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  • 1. Abbasi Hoseini, A.
    et al.
    Lundell, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Andersson, H. I.
    Finite-length effects on dynamical behavior of rod-like particles in wall-bounded turbulent flow2015In: International Journal of Multiphase Flow, ISSN 0301-9322, E-ISSN 1879-3533, Vol. 76, p. 13-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Combined Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) measurements have been performed in dilute suspensions of rod-like particles in wall turbulence. PIV results for the turbulence field in the water table flow apparatus compared favorably with data from Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of channel flow turbulence and the universality of near-wall turbulence justified comparisons with DNS of fiber-laden channel flow. In order to examine any shape effects on the dynamical behavior of elongated particles in wall-bounded turbulent flow, fibers with three different lengths but the same diameter were used. In the logarithmic part of the wall-layer, the translational fiber velocity was practically unaffected by the fiber length l. In the buffer layer, however, the fiber dynamics turned out to be severely constrained by the distance z to the wall. The short fibers accumulated preferentially in low-speed areas and adhered to the local fluid speed. The longer fibers (l/z > 1) exhibited a bi-modal probability distribution for the fiber velocity, which reflected an almost equal likelihood for a long fiber to reside in an ejection or in a sweep. It was also observed that in the buffer region, high-speed long fibers were almost randomly oriented whereas for all size cases the slowly moving fibers preferentially oriented in the streamwise direction. These phenomena have not been observed in DNS studies of fiber suspension flows and suggested l/z to be an essential parameter in a new generation of wall-collision models to be used in numerical studies.

  • 2.
    Alfredsson, Bo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.). STandUP Wind.
    Segalini, Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. STandUP Wind.
    Wind farms in complex terrains: an introduction2017In: Philosophical Transactions. Series A: Mathematical, physical, and engineering science, ISSN 1364-503X, E-ISSN 1471-2962, Vol. 375, no 2091Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wind energy is one of the fastest growing sources of sustainable energy production. As more wind turbines are coming into operation, the best locations are already becoming occupied by turbines, and wind-farm developers have to look for new and still available areas-locations that may not be ideal such as complex terrain landscapes. In these locations, turbulence and wind shear are higher, and in general wind conditions are harder to predict. Also, the modelling of the wakes behind the turbines is more complicated, which makes energy-yield estimates more uncertain than under ideal conditions. This theme issue includes 10 research papers devoted to various fluid-mechanics aspects of using wind energy in complex terrains and illustrates recent progress and future developments in this important field. This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'.

  • 3.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Lingwood, Rebecca J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. University of Cambridge, United Kingdom .
    Rotation Effects on Wall-Bounded Flows: Some Laboratory Experiments2014In: Modeling Atmospheric and Oceanic Flows: Insights from Laboratory Experiments and Numerical Simulations, Wiley-Blackwell, 2014, p. 83-100Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter focuses on three different categories: (1) system rotation vector parallel to mean-flow vorticity; (2) flows set up by the rotation of one or more boundaries; and (3) system rotation aligned with the mean-flow direction. The flows in the different categories above differ with respect to their geometry but, more importantly, in how rotation affects them. The chapter focuses on three different flows that are relatively amenable to laboratory investigation, one from each category described above: One is plane Couette flow undergoing system rotation about an axis normal to the mean flow, another is the von Kármán boundary layer flow, and the third is axially rotating pipe flow. It defines important nondimensional parameters that govern them and discuss some of their interesting flow features in various parameter ranges. Various experimental realizations of the three different flow systems are described and considerations and limitations regarding the laboratory systems are discussed.

  • 4.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    The diagnostic plot - a litmus test for wall bounded turbulence data2010In: European journal of mechanics. B, Fluids, ISSN 0997-7546, E-ISSN 1873-7390, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 403-406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A diagnostic plot is suggested that can be used to judge wall bounded turbulence data of the mean and the rms of the streamwise velocity in terms of reliability both near the wall, around the maximum in the rms as well as in the outer region. The important feature of the diagnostic plot is that neither the wall position nor the friction velocity needs to be known, since it shows the rms value as a function of the streamwise mean velocity, both normalized with the free stream velocity. One must remember, however, that passing the test is a necessary, but not sufficient condition to prove good data quality.

  • 5.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Kurian, Thomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Fransson, Jens H. M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Segalini, A.
    Rüedi, Jean-Daniel
    Talamelli, Alessandro
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    The diagnostic plot: a new way to appraise turbulent boundary-layer data2009In: ADVANCES IN TURBULENCE XII: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 12TH EUROMECH EUROPEAN TURBULENCE CONFERENCE / [ed] Eckhardt, B., 2009, Vol. 132, p. 609-612Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6. Alveroglu, B.
    et al.
    Segalini, Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Garrett, S. J.
    The effect of surface roughness on the convective instability of the BEK family of boundary-layer flows2016In: European journal of mechanics. B, Fluids, ISSN 0997-7546, E-ISSN 1873-7390, Vol. 56, p. 178-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A Chebyshev polynomial discretisation method is used to investigate the effect of both anisotropic (radially and azimuthally) and isotropic surface roughnesses on the convective instability of the BEK family of rotating boundary-layer flows. The mean-flow profiles for the velocity components are obtained by modelling surface roughness with a partial-slip approach. A linear stability analysis is then performed to investigate the effect of roughness on the convective instability characteristics of the inviscid Type I (cross-flow) instability and the viscous Type II instability. It is revealed that all roughness types lead to a stabilisation of the Type I mode in all flows within the BEK family, with the exception of azimuthally-anisotropic roughness (radial grooves) within the Bödewadt layer which causes a mildly destabilising effect. In the case of the Type II mode, the results reveal the destabilising effect of radially-anisotropic roughness (concentric grooves) on all the boundary layers, whereas both azimuthally-anisotropic and isotropic roughnesses have a stabilising effect on the mode for Ekman and von Kármán layers. Complementary results are also presented by considering the effects of roughness on the growth rates of each instability mode within the Ekman layer.

  • 7.
    Appelquist, Ellinor
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Imayama, Shintaro
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Alfredsson, Henrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control.
    Lingwood, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London, United Kingdom.
    Linear disturbances in the rotating-disk flow: A comparison between results from simulations, experiments and theory2016In: European journal of mechanics. B, Fluids, ISSN 0997-7546, E-ISSN 1873-7390, Vol. 55, p. 170-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations have an exact similarity solution for the flow over an infinite rotating disk giving a laminar boundary layer of constant thickness, also known as the von Kármán flow. It is well known now that there is an absolute instability of the boundary layer which is linked to transition to turbulence, but convective routes are also observed. It is these convective modes that we focus on here. A comparison of three different approaches to investigate the convective, so called Type-I, stationary crossflow instability is presented here. The three approaches consist of local linear stability analysis, direct numerical simulations (DNS) and experiments. The ’shooting method’ was used to compute the local linear stability whereas linear DNS was performed using a spectral-element method for a full annulus of the disk, a quarter and 1/32 of an annulus, each with one roughness element in the computational domain. These correspond to simulating one, four and 32 roughness elements on the full disk surface and in addition a case with randomly-distributed roughnesses was simulated on the full disk. Two different experimental configurations were used for the comparison: i) a clean-disk condition, i.e. unexcited boundary-layer flow; and ii) a rough-disk condition, where 32 roughness elements were placed on the disk surface to excite the Type-I stationary vortices. Comparisons between theory, DNS and experiments with respect to the structure of the stationary vortices are made. The results show excellent agreement between local linear stability analysis and both DNS and experiments for a fixed azimuthal wavenumber (32 roughnesses). This agreement clearly shows that the three approaches capture the same underlying physics of the setup, and lead to an accurate description of the flow. It also verifies the numerical simulations and shows the robustness of experimental measurements of the flow case. The effects of the azimuthal domain size in the DNS and superposition of multiple azimuthal wavenumbers in the DNS and experiments are discussed.

  • 8.
    Appelquist, Ellinor
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Imayama, Shintaro
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Alfredsson, Henrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control.
    Lingwood, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. University of Cambridge, UK.
    Linear disturbances in the rotating-disk flow: a comparison between results from simulations, experiments and theory2014Report (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Appelquist, Ellinor
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Alfredsson, Henrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Lingwood, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. nstitute of Continuing Education, University of Cambridge, Madingley Hall, Madingley Cambridge, United Kingdom .
    Global linear instability of the rotating-disk flow investigated through simulations2015In: Journal of Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 0022-1120, E-ISSN 1469-7645, Vol. 765, p. 612-631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerical simulations of the flow developing on the surface of a rotating disk are presented based on the linearized incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The boundary-layer flow is perturbed by an impulsive disturbance within a linear global framework, and the effect of downstream turbulence is modelled by a damping region further downstream. In addition to the outward-travelling modes, inward-travelling disturbances excited at the radial end of the simulated linear region, r(end), by the modelled turbulence are included within the simulations, potentially allowing absolute instability to develop. During early times the flow shows traditional convective behaviour, with the total energy slowly decaying in time. However, after the disturbances have reached r(end), the energy evolution reaches a turning point and, if the location of r(end) is at a Reynolds number larger than approximately R = 594 (radius non-dimensionalized by root v/Omega*, where v is the kinematic viscosity and Omega* is the rotation rate of the disk), there will be global temporal growth. The global frequency and mode shape are clearly imposed by the conditions at r(end). Our results suggest that the linearized Ginzburg-Landau model by Healey (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 663, 2010, pp. 148-159) captures the (linear) physics of the developing rotating-disk flow, showing that there is linear global instability provided the Reynolds number of r(end) is sufficiently larger than the critical Reynolds number for the onset of absolute instability.

  • 10.
    Bellani, Gabriele
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Experimental Studies of Complex Flows through Image-Based Techniques2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis deals with the development of experimental techniques for the study of complex flows inspired to a large extent by the papermaking process. In particular one part of this thesis is devoted to the development of laboratory experiments based on index-of-refraction matching and imaging techniques to study the behavior of dilute and concentrated suspension of elongated particles. Another part is aimed at exploring the potential of the synergy between experiments and numerical simulations to access quantities otherwise not-measurable in complex flows. Highspeedimaging experiments have been specifically designed for this purpose.

    The first of the Refractive IndexMatching (RIM) experiment was aimed at studying the flow generated during the filtration of a fiber suspension using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and pressure drop measurements. The experiments were performed in a vertical laboratory filtration device. Index of refraction matching of fibers and fluids allowed measurements to be performed in the proximity and, to some extent, in the forming network during filtration. The area over which the forming network induces velocity gradients has been measured and have been found to be independent of the Reynolds number but dependent on the fiber length and the structure of the network. Analysis of the flow scales in the proximity of the network showed that the signature of the mesh used to filter the suspension is never completely suppressed as the network thickness increases. Also, pressure drop measurements over a static fiber network have been performed. A linear dependence of the pressure drop with the basis weight (mass of fibers in the network per unit area) and a non-dimensional filtration resistance independent of filtration velocity and network thickness (if network compressibility is accounted for) was found. These findings can help explain characteristics that are observed on paper sheets and help improvede watering efficiency.

    The second RIM experiment was aimed at measuring the interactions of Taylorscale elongated particles with turbulence. RIM particles with embedded tracers and Stereoscopic PIV were combined to simultaneously measure fluid phase and particle velocity. The novelty of this technique is that it allows to measure the three-dimensional angular velocity vector of arbitrarily shaped particles. This technique was applied to study the interaction of neutrally buoyant ellipsoidal particles with stationary homogeneous isotropic turbulence. The results were compared to the case of spherical particles. The main result is that both spherical and ellipsoidal particles provide enhancement of the small scales and reduction of the large scales at volume concentrations as low as 0.1%. However, the reduction of the large scales was much more evident for spherical particles. These results highlight the fact that particle elongation introduces different mechanisms of turbulent modulation as compared to the spherical particles.

    The first of the high-speed imaging experiments was to provide a database for test and validation of a CFD-based flow observer for complex flows. For this purpose time resolved measurements of a turbulent confined jet have been performed with high-speed PIV. The measurements have been used both as a feedback signal and as a reference for the evaluation of a CFD-based estimator for complex flows. Furthermore, based on the measurements Kalman filters have been designed and implemented in the observer. The experimental data have also been used to compare two modal decompositions, namely Proper Orthogonal Decomposition and Dynamical Modal Decomposition and evaluate their ability to describe the global behavior of complex flow.

    The second of the high-speed imaging experiment was applied to study spreading of a droplet on a solid surface. These experiments have been performed with extremely high time-resolution (140000 fps), over a range of parameters (in terms of droplet viscosity, equilibrium contact angle and droplet size) larger than any other experiment reported in the literature in a single work. By combining the experiments and direct numerical simulations a dissipative mechanisms arising from the contact line movement has been identified and the corresponding macroscopic coefficient has been measured.i

  • 11.
    Bellani, Gabriele
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Velocity measurements in a fiber suspension flow: formation of a fiber network2008Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present work is to experimentally study the dynamics of the formation of a fiber network formed from the filtration of a fiber suspension. This is relevant for all industrial applications (e.g. papermaking, productions of composite material, etc.) where a suspension of fibers has to flow through narrow gaps, and the quality of the product depends on the distribution of mass and orientation of the fibers.

    To study the dynamics of network formation, we developed an experimental setup where the filtration of a fiber suspension through a semi-permeable screen can be studied. In the setup, both the fluid and the solid phase can be visualized.

    The focus of the present thesis is to study the fluid flow generated during the filtration.

    Index of refraction matching, image processing and particle image velocimetry have been used to measure the velocity field in the proximity of the resulting fiber network. Experiments with varying fiber length and filtration velocity have been performed.

    The disturbances generated by the screen and the forming network was found to be confined in a region (boundary region), whose extension varies with time: first, after the formation of the first fiber layers, the extent of the boundary region increases; at later times, the boundary region is thinner. The extent appears to be correlated to the gap size either of the screen (at very early times) or of the fiber network, but independent of the filtration velocity.

    Fluctuations on a scale larger than a fiber length are also observed during the filtration process. These fluctuations are found to be correlated to the nondimensional number Se that relates the sedimentation velocity of a fiber to the filtration velocity.

    The governing non-dimensional parameters are derived from the equations. The parameters are used to relate the experimental observations to the dewatering process in papermaking.

  • 12.
    Berg, Niclas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Blood flow and cell transport in arteries and medical assist devices2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The cardiovascular system is responsible for transport of nutrients, oxygen, as well as the cells and molecules making up the immune system. Through the hemostatic system, the body maintains the integrity of the blood vessels, and prevents bleeding. The biochemical and physical processes governing the circulation interact, and take place at a large range of time and length scales - from those related to the individual cells up to the large scale flow structures. Dysfunctions of the heart or the circulatory system may have severe consequences. Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) is a heterogeneous group of diseases, responsible for about 50% of all death cases in the western world.

    Patients with severe but transient heart and/or lung disease may require the assistance of a heart-lung machine to bridge over the period required for the affected organ to recover. One such system is the Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenator (ECMO) circuit, consting of a blood pump, a membrane oxygenator, cannulae and tubing system. While the therapy is life-saving, it is associated with relatively frequent thromboembolic (blood clotting and/or bleeding) events. Modeling of the flow in some components of the ECMO circuit was undertaken. The flow data was used together with models for platelet activation to assess the risk for thrombus formation. The results indicated locations of elevated risk of thrombosis in the centrifugal blood pump, the ECMO cannulae and the pipe connectors. The identified locations agreed well with clinical observations. The results lead to a direct recommendation to minimize the use of tube connectors. Further study of the sensitivity of the platelet activation models to uncertainties and errors was carried out. Some recommendations for improved modeling were proposed.

    Arteriosclerosis develops slowly over a long period of time (years or decades). It manifests initially at some common sites; arteries of certain sizes with relatively strong flow rate, as well as near artery bifurcations and locations of strong vessel curvature. The location specificity indicates that the blood flow plays a central role in the arteriosclerotic process. Being able to predict the future development of arteriosclerotic lesion and its location for an individual patient would imply that pre-emptive actions could be taken. This idea was the foundation of some of the numerical simulations in this thesis. A stenoted patient specific renal artery was considered, and was reconstructed to a non-pathological state by removing the stenosis using different segmentation methods. We could then evaluate if common stenosis markers based on functions of time-averages of the Wall Shear-Stress (WSS) could be use as predictive parameters. It was shown that these markers are not adequate as predictive tools. Furthermore, it was shown that the sensitivity to reconstruction technique was at least of the same order as the effect of the choice of blood rheology model. The rheology of blood was further studied through detailed simulations resolving the blood plasma flow and its interaction with the red blood cells (RBC) and the platelets. A hybrid Immersed boundary-Lattice Boltzmann method was applied, and the rheological data was compared to the Quemada model. It was found that the Quemada model could underpredict the effective viscosity by as much as 50%. The same methodology was applied to study the transport of RBCs and platelets, and the influence of RBC polydispersity. An increased degree of variability in RBC volume was found, under certain circumstances, to lead to an increase of the transport of platelets to the vessel wall (margination). 

  • 13.
    Berg, Niclas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Fuchs, Laszlo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Wittberg, L. Prahl
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Biomechanics.
    Blood flow simulations of the renal arteries - effect of segmentation and stenosis removalIn: Flow Turbulence and Combustion, ISSN 1386-6184, E-ISSN 1573-1987Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patient specic based simulation of blood flows in arteries has been proposed as a future approach for better diagnostics and treatment of arterial diseases.The outcome of theoretical simulations strongly depends on the accuracy in describing the problem (the geometry, material properties of the artery and of the blood, flow conditions and the boundary conditions). In this study, the uncertainties associated with the approach for a priori assessment of reconstructive surgery of stenoted arteries are investigated. It is shown that strong curvature in the reconstructed artery leads to large spatial- and temporal-peaks in the wall shear-stress. Such peaks can be removed by appropriate reconstruction that also handles the post-stenotic dilatation of the artery. Moreover, it is shown that the effects of the segmentation approach can be equally important as the effects of using advanced rheological models. Unfortunately, this fact has not been recognized in the literature up to this point, making patient specic simulations potentially less reliable.

  • 14.
    Berg, Niclas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Fuchs, Laszlo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Wittberg, L. Prahl
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Biomechanics.
    Flow characteristics and coherent structures in a centrifugal blood pumpIn: Flow Turbulence and Combustion, ISSN 1386-6184, E-ISSN 1573-1987Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blood clot formation can be initiated by local flow conditions where regions of high shear and long residence time regions, such as flow separation and stagnation, have been identified as risk factors. This study highlights coherent structures,some of which not yet considered in the literature that may contribute to blood clot formation in the ECMO (Extra Corporeal Membrane Oxygenator) circuit. The centrifugal ECMO pump investigated in this study is compact and delivers adequate volume of blood with relatively high pressure in order to compensate for the large pressure drop in the membrane oxygenator. These requirements lead to regions with high shear in several different parts of the pump. In the narrow gap between the pump house and the impeller body (the magnet) a Taylor-Couette-like flow is observed with azimuthally aligned wavy vortices, which are also pushed towards the bottom of the pump-house by the flow generated by the blades. At the bottom gap between the impeller house and the pump house one finds spiraling flow structures, due to the rotation of the former structure. Separation bubbles are found near the tongue of the pump and at the lee sides of the blades. Such vortical structures have in literature been identified as regions where platelets may be activated whereby clots may develop.

  • 15.
    Berg, Niclas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Fuchs, Laszlo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Wittberg, L. Prahl
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Biomechanics.
    Influence of red blood cell polydispersity on blood rheology and platelet marginationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Brett, Calvin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. DESY, Photon Sci, Hamburg, Germany.
    Mittal, Nitesh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ohm, Wiebke
    DESY, Photon Sci, Hamburg, Germany..
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. DESY, Photon Sci, Hamburg, Germany..
    In situ self-assembly study in bio-based thin films2018In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 255Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17. Brunet, P.
    et al.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Control of thermocapillary instabilities far from threshold2005In: Physics of fluids, ISSN 1070-6631, E-ISSN 1089-7666, Vol. 17, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report experiments on control of thermocapillary instabilities at high temperature differences, in an annular geometry. Previous studies [Phys. Fluids 14, 3039 (2002)] showed that a reasonable control of oscillatory instability could be achieved by optimizing a local heating feedback process. We conducted experiments with a basic flow converging from periphery to center. This constitutes a more unstable configuration than previously, and enables appearance of higher-order instabilities and chaos. Applying successfully local feedback control to the periodic state close to the threshold, we extend the process to higher temperature differences, where nonlinear as well as proportional/derivative control laws are necessary to obtain a significant decrease of the temperature fluctuations. Finally, proportional control allows us to synchronize a chaotic state, to a periodic one.

  • 18. Camarri, S.
    et al.
    Fransson, Jens H. M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Talamelli, A.
    Numerical investigation of the AFRODITE transition control strategy2014In: Springer Proceedings in Physics, Springer, 2014, p. 65-69Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The experiments carried out within the AFRODITE[2] project are aimed at exploring the effectiveness of properly shaped velocity miniature vortex generators in delaying transition to turbulence in a boundary layer. The present work details the direct numerical simulation setup designed to support and reproduce the AFRODITE experiments and provide results showing that the proposed DNS is in good agreement with the experiments. The results of the DNS also show that even a minimal delay of the transition point results in an overall gain in terms of drag when MVGs are installed on the plate.

  • 19. Camarri, Simone
    et al.
    Fallenius, Bengt E. G.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Fransson, Jens H. M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Stability analysis of experimental flow fields behind aporous cylinder for the investigation of the large-scale wake vorticesReport (Other academic)
  • 20. Camarri, Simone
    et al.
    Trip, Renzo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Fransson, Jens
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Investigation of passive control of the wake past a thick plate by stability and sensitivity analysis of experimental dataManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Canton, Jacopo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx). KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Linear stability of the flow in a toroidal pipe2015In: 9th International Symposium on Turbulence and Shear Flow Phenomena, TSFP 2015, TSFP-9 , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While hydrodynamic stability and transition to turbulence in straight pipes - being one of the most fundamental problems in fluid mechanics - has been studied extensively, the stability of curved pipes has received less attention. In the present work, the first (linear) instability of the canonical flow inside a toroidal pipe is investigated as a first step in the study of the related laminar-turbulent transition process. The impact of the curvature of the pipe, in the range 8 e [0.002,1], on the stability properties of the flow is studied in the framework of linear stability analysis. Results show that the flow is indeed modally unstable for all curvatures investigated and that the wave number corresponding to the critical mode depends on the curvature, as do several other features of this problem. The critical modes are mainly located in the region of the Dean vortices, and are characterised by oscillations which are symmetric or antisymmetric as a function of the curvature. The neutral curve associated with the first bifurcation is the result of a complex interaction between isolated modes and branches composed by several modes characterised by a common structure. This behaviour is in obvious contrast to that of straight pipes, which are linearly stable for all Reynolds numbers.

  • 22.
    Canton, Jacopo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control.
    Characterisation of the steady, laminar incompressible flow in toroidal pipes covering the entire curvature rangeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Canton, Jacopo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Characterisation of the steady, laminar incompressible flow in toroidal pipes covering the entire curvature range2017In: International Journal of Heat and Fluid Flow, ISSN 0142-727X, E-ISSN 1879-2278, Vol. 66, p. 95-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work is concerned with a detailed investigation of the steady (laminar), incompressible flow inside bent pipes. In particular, a toroidal pipe is considered in an effort to isolate the effect of the curvature, δ, on the flow features, and to compare the present results to available correlations in the literature. More than 110 000 numerical solutions are computed, without any approximation, spanning the entire curvature range, 0 ≤ δ ≤ 1, and for bulk Reynolds numbers Re up to 7 000, where the flow is known to be unsteady. Results show that the Dean number De provides a meaningful non-dimensional group only below very strict limits on the curvature and the Dean number itself. For δ>10−6 and De > 10, in fact, not a single flow feature is found to scale well with the Dean number. These considerations are also valid for quantities, such as the Fanning friction factor, that were previously considered Dean-number dependent only. The flow is therefore studied as a function of two equally important, independent parameters: the curvature of the pipe and the Reynolds number. The analysis shows that by increasing the curvature the flow is fundamentally changed. Moderate to high curvatures are not only quantitatively, but also qualitatively different from low δ cases. A complete description of some of the most relevant flow quantities is provided. Most notably the friction factor f for laminar flow in curved pipes by Ito [J. Basic Eng. 81:123–134 (1959)] is reproduced, the influence of the curvature on f is quantified and the scaling is discussed. A complete database including all the computed solutions is available at www.flow.kth.se.

  • 24.
    Canton, Jacopo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control.
    On the Reynolds number dependence of large-scale friction control in turbulent channel flowManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Carlson, Andreas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Capillarity and dynamic wetting2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis capillary dominated two–phase flow is studied by means of nu- merical simulations and experiments. The theoretical basis for the simulations consists of a phase field model, which is derived from the system’s thermody- namics, and coupled with the Navier Stokes equations. Two types of interfacial flow are investigated, droplet dynamics in a bifurcating channel and sponta- neous capillary driven spreading of drops.

    Microfluidic and biomedical applications often rely on a precise control of droplets as they traverse through complicated networks of bifurcating channels. Three–dimensional simulations of droplet dynamics in a bifurcating channel are performed for a set of parameters, to describe their influence on the resulting droplet dynamics. Two distinct flow regimes are identified as the droplet in- teracts with the tip of the channel junction, namely, droplet splitting and non- splitting. A flow map based on droplet size and Capillary number is proposed to predict whether the droplet splits or not in such a geometry.

    A commonly occurring flow is the dynamic wetting of a dry solid substrate. Both experiments and numerical simulations of the spreading of a drop are presented here. A direct comparison of the two identifies a new parameter in the phase field model that is required to accurately predict the experimental spreading behavior. This parameter μf [P a · s], is interpreted as a friction factor at the moving contact line. Comparison of simulations and experiments for different liquids and surface wetting properties enabled a measurement of the contact line friction factor for a wide parameter space. Values for the contact line friction factor from phase field theory are reported here for the first time.

    To identify the physical mechanism that governs the droplet spreading, the different contributions to the flow are measured from the simulations. An im- portant part of the dissipation may arise from a friction related to the motion of the contact line itself, and this is found to be dominating both inertia and viscous friction adjacent to the contact line. A scaling law based on the con- tact line friction factor collapses the experimental data, whereas a conventional inertial or viscous scaling fails to rationalize the experimental observation, supporting the numerical finding.

  • 26.
    Carlson, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Bellani, Gabriele
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Contact line dissipation in short-time dynamic wetting2012In: Europhysics letters, ISSN 0295-5075, E-ISSN 1286-4854, Vol. 97, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dynamic wetting of a solid surface is a process that is ubiquitous in Nature, and also of increasing technological importance. The underlying dissipative mechanisms are, however, still unclear. We present here short-time dynamic wetting experiments and numerical simulations, based on a phase field approach, of a droplet on a dry solid surface, where direct comparison of the two allows us to evaluate the different contributions from the numerics. We find that an important part of the dissipation may arise from a friction related to the motion of the contact line itself, and that this may be dominating both inertia and viscous friction in the flow adjacent to the contact line. A contact line friction factor appears in the theoretical formulation that can be distinguished and quantified, also in room temperature where other sources of dissipation are present. Water and glycerin-water mixtures on various surfaces have been investigated where we show the dependency of the friction factor on the nature of the surface, and the viscosity of the liquid.

  • 27.
    Carlson, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Bellani, Gabriele
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Universality in dynamic wetting dominated by contact-line friction2012In: Physical Review E. Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics, ISSN 1539-3755, E-ISSN 1550-2376, Vol. 85, no 4, p. 045302-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report experiments on the rapid contact-line motion present in the early stages of capillary-driven spreading of drops on dry solid substrates. The spreading data fail to follow a conventional viscous or inertial scaling. By integrating experiments and simulations, we quantify a contact-line friction mu(f) which is seen to limit the speed of the rapid dynamic wetting. A scaling based on this contact-line friction is shown to yield a universal curve for the evolution of the contact-line radius as a function of time, for a range of fluid viscosities, drop sizes, and surface wettabilities.

  • 28. Castellani, F.
    et al.
    Astolfi, D.
    Mana, M.
    Becchetti, M.
    Segalini, Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Wake losses from averaged and time-resolved power measurements at full scale wind turbines2017In: Journal of Physics, Conference Series, ISSN 1742-6588, E-ISSN 1742-6596, Vol. 854, no 1, article id 012006Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work deals with the experimental analysis of wake losses fluctuations at full-scale wind turbines. The test case is a wind farm sited on a moderately complex terrain: 4 turbines are installed, having 2 MW of rated power each. The sources of information are the time-resolved data, as collected from the OPC server, and the 10-minutes averaged SCADA data. The objective is to compare the statistical distributions of wake losses for far and middle wakes, as can be observed through the "fast" lens of time-resolved data, for certain selected test-case time series, and through the "slow" lens of SCADA data, on a much longer time basis that allow to set the standards of the mean wake losses along the wind farm. Further, time-resolved data are used for an insight into the spectral properties of wake fluctuations, highlighting the role of the wind turbine as low-pass filter. Summarizing, the wind rose, the layout of the site and the structure of the data sets at disposal allow to study middle and far wake behavior, with a "slow" and "fast" perspective.

  • 29.
    Ceci, Alessandro
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Gojon, Romain
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. ISAE-SUPAERO, Toulouse, France.
    Mihaescu, Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx). KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics of Industrial Processes.
    Large Eddy Simulations for Indirect Combustion Noise Assessment in a Nozzle Guide Vane Passage2018In: Flow Turbulence and Combustion, ISSN 1386-6184, E-ISSN 1573-1987, Flow, Turbulence and Combustion, ISSN 1386-6184, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The combustion noise in aero-engines is known to originate from two different sources. First, the unsteady heat release in the combustion chamber generates the direct combustion noise. Second, hot and cold spots of air generated by the combustion process are convected and accelerated by the turbine stages and give rise to the so-called indirect combustion noise. The present work targets, by using a numerical approach, the generation mechanism of indirect combustion noise for a simplified geometry of a turbine stator passage. Periodic temperature fluctuations are imposed at the inlet, permitting to simulate hot and cold packets of air coming from the unsteady combustion. Three-dimensional Large Eddy Simulation (LES) calculations are conducted for transonic operating conditions to evaluate the blade acoustic response to the forced temperature perturbations at the inlet plane. Transonic conditions are characterized by trailing edge expansion waves and shocks. It is notably shown that their movement can be excited if disturbances with a particular frequency are injected in the domain.

  • 30. Chin, C.
    et al.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Monty, J.
    Hutchins, N.
    Ooi, A.
    Schlatter, Phillip
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Simulation of a Large-Eddy-Break-up Device (LEBU) in a Moderate Reynolds Number Turbulent Boundary Layer2016In: Flow Turbulence and Combustion, ISSN 1386-6184, E-ISSN 1573-1987, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A well-resolved large eddy simulation (LES) of a large-eddy break-up (LEBU) device in a spatially evolving turbulent boundary layer is performed with, Reynolds number, based on free-stream velocity and momentum-loss thickness, of Reθ ≈ 4300. The implementation of the LEBU is via an immersed boundary method. The LEBU is positioned at a wall-normal distance of 0.8 δ (δ denoting the local boundary layer thickness at the location of the LEBU) from the wall. The LEBU acts to delay the growth of the turbulent boundary layer and produces global skin friction reduction beyond 180δ downstream of the LEBU, with a peak local skin friction reduction of approximately 12 %. However, no net drag reduction is found when accounting for the device drag of the LEBU in accordance with the towing tank experiments by Sahlin et al. (Phys. Fluids 31, 2814, 1988). Further investigation is performed on the interactions of high and low momentum bulges with the LEBU and the corresponding output is analysed, showing a ‘break-up’ of these large momentum bulges downstream of the LEBU. In addition, results from the spanwise energy spectra show consistent reduction in energy at spanwise length scales for (Formula presented.) independent of streamwise and wall-normal location when compared to the corresponding turbulent boundary layer without LEBU.

  • 31.
    Downs, R. S. , I I I
    et al.
    KTH.
    Fallenius, Bengt E. G.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Fransson, Jens H. M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Martensson, H.
    Miniature vortex generators for flow control in falkner-skan boundary layers2017In: AIAA Journal, ISSN 0001-1452, E-ISSN 1533-385X, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 352-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vortex generators with heights comparable to displacement thickness are an effective means of producing persistent mean-flow streaks in laminar boundary layers. Inducing streaky base flows can suppress the growth of unsteady disturbances that would otherwise incite laminar-to-turbulent transition. Previous experimental and numerical works demonstrated the versatility of these miniature vortex generators in zero-pressure-gradient boundary layers. In this work, mean-flow disturbances developing from miniature vortex generators in adverse and favorable pressure-gradient boundary layers are measured systemically to assess the possibility of extending miniature vortex generator-based flow control to these scenarios. Boundary-layer streak amplitudes are measured across a range of Falkner-Skan m values, and an empirical scaling is found based on existing results. The effect of streaks on transition in an adverse pressure-gradient boundary layer is also tested, and moderate increases to laminar flow extents are observed.

  • 32.
    Ebenhoch, Raphael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Simplified modeling of wind-farm flows2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstact: In order to address the wind-industry's need for a new generation of more advanced wake models, which accurately quantify the mean flow characteristics within a reasonably CPU-time, the two-dimensional analytical approach by Belcher et al. (2003) has been extended to a three-dimensional wake model. Hereby, the boundary-layer approximation of the Navier-Stokes equations has been linearized around an undisturbed baseflow, assuming that the wind turbines provoke a small perturbation of the velocity field.

    The conducted linearization of the well established actuator-disc theory brought valuable additional insights that could be used to understand the behavior (as well as the limitations) of a model based on linear methods. Hereby, one of the results was that an adjustment of the thrust coecient is necessary in order to get the same wake-velocity field within the used linear framework.

    In this thesis, two different datasets from experiments conducted in two different wind-tunnel facilities were used in order to validate the proposed model against wind-farm and single-turbine cases. The developed model is, in contrary to current engineering wake models, able to account for effects occurring in the upstream flow region. The measurement, as well as the simulations, show that the presence of a wind farm affects the approaching flow even far upstream of the first turbine row, which is not considered in current industrial guidelines. Despite the model assumptions, several velocity statistics above wind farms have been properly estimated, providing insight about the transfer of momentum inside the turbine rows.

    Overall, a promising preliminary version of a wake model is introduced, which can be extended arbitrarily depending on the regarded purpose.

  • 33. Einarsson, J.
    et al.
    Candelier, F.
    Lundell, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Angilella, J. R.
    Mehlig, B.
    Rotation of a spheroid in a simple shear at small Reynolds number2015In: Physics of fluids, ISSN 1070-6631, E-ISSN 1089-7666, Vol. 27, no 6, article id 063301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We derive an effective equation of motion for the orientational dynamics of a neutrally buoyant spheroid suspended in a simple shear flow, valid for arbitrary particle aspect ratios and to linear order in the shear Reynolds number. We show how inertial effects lift the degeneracy of the Jeffery orbits and determine the stabilities of the log-rolling and tumbling orbits at infinitesimal shear Reynolds numbers. For prolate spheroids, we find stable tumbling in the shear plane and log-rolling is unstable. For oblate spheroids, by contrast, log-rolling is stable and tumbling is unstable provided that the particle is not too disk-like (moderate asphericity). For very flat oblate spheroids, both log-rolling and tumbling are stable, separated by an unstable limit cycle.

  • 34.
    Eitel-Amor, Georg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Stability, Transition and Control. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Simulation and validation of a spatially evolving turbulent boundary layer up to Reθ = 83002014In: International Journal of Heat and Fluid Flow, ISSN 0142-727X, E-ISSN 1879-2278, Vol. 47, p. 57-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Results of a finely resolved large-eddy simulation (LES) of a spatially developing zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer up to a Reynolds number of Reθ = 8300 are presented. The very long computational domain provides substantial assessment for suggested high Reynolds number (Re) trends. Statistics, integral quantities and spectral data are validated using high quality direct numerical simulation (DNS) ranging up to Reθ = 4300 and hot-wire measurements covering the remaining Re-range. The mean velocity, turbulent fluctuations, skin friction, and shape factor show excellent agreement with the reference data. Through utilisation of filtered DNS, subtle differences between the LES and DNS could to a large extent be explained by the reduced spanwise resolution of the LES. Spectra and correlations for the streamwise velocity and the wall-shear stress evidence a clear scale-separation and a footprint of large outer scales on the near-wall small scales. While the inner peak decreases in importance and reduces to 4% of the total energy at the end of the domain, the energy of the outer peak scales in outer units. In the near-wall region a clear k - 1 region emerges. Consideration of the two-dimensional spectra in time and spanwise space reveals that an outer time scale λt ≈ 10δ99 / U∞, with the boundary layer thickness δ99 and free-stream velocity U∞, is the correct scale throughout the boundary layer rather than the transformed streamwise wavelength multiplied by a (scale independent) convection velocity. Maps for the covariance of small scale energy and large scale motions exhibit a stronger linear Re dependence for the amplitude of the off-diagonal peak compared to the diagonal one, thereby indicating that the strength of the amplitude modulation can only qualitatively be assessed through the diagonal peak. In addition, the magnitude of the wall-pressure fluctuations confirms mixed scaling, and pressure spectra at the highest Re give a first indication of a -7/3 wave number dependence. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  • 35. Elvsén, Per Åke
    et al.
    Fransson, Jens H. M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Sandberg, M.
    Vortical structures generated by a time varying jet flow in a ventilated enclosure2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36. Facciolo, Luca
    et al.
    Tillmark, Nils
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Talamelli, Alessandro
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    A study of swirling turbulent pipe and jet flows2007In: Physics of fluids, ISSN 1070-6631, E-ISSN 1089-7666, Vol. 19, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Axially rotating turbulent pipe flow is an example in which the rotation strongly affects the turbulence, which then also influences the mean flow properties. For instance, in the fully developed flow as well, the fluid is not in solid body rotation due to the influence of the cross-stream Reynolds stress. The present paper reports new measurements from a rotating pipe flow and the streamwise mean velocity distribution is compared with recent scaling ideas of Oberlack [J. Fluid Mech. 379, 1 (1999)] and good agreement is found. A second part of the paper deals with the initial stages when the flow leaves the pipe and forms a swirling jet. The measurements in the jet show that at some distance downstream (approximately five jet diameters) the central part of the jet actually rotates in the opposite direction as compared to the rotation of the pipe. This effect is explained by the influence of the cross-stream Reynolds shear stress.

  • 37.
    Fallenius, Bengt E. G.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Sandberg, Mats
    Sattari, Amir
    Fransson, Jens H. M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Experimental study on the effect of pulsating inflowto a closed volume2011Report (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Fallenius, Bengt E. G.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Trip, Renzo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Fransson, Jens H. M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    A new test-section for wind tunnel studies on wake instability and its control2009Report (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Fallenius, Bengt E. G.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Experimental design and vortex analyses in turbulent wake flows2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A new experimental setup for studies on wake flow instability and its control that successfully has been designed and manufactured, is introduced and de- scribed. The main body is a dual-sided flat plate with an elliptic leading edge and a blunt trailing edge. Permeable surfaces enable boundary layer suction and/or blowing that introduce the unique feature of adjusting the inlet condition of the wake created behind the plate. This, in combination with a trailing edge that is easily modified, makes it an ideal experiment for studies of different control methods for the wake flow instability as well as extensive parameter studies. Experimental validation of the setup has been performed by means of measurements of the wake symmetry and boundary layer velocity profiles at the trailing edge. Some preliminary results on the Strouhal number versus different inlet conditions are reported.

    Additionally, an in-house vortex detection (VD) program has been developed in order to detect, analyse and compare small-scale vortical structures in instantaneous velocity fields from flow measurements. This will be a powerful tool for comparison of wake characteristics for varying inlet conditions and control methods in the new experimental setup. Measurements from three completely separate experimental setups with different geometries and flow cases, have been analysed by the VD-program.

     

           i.     In order to obtain improved ventilation we have studied the effect of pulsating inflow into a closed volume compared to having the inflow at a constant flow rate. We show that the number of small-scale eddies is significantly increased and that the stagnation zones are reduced in size, which enhances the mixing.

     

          ii.     Instantaneous velocity fields in the wake behind a porous cylinder subjected to suction or blowing through the entire cylinder surface have also been analysed using the VD-program. The results show that the major change for different levels of blowing or suction is the location of vortices while the most common vortex size and strength are essentially unchanged.

     

         iii.     Another study on how the geometry of a V-shaped mixer in a pipe flow affects the mixing have also been examined, where no general differences were found between different thicknesses, why a thickness that is favourable from an acoustic point of view can be chosen.

     

    We also propose a new method, using global mode analysis on experimental data, showing that randomly ordered snapshots of the velocity field behind the porous cylinder can be re-ordered and phase-averaged.

  • 40.
    Fallenius, Bengt
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Fransson, Jens H. M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Vortex analysis in the wake of a porous cylinder subject to continuous suction or blowing2008Report (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Ferro, Marco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Fallenius, Bengt
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Fransson, Jens
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    On the scaling of turbulent asymptotic suction boundary layers2017In: 10th International Symposium on Turbulence and Shear Flow Phenomena, TSFP 2017, 2017, Vol. 2Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An analysis of turbulent suction boundary layers is carried out on the basis of new experimental data. The streamwise extent of the suction region of the present experimental apparatus is significantly longer than previous studies, allowing us to better investigate the development of boundary layers with wall suction. We show that it is possible to experimentally realize a turbulent asymptotic state where the boundary layer becomes independent of the streamwise direction and of the initial condition, so that the suction rate constitutes the only control parameter. Turbulent asymptotic suction boundary layers appear to be characterized by a mean velocity with a long logarithmic region, with a slope independent of the suction rate if outer scaling is adopted. In addition to the mean-velocity scaling of turbulent asymptotic suction boundary layers, the suction rate threshold for self-sustained turbulence is also investigated. 

  • 42.
    Ferro, Marco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Fallenius, Bengt
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Fransson, Jens
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    On the turbulent boundary layer with wall suction2017In: Progress in Turbulence VII, Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2017, Vol. 196, p. 39-44Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An experimental analysis of the turbulent boundary layer subject to wall-normal suction is carried out on a 6.4 m long perforated plate by means of hot-wire anemometry. For this type of flow the scaling of the mean velocity and of the other statistical quantities remains an open question and the amount of experimental data available, especially regarding the fluctuating velocity components, is scarce. The longer streamwise length of the present experimental apparatus compared to the one used in the previous studies allows us to better investigate the development of the boundary layer: it is shown that a turbulent asymptotic state with a constant boundary-layer thickness, analogously to what happens for the laminar state, can be closely approached experimentally and that its mean velocity profile exhibit a clear logarithmic region.

  • 43. Fiorini, T.
    et al.
    Bellani, G.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Segalini, Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Talamelli, A.
    Turbulent pipe flow near-wall statistics2017In: Progress in Turbulence VII: Proceedings of the iTi Conference in Turbulence 2016, Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2017, Vol. 196, p. 89-94Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Results from the first experimental campaign in the Long Pipe facility of the CICLoPE laboratory are reported. Single hot-wire profile measurements are presented, taken from the wall up to one third of the pipe radius, with the friction Reynolds number Reτ ranging from 6.5 × 103 up to 3.8 × 104 . Measurements of the pressure drop along the pipe are presented together with an estimation of its uncertainty. Mean and variance of the streamwise velocity fluctuations are examined and compared with the findings from other facilities. The amplitude of the inner-scaled near-wall peak of the variance, after being corrected for spatial resolution effects, shows an increasing trend with Reynolds number, in accordance with low Reynolds number experiments and simulations.

  • 44.
    Fjällman, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    GT-Power Report2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Presently in the vehicle industry full engine system simulations are performedusing dierent one-dimensional software programs in order to assess the eectof dierent geometrical and part changes on the system as a whole. Thesesimulations are usually fast and multiple parameters can be monitored andanalysed.In this report GT-Power simulations have been performed on a completeengine designed by Volvo Car Corporation. The investigation was performedin order to gain basic knowledge about the internal combustion engine andspecically about the gas exchange system and the turbocharger. A parameterstudy was performed and the responses on the turbine eciency and breaktorque were analysed.The trends in the simulation results follow the background theory well, i.e.increasing the turbine eciency increases the engine eciency and reduces thetime to torque. The eect of the valve opening times and durations on thebreak torque and the turbine eciency can be studied. There is an intricaterelationship where the optimal conguration is dependent on the engine speedas well as the opening angles and times.GT-Power is a very powerful tool for simulating complete engines. Howevercare must be taken when analysing the results. The code only uses one directionand time, meaning that the ow will always be uniform in the cross sections.Whereas in many parts of the real engine the ow eld is three dimensional andfar from uniform in the cross-sections.

  • 45.
    Fjällman, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Large Eddy Simulations of Complex Flows in IC-Engine's Exhaust Manifold and Turbine2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis deals with the flow in pipe bends and radial turbines geometries that are commonly found in an Internal Combustion Engine (ICE). The development phase of internal combustion engines relies more and more on simulations as an important complement to experiments. This is partly because of the reduction in development cost and the shortening of the development time. This is one of the reasons for the need of more accurate and predictive simulations. By using more complex computational methods the accuracy and predictive capabilities are increased. The disadvantage of using more sophisticated tools is that the computational time is increasing, making such tools less attractive for standard design purposes. Hence, one of the goals of the work has been to contribute to assess and improve the predictive capability of the simpler methods used by the industry.

    By comparing results from experiments, Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computations, and Large Eddy Simulations (LES) the accuracy of the different computational methods can be established. The advantages of using LES over RANS for the flows under consideration stems from the unsteadiness of the flow in the engine manifold. When such unsteadiness overlaps the natural turbulence the model lacks a rational foundation. The thesis considers the effect of the cyclic flow on the chosen numerical models. The LES calculations have proven to be able to predict the mean field and the fluctuations very well when compared to the experimental data. Also the effects of pulsatile exhaust flow on the performance of the turbine of a turbocharging system is assessed. Both steady and pulsating inlet conditions are considered for the turbine case, where the latter is a more realistic representation of the real flow situation inside the exhaust manifold and turbine. The results have been analysed using different methods: single point Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT), probe line means and statistics, area and volume based Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) and Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD).

  • 46.
    Fjällman, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Unsteady simulations of the turbulent flow in the exhaust system of an IC-engine for optimal energy utilization2013Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This licentiate thesis deals with the ow in pipe bends and radial turbines inan internal combustion engine environment. Looking into the engine bay of apassenger car one cannot avoid noticing all the pipe bends and splits. Duringthe development of internal combustion engines the engine manufacturers arestarting to focus more on simulations than on experiments. This is partly becauseof the reduction in cost but also the reduction in turn around time. This isone of the reasons for the need of more accurate and predictive simulations.By using more complex computational methods the accuracy and predictivecapabilities are increased. The downside is that the computational time isincreasing so the long term goal of the project is to use the results to improvethe predictive capability of the lower order methods used by the industry.By comparing experiments, Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS)simulations, and Large Eddy Simulations (LES), the accuracy of the simulationmethods can be established. The advantages of using LES over RANS for the ows under consideration stems from the unsteadiness of the ow in the enginemanifolds. When such unsteadiness overlaps the natural turbulent spectrum,general RANS models cannot handle the problem specic ow. The thesisconsiders this eect on the chosen numerical model. The LES results have beenshown to be more accurate than the RANS simulations both for global meanvalues and for the uctuating components. The LES calculations have provento predict the mean

  • 47.
    Fjällman, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Mihaescu, Mihai
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Fuchs, Laszlo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Analysis of 3 Dimensional Turbine Flow by using Mode Decomposition Techniques2014In: Proceedings of the ASME Turbo Expo, 2014, p. GT2014-26963-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Today one of the most popular ways of lowering the fuel consumption and emissions of the Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) is by downsizing the engine. Downsizing means that the swept volumes of the cylinders are decreased; this lowers the frictional and thermal losses. By combining the downsizing with a well matched turbocharger system the performance is preserved while the advantages are retained. Since more and more of the development work is being performed by simulations there is an increasing need for more accurate methods. These methods are more complex and require more resources than the simpler, faster and more robust models used today. In this study Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of the unsteady flow in a radial turbine designed for a gasoline ICE has been performed and analysed. The flow inside the turbine is highly 3 dimensional, pulsating and characterized by secondary flow motions and high curvatures. All these are reasons for which the method of choice should be LES. LES is able to resolve a large range of scales and capture the flow dynamics. The considered case concerns a non-pulsating flow condition but with engine like mass flow and temperature. Post-processing tools based on Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) and Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) are used to analyse the large amount of LES based flow data. The POD method is used to investigate the energy content of the dominant, large structures present in the flow. The DMD method on the other hand is used to reveal the flow structures responsible for specific frequencies found in the flow field. Preliminary data show a fair agreement between experimental data and LES results in terms of predicting the turbine performance parameters.

  • 48.
    Fjällman, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Mihaescu, Mihai
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Fuchs, Laszlo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Analysis of Secondary Flow Induced by a 90 Bend in a Pipe Using Mode Decomposition Techniques2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study unsteady simulations of the flow through and after a 90 pipe bend has been performed by Large Eddy Simulations (LES). In the passenger car engine there is an abundance of pipes and pipe bends. Since pipes and bends are often situated upstream of important engine components the flow in these needs to be well predicted. This entails that there is a need for accurate pipe flow simulations in order to ensure that the inflow conditions, to the e.g. cylinders or turbocharger, are as close to the experimental values as possible. The flow field is further studied by the use of Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) and Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD). It has been found that there is a low frequency oscillation in the strength of the alternately dominant dean vortex at the exit of the pipe bend. This phenomenon is analysed and the mechanism for it is discussed.

  • 49.
    Fjällman, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Mihaescu, Mihai
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Fuchs, Laszlo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Effects of inlet geometry on turbine performanceManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study comparisons have been performed between gas-stand experiments,Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) simulations, and LargeEddy Simulations (LES) of the ow through a radial turbine of a turbochargerdesigned for an internal combustion engine. The long term goal for the projectis to improve the prediction capabilities for the simpler computational modelsused by industry in the research and development of new products. At thepresent stage the eects of using simplied geometries and methods for turbineperformance predictions are assessed. Additionally, data obtained from URANScalculations is compared against experimental data and against unsteady LESresults. The comparisons are made in order to evaluate the employed methodologies,to know when to use simplied models with reasonable accuracy, as wellas to justify the use of more advanced methods when the models are inadequate.It was found out that the LES results are closer to the gas-stand experimentsthan the URANS predictions are.

  • 50.
    Fjällman, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Mihaescu, Mihai
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Fuchs, Laszlo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Effects of Pulsation Frequency and Pulse Shape on Turbine PerformanceManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      The current paper studies the pulsating flow in the exhaust manifold and turbine of a passenger car engine. The study focuses on three engine RPMs and two different pulse shapes, one normal shape and one shorter DEP like shape. By simulating different valve strategies one can investigate how to maximize the available exhaust flow energy to the turbine. The simulations have been performed with the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) method with boundary conditions received from GT-Power simulations. The study focuses on kinetic energy and turbine torque analysis of the incoming flow and of the flow in the turbine wheel region. It is found that the pulse shape is affecting the wheel torque significantly and that the kinetic energy entering the wheel region is different depending on which cylinder fired.

1234 1 - 50 of 179
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