extracted from the norm-critical work, and that we – as researchers and designers – take responsibility for our prevail by highlighting our own bodies and gaze.The thesis therefore proposes the concept of diffraction as an approach to the production of meaning in norm critical design practices. A diffractive approach enables an understanding of how the production of meaning occurs in various coincidences, but also how our own interventions shape the story. It opens up to the realization that parallel narratives are possible and thus becomes a tool to break away from the linear understanding framework and offer an exploration of alternative thought patterns. A diffractive approach to the production of meaning is thus also a tool to pro-mote increased creativity.

  • 11.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Broms, Loove
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. Interactive Institute.
    Becoming the Energy AWARE Clock: Revisiting the Design Process Through a Feminist Gaze2013In: Experiments in Design Research / [ed] Eva Brandt, Pelle Ehn, Troels Degn Johansson, Maria Hellström Reimer, Thomas Markussen, Anna Vallgårda, Köpenhamn: The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools Architecture, Design and Conservation , 2013, p. 258-266Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the border between technology and design (form giving) from a feminist perspective. Looking at the energy system and how it has been integrated in the household, we want to address the underlying structures that have been built into the ecology of electrical appliances used in daily life, preserving certain norms that could be questioned from both a gender and a sustainability perspective. We have created an alternative electricity meter, the Energy AWARE Clock, addressing design issues uncovered in an initial field study. In this paper, we will make parallels to these issues. We also use feminist technoscience studies scholar Donna Haraway’s theory of the cyborg in order to clarify useful concepts that can be derived from feminist theory and that can act as important tools for designers engaged in creative processes. From our own experience with the Energy AWARE Clock this approach has great potential for questioning and rethinking present norms within sustainability and gender, from the viewpoints of design research and design practice.

  • 12.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Räsänen, Minna
    Södertörns Högskola.
    Börjesson, Emma
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Hertz, Anne- Christine
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Sundbom, Cristine
    Konstfack.
    The Androchair: Performing Gynaecology through the Practice of Gender Critical Design2017In: The Design Journal, ISSN 1460-6965, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper highlights the important role that design plays when it comes to women’s overall experi- ences of ther gynaecological examination. It exempli es how the examination can become renegotiable through the practice of a critical design. We will re ect this in the design of the contemporary gynaecological examination chair (GEC). We used women’s experiences as a starting point for the design of an Androchair (a conceptual male equivalent of the GEC), in order to make the experiences critically visible. Inspired by the view of the gynaecolog- ical examination as a performance where the Androchair is represented as a prop and was placed on a stage as a discussion object during a public seminar. The Androchair allowed for both critical and multiple readings of the GEC and through that, the gynaecology examination at large. Moreover, it stimulated a discussion about alternative ideas towards achieving a more positive experience. 

  • 13.
    EKSTRÖM, MARCUS
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    NIEMI, DANIEL
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Moonisic2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This bachelor thesis is conducted in Technical design at Royal Institute of Technology in cooperation with a company called Mooni International. The assignment was to make a speaker combined with lantern that fits their product range while challenges their design and is directed to an alternative target group. Their current product is rather big and our vision was to develop a smaller product with thesame technical components and features. Our target group came to be younger than their current andhave an active lifestyle where they often spend time in a park or on adventure. Our goal was topackage what Mooni have already done in a small and portable format without compromising on their quality regarding light and sound.

    The project started out with market analysis, interviews and discussions with multiple different people.During the market analysis we got the impression that it was not many products that had light and sound combined. The focus in this project was to explore as many shapes and solutions as possible to find the best way to package their technology and experience as effectively as possible. Through sketches, prototypes and 3D models we generated three different concepts. Of them three there was one who stood out a little bit more, our concept “TriCircle”. It was the smallest of them all with the possibility to be very simple to handle and with an interesting design. The design was inspired by simple geometrical shapes that merged together in a compact and beautiful package.

    To develop the concept further we have looked at different aspects of the products. We have made meticulous research in the handling of the products and how it have to be designed to make it into production. A complete cost analysis has been made were it meets a satisfying level together with an informative and smart packaging.

    The final product is a good result seen to the assignment; It’s compact, versatile, easy to handle and have all of the core features that is now used in the bigger Mooni products. It’s an attractive calculated manufacturing price of 75.51 SEK that makes it possible to market it out to consumers in a very goodprice point. “TriCircle” have the possibility to make an impact and be seen on many picnic blankets ahead.

  • 14.
    HAMMALRUND, LOVISA
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    INGVALDSDÓTTIR, EMBLA
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Pyro2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the project is to further develop the construction of the 5 Minute Pyramid Test, 5MPT, which is a test for measuring maximum rate of oxygen uptake, VO2max. The existing construction of the 5MPT does not meet the requirements for mobility, stability and safety nor is it user-friendly enough to be able to reach its potential to become the new standard test to measure VO2max.

    A pilot study was conducted containing a State of the art analysis as well as a study of the users of the test. The problem was divided into sub-areas, further developed into sub-systems where solutions were generated within each area. Concepts were compared and evaluated against a requirement specification. The different solutions for each subsystem were also compared and evaluated. After variations of design and structure, feedback from users and a solid verification through production of prototypes, the final choices together form the final concept.

    The project resulted in a simple and minimalist construction called Pyro. The focus is on user-friendliness for both the test subject as well as the leader of the test. Other important aspects of the product development have been to increase its mobility, security and stability. This has been achieved through stable construction solutions, applying a vaulting box wheel construction for mobility and through careful selections of material and color.

  • 15.
    Hasselqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hesselgren, Mia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Bridging citizen and stakeholder perspectives of sustainable mobility through practice-oriented designManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Transitions toward more sustainable mobility are necessary and involve changes in complex constellations of mobility-related practices. To understand opportunities for moving in this direction, there is a need to explore both the consumption side of sustainable mobility practices and the perspective of stakeholders that provide products, services, infrastructures, and policies required for such practices. This article contributes to a discussion of critical aspects of sustainable mobility practices in relation to the responsibilities and concerns of stakeholders with power to influence these practices. We present four sets of design concepts for supporting car-free living which were formulated and co-created based on a practice-oriented analysis of a one-year study of three families in Stockholm, Sweden that replaced their cars with light electric vehicles. The design concepts bring forward elements of sustainable mobility with a focus on: trying out new mobility practices, cycling infrastructure, child-friendly public transport, and transporting stuff. Furthermore, we discussed the concepts with public and private sector stakeholders and examined their interests in particular practices. Also considered are how the responsibilities of different stakeholders may clash. Finally, we suggest that practice-oriented design concepts can support discussions and increased knowledge about responsibilities and potential conflicts related to sustainable practices, as well as provide means for supporting learning about sustainable practices among decision makers.

  • 16.
    Hasselqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Hesselgren, Mia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Bogdan, Christian
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Challenging the Car Norm: Opportunitites for ICT to Support Sustainable Transportation Practices2016In: CHI '16 Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM Digital Library, 2016, p. 1300-1311Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of practices as a unit of analysis has been suggested in order to scale up efforts within sustainable HCI and to shift the focus from changing individual behaviours to supporting transitions at a societal level. In this paper, we take a practice approach to the case of sustainable transportation, and more specifically to car-free transportation. Car use is intertwined in many practices and managing life without a car is difficult, particularly for people in contexts where owning at least one car per family is the norm. We studied three families in Stockholm who replaced their cars with different combinations of light electric vehicles during one year. From the families' experiences, we identified a number of opportunities for designers of interactive technologies to support environmental pioneers in the particular case of car-free living, as well as to support transitions towards sustainable practices in general.

  • 17.
    Hesselgren, Mia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Hasselqvist, Hanna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Giving car-free life a try: Designing seeds for changed practices2016In: Proceedings of DRS 2016, Design Research Society 50th Anniversary Conference. Brighton, UK, 27–30 June 2016., Design Research Society, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For sustainable practices to emerge, they have to be tried out. In the design intervention A Car-free Year, we studied the particularities of three families’ changed practices. With a collaborative mind-set, the practices’ constituting elements were analysed, and their intertwined links followed, forming possible design concepts. When designing these seeds for changed practices, we have found, through the knowledge gained from the participants’ different perspectives, possibilities to design initiatives that could enable more people to live car-free. We believe that designing enabling ecosystems, where all types of elements encourage sustainable practices, can be an important role of sustainable design. Furthermore, design research can challenge existing societal norms, as clearly revealed in this project, and consequently inspire more people to make sustainable lifestyle choices.

  • 18.
    Hesselgren, Mia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Hasselqvist, Hanna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    A Car-free Year: Providing vehicles for change2015In: Design Ecologies: Challenging anthropocentrism in the design of sustainable futures, Nordes , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes an interventionist design research project called a Car-free Year, where three families substitute their cars for a fleet of light electric vehicles during one year. The aim is to study how this intervention changes the families’ everyday practices, as well as suggest how design can support and sustain such a change on a larger scale. If radically new paradigms are to be shaped, changes are needed both in what is considered normalities and in people’s everyday practices. We argue that design can play an important role in the transition towards more sustainable futures and new normalities.

  • 19.
    HÄLLJE, ARVID
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    OLIN, ANTON JOHNNER
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Trangia Iris2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    At present, Trangia is the only large company that develops and produces outdoor stoves driven by a spirit burner. The spirit burner comes with a product meant for regulating the flame, which is suffering several failings, mainly being troublesome and risky to handle. For this reason the goal with this project is to develop a new product for regulating the existing spirit burner.Trangia is selling more spirit-driven stoves than gas driven ones and are practically alone on that market. This implies that it potentially would be favourable to develop a product that improves the experience of using spirit driven outdoor stoves.

    This project has mainly been carried out through own studies but also along Trangias guidelines and wishes. With the use of well known methods concerning design and product development the process has gone from research to a completely realised product. The work is parted into three phases. The first consists of research and gathering information, the second is conceptual exploration and the third development and construction. The resources has been approximately split equal between these phases.

    The purpose of this work has been to explore Trangias possibilities to develop a new product to regulate the spirit burner while the goal has been to realise a complete product that fulfills given demands and is compatible with Trangias already existing components.

    The first phase included analyzing the market, creating personas and a customer journey, carrying out a user study with interview and lastly, defining a specification of requirements. Next, phase two were initiated with collecting as many ideas as possible to gather a pool of possible concepts.

    After generating a broad spectrum of ideas and furthermore function-modelling, about ten ideas were considered possible. Among these about half were eliminated wherafter three of the remaining were selected. These three all followed different principles and were developed sideby side for a shorter time. Finally the concept that later was named Iris was selected.

    The result was a product which function is based on a mechanism that works through linked and rotational joints. This lets the regulation run from fully open to completely shut, steplessly and without the need of mounting or dismounting any component in the process. The way of operating is as simple as rotating the upper wind cover with the tool that comes with all Trangia stoves. A spring that causes friction against the wind cover translates the rotational motion to the linked mechanism. The product was first designed as a function model. Later it was drawn more accurately with CAD and lastly it was constructed as a physical prototype.

  • 20.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Design, energi och hållbar utveckling2011Report (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    People in design2010In: Static! Designing for energy Awareness / [ed] Ramia Mazé, Stockholm: Arvinius förlag , 2010, p. 43-48Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Gustafsson, Anton
    Interactive Institute.
    Gyllenswärd, Magnus
    Interactive Institute.
    Designing for Energy Awareness: The Power-Aware Cord2005In: Pride and pre-design: The conference for Cultural Heritage and the Science of Design / [ed] Yrjö Sotama, Helsinki: Valopaino OY , 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Mårtens, Pehr
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Design as enabler of Social Innovation: - A Swedish Perspective2010Report (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Ilstedt, Sara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Hesselgren, Mia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Sustainable lifestyles: How values affect sustainable practises2017In: Design + Power / [ed] Andrew Morrisson, Dagny Stuedahl, 2017, p. 1-7Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a project that explores how different values and lifestyle choices are related to sustainable practices. The goal has been to develop an understanding of both complexity in people’s everyday practices as well as patterns in this complexity to be used when designing interventions for sustainable lifestyles. In the project, we have used a mixed methods approach in order to develop a more comprehensive picture of both the larger patterns of the complexities of everyday practices as well as the particulars of sustainability engagement in Sweden. In this paper we present the initial results from a Swedish study of people with different values and their relations to sustainability, based on Schwartz Theory of Basic Human Values. In particular, we present their overall perspective on sustainability, their existing sustainable practices, and their needs for transitions towards more sustainable lifestyles.

  • 25.
    Isaksson, Anna
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Börjesson, Emma
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Att synliggöra det osynliga: Design som aktör i jämställdhetsarbete2014In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 28-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research points to the need for developing methods to change established gender orders and converting gender perspectives into practical action. Based on a gender equality project at the Centre for Health Technology Halland (HCH), this article discusses the potential of critical design as an agent within the framework of gender equality work and work for change. The project worked with critical design as a tool for making visible what a gender perspec- tive can mean in the context of one’s work, in this case health technology. It resulted in a conceptual prototype called the Androchair – a medical chair designed for men but based on women’s experiences of the gynaecological chair. The aim of the article is to study and discuss the significance of including a prototype, that is an object, in the gender equality work of an organisation. Special focus is placed on whether, and in that case how, a prototype can influence notions of gender and gender equality in relation to one’s own area of work. The empirical data consists of qualitative interviews with staff at the HCH. Actor-net- work theory is used to interpret the data. The analysis shows how the Androchair raises questions of power, needs and interpretative prerogative in relation to what one does in one’s work. Furthermore, it does this to a greater extent than more conventional ways of conveying knowledge about gender equality (such as academic texts, statistics and PowerPoint presentations). Physical objects are perceived of as making gender and gender equality issues more tangible. 

  • 26.
    JANSSON, EMELIE
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    SANDBERG SALACH, MIRIAM
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Ett barnsäkert fönsterbeslag2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The project was a part of the Technical Design bachelor at Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm. The aim of the project was to develop a childproof window fitting that could easily be opened by a grown up without further physical effort.

    Today there are a lot of different kinds of childproof window fittings on the market, but only a limited number are customized for elder with impaired mobility. In the pilot study, already existing window fittings were examined by visiting building supply stores, private residences, children stores and by an information exchange with the cooperative business partner Alfaglas. At an early stage of the project a functional specification was written, in which the most important properties and functions were defined. A QFD and a modified morphological matrix were made in order to help inspiring during the phase in which the concepts were generated. In open interviews with children educators the knowledge about children's behavior was broaden. When children reach an obstacle they can’t pass, for example a childproof window handle, they use pure power as a first tool and it was also explained by the educators that children practically can open anything if they are given enough time. This was an important understanding for the coming idea generating phase.

    There were no limitations considering what kind of windows the fitting would be developed for and regulations that Boverket has developed concerning windows and window fittings were followed during the whole project. By further internet browsing, residential visits and interviews with window installers, sketches and simple prototypes led to three concepts. The concepts were; an external unit that was ought to be placed on existing windows frames, an internal fitting integrated inside the handle or in the opening mechanism and a smart solution that would be controlled by an application or a remote control.

    The concepts were compared with the functional specification and the QFD. They were also weight against each other in a matrix containing the most important criterias from the functional specification. The internal concept was the one to be further developed and different solutions were tested with simple sketches and prototypes. A handle in combination with a lock mechanism was designed with a path in which the handle had to follow in order to open the window. The fitting was constructed in a way that made it possible to install it by yourself on existing windows with espagnolette.

    The final product was a childproof window fitting that was built in a handle with a lock-function that required a 15 mm sliding movement that would make it hard for a young child to operate. A covering lid held the handle and made the sliding movement possible. The end of the handle was formed like a wrench and could thereby be used as an opening tool. A spring was attached inside the lid and made the construction spring back to its original position when the handle was re-rotated. The handle was ergonomically designed by use of a user test and anthropometric data. The inner components were formed in order to fulfill the Design For Assembly-method.

  • 27.
    JANSSON, LOVISA
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    LIU, YI
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Plätt-i-lätt: Ett snabbt och spillfritt sätt att tillaga plättar2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    On behalf of C3 Scandinavian Lifestyle, a product for dispensing batter into seven mini pancake molds in one step was developed. This report describes the work throughout the project and proposals for further work. The project began with a project planning stage and background research. For the background research, shop visits and interviews were conducted with employees in two stores. A state of the art was executed through internet searches and by searching the patent office database. The conclusion was that there were no similar products on the market, but on the other hand there were batter dispensers with simple nozzles. For example, there were some adapted to portion muffins. Afterwards, storyboards were created to identify different sequences of events that may happen when using the product. The target group was identified by creating personas. Also, it was important know C3's sales outlet for framing the target group. Since all types of people shop at supermarkets where C3 sell their products and mini pancakes is a popular dish in Sweden, the target group for the product was very wide. However, families with children may be the biggest consumer of mini pancakes because it is a children's favorite. A moodboard could then be created for the target group. In order to create the most attractive product, it was decided that it would be in the lower price range.

    Following, three existing batter dispensers were ordered to carry out tests. These tests gave different insights, such as the appropriate size of the container, and suitable hole sizes for the viscosity of pancake batter. After the preliminary studies, a QFD was created with user requests that were translated into a requirement specification. Thereafter, ideas were sketched by brainstorming and inspiration from the tests. Partial functions that could be solved in various ways were identified during this stage, and formed a morphological matrix. Based on this matrix, different solutions could be combined and resulted in four final concepts. Even more storyboards were created at this stage. Three of the concepts were then tested with simple prototypes and the pros and cons of these emerged. Thereafter, the concepts were evaluated against each other using the weight ranking method, and the concept of a lever with arms blocking the holes scored the highest. This concept was also the one that worked best of the simple prototypes.

    Afterwards, several iterations were made of the chosen concept, and by testing the 3D-printed prototypes, the product improved in several stages. User tests were also performed with one of the 3D-printed prototypes. The final exterior of the product was based on a moodboard of C3's current product range, to suit the company and a broad target audience. The material selection for most of Plätt-i-Lätt was polypropylene, because of its high heat resistance and price. A further development is to place seals on the arms, as this would make the product completely spill free.

  • 28.
    Karlsson Bergquist, Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Kondensorkylning för rastkyla2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Many of the drivers whose truck is equipped with beds often choose to install some type of extra cooling system. This is to ensure good comfort when sleeping in countries with hot climate. The cooling devices is battery driven hence they can be used when the engine is switched off and by that provide the driver with a comfortable temperature. The coolers can be purchased on the aftermarket from various manufacturers and distributors. There are three types of additional coolers, cold storage, evaporations cooling and air conditioning, where the last two are more common. The backhand of the extra coolers is the power consumption which often results in worn out batteries. With the aim to carry out extra cab cooling energy as efficiently as possible there is an idea to run the trucks air conditioning system with a small 24-volts compressor, this means disconnection of the belt-driven compressor. The motor fan which also is used for cooling the condenser was driven by the engine. A new method for condenser cooling was therefore needed. This defined the problem as; removal of the condensation heat. As an additional part of the project a concept named ramradiatorn was investigated. Ramradiatorn were previously developed with the purpose to reject the condensation heat from the cooling media, by leading it in to the back frame of the truck. The requirement of the cooling system was to keep the cab temperature at +22 ºC with an ambient temperature of +30 ºC. The power consumption was never to exceed 10 A. The possibility was examined during a test in a climate chamber. The test also contributed with data for the development of the condenser cooling method. A lot was learned from the test, among other things that the ramradiatorn couldn’t remove the condensation heat without an significant redesign and resizing. Further work involved development of heat rejection methods. Several solutions were generated and the one chosen to be further developed was condenser cooling by implementation of a 24-volt fan from the producer SPAL. The selected fan qualified for needed volume flow rate, power consumption and other influencing aspects. A fixture for the fan was constructed which allowed quick and reliable assembly.

  • 29.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    et al.
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Broms, Loove
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Jönsson, Li
    Denmark Design School.
    Räsänen, Minna
    Södertörns Högskola.
    Westholm, Ulrika
    Exploring Sustainable Practices in Workplace Settings through Visualizing Electricity Consumption2013In: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, ISSN 1073-0516, E-ISSN 1557-7325, ISSN ISSN 1073-0516, Vol. 20, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People’s domestic habits are increasingly being targeted to reduce levels of CO2 emissions. Whereas domestic energy consumption has received a lot of attention with several reported studies on sustainable practices, there are very few studies on workplace practices. Nevertheless, these are considered as having much potential for reducing energy consumption. This paper presents the findings from two field studies where two different types of prototypes for visualizing energy use were designed, implemented and evaluated in different types of workplace settings – factories and offices. The studies used design probes to explore how visual feedback for electricity use was interpreted and acted upon by employees in work settings. A striking observation was that it is very difficult to get people to change to more pro-environmental behavior and practices in a workplace environment. The paper discusses why this might be the case.

  • 30.
    Knaust, Annika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.).
    Lindqvist, Louise
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Effektivisering av dragstrumpan2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    AbstractBedsab is a Swedish company that produces cable socks which is a tool that facilitates thetransport of wires. The mechanical properties of the closed cable sock can be explained asfollowing: a compressive stress forces the diameter to expand; and the cable sock can be placedon the wire. By applying a tensile stress the diameter decreases and the cable sock locks itselfaround the wire. With an applied force the wire can then be moved. At Bedsab the cable sock ismade by hand, which is a demanding job for the operators, and is also time consuming.This master thesis builds on a previous project where an automatic braiding method wasdeveloped for the production of cable socks. The aim of this master thesis is to realize thedeveloped braiding method.This thesis is divided into two parts. The goal in the first part is to realize the basic design of abraiding machine and the aim in the second part is to use this basic design to test that thedeveloped braiding method works in reality. The basic design consists of eight pulleys and a belt.The pulleys rotate every right and every other left. This is required to obtain the correct braiding.The pulleys are driven by a motor, which is connected to a gear that is used to reduce the speedof rotation. The second part of the master thesis was achieved by extensive testing in order todevelop the mechanism through which the braiding is done. There will be a track wheresomething called a carrier, which is the part that holds the wire in the braid, will move. Thecarriers are run by something called discs, which are circular with four notches in which thecarrier hook into. The discs are mounted on the pulleys and rotate with them. What has beentested is the appearance on the track, the part of the carrier that is in the track and discs.During the testing stage of the project a lot of difficulties held back the work. One was thematerial that the prototypes were made of. The material had much more friction than steel, whichis the material the prototypes will be manufactured in. This led to that the testing part of theproject was not completely realistic. When the prototypes that were tested were made of amaterial with less friction the braiding method worked in practice. There is work that remains tobe done in order for the braiding machine to work properly in production. Therefore, continuedclose cooperation with the company Bedsab will be necessary.

  • 31.
    LANDIN, NIKLAS
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Utsättningsvagn: För att effektivisera utsättningsmomentet i byggbranschen2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the process of marking the lines for the inner and outer walls on the newly cast concrete slab when producing new apartment buildings, there is a huge potential today to make the whole process much more effective. The purpose of this bachelor´s degree project thesis is to come up with a product concept that considerably reduces the time it takes to mark the lines for all walls to be built on a newly cast concrete slab, and to improve the working environment for those who do this work professionally on a daily basis. The desired outcome of this would be a much less time consuming and less expensive activity and enable the possibility to reduce the number of workers involved in the activity from two to just one. Reducing the number of workers will also reduce the cost for the work as a whole.

    A research phase was performed to study exactly how the line marking process is carried out today, and what relevant products and technologies there are on the market. A field trip to a construction site was carried out as well as interviews with people with experience of the linemarking process to give a clear picture of how it is done today. Some research was also done onthe robotic total stations that are used today to see if they could be integrated in the product or if they operate as a closed system.

    A number of sketches, a function- and method tree, shape- and structure variations andevaluation matrices were made and led up to the final concept that is a semi automatic wagon.The wagon looks almost like a lawn mower and is pushed forward by the user in a similar way. The wagon is equipped with a 360 degree prism that enables a robotic total station to track thewagon´s position in real time. Information about the wagon´s position is sent to the wagon from the total station and thanks to this data the wagon is able to draw the line at the exact location it should be drawn on. The only thing the user has to do is to input the position of the line to the wagon and then walk with it in a specific range around the right position. It will take approximately one hour to do the whole line marking process with this product compared to four hours if it is done as it is today. Also, the process will only need one person doing the job compared to two that is needed today. When using the wagon, there is no need to work on floor level or even bending the back or knees which makes it very ergonomically correct.

    The final concept met almost all the requirements set up in the specification so the project should be considered successful and the purpose of the project fulfilled. However, some requirements were set late in the project and they were hard to meet when the design process had gone so far as it had when the requirements came up. The most important requirement of that sort was the one saying that the product should be able to mark lines in a corner surrounded by physical obstacles. A small rearrangement of the wagon´s drawing unit would make it meet even this requirement as well.There is still a lot of work to be done on this product, that is more to consider a well developed concept at the moment.

    A lot of work is still to be done with the programming of the logic that controls the drawing unit and to connect the wagon to the controller of the total station to use the data from its output. A prototype is to be built to verify the technology´s speed and accuracy.The manufacturing part of designing the product is also remaining and it should be done in a way that enables it to be mass produced in a cheap and efficient way.

  • 32.
    LARSSON, KEVIN
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Hushållsprodukt för avsaltning av vatten2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Stockholm Water Technology has developed an energy efficient capacitive deionization technology (CDI) for desalination of water. This in the form of a module that during this project has been integrated into a household product. The product is aimed at consumers who rely mainly on brackish water sources.

    The water scarcity remains critical in many parts of the world and the problems associated with it are many. The early phases of this project are aimed at analyzing these issues and evaluating which of them the CDI technology could solve. Simultaneously, future users and existing markets were analyzed. A large part of this phase was centered around people who rely on brackish water, that is, water with a salinity somewhere between fresh and salt water. The situation for these people differs significantly depending on where in the world one chooses to focus and the problemsextend all the way from the Stockholm archipelago to countries such as India.

    The second phase of the project is centered around generating concept ideas and the evaluation of these. Different solutions and ideas were evaluated with the conclusions from the earlier phase in mind. The result of the phase is a product concept that is suitable for users in many parts of the world and which can be customized in a variety of ways according to specific needs. It is a product concept that can compete withdesalination products in already established markets and simultaneously opens up for new applications. The remaining part of the project is centered around transforming this concept idea into a more refined product. The result is a portable product with a storage capacity of three liters. In comparison to existing products, the product has significantbenefits in terms of water recovery, mobility, flexibility, energy efficiency andmaintenance.

    Both the work itself and this report are structured around David G. Ullman's "Mechanical Design Process".

  • 33.
    Lindberg, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Wärmegård, Lisa
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Energieffektiv grill2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This master thesis of 30 hp has been performed in collaboration with the non-profit organizationCreative Entrepreneurs Solution (CES) based in Ondangwa in northern Namibia. MarieJohansson, the initiator of CES had identified a need for more energy efficient barbecues at theopen markets in Namibia since firewood constitutes a large cost for the actors selling food at themarket. The aim of this project has therefore been to develop a concept that decreases thefirewood consumption.To get further understanding of the conditions that apply in Namibia, a field study wasperformed during two months. User involvement has been an important part during the project,interviews and observations were therefore conducted at open markets in Ondangwa andneighboring cities. To wider the perspectives the whole process of cooking at markets and inhomes was studied. Also aspects like material and manufacturing methods were examined alongwith possible ways of distribution.The most important finding during the field study was that it is common to use two or more firesat the same time to be able to both barbecue and cook in pots. Firewood constitutes 18% of thetotal cost for barbecuing and cooking food at the open market and the vendors have an averageprofit of N$ 13 per day for selling barbecued meat. The findings from the field study resulted ina specification of requirements and thereafter a concept combining cooking and barbecuing wasdeveloped.The concept was demonstrated at the open market in Ondangwa to let the users give theiropinion on the concept and to get ideas of what refinements could be made. Some adjustmentswere made and a second prototype was built and tested in Sweden. Since the concept combinesboth cooking and barbecuing only one fire is needed which reduces the firewood consumptionwith approximately 30% meaning the vendors at the open market would save N$ 8 per day.

  • 34.
    LINDER, FELICIA
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    WALLNER, HANNA
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Ski Ladder: Bekvämare lasting i takbox2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A project has been performed as a bachelor’s degree thesis in engineering design at Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm. With Thule as cooperation partner, the objective withthis project was to develop a product that makes it easier to load, and unload a roof box. Thuleis a market leading company within the roof box industry and has the ambition to simplify transportation of outdoor activity gear and that way help their customers live an active life [1].

    The idea of the project was founded upon a thesis that people experience discomfort when loading their roof boxes. Initially, a substantial and thorough pre-study was performed. This included a survey, interviews, observations and information retrieval. The focus of the study was mainly to gain information about the usage of roof boxes, but also about when and how often they are used. In addition to this, the study also intended to provide knowledge within almost everything that has to do with roof boxes; types of cars, roof racks, rails, parking spaces and loading equipment. With the pre-study as a foundation, an analysis was made, where upon requirements and guidelines for the development process could be defined.

    Ideas were generated by sketching, brainstorming and tests using simple models. This resulted in three concepts that, through different technical principles, solve the defined problem; The Gantry, The Ladder and The Tilter. After thorough evaluation, The Ladder was established to be the most suitable concept for further development.

    The project eventually resulted in a product, given the name Ski Ladder, consisting of two main components; a stem assembled between the roof racks, and a telescopic ladder that rests against the stem. The telescopic ladder extends and retracts through a single push of a button. In its extended position, the ladder measures 320 mm wide and 1850 mm long, and in its folded state 320 mm wide and 650 mm long. The ladder´s foundation consists of a double set of 7 sections of aluminum pipes, interconnected through four footsteps and four handles. The stem is rotatable and has two positions; vertical when not in use, and horizontal when supporting the telescopic ladder. It is designed to stretch 200 mm from the roof racks in its horizontal position.

    The product solves the problem that was identified in the beginning of this project; discomfort when loading a roof box. The solution allows the user to reduce the distance to the load surface with up to 970 mm.

  • 35.
    LINDGREN, NATALIA
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    HEDE MORTENSEN, JULIA
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Product development in low income markets: Identifying user needs and approaches in design in a low income market, with focus on the water filtration market in Malaysia2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The water situation in Malaysia is not ideal. Due to the unsatisfactory quality of the piped water, the demand of domestic water filters in Malaysia is increasing. At the same time, 40 percent of the Malaysian population are described as a low income group who are especially vulnerable against increases in living costs. Developing products that meet the needs of consumers who are constrained in resources is vital for straining the growth of poverty and reaching the global SDGs. To ensure that the access to clean water is achievable for all, regardless of income group, established methodologies within product development in emerging markets with low income target groups needs to be identified.

    The intention with this study is to identify and evaluate some of the existing models and methods within this area through thorough research and a case study. The main focus is to analyse the methodologies for identifying user needs, as well as the approaches in design and conceptualization, when developing products for the lower income group. An extensive literature study has been made, in combination with interviews from Engineers without borders, Sweden. The results were that no models or methods were frequently used in their different projects but every project was individually structured. These results were then applied in a field study in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. During the field study, a market analysis took place and a new product concept was shaped. The project was in collaboration with the company Blöndal, a water purification company in Kuala Lumpur. Their point of use water filter called Källa 8 was further developed, guided by the identified models and methods gained from the pre-development research.

    Before the development of Källa 8, the user needs were identified through surveys, in-home visits and shorter interviews. To translate the identified user want and needs to product attributes, a House of Quality matrix was used and worked as a basis of discussion during the conceptualization of the new Källa 8. Throughout the conceptualization, the mindset originating from the theory of Frugal Innovation was constantly present.

    The result of the market analysis clearly pointed to a too high of a price of the product, but stating that the already existing design of the product was both attractive and important for the lower income group. These attributes were later realized by foremost changing the configuration of the piping in the product. The purpose was to make the filters easily changeable, sparing the users the service cost of changing the filters. This was done without interfering with the most valued features of the product.

  • 36.
    LINDGREN, PIERRE
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    SJÖSTRAND, OSCAR
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Wingseat – en ergonomisk kontorsstol2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Sedentary work is a recurring aspect of modern office life. Inactivity is a source of discomfort and becomes a cause of musculoskeletal disorders in the long run. These issues can be mitigated by improving one's ergonomics while working. The aim of this project was to develop an ergonomic office chair reducing the effort of sitting properly and activating the body. The chair's appearance must fit in different office environments and look familiar enough as to not deter users. After reviewing studies and ergonomic literature, as well as conducting user interviews, the conclusion is drawn that discomfort and the risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders are affected by a lack of frequent variation in sitting positions. Additionally, these problems were linked to users' lack of knowledge regarding good ergonomic sitting practices.The result of the following product development process is an office chair concept that offers a simple way of switching positions, attaining ergonomic benefits without any need for pre-requisite knowledge about the subject. Thanks to its simple operation, the switch is easy to make use of. The seat features flexible parts that fold under the weight of the user's legs, causing their lower back to arch and improving their posture. The chair also provides the option to sit normally thanks to a set of supports that can be folded in under these flexible parts.

  • 37.
    LUNDQVIST, ROBIN
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    SÖDER, ALFRED
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Nano Water: Från Havsvatten till dricksvatten2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today water treatment systems that enables the use of sea water as the main source for production of drinking water are being researched. The reason for this being that many of the water sources being used today are limited and the shortage of water around the world is extensive. The dominating desalination technique on the market is reversed osmosis which using high pressure forces water through membranes to separate water from salt. The technique is energy-consuming and other more efficient techniques are being developed.

    This project focuses on the development of a product that incorporates a new energy efficient technique that has been developed by two scientists at KTH. This technique uses an electric potential over two electrodes to extract charged particles from the saline water to produce drinkable water. The technique is called CDI, short for capacitive deionization. Similar techniques for water treatment are used on the international market where the leading companies are Dutch Voltea Inc. and American Atlantis Technologies.

    The scientist behind the technique has established a partnership with KTH innovation that during the spring of 2018 involved students doing their bachelors degree project within technical design.

    The student project consisted of the development of a product for the Swedish household market which incorporates this technique. The product is part of a bigger system where sea water from the Baltic sea is used for the production of drinking water. The target group for the product are citizens without access to municipal water.

    After thorough research the archipelago of Stockholm was chosen as the target area as many citizens either lack access to municipal water, lack access to drinking water or experience problems with existing water wells. Studies on salinity in the area were conducted to establish a solid ground for capacity calculations of the technique. The scientists had suggestions on how to operate the system which were then further developed into one with increased performance.

    The project has resulted in a modular based water treatment system which can be adapted to variation in demand. The modular system consists of three units, a control unit, a filtration unit and a reservoir unit that together constitute a complete system. The final product is capable of cleaning sea water in the archipelago of Stockholm to drinking water quality approved by legal requirements set by Livsmedelsverket. The product is a household product made to fit within a home environment. A standard setup for four persons has dimensions H1410 x B940 x D720 (mm) and a minimalistic design with a light grey colour. The units are all constructed with similar components to optimize both warehousing and manufacturing costs. The system works on a theoretical level but needs testing before being sold on the Swedish market.

  • 38.
    MARIKA, NORDENSTRÖM JUNG
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Stolsunderrede för höghastighetsbåt2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The boat model Nitra 29 is just about to be updated and a roof will be implemented. This increases the importance that the driver is correctly positioned in the boat to get a good sight and driving position.The boat is a high speed boat with 50-100 knots as maximum speed.

    This bachelor project in Technical Design addresses the assignment, given by Nitra Boats, to developan adjustable chair base for Nitra 29 with an already existent seat. The chair base needs to fit the boatand the seat regarding dimensions as well as allowing adjustment in both vertical and longitudinaldirection. At high speeds, loads occur in form of shocks and vibrations that place high demands on the strength of the seat support, the base of the chair. The work has followed the methodology of product development and has been carried out at the Royal Institute of Technology.

    The required adjustment that is needed had to be defined. The target group population was therefore defined and the driving position in the boat was determined. This resulted in a vertical adjustment of 167 mm and a longitudinal adjustment of 184 mm.

    Data on the load of the boat was non-existing, as a result a large part of the work was devoted to making an estimate of the loads in order to define the dimensions of the chair base. During the research study it was discovered that the loads also is affected the body of the driver, especially the lumbar spine. Therefore it was decided to integrate shock absorption.

    All dimensioning has been done using the methods learned in Design and Product Development, CDEPR, with constraints to make these applicable.

  • 39.
    Morberg, Elin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Kabelhantering: Utveckling av Kableringssystem för Olika Radiobasstationer2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    AbstractThe Master Thesis was preformed at Ericsson in Kista at the division Interconnect which designs the internal cabling for all Radio Base Stations (RBS). Due to the complex usage of telecommunication today, many different RBS cabinets are developed and they vary in capacity and design. The cabling is designed late in the development process which results in unnecessary loss of usability. The goal is therefore to develop a solution that can be applied in all the RBS cabinets so that the cabling becomes consistent and more effective.There are several smaller solutions at the market of cabling today but not an entire system. The most common RBS cabinets are studied carefully and the knowledge of these is essential to develop the most suitable system and to identify the necessary requirements and functions. The strapping points in the RBS cabinets currently not placed at the most suitable locations. Cable shelves and guides are placed everywhere there are some extra space and a lot of these are never used. This contributes to that the cabling has to be adapted to the strapping points and not the other way around.To solve this, a concept is created to fulfill the requirements specification and then developed into a cabling system. The system is based on two guides, one straight and one curved, that are placed where the cables need extra support and guidance, such as junctions and corners. Rails are running on the sides and with these the guides can be attached together in different ways to fulfill the specific requirements of every possible location. By combining the guides, the system also can separate different types of cables, such as power and signal cables. In the same way, guides can be added to enhance the cabling capacity to fit the number of cables.The guides are manufactured in Polypropylene (PP) and with the manufacturing process Injection Molding. The design is therefore adapted for the chosen process and material. The two enclosing covers, which secure the cables inside the guides, are designed with a so called ‘Living hinge’. It can therefore be made in one piece and with only one mold.The cabling system requires a new way of thinking and a development process which includes the cabling in an earlier stage. I believe that the system has a potential to create a structured cabling and a generally accepted appearance inside every Radio Base Station developed by Ericsson.

  • 40.
    Pernestål Brenden, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Integrated Transport Research Lab, ITRL.
    Hesselgren, Mia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Possibilities and barriers in ride-sharing in work commuting – a case study in Sweden2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To understand possibilities and barriers for ride-sharing in work commuting, 451 persons living in the same suburban area and working at the same site were invited to join a ride-sharing program and use a mobile application. Two quantitative web surveys and 16 in-depth interviews have been performed. The results have been analysed using social practice theories as an analytical lens. The participants understood the benefits with the ride-sharing practice, but out of the 451 invited participants, only 8 downloaded the required mobile application for the ride-sharing program. Different to previous results in the literature, trust and security were not seen as issues in this case. Instead the expected loss of flexibility was seen as the main barrier. The participants found a meaning in “being a green commuter” and understood that ride-sharing could contribute to decrease challenges of congestion, environmental impact, and overfull parking places. However, they rated their own current flexibility and convenience in commuting higher than the expected benefits from ride-sharing.

  • 41.
    RASCH, LINNÉA
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Stolsunderrede – Nitra boats2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this project is to develop a chair base that is adjustable both height- and lengthwise. The base has been developed for the company Nitra boats and more specifically for the boat model Nitra 29, a high-speed boat which can go up to 100 knots and will soon have a foldable roof. Nitra also wants to CE-mark the angle of sight which will impose anthropometrical measures so that most of the population can use it. In today’s market, there are no solutions.

    During the project, a prestudy was done that showed that many boat drivers suffer from pain during the boat ride, a following of the high forces which also affects the passengers. Unfortunately this has resulted in many drivers receiving chronic diseases. Most of this work has therefore focused to form a chair base that can suppress the forces and stop the injuries from happening.

    The result of this work’s study generated a concept which lives up to the requirements from Nitra and suppresses the forces for the passenger’s own safety.

    The product is constructed to esthetically fit in Nitra’s current collection, with the right choice of colors and form. The materials have been selected to handle any weather and other outer threats. Moreover, lots of time was spent on dimensioning the chair so that it would not break accordingly to the upcoming forces.

    During this project, no specific tests were done on the Nitra 29 since it was not available. Therefore, only theoretical calculations – based on assumptions and simplifications - were made which gave a hint of how big the forces could be.

  • 42.
    Sopjani, Liridona
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Hesselgren, Mia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager Stier, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Co-creation with diverse actors for sustainability innovation2017In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED, Design Society , 2017, no DS87-8, p. 459-468Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability driven innovations differ from current established technologies imposing new requirements on users and often interdependent with other actors' changes. Strategic Niche Management (SNM) stresses interactions between actors through niches i.e. protected spaces for experimentation to support innovation. However, it is unclear what activities are necessary when different actors are involved in developing and diffusing sustainability innovation. This paper aims at identifying activities crucial for sustainability innovation in an implemented mobility project. The results show that cocreation through iterations and reflections by combinations of diverse actors and users can be considered a core process for sustainability innovation. Six activities are identified as critical: matching the interdependencies by combining the actors' diverse competences and resources; facilitating to steer the group of actors into actions; engaging users at early stages of innovation; trying to drive change by offering the users an opportunity; co-creating through a multitude of actors with the development and usage simultaneously; steering and facilitating to enable co-creation.

  • 43.
    Svallingsson, Emil
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Vikning av en Dammsugarpåse: Utveckling av ett Mekaniskt Packningshjälpmedel2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Exir (Wuxi) Technology Co. Ltd. has an agreement with a Swedish industrial company, the Client, scope of business being manufacturing and delivery of industrial vacuum cleaners for the global market. Many of the vacuum cleaners delivered to the Client are equipped with a patented bag hose system, a dust extractor bag. This is the main product of a Swedish manufacturing company, the Supplier. In the Exir plant these bags are attached to the assembled industrial vacuum cleaners before delivery to the Client. In the near future this will remain the only part of the complete product that Exir is not the supplier of, a situation they wish to rectify. This was the basis of the problem handled in this master thesis. The purpose of this project was to provide Exir with the possibility of supplying the Client with a complete product package. The goal was to develop a manually operated, mechanical packing appliance able to fabricate a bag comparable to the Supplier’s bag hose system. The master thesis was to be considered complete on delivery of drawings for a proposed solution. However, time and solution permitting, a prototype or model was to be manufactured and evaluated. The methods used in this master thesis project were based on the procedures devised by Karl T. Ulrich and Steven D. Eppinger. Their techniques have not been followed meticulously; rather, they were adapted to fit the needs of the project. The project started with an information gathering phase and the definition of a PDS (product design specification). This led to a concept generation phase from which six concepts were chosen. These were screened and developed until only one remained. This final concept was then further developed into a final design. The outcome was a complete set of plan of a machine designed to fold a polyethylene hose into a bag that can be fitted on the industrial vacuum cleaners assembled by Exir. It is a completely manually operated appliance but can easily be automated. The machine has been fitted with numerous adjustment possibilities to raise the probability of functionality without the need for redesigning. A prototype was manufactured according to these plans and a first folding test run was performed. As a result a list of recommendations for future adjustments and tests was formulated.

  • 44.
    Wangel, Josefin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Broms, Loove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Hesselgren, Mia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Kanulf, Gabriel
    Freelance graphic designer.
    Ljunggren, Andrejs
    Freelance graphic designer.
    Vitiden: en energifiktion2017Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We must accept the present reality – only thereby do we have the possibility to understand it, relate to it to influence it and create culture that is a flexible tool for the transition.

    This is the opening paragraph of "Vitiden - an energy fiction"1 where the transition to a more sustainable society is explored through interacting text and image. In the forward-looking and text-based manifesto, Vitiden is outlined as an answer to today's ecological and social challenges. The high pitch and ambitions of the manifesto are commented on by an image-based future archaeology, constructed by fictional fragments of the future. Inset images from the acceptera manifesto2, which is also paraphrased in the introductory paragraph of Vitiden, relates the energy fiction to the modernist societal development and the critique thereof. A generous body of annotations contributes with further perspectives.

    1) The term Vitiden is Swedish and can be translated to the 'we-age'. In contrast to other 'ages' such as the bronze age or the atom age, Vitiden is not a description of a historical era, but a suggested future, an age yet to come, distinguished by its emphasis on togetherness.

    1An energy fiction is a design fiction or essentially any image of the future dealing primarily with questions related to energy, in this case as an enabling and constraining factor for sociomaterial entanglements and practices to emerge and endure.

    2Asplund, G., Gahn, W., Markelius, S., Paulsson, G., Sundahl, E., Åhrén, U. 1980[1931] acceptera. Tiden förlag. Faksimil.

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