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  • 1. Abbasi Hoseini, A.
    et al.
    Lundell, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Andersson, H. I.
    Finite-length effects on dynamical behavior of rod-like particles in wall-bounded turbulent flow2015In: International Journal of Multiphase Flow, ISSN 0301-9322, E-ISSN 1879-3533, Vol. 76, p. 13-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Combined Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) measurements have been performed in dilute suspensions of rod-like particles in wall turbulence. PIV results for the turbulence field in the water table flow apparatus compared favorably with data from Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of channel flow turbulence and the universality of near-wall turbulence justified comparisons with DNS of fiber-laden channel flow. In order to examine any shape effects on the dynamical behavior of elongated particles in wall-bounded turbulent flow, fibers with three different lengths but the same diameter were used. In the logarithmic part of the wall-layer, the translational fiber velocity was practically unaffected by the fiber length l. In the buffer layer, however, the fiber dynamics turned out to be severely constrained by the distance z to the wall. The short fibers accumulated preferentially in low-speed areas and adhered to the local fluid speed. The longer fibers (l/z > 1) exhibited a bi-modal probability distribution for the fiber velocity, which reflected an almost equal likelihood for a long fiber to reside in an ejection or in a sweep. It was also observed that in the buffer region, high-speed long fibers were almost randomly oriented whereas for all size cases the slowly moving fibers preferentially oriented in the streamwise direction. These phenomena have not been observed in DNS studies of fiber suspension flows and suggested l/z to be an essential parameter in a new generation of wall-collision models to be used in numerical studies.

  • 2.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Characterisation of airborne particles from rail traffic2011Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the investigation of wear particles in rail transport started in late-1910s, the high mass concentration of these particles has raised worries among researchers concerned with air quality. However, effective action has yet to be taken because of lack of relevant knowledge. This thesis provides applicable information for the airborne wear particles in rail transport. Some aspects of their characteristics such as diameter size, mass concentration, number concentration, and morphology of particles were investigated in field tests and laboratory tests.The effects on particle characterisations from different operational conditions in the field tests, and applying different braking materials, conducting tests in different applied loads or sliding velocities in the laboratory tests were studied. The main advantage of conducting laboratory tests was to focus on studying particles from one source. The possibility of repetition, using high sensitive instruments and conducting tests at low costs are the other advantages of laboratory studies. Paper A describes how a pin-on-disc machine was used to reproduce similar real operational conditions during mechanical braking in a train. The results were validated by comparing the field tests results with the laboratory studies. The particles morphology and size distribution were also studied.Paper B presents a summary of field tests results. The effects of curve negotiating and applying braking in different real conditions were investigated with an on-board measurement.The element composition of the particles and their potential sources were also investigated outside of the particles morphologies.Paper C presents comprehensive results from laboratory studies on airborne particles from different braking materials. The differences in the particle characteristics in similar test conditions were attributable to different material compositions and dominant wear mechanisms. A new index was introduced in this paper and is suggested to be used as a qualitative factor with regard to the airborne wear particle emission rate.Paper D is a review of the recent studies of exhaust emission and non-exhaust emission from rail vehicles. A summary of results, measurements, adverse health effects, and proposed or applied solutions are reviewed in this paper.

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  • 3.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Sellgren, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Technical note: Experiences of studying airborne wear particles from road and rail transport2013In: Aerosol and Air Quality Research, ISSN 1680-8584, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 1161-1169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Airborne particles and their adverse effects on air quality have been recognized by humans since ancient times. Current exhaust emission legislations increase the relative contribution of wear particles on the PM levels. Consequently, wearbased particle emissions from rail and road transport have raised concerns as ground transportation is developing quickly. Although scientific research on airborne wear-based particles started in 1909, there is almost no legislation that control the generation of wear-based particles. In addition, there is no accepted and approved standard measurement technique for monitoring and recording particle characteristics. The main objective of this study is to review recent experimental work in this field and to discuss their set-ups, the sampling methods, the results, and their limitations, and to propose measures for reducing these limitations.

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  • 4.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Teimourimanesh, Shahab
    Chalmers.
    Vernersson, Tore
    Chalmers.
    Sellgren, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Lunden, Roger
    Chalmers.
    Temperature and thermo-elastic instability of tread braking friction materials2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5. Abreu, L. I.
    et al.
    Cavalieri, A. V. G.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Vinuesa, Ricardo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Henningson, Dan S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Reduced-order models to analyse coherent structures in turbulent pipe flow2019In: 11th International Symposium on Turbulence and Shear Flow Phenomena, TSFP 2019, International Symposium on Turbulence and Shear Flow Phenomena, TSFP , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fully resolved direct numerical simulations, performed with a high-order spectral-element method, are used to study coherent structures in turbulent pipe flow at friction Reynolds numbers Reτ = 180 and 550 (El Khoury et al., 2013). The database was analysed using spectral proper orthogonal decomposition (SPOD) so as to identify dominant coherent structures, most of which are of streaky shape. As a reduced-order model for such structures, the linearised flow response to harmonic forcing was computed, and the analysed singular modes of the resolvent operator were analysed. For turbulent flows, this approach amounts to considering the non-linear terms in the Navier–Stokes system as an unknown forcing, treated convenienty as external. Resolvent analysis then allows an identification of the optimal forcing and most amplified flow response; the latter may be related to observed relevant structures obtained by SPOD, especially if the gain between forcing and response is much larger than what is found for suboptimal forcings or if the non-linear forcing is white noise. Results from SPOD and resolvent analysis were extracted for several combinations of frequencies, streamwise and azimuthal wavenumbers. For both Reynolds numbers, good agreement between SPOD and resolvent modes was observed for parameter combinations where the lift-up mechanism is present: optimal forcing from resolvent analysis represents streamwise vortices and the associated response are streaky structures.

  • 6.
    Abreu, Leandra I.
    et al.
    Divisão de Engenharia Aeronáutica, Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica, 12228-900, São José dos Campos, SP, Brazil.
    Tanarro, Alvaro
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics.
    Cavalieri, André V.G.
    Divisão de Engenharia Aeronáutica, Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica, 12228-900, São José dos Campos, SP, Brazil.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Mechanics. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Vinuesa, Ricardo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Hanifi, Ardeshir
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Henningson, Dan S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Mechanics. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Wavepackets in turbulent flows around airfoilsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Motivated by the recent analysis by Sano et al. 2019, Phys. Rev. Fluids, vol. 4, p. 094602, of spanwise-coherent structures in the turbulent flow around airfoils and their connection to trailing-edge noise, we carry out a thorough characterisation of such structures in three simulation databases. We analyse two different numerical simulations of incompressible flow in turbulent regime, both at chord Reynolds number of 400,000: a large-eddy simulation for a NACA 0012 profile at zero angle of attack, and a direct numerical simulation for a NACA 4412 airfoil with an angle of attack of 5 degrees. Snapshots of the flow field were analysed using Spectral Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (SPOD), in order to extract the dominant coherent structures of the flow. Focus is given to  the aforementioned spanwise-coherent fluctuations, which two-dimensional disturbances in the computational domain due to the use of periodic boundary conditions. The leading SPOD modes show that the most energetic coherent structures are wavepackets, extending over the whole turbulent boundary layers around the airfoils with significant amplitudes near the trailing-edge. Higher amplitudes are observed in the region of  stronger adverse pressure gradient at the suction side of the NACA 4412 airfoil. To understand how such structures in the turbulent field can be modelled, the linear response of the flow using the singular value decomposition of the linearised resolvent operator was performed, using the mean field as a base flow and considering a locally parallel approximation. Such analysis shows that the leading SPOD modes can be associated to optimal, linearised flow responses, particularly for stations far from the trailing edge; the latter introduces a discontinuity in boundary conditions, and the locally parallel approximation becomes questionable. We then focus on evaluating the dependence of such wavepackets on the domain size, to ensure that these structures are not an artifact of the use of periodic boundary conditions in small computational boxes. To do so, we performed an incompressible LES of a zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer (ZPGTBL), for three different spanwise sizes: Lz=32 δ*, Lz=64 δ* and Lz=128 δ*, where δ* is a reference displacement thickness in a region of developed turbulent flow, with Reynolds number matching the values in the airfoil simulations. The signature of such wavepackets is seen in non-premultiplied spanwise wavenumber spectra, which reaches, for the three domain sizes, a plateau for spanwise wavelengths going to infinity (or wavenumbers going to zero); this plateau is representative of the spanwise-coherent structures seen in the airfoil simulations. Similar SPOD and resolvent analyses were carried out for the zero spanwise wavenumber of the ZPGTBL, and the same coherent wavepackets were observed for the three domains, with very similar amplitudes. Such wavepackets were also accurately modelled using the optimal resolvent response. These results confirm that the spanwise-elongated structures are not domain-size dependent for the studied simulations, and are thus a feature of turbulent boundary layers.

  • 7.
    af Klinteberg, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Numerical Analysis, NA. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Lindbo, Dag
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Numerical Analysis, NA. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Tornberg, Anna-Karin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Numerical Analysis, NA. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    An explicit Eulerian method for multiphase flow with contact line dynamics and insoluble surfactant2014In: Computers & Fluids, ISSN 0045-7930, E-ISSN 1879-0747, Vol. 101, p. 50-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The flow behavior of many multiphase flow applications is greatly influenced by wetting properties and the presence of surfactants. We present a numerical method for two-phase flow with insoluble surfactants and contact line dynamics in two dimensions. The method is based on decomposing the interface between two fluids into segments, which are explicitly represented on a local Eulerian grid. It provides a natural framework for treating the surfactant concentration equation, which is solved locally on each segment. An accurate numerical method for the coupled interface/surfactant system is given. The system is coupled to the Navier-Stokes equations through the immersed boundary method, and we discuss the issue of force regularization in wetting problems, when the interface touches the boundary of the domain. We use the method to illustrate how the presence of surfactants influences the behavior of free and wetting drops.

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  • 8.
    af Klinteberg, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Numerical Analysis, NA. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Tornberg, Anna-Karin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Numerical Analysis, NA. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    A fast integral equation method for solid particles in viscous flow using quadrature by expansion2016In: Journal of Computational Physics, ISSN 0021-9991, E-ISSN 1090-2716, Vol. 326, p. 420-445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Boundary integral methods are advantageous when simulating viscous flow around rigid particles, due to the reduction in number of unknowns and straightforward handling of the geometry. In this work we present a fast and accurate framework for simulating spheroids in periodic Stokes flow, which is based on the completed double layer boundary integral formulation. The framework implements a new method known as quadrature by expansion (QBX), which uses surrogate local expansions of the layer potential to evaluate it to very high accuracy both on and off the particle surfaces. This quadrature method is accelerated through a newly developed precomputation scheme. The long range interactions are computed using the spectral Ewald (SE) fast summation method, which after integration with QBX allows the resulting system to be solved in M log M time, where M is the number of particles. This framework is suitable for simulations of large particle systems, and can be used for studying e.g. porous media models.

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  • 9. Agarwal, A.
    et al.
    Brandt, Luca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Zaki, T. A.
    Transition to Turbulence in Viscoelastic Channel Flow2015In: Procedia IUTAM, Elsevier, 2015, p. 519-526Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of viscoelasticity on bypass transition to turbulence in channel flow is studied using data from direct numerical simulations by Agarwal et al. (2014) 1. The initial field is a superposition of a laminar base state and a localized disturbance. Relative to the Newtonian conditions, the polymeric FENE-P flow delays the onset of transition and extends its duration. The former effect is due to a weakening of the pre-transitional disturbance field, while the prolonged transition region is due to a slower spreading rate of the turbulent spots. Once turbulence occupies the full channel, a comparison of the turbulence fields shows that energetic flow structures are longer and wider in the polymeric flow. The final turbulent state is compared to elasto-inertial turbulence (EIT), where the polymer conformation field takes the form of elongated sheets with wide spanwise extent. © 2015 The Authors.

  • 10. Agarwal, Akshat
    et al.
    Brandt, Luca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Zaki, Tamer A.
    Linear and nonlinear evolution of a localized disturbance in polymeric channel flow2014In: Journal of Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 0022-1120, E-ISSN 1469-7645, Vol. 760, p. 278-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The evolution of an initially localized disturbance in polymeric channel flow is investigated, with the FENE-P model used to characterize the viscoelastic behaviour of the flow. In the linear growth regime, the flow response is stabilized by viscoelasticity, and the maximum attainable disturbance energy amplification is reduced with increasing polymer concentration. The reduction in the energy growth rate is attributed to the polymer work, which plays a dual role. First, a spanwise polymer-work term develops, and is explained by the tilting action of the wall-normal voracity on the mean streamwise conformation tensor. This resistive term weakens the spanwise velocity perturbation thus reducing the energy of the localized disturbance. The second action of the polymer is analogous, with a wall-normal polymer work term that weakens the vertical velocity perturbation. Its indirect effect on energy growth is substantial since it reduces the production of Reynolds shear stress and in turn of the streamwise velocity perturbation, or streaks. During the early stages of nonlinear growth, the dominant effect of the polymer is to suppress the large-scale streaky structures which are strongly amplified in Newtonian flows. As a result, the process of transition to turbulence is prolonged and, after transition, a drag-reduced turbulent state is attained.

  • 11.
    Ahlberg, Charlotte
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Lundell, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Soderberg, L. Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    SELF-ORGANIZATION OF FIBERS IN A SUSPENSION BETWEEN TWO COUNTER-ROTATING DISCS2009In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE ASME FLUIDS ENGINEERING DIVISION SUMMER CONFERENCE, VOL 1, PTS A-C, NEW YORK: AMER SOC MECHANICAL ENGINEERS , 2009, p. 585-592Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The behavior of fibers suspended in a flow between two flat counter-rotating discs has been studied experimentally. Captured images of the fibers in the flow were analyzed by steerable filters, to extract positions and orientations of the fibers. Experiments were performed for gaps between the discs of less than one fiber length, and for equal absolute values of the angular velocities for the discs. The length-to-diameter ratio of the fibers was approximately 14. During certain conditions, the fibers organized themselves in a distinct manner, which we will denote as fiber trains, in which three or more fibers are aligned next to each other, at the same radial position, with a short fiber-to-fiber distance. The direction of the individual fibers is radial and the direction of the whole train is tangential. Trains containing more than 60 fibers have been observed and are quite impressing.

  • 12.
    Ahmed, Zaheer
    et al.
    Koc Univ, Dept Mech Engn, Istanbul, Turkey..
    Izbassarov, Daulet
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Lu, Jiacai
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Dept Mech Engn, Baltimore, MD 21218 USA..
    Tryggvason, Gretar
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Dept Mech Engn, Baltimore, MD 21218 USA..
    Muradoglu, Metin
    Koc Univ, Dept Mech Engn, Istanbul, Turkey..
    Tammisola, Outi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Effects of soluble surfactant on lateral migration of a bubble in a pressure driven channel flow2020In: International Journal of Multiphase Flow, ISSN 0301-9322, E-ISSN 1879-3533, Vol. 126, article id 103251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of soluble surfactant on the lateral migration of a bubble in a pressure-driven channel flow are examined by interface-resolved numerical simulations. The interfacial and bulk surfactant concentration evolution equations are solved fully coupled with the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. A non-linear equation of state is used to relate interfacial surface tension to surfactant concentration at the interface. Extensive computations are performed to investigate the bubble dynamics for a wide range of parameters. It is found that surfactant dramatically changes the bubble dynamics. In the clean case, the bubble position depends on its deformability, characterized by the Eotvos (Eo) and the capillary (Ca) numbers. The spherical bubble moves towards the wall, while the deformable one migrates away from it. On the other hand, in the presence of the surfactant, even the spherical bubble moves away from the wall. It is also found that the contaminated bubble stays away from the wall for Eo = 0.1 and Eo = 1.5 while it migrates towards the wall for 0.1 < Eo < 1.5. Also, at high Eo, the onset of path instability is observed for both the clean and the contaminated cases. However, adding surfactant to the system triggers the path instability earlier and amplifies the oscillations afterwards.

  • 13.
    Albernaz, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Do, Quang Minh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Multirelaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model for droplet heating and evaporation under forced convection2015In: Physical Review E. Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics, ISSN 1539-3755, E-ISSN 1550-2376, Vol. 91, no 4, article id 043012Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the evaporation of a droplet surrounded by superheated vapor with relative motion between phases. The evaporating droplet is a challenging process, as one must take into account the transport of mass, momentum, and heat. Here a lattice Boltzmann method is employed where phase change is controlled by a nonideal equation of state. First, numerical simulations are compared to the D-2 law for a vaporizing static droplet and good agreement is observed. Results are then presented for a droplet in a Lagrangian frame under a superheated vapor flow. Evaporation is described in terms of the temperature difference between liquid-vapor and the inertial forces. The internal liquid circulation driven by surface-shear stresses due to convection enhances the evaporation rate. Numerical simulations demonstrate that for higher Reynolds numbers, the dynamics of vaporization flux can be significantly affected, which may cause an oscillatory behavior on the droplet evaporation. The droplet-wake interaction and local mass flux are discussed in detail.

  • 14.
    Albernaz, Daniel L.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Do-Quang, Minh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Lattice Boltzmann Method for the evaporation of a suspended droplet2013In: Interfacial phenomena and heat transfer, ISSN 2167-857X, Vol. 1, p. 245-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we consider a thermal multiphase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to investigate the heating and vaporization of a suspended droplet. An important benefit from the LBM is that phase separation is generated spontaneously and jump conditions for heat and mass transfer are not imposed. We use double distribution functions in order to solve for momentum and energy equations. The force is incorporated via the exact difference method (EDM) scheme where different equations of state (EOS) are used, including the Peng-Robinson EOS. The equilibrium and boundary conditions are carefully studied. Results are presented for a hexane droplet set to evaporate in a superheated gas, for static condition and under gravitational effects. For the static droplet, the numerical simulations show that capillary pressure and the cooling effect at the interface play a major role. When the droplet is convected due to the gravitational field, the relative motion between the droplet and surrounding gas enhances the heat transfer. Evolution of density and temperature fields are illustrated in details.

  • 15.
    Albernaz, Daniel L.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Do-Quang, Minh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Hermanson, J. C.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Droplet deformation and heat transfer in isotropic turbulence2017In: Journal of Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 0022-1120, E-ISSN 1469-7645, Vol. 820, p. 61-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The heat and mass transfer of deformable droplets in turbulent flows is crucial. to a wide range of applications, such as cloud dynamics and internal combustion engines. This study investigates a single droplet undergoing phase change in isotropic turbulence using numerical simulations with a hybrid lattice Boltzmann scheme. Phase separation is controlled by a non-ideal equation of state and density contrast is taken into consideration. Droplet deformation is caused by pressure and shear stress at the droplet interface. The statistics of thermodynamic variables are quantified and averaged over both the liquid and vapour phases. The occurrence of evaporation and condensation is correlated to temperature fluctuations, surface tension variation and turbulence intensity. The temporal spectra of droplet deformations are analysed and related to the droplet surface area. Different modes of oscillation are clearly identified from the deformation power spectrum for low Taylor Reynolds number Re, whereas nonlinearities are produced with the increase of Re A, as intermediate frequencies are seen to overlap. As an outcome, a continuous spectrum is observed, which shows a decrease in the power spectrum that scales as similar to f(-3) Correlations between the droplet Weber number, deformation parameter, fluctuations of the droplet volume and thermodynamic variables are also developed.

  • 16.
    Albernaz, Daniel L.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Do-Quang, Minh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Hermanson, J. C.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Thermodynamics of a real fluid near the critical point in numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence2016In: Physics of fluids, ISSN 1070-6631, E-ISSN 1089-7666, Vol. 28, no 12, article id 125105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the behavior of a fluid near the critical point by using numerical simulations of weakly compressible three-dimensional isotropic turbulence. Much has been done for a turbulent flow with an ideal gas. The primary focus of this work is to analyze fluctuations of thermodynamic variables (pressure, density, and temperature) when a non-ideal Equation Of State (EOS) is considered. In order to do so, a hybrid lattice Boltzmann scheme is applied to solve the momentum and energy equations. Previously unreported phenomena are revealed as the temperature approaches the critical point. Fluctuations in pressure, density, and temperature increase, followed by changes in their respective probability density functions. Due to the non-linearity of the EOS, it is seen that variances of density and temperature and their respective covariance are equally important close to the critical point. Unlike the ideal EOS case, significant differences in the thermodynamic properties are also observed when the Reynolds number is increased. We also address issues related to the spectral behavior and scaling of density, pressure, temperature, and kinetic energy.

  • 17.
    Alenius, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics.
    Fuchs, Laszlo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    LES of Acoustic-Flow Interaction at an Orifice Plate2012In: 18th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference (33rd AIAA Aeroacoustics Conference), 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The scattering of plane waves by a thick orifice plate, placed in a circular or square duct with flow, is studied through Large Eddy Simulation. The scattering matrix is computed and compared to measurements, showing reasonably good agreement except around one frequency ($St \approx 0.4$). Here a stronger amplification of acoustic energy is observed in the circular duct simulations than in the measurements and the square duct simulations. In order to improve the understanding of the interaction between an incoming wave, the flow, and the plate, a few frequencies are studied in more detail. A Dynamic Mode Decomposition is performed to identify flow structures at significant frequencies. This shows that the amplification of acoustic energy occurs at the frequency where the jet in the circular duct has an axisymmetric instability. Furthermore, the incoming wave slightly amplifies this instability, and suppresses background flow fluctuations.

  • 18.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Imayama, Shintaro
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Lingwood, Rebecca J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. University of Cambridge, United Kingdom .
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Segalini, Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Turbulent boundary layers over flat plates and rotating disks-The legacy of von Karman: A Stockholm perspective2013In: European journal of mechanics. B, Fluids, ISSN 0997-7546, E-ISSN 1873-7390, Vol. 40, p. 17-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many of the findings and ideas of von Karman are still of interest to the fluid dynamics community. For instance, his result that the mean velocity distribution in turbulent flows has a logarithmic behavior with respect to the distance from the centreline is still a cornerstone for everybody working in wall-bounded turbulence and was first presented to an international audience in Stockholm at the Third International Congress for Applied Mechanics in 1930. In this paper we discuss this result and also how the so-called von Karman constant can be determined in a new simple way. We also discuss the possibility of a second (outer) maximum of the streamwise velocity fluctuations, a result that was implicit in some of the assumptions proposed by von Karman.

  • 19.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Lingwood, Rebecca J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. University of Cambridge, United Kingdom .
    Rotation Effects on Wall-Bounded Flows: Some Laboratory Experiments2014In: Modeling Atmospheric and Oceanic Flows: Insights from Laboratory Experiments and Numerical Simulations, Wiley-Blackwell, 2014, p. 83-100Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter focuses on three different categories: (1) system rotation vector parallel to mean-flow vorticity; (2) flows set up by the rotation of one or more boundaries; and (3) system rotation aligned with the mean-flow direction. The flows in the different categories above differ with respect to their geometry but, more importantly, in how rotation affects them. The chapter focuses on three different flows that are relatively amenable to laboratory investigation, one from each category described above: One is plane Couette flow undergoing system rotation about an axis normal to the mean flow, another is the von Kármán boundary layer flow, and the third is axially rotating pipe flow. It defines important nondimensional parameters that govern them and discuss some of their interesting flow features in various parameter ranges. Various experimental realizations of the three different flow systems are described and considerations and limitations regarding the laboratory systems are discussed.

  • 20.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Mechanics.
    Segalini, Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Wind farms in complex terrains: an introduction2017In: Philosophical Transactions. Series A: Mathematical, physical, and engineering science, ISSN 1364-503X, E-ISSN 1471-2962, Vol. 375, no 2091Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wind energy is one of the fastest growing sources of sustainable energy production. As more wind turbines are coming into operation, the best locations are already becoming occupied by turbines, and wind-farm developers have to look for new and still available areas-locations that may not be ideal such as complex terrain landscapes. In these locations, turbulence and wind shear are higher, and in general wind conditions are harder to predict. Also, the modelling of the wakes behind the turbines is more complicated, which makes energy-yield estimates more uncertain than under ideal conditions. This theme issue includes 10 research papers devoted to various fluid-mechanics aspects of using wind energy in complex terrains and illustrates recent progress and future developments in this important field. This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'.

  • 21.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Segalini, Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    A new scaling for the streamwise turbulence intensity in wall-bounded turbulent flows and what it tells us about the "outer" peak2011In: Physics of fluids, ISSN 1070-6631, E-ISSN 1089-7666, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 041702-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One recent focus of experimental studies of turbulence in high Reynolds number wall-bounded flows has been the scaling of the root mean square of the fluctuating streamwise velocity, but progress has largely been impaired by spatial resolution effects of hot-wire sensors. For the near-wall peak, recent results seem to have clarified the controversy; however, one of the remaining issues in this respect is the emergence of a second (so-called outer) peak at high Reynolds numbers. The present letter introduces a new scaling of the local turbulence intensity profile, based on the diagnostic plot by Alfredsson and Orlu [Eur. J. Mech. B/Fluids 42, 403 (2010)], which predicts the location and amplitude of the "outer" peak and suggests its presence as a question of sufficiently large scale separation.

  • 22.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH Mech, Linne FLOW Ctr, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Large-Eddy BreakUp Devices - a 40 Years Perspective from a Stockholm Horizon2018In: Flow Turbulence and Combustion, ISSN 1386-6184, E-ISSN 1573-1987, Vol. 100, no 4, p. 877-888Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the beginning of the 1980's Large Eddy BreakUp (LEBU) devices, thin plates or airfoils mounted in the outer part of turbulent boundary layers, were shown to be able to change the turbulent structure and intermittency as well as reduce turbulent skin friction. In some wind-tunnel studies it was also claimed that a net drag reduction was obtained, i.e. the reduction in skin-friction drag was larger than the drag on the devices. However, towing-tank experiments with a flat plate at high Reynolds numbers as well as with an axisymmetric body showed no net reduction, but instead an increase in total drag. Recent large-eddy simulations have explored the effect of LEBUs on the turbulent boundary layer and evaluations of the total drag show similar results as in the towing tank experiments. Despite these negative results in terms of net drag reduction, LEBUs manipulate the boundary layer in an interesting way which explains why they still attract some interest. The reason for the positive results in the wind-tunnel studies as compared to drag measurements are discussed here, although no definite answer for the differences can be given.

  • 23.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    The diagnostic plot - a litmus test for wall bounded turbulence data2010In: European journal of mechanics. B, Fluids, ISSN 0997-7546, E-ISSN 1873-7390, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 403-406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A diagnostic plot is suggested that can be used to judge wall bounded turbulence data of the mean and the rms of the streamwise velocity in terms of reliability both near the wall, around the maximum in the rms as well as in the outer region. The important feature of the diagnostic plot is that neither the wall position nor the friction velocity needs to be known, since it shows the rms value as a function of the streamwise mean velocity, both normalized with the free stream velocity. One must remember, however, that passing the test is a necessary, but not sufficient condition to prove good data quality.

  • 24.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Kurian, Thomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Fransson, Jens H. M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Segalini, A.
    Rüedi, Jean-Daniel
    Talamelli, Alessandro
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    The diagnostic plot: a new way to appraise turbulent boundary-layer data2009In: ADVANCES IN TURBULENCE XII: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 12TH EUROMECH EUROPEAN TURBULENCE CONFERENCE / [ed] Eckhardt, B., 2009, Vol. 132, p. 609-612Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    The viscous sublayer revisited-exploiting self-similarity to determine the wall position and friction velocity2011In: Experiments in Fluids, ISSN 0723-4864, E-ISSN 1432-1114, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 271-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In experiments using hot wires near the wall, it is well known that wall interference effects between the hot wire and the wall give rise to errors, and mean velocity data from the viscous sublayer can usually not be used to determine the wall position, nor the friction velocity from the linear velocity distribution. Here, we introduce a new method that takes advantage of the similarity of the probability density distributions (PDF) or rather the cumulative distribution functions (CDF) in the near-wall region. By using the velocity data in the CDF in a novel way, it is possible to circumvent the problem associated with heat transfer to the wall and to accurately determine both the wall position and the friction velocity. Prior to its exploitation, the self-similarity of the distribution functions of the streamwise velocity fluctuations within the viscous sublayer is established, and it is shown that they can accurately be described by a lognormal distribution.

  • 26.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Segalini, Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    A new formulation for the streamwise turbulence intensity distribution2011In: 13th European Turbulence Conference (ETC13): Wall-Bounded Flows And Control Of Turbulence, Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP), 2011, p. 022002-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerical and experimental data from zero pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layers over smooth walls have been analyzed by means of the so called diagnostic plot introduced by Alfredsson & Orlu [Eur. J. Fluid Mech. B/Fluids, 4 2, 403 (2010)]. In the diagnostic plot the local turbulence intensity is shown as a function of the local mean velocity normalized with a reference velocity scale. In the outer region of the boundary layer a universal linear decay of the turbulence intensity is observed independent of Reynolds number. The deviation from this linear region appears in the buffer region and seems to be universal when normalized with the friction velocity. Therefore, a new empirical fit for the streamwise velocity turbulence intensity distribution is proposed and the results are compared with up to date reliable high-Reynolds number experiments and extrapolated towards Reynolds numbers relevant to atmospherical boundary layers.

  • 27.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Segalini, Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    A new formulation for the streamwise turbulence intensity distribution in wall-bounded turbulent flows2012In: European journal of mechanics. B, Fluids, ISSN 0997-7546, E-ISSN 1873-7390, Vol. 36, p. 167-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The distribution of the streamwise velocity turbulence intensity has recently been discussed in several papers both from the viewpoint of new experimental results as well as attempts to model its behavior. In the present paper numerical and experimental data from zero pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layers, channel and pipe flows over smooth walls have been analyzed by means of the so called diagnostic plot introduced by Alfredsson & ÖrlÌ [P.H. Alfredsson, R. ÖrlÌ, The diagnostic plot-a litmus test for wall bounded turbulence data, Eur. J. Mech. B Fluids 29 (2010) 403-406]. In the diagnostic plot the local turbulence intensity is plotted as function of the local mean velocity normalized with a reference velocity scale. Alfredsson et al. [P.H. Alfredsson, A. Segalini, R. ÖrlÌ, A new scaling for the streamwise turbulence intensity in wall-bounded turbulent flows and what it tells us about the outer peak, Phys. Fluids 23 (2011) 041702] observed that in the outer region of the boundary layer a universal linear decay of the turbulence intensity independent of the Reynolds number exists. This approach has been generalized for channel and pipe flows as well, and it has been found that the deviation from the previously established linear region appears at a given wall distance in viscous units (around 120) for all three canonical flows. Based on these results, new empirical fits for the streamwise velocity turbulence intensity distribution of each canonical flow are proposed. Coupled with a mean streamwise velocity profile description the model provides a composite profile for the streamwise variance profile that agrees nicely with existing numerical and experimental data. Extrapolation of the proposed scaling to high Reynolds numbers predicts the emergence of a second peak of the streamwise variance profile that at even higher Reynolds numbers overtakes the inner one.

  • 28.
    Alghalibi, Dhiya
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. Kufa Univ, Coll Engn, Al Najaf, Iraq..
    Numerical study of particle suspensions in Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Solid or deformable particles suspended in a viscous fluid are of scientific and technological interest in a broad range of applications. Pyroclastic flows from volcanoes, sedimentation flows in river bed, food industries, oil-well drilling, as well as blood flow in the human body and the motion of suspended micro-organisms in water (like plankton) are among the possible examples. Often, in these particulate flows, the carrier fluid might exhibit an inelastic or a visco-elastic non-Newtonian behavior. Understanding the behavior of these suspensions is a very difficult task. Indeed, the complexities and challenges of multiphase flows are mainly due to the large number of governing parameters such as the physical properties of the particles (e.g., shape, size, stiffness, density difference with suspended fluid, solid volume fraction), the large set of interactions among particles and the properties of the carrier fluid (Newtonian or non-Newtonian); variations of each of these parameters may provide substantial quantitative and qualitative changes in the behavior of the suspension and affect the overall dynamics in several and sometimes surprising ways. The aim of this work is therefore to provide a deeper understanding of the behavior of particle suspensions in laminar Newtonian and non-Newtonian (inelastic and/or visco-elastic) fluid flows for a wide range of different parameters. To this purpose, particle-resolved direct numerical simulations of spherical particles are performed, using an efficient and accurate numerical tool. The code is based on the Immersed Boundary Method (IBM) for the fluid-solid interactions with lubrication, friction and collision models for the close range particle-particle (particle-wall) interactions. Both inelastic (Carreau and power-law), and visco-elastic models (Oldroyd-B and Giesekus) are employed to investigate separately the shear-thinning, shear-thickening, viscoelastic and combined shear-thinning visco-elastic features of the most commonly encountered non-Newtonian fluids. Moreover, a fully Eulerian numerical algorithm based on the one-continuum formulation is used to examine the case of an hyper-elastic neo-Hookean deformable particle suspended in a Newtonian flows.

    Firstly, we have investigated suspensions of solid spheres in Newtonian, shear thinning and shear thickening fluids in the simple shear flow created by two walls moving in opposite directions, considering various solid volume fractions and particle Reynolds numbers, thus including inertial effects. The results show that that the non-dimensional relative viscosity of of the suspension and the mean value of the local shear-rate can be well predicted by homogenization theory, more accurately for lower particle concentrations. Moreover, we show that in the presence of inertia, the effective viscosity of these suspensions deviates from that of Stokesian suspensions.

    We also examine the role of fluid elasticity, shear-thinning and combined shear-thinning visco-elastic effects on the simple linear Couette shear flow of neutrally-buoyant rigid spherical particles. It is found that the effective viscosity grows monotonically with the solid volume fraction and that all the Non-Newtonian cases exhibit a lower effective viscosity than the Newtonian ones; in addition, we show that elastic effects dominate at low elasticity whereas shear thinning is predominant at high applied shear rates. These variations in the effective viscosity are mainly due to changes in the particle-induced shear stress component.

    We then study the settling of spherical particles in quiescent wall-bounded Newtonian and shear-thinning fluids at three different solid volume fractions. We find that the mean settling velocities decrease with the particle concentration as a consequence of the hindering effect and thatthe mean settling speed is always larger in the shear thinning fluid than in the Newtonian one, due to the reduction of the local fluid viscosity around the particles which leads to a lower drag force acting on the particles.

    Finally, the inertial migration of hyper-elastic deformable particle in laminar pipe flows is also investigated. We consider different flow rates and various levels of particle elasticity. We observe that the particle deforms and experiences a lateral movement while traveling downstream through the pipe, always finding a stable position at the pipe centerline.

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  • 29.
    Alghalibi, Dhiya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. College of Engineering, University of Kufa, Al Najaf, Iraq.
    Fornari, Walter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Rosti, Marco E.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Brandt, Luca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Sedimentation of finite-size particles in quiescent wall-bounded shear-thinning and Newtonian fluidsIn: Journal of International Journal of Multiphase Flow, ISSN 0301-9322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the sedimentaion of finite-size particles in a quiescent wall-boundedNewtonian and shear-thinning fluids. The problem is studied numerically bymeans of direct numerical simulations with the presence of the particles ac-counted for with an immersed boundary method. The supensions are Non-Brownian rigid spherical particles with particle to fluid density ratio ρ p /ρ f =1.5; three different solid volume fractions Φ = 1%, 5% and 20% are considered.The Archimedes number is kept constant to Ar = 36 for all shear-thinning fluidcases, while it is changed to Ar = 97 for the Newtonian fluid to reproduce thesame terminal velocity of a single particle sedimenting in the shear-thinningfluid. We show that the mean settling velocities decrease with the particle con-centration as a consequence of the hindering effect and that the mean settlingspeed is always larger in the shear thinning fluid than in the Newtonian one.This is due to the decrease of the mean viscosity of the fluid which leads to alower drag force acting on the particles. We show that particles tend to formaggregates in the middle of the channel in a shear-thinning fluid, preferentiallypositioning in the wake of neighboring particles or aside them, resulting in lowerlevels of fluctuation in the gravity direction than in a Newtonian fluid.

  • 30.
    Alghalibi, Dhiya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. Kufa Univ, Coll Engn, Al Najaf, Iraq..
    Lashgari, Iman
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Brandt, L.uca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Hormozi, Sarah
    Ohio Univ, Dept Mech Engn, Athens, OH 45701 USA..
    Interface-resolved simulations of particle suspensions in Newtonian, shear thinning and shear thickening carrier fluids2018In: Journal of Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 0022-1120, E-ISSN 1469-7645, Vol. 852, p. 329-357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a numerical study of non-colloidal spherical and rigid particles suspended in Newtonian, shear thinning and shear thickening fluids employing an immersed boundary method. We consider a linear Couette configuration to explore a wide range of solid volume fractions (0.1 <= Phi <= 0.4) and particle Reynolds numbers (0.1 <= Re<INF>p</INF><INF></INF> <= 10). We report the distribution of solid and fluid phase velocity and solid volume fraction and show that close to the boundaries inertial effects result in a significant slip velocity between the solid and fluid phase. The local solid volume fraction profiles indicate particle layering close to the walls, which increases with the nominal Phi. This feature is associated with the confinement effects. We calculate the probability density function of local strain rates and compare the latter's mean value with the values estimated from the homogenisation theory of Chateau et al. (J. Rheol., vol. 52, 2008, pp. 489-506), indicating a reasonable agreement in the Stokesian regime. Both the mean value and standard deviation of the local strain rates increase primarily with the solid volume fraction and secondarily with the Re<INF>p</INF>. The wide spectrum of the local shear rate and its dependency on Phi and Re<INF>p</INF> point to the deficiencies of the mean value of the local shear rates in estimating the rheology of these non-colloidal complex suspensions. Finally, we show that in the presence of inertia, the effective viscosity of these non-colloidal suspensions deviates from that of Stokesian suspensions. We discuss how inertia affects the microstructure and provide a scaling argument to give a closure for the suspension shear stress for both Newtonian and power-law suspending fluids. The stress closure is valid for moderate particle Reynolds numbers, O(Re<INF>p</INF>) similar to 10.

  • 31.
    Alghalibi, Dhiya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. College of Engineering, University of Kufa, Al Najaf, Iraq.
    Rosti, Marco E.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Brandt, Luca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Inertial migration of a deformable particle in pipe flow2019In: Physical Review Fluids, E-ISSN 2469-990X, Vol. 4, no 10, article id 104201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We perform fully Eulerian numerical simulations of an initially spherical hyperelastic particle suspended in a Newtonian pressure-driven flow in a cylindrical straight pipe. We study the full particle migration and deformation for different Reynolds numbers and for various levels of particle elasticity, to disentangle the interplay of inertia and elasticity on the particle focusing. We observe that the particle deforms and undergoes a lateral displacement while traveling downstream through the pipe, finally focusing at the pipe centerline. We note that the migration dynamics and the final equilibrium position are almost independent of the Reynolds number, while they strongly depend on the particle elasticity; in particular, the migration is faster as the elasticity increases (i.e., the particle is more deformable), with the particle reaching the final equilibrium position at the centerline in shorter times. Our simulations show that the results are not affected by the particle initial conditions, position, and velocity. Finally, we explain the particle migration by computing the total force acting on the particle and its different components, viscous and elastic.

  • 32.
    Alghalibi, Dhiya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. College of Engineering, Kufa University, Al Najaf, Iraq.
    Rosti, Marco E.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Brandt, Luca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Interface-resolved simulations of particle suspensions in visco-elastic carrier fluidsIn: Journal of Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 0022-1120, E-ISSN 1469-7645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the rheology of a suspension of neutrally buoyant rigid particles subject touniform shear in different kinds of non-Newtonian fluids, chosen in order to disentanglethe effect of elasticity and shear thinning on the macroscopic system behavior. In par-ticular, we adopt the inelastic Carreau, viscoelastic Oldroyd-B and Giesekus models forthe carrier fluid. The rheology of the suspension is analyzed for a wide range of particlevolume fractions, Weissenberg and Reynolds numbers, comparing the results with thoseobtained for a Newtonian carrier fluid. We report here that the effective viscosity per-taining all the non-Newtonian cases is always lower than that of the suspension in theNewtonian carrier fluid and grows monotonically with the solid volume fraction. Theshear-thinning viscoelastic Giesekus fluid behaves similarly to the Oldroyd-B fluid at lowWeissenberg numbers and to the Carreau fluid at high Weissenberg numbers, indicatingthat elastic effects dominate at low Weissenberg and shear thinning is predominant athigh Weissenberg number. These variations in the effective viscosity are mainly due tochanges in the particle induced shear stress component. These data show that, at highshear rates, a viscoelastic carrier fluid can be modelled as a simple shear-thinning fluidfor which theoretical closures exists, while new models are needed at low Weissenbergnumbers to account for elastic effects such as decreased particle stress. Finally, when theinertia is increased, the suspension effective viscosity grows with the particle Reynoldsnumber at the same rate as in a Newtonian fluid for the Oldroyd-B case, while in ashear-thinning fluid the growth is less than in the Newtonian fluid. Also in the presenceof inertia, therefore, the shear-thinning behaviour dominates the suspension dynamics atrelatively high values of the imposed shear rate and elasticity effects saturate.

  • 33.
    Alizad Banaei, Arash
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Rahmani, Mona
    Univ British Columbia, Dept Math, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z2, Canada..
    Martinez, D. Mark
    Univ British Columbia, Dept Chem & Biol Engn, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada..
    Brandt, Luca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Inertial settling of flexible fiber suspensions2020In: Physical Review Fluids, E-ISSN 2469-990X, Vol. 5, no 2, article id 024301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the inertial settling of suspensions of flexible and rigid fibers using an immersed boundary method. The fibers considered are inextensible and slender, with an aspect ratio of 20. For a single Galileo number of Ga = 160, we examine a range of dimensionless bending rigidities 0.1 < gamma < 20 and fiber concentrations 0.5 < nL(3) < 25, with n being the fiber number density and L the fiber length, that spans dilute and semidilute regimes. The settling fibers form streamers, regions where the fibers are packed and settle faster than the average settling velocity of the suspension, for nL(3) > 10. In the low-concentration regions outside the streamers, the fibers either go upward or have low settling velocities. Flexible fibers exhibit higher packing inside the streamers and smaller streamers compared to the streamers formed by the rigid fibers. Due to this higher packing, the flexible fibers settle faster compared to the rigid fibers. The formation of the streamers counterbalances the hindering of the settling velocity at higher concentrations. At higher nL(3), however, the maximum local concentration of fibers relative to a uniform distribution diminishes for both flexible and rigid fibers as the mobility of the fibers becomes limited due to the presence of other fibers in their vicinity. Due to this limited mobility, the deformation of the fibers and their settling orientation become insensitive to nL(3) for nL(3) > 7. In both the dilute and semidilute regimes, flexible fibers are more aligned with the direction perpendicular to gravity compared to rigid fibers.

  • 34. Alkmim, M. H.
    et al.
    Cuenca, J.
    De Ryck, L.
    Göransson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    Model-based acoustic characterisation of muffler components and extrapolation to inhomogeneous thermal conditions2018In: Proceedings of ISMA 2018 - International Conference on Noise and Vibration Engineering and USD 2018 - International Conference on Uncertainty in Structural Dynamics, KU Leuven - Departement Werktuigkunde , 2018, p. 3009-3020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A methodology for evaluating the acoustic behaviour of two-port inhomogeneous media in experimentally unavailable thermal conditions is proposed. The method consists of an inverse estimation of the geometrical and material properties of the object at room temperature followed by a forced thermal input. The properties of interest for the inverse estimation are the spatially-varying cross-section and/or bulk properties. The underlying model relies on a transfer matrix approach, allowing for a representation of spatially inhomogeneous objects as piece-wise equivalent homogeneous fluids, while ensuring continuity conditions between successive elements. A model of non-stationary thermal conduction is used as a first approximation, where an integral formulation accounts for the cumulative effect of multiple homogeneous elements. In order to evaluate the validity of the extrapolation, a validation against a fully numerical simulation is presented in two cases, namely a simple expansion chamber and a complex muffler. 

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  • 35.
    Allam, Sabry
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. Hellwan University, Egypt .
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Experimental characterization of acoustic liners with extended reaction2008In: 14th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference (29th AIAA Aeroacoustics Conference), 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Suppressing of jet engine noise by inlet and exhaust duct liners and internal combustion engine (ICE) noise by intake and exhaust systems is an important part of developing environmentally acceptable vehicles. The acoustic liner is designed to provide an impedance boundary condition in the engine duct that reduces the propagation of engine noise through the duct. An accurate impedance boundary condition is necessary to optimally suppress the noise at different conditions. The goal of the research presented in this paper is to present a new technique to Educe and characterize the acoustic liner impedance for cases with extended reaction. This technique is depending on comparing both the measured and predicted 2-port transfer matrices. The measurement of the transfer matrix is performed using the two microphone technique, while the prediction of the transfer matrix is obtained assuming plane waves in the inner pipe and outer chamber coupled by a perforated wall impedance. By using a regression process the unknown wall impedance is then educed. The method is applied to investigate the effect of flow on the impedance of so called Micro-perforated panels (MPP). A MPP consists of a panel (here a plate made of Al or steel) with small perforations distributed over its surface. When these perforations are of sub-millimeter size they provide by themselves enough acoustic resistance and low acoustic mass reactance necessary for a wideband absorber.

  • 36. Altimira, M.
    et al.
    Fuchs, Laszlo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Numerical investigation of throttle flow under cavitating conditions2015In: International Journal of Multiphase Flow, ISSN 0301-9322, E-ISSN 1879-3533, Vol. 75, p. 124-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper shows the importance of the resolution of large unsteady flow structures in numerical simulations of cavitating flows. Three-dimensional simulations of the flow through a throttle geometry representative for fuel injectors have been performed to characterise the inception and development of cavitation, adopting the implicit Large Eddy Simulation approach. The two-phase flow has been handled by the Volume of Fluid method; whilst the simplified Rayleigh equation has been adopted to handle bubble dynamics. The mathematical model has been solved in the open source C++ toolbox OpenFOAM 2.0.1. Results obtained with the mathematical model are compared with those from RANS-based simulations and validated against experimental measurements. The performed Large Eddy Simulations not only are able to reproduce vortex cavitation, but also give further insight into the complex interaction between cavitation and turbulence through the assessment of the different terms of the vorticity equation.

  • 37. Alveroglu, B.
    et al.
    Segalini, Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Garrett, S. J.
    An energy analysis of convective instabilities of the Bödewadt and Ekman boundary layers over rough surfaces2017In: European journal of mechanics. B, Fluids, ISSN 0997-7546, E-ISSN 1873-7390, Vol. 61, p. 310-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ⋯ An energy balance equation for the three-dimensional Bödewadt and Ekman layers of the so called "BEK family" of rotating boundary-layer flows is derived. A Chebyshev discretization method is used to solve the equations and investigate the effect of surface roughness on the physical mechanisms of transition. All roughness types lead to a stabilization of the Type I (cross-flow) instability mode for both flows, with the exception of azimuthally-anisotropic roughness (radial grooves) within the Bödewadt layer which is destabilizing. In the case of the viscous Type II instability mode, the results predict a destabilization effect of radially-anisotropic roughness (concentric grooves) on both flows, whereas both azimuthally-anisotropic roughness and isotropic roughness have a stabilization effect. The results presented here confirm the results of our prior linear stability analyses.

  • 38.
    Alveroglu, B.
    et al.
    Department of Mathematics, University of Leicester, Leicester, LE1 7RH, United Kingdom.
    Segalini, Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Garrett, S. J.
    Department of Engineering, University of Leicester, Leicester, LE1 7RH, United Kingdom.
    An energy analysis of convective instabilities of the Bödewadt and Ekman boundary layers over rough surfaces2019In: Open Archives of the 16th International Symposium on Transport Phenomena and Dynamics of Rotating Machinery, ISROMAC 2016, International Symposium on Transport Phenomena and Dynamics of Rotating Machinery, ISROMAC 2016 , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An energy balance equation for the three-dimensional Bödewadt and Ekman layers of the so called “BEK family" of rotating boundary-layer flows is derived. A Chebyshev discretisation method is used to solve the equations and investigate the effect of surface roughness on the physical mechanisms of transition. All roughness types lead to a stabilization of the Type I (cross-flow) instability mode for both flows, with the exception of azimuthally-anisotropic roughness (radial grooves) within the Bödewadt layer which is destabilising. In the case of the viscous Type II instability mode, the results predict a destabilisation effect of radially-anisotropic roughness (concentric grooves) on both flows, whereas both azimuthally-anisotropic roughness and isotropic roughness have a stabilisation effect. The results presented here confirm the results of our prior linear stability analyses.

  • 39. Alveroglu, B.
    et al.
    Segalini, Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Garrett, S. J.
    The effect of surface roughness on the convective instability of the BEK family of boundary-layer flows2016In: European journal of mechanics. B, Fluids, ISSN 0997-7546, E-ISSN 1873-7390, Vol. 56, p. 178-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A Chebyshev polynomial discretisation method is used to investigate the effect of both anisotropic (radially and azimuthally) and isotropic surface roughnesses on the convective instability of the BEK family of rotating boundary-layer flows. The mean-flow profiles for the velocity components are obtained by modelling surface roughness with a partial-slip approach. A linear stability analysis is then performed to investigate the effect of roughness on the convective instability characteristics of the inviscid Type I (cross-flow) instability and the viscous Type II instability. It is revealed that all roughness types lead to a stabilisation of the Type I mode in all flows within the BEK family, with the exception of azimuthally-anisotropic roughness (radial grooves) within the Bödewadt layer which causes a mildly destabilising effect. In the case of the Type II mode, the results reveal the destabilising effect of radially-anisotropic roughness (concentric grooves) on all the boundary layers, whereas both azimuthally-anisotropic and isotropic roughnesses have a stabilising effect on the mode for Ekman and von Kármán layers. Complementary results are also presented by considering the effects of roughness on the growth rates of each instability mode within the Ekman layer.

  • 40.
    Amlinger, Hanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Lopez Arteaga, Ines
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Leth, Siv
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Impact of PWM switching frequency on the radiated acoustic noise from a traction motor2017In: 2017 20th International Conference on Electrical Machines and Systems, ICEMS 2017, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The radiated acoustic noise from a traction motor at low speeds is dominated by the noise of electromagnetic origin. For a motor operated from pulse width modulated (PWM) converters, the switching frequency of the converter will have a large impact on the noise. The total harmonic distortion of the motor phase currents and thus also the exciting forces, will decrease with increasing switching frequency. Furthermore, changing the switching frequency will shift the frequencies of the exciting forces, hence have an influence on the coincidence with structural resonances of the motor. Tests have been performed on a traction motor and a decrease in sound pressure level with increasing switching frequency has been quantified and analyzed.

  • 41.
    Amor, Christian
    et al.
    Univ Politecn Madrid, Sch Aerosp Engn, E-28040 Madrid, Spain..
    Perez, Jose M.
    Univ Politecn Madrid, Sch Aerosp Engn, E-28040 Madrid, Spain..
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Vinuesa, Ricardo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Le Clainche, Soledad
    Univ Politecn Madrid, Sch Aerosp Engn, E-28040 Madrid, Spain..
    Soft Computing Techniques to Analyze the Turbulent Wake of a Wall-Mounted Square Cylinder2020In: 14th International Conference on Soft Computing Models in Industrial and Environmental Applications, SOCO 2019 / [ed] Alvarez, FM Lora, AT Munoz, JAS Quintian, H Corchado, E, Springer, 2020, Vol. 950, p. 577-586Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces several methods, generally used in fluid dynamics, to provide low-rank approximations. The algorithm describing these methods are mainly based on singular value decomposition (SVD) and dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) techniques, and are suitable to analyze turbulent flows. The application of these methods will be illustrated in the analysis of the turbulent wake of a wall-mounted cylinder, a geometry modeling a skyscraper. A brief discussion about the large and small size structures of the flow will provide the key ideas to represent the general dynamics of the flow using low-rank approximations. If the flow physics is understood, then it is possible to adapt these techniques, or some other strategies, to solve general complex problems with reduced computational cost. The main goal is to introduce these methods as machine learning strategies that could be potentially used in the field of fluid dynamics, and that can be extended to any other research field.

  • 42.
    Andersson, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Karoumi, Raid
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    A soil-steel bridge under high-speed railways2017In: Archives of Institute of Civil Engineering / [ed] Arkadiusz Madaj, Iwona Jankowiak, Poznan, 2017, Vol. 23, p. 45-52Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents some recent research on railway bridge dynamics with application to buried flexible structures. Based on a combination of simulations and full-scale testing, current research indicates that a rather comprehensive numerical model is required to accurately describe the response from passing trains.

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  • 43.
    Andersson, Evert
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Green Train Concept proposal for a Scandinavian high-speed train: Final report,  part B2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Gröna Tåget (English: Green Train) is a research and development programme, the aim of which is to define a concept and develop technology for future high-speed trains for the Nordic European market. The target is a train for Scandinavian interoperability (Denmark, Norway and Sweden), although the pan-European minimum standards must be applied.

    Gröna Tåget is a concept for long-distance and fast regional rail services. It should be suitable for specific Nordic conditions with a harsh winter climate as well as mixed passenger and freight operations on non-perfect track.

    Gröna Tåget delivers a collection of ideas, proposals and technical solutions for rail operators, infrastructure managers and industry. The programme aims to define a fast, attractive, environmentally friendly and economically efficient high-speed train concept based on passenger valuations and technical possibilities. Proposals do not take corporate policies into account as these may vary between companies and over time.

    This is one of the final reports, specifying the functional requirements for the train concept from a technical, environmental and economic perspective, with an emphasis on the areas where research and development have been carried out within the Gröna Tåget programme. It is not a complete specification of a new train, but concentrates on issues that are particularly important for successful use in the Scandinavian market. It should be regarded as a complement to the pan-European standards. Research and development within the Gröna Tåget programme, including analysis and testing activities, are summarized. References are given to reports from the different projects in the programme but also to other relevant work.

    Other summary reports deal with market, economy and operational aspects as well as a design for an attractive, efficient and innovative train from a traveller’s point of view.

    The main alternative proposed in this concept specification is a train for speeds up to 250 km/h, equipped with carbody tilt for short travel time on existing main-line track. The train is proposed to have high-power permanent magnet motors, low aerodynamic drag and modest adhesion utilization. It has low noise emissions and a track-friendly bogie design. The train should be equipped with active highperformance suspension to produce superior ride qualities on non-perfect track and minimize suspension motions. Due to the approximately 3.30 m interior width of the carbody, one more comfortable seat can be accommodated abreast, which will reduce cost and energy use per seat-km and also maximize the capacity of the train and of the railway system. One most important and critical issue is that the train must be able to run in a Nordic winter climate, where technologies have been tested, proposed and also compiled in a special report.

    Most technologies developed can also be used for modified train concepts, such as non-tilting trains, trains for higher speeds than 250 km/h, trains with continental width carbodies, and others. Further, many technologies developed in the programme are also useful for lower speeds. Newly developed technologies were type-tested in a special test train from 2006 to 2009. Endurance tests in commercial service were performed between 2009 and 2011.

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  • 44.
    Andersson, Evert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Rail Vehicles. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Berg, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Rail Vehicles. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Greenhouse gas emissions from rail services: Present and future2010In: Proceedings of Railways and Environment, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Andersson, Evert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Rail Vehicles. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Berg, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Rail Vehicles. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Nelldal, Bo-Lennart
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Fröidh, Oskar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    TOSCA. Rail freight transport: Techno-economic analysis of energy and greenhouse gas reductions2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Stage 1 of the EU/FP7-funded project TOSCA (Technology Opportunities and Strategies toward Climate-friendly trAnsport) the techno-economical feasibility of different technolo-gies and means to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is being analysed for different modes of transport. This is made over the long-term perspective until 2050, with 2009 as the reference year. This is the report on the rail freight transport market, applicable to the European Union (EU-27).The analysis presented in this report estimates that a number of efficient technologies and means are available, individually and in combination, to significantly reduce energy use and the resulting GHG emissions on the rail freight market until 2050. The analysis has considered the following technologies and means:

    – heavy freight trains (high payload capacity per metre of train as well as longer trains)

    – eco-driving, including traffic flow management

    – energy recovery

    – high-efficiency machinery in locomotives and electric supply

    – low air drag

    – incremental improvements, in particular reduced tare mass of wagons.

    Despite anticipated higher train speeds in most future train operations the above-mentioned technologies and means have, according to the analysis, the potential to reduce the average energy use per net-tonne-km (tkm) of payload by 40–50 % until 2050. As a consequence also the direct and indirect GHG emissions will be reduced. Energy use and GHG emissions are measured per net-tonne-km, assuming representative load factors in different operations.

  • 46.
    Andersson, Evert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Rail Vehicles. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Berg, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Rail Vehicles. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Nelldal, Bo-Lennart
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Fröidh, Oskar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    TOSCA. Rail passenger transport: Techno-economic analysis of energy and greenhouse gas reductions2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Stage 1 of the EU/FP7-funded project TOSCA (Technology Opportunities and Strategies toward Climate-friendly trAnsport) the techno-economical feasibility of different technologies and means to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is being analysed for the different modes of transport. This is made in the long-term perspective until 2050, with 2009 as the reference year. This is the report on rail passenger transport, applicable to the European Union (EU-27).The present report has been subject to review among railway experts, representing train suppliers, railway operators as well as academia. They have also responded to a questionnaire. Further, a workshop was held, where the report with assumptions and results was discussed.In the analysis presented in this report it is estimated that a number of efficient improvements that, individually and in combination, are available in order to significantly reduce energy use and the resulting GHG emissions on the rail passenger market until 2050. The analysis has considered different technologies and means:

    – low air drag

    – low train mass

    – energy recovery

    – eco-driving, including traffic flow management

    – space efficiency in trains (increasing payload per metre of train)

    – incremental improvements of energy efficiency, in particular reduced losses.

    Despite anticipated higher average train speeds in the future these combined approaches will, according to the analysis, have the potential to reduce the average specific energy use per passenger-km (pkm) in the order of 45–50 % in the very long term until 2050. As a consequ-ence also the direct and indirect GHG emissions will be reduced. The highest reductions are possible in city and regional rail operations. Reductions are more limited in high-speed opera-tions, because of the advanced technologies already applied. However, high-speed rail has today a comparatively low energy use per passenger-km, partly due to its high average load factor. To be consistent with other work packages of TOSCA, energy use and GHG emissions are measured per passenger-km, assuming representative load factors in different operations.

  • 47.
    Andersson, Evert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Berg, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Vehicle Engineering and Solid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Nelldal, Bo-Lennart
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Transport planning. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Stichel, Sebastian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Vehicle Engineering and Solid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Varför behövs Nya Stambanor i Sverige?2020Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Stora investeringar och omdaningar planeras i vårt transportsystem. Transporterna väntas öka starkt i framtiden och mera kapacitet måste skapas på ett hållbart sätt. Diskussionerna om vilka transportmedel som ska prioriteras, såväl som vilka objekt som vi ska satsa på, är livliga.

    En viktig fråga är satsningen på Nya Stambanor avsedda för snabba persontransporter i de redan idag hårt belastade stråken Stockholm‒Göteborg och Stockholm‒Malmö, med ett stort antal mellanliggande orter. Denna typ av järnvägar finns redan eller planeras i de flesta av världens ledande ekonomier. Syftet med att bygga nya stambanor är att öka den totala kapaciteten för person- och godstrafik på järnväg, öka punktligheten och öka tillgängligheten genom korta restider. Det ger också förutsättningar för större regionala arbetsmarknader och ökat bostadsbyggande utanför storstäderna samt en bättre miljö. Nuvarande stambanor avlastas och lämnar plats för bl a effektivare godstransporter.

    Denna rapport behandlar först järnvägens egenskaper. Järnvägen är det energieffektivaste transportmedel vi känner till, den tar liten plats och är mycket trafiksäker. Moderna tåg på modern bana är vårt snabbaste transportmedel till lands. Tåg kan bereda plats och komfort för arbete och avkoppling under resan. Enligt författarnas uppfattning bör dessa egenskaper göra järnvägen till ett förstahandsalternativ för effektiva och hållbara transporter i de segment där järnvägen är eller kan bli konkurrenskraftig.

    Prognoser och analys, samt erfaren­heter från utlandet, visar att trafikunderlaget i Sverige är tillräckligt för nya stambanor. Med de förslagna banorna väntas järnvägens totala kapacitet öka till mer än det dubbla i de mest belastade stråken. En viktig faktor är att den snabba och långsamma tågtrafiken separeras. Denna åtgärd ger ökad kapacitet, utöver vad de dubblerade spåren ger, eftersom tågen kan köra tätare efter varandra och störningarna i tågtrafiken minskar.

    Restiderna för orterna längs de nya stambanorna minskar kraftigt, i regel mellan 30 och 65%. Tillsammans med ökad turtäthet och minskade störningar ger det stora ökningar av tågtrafiken. De officiella prognoserna lider dock av ett antal allvarliga brister, varför både trafikökningen och den samhällsekonomiska lönsamheten beräkningsmässigt framstår som mindre än vad den enligt KTH:s prognoser och internationell erfarenhet borde vara.

    Författarna anser att anläggningskostnaderna är rimliga i relation till nyttorna och jämfört med vad andra omställningar i samhällets transportsystem kostar. Detsamma gäller den engångs ”klimatskuld” som uppkommer vid de flesta satsningar för framtiden inom alla trafikslag. Nya transportslag i ett tidigt utvecklingsskede (elflyg, magnettåg, Hyperloop etc) är mycket osäkra beträffande när eller om de överhuvudtaget kommer att bli tillgängliga för användning i stor skala. I flera fall skulle krävas stora tekniska genombrott som vi idag inte känner till. Vi anser att man rimligen inte idag kan besluta att satsa på helt nya tekniska system för vilka framtiden är mycket osäker. Vi kan inte heller ”vänta och se”, eftersom ytterligare kapacitet behövs redan idag och ledtiderna är långa.

    Sammanfattningsvis är de nya stambanorna ett samhällsbyggnadsprojekt och en del i transportsektorns nödvändiga omställning. De ger korta restider och effektiva transporter mellan våra största städer, liksom till och från ett stort antal mellanliggande orter, med omnejd. Godstransporterna kan också få plats på spåren och de kan utvecklas och effektiviseras. Det handlar om hållbar mobilitet för människor och gods i framtiden.

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  • 48.
    Andersson, Evert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Rail Vehicles. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Berg, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Rail Vehicles. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Stichel, Sebastian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Rail Vehicles. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Casanueva, Carlos
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Rail Vehicles. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Rail Systems and Rail Vehicles: Part 2: Rail Vehicles2016 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This compendium is mainly intended for MSc education in rail vehicle engineering at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. The objective is to give an overview and fundamental knowledge of different rail systems, followed by a more thorough introduction to rail vehicles. In this way most rail aspects are covered. The compendium consists of 20 chapters.

    Download (pdf)
    sammanfattning
  • 49.
    Andersson, Evert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Kottenhoff, Karl
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Nelldal, Bo-Lennart
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Extra wide-body passenger trains in Sweden2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Andersson, Evert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Nelldal, Bo-Lennart
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Effektiva Tågsystem för framtida persontrafik – analys av förutsättningar och möjligheter för attraktiv tågtrafik1997Report (Other academic)
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