Change search
Refine search result
1 - 17 of 17
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Alsmo, Thomas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Holmberg, Sture
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Causes of Poor Air Quality in Swedish Schools2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This literature survey distinguishes between building and other factors influencing air quality. It does not identify building factors sufficient to account for occupant complaints. It concludes that buildings are often blamed for adverse health effects without sufficient grounds. The risk is there will be too much focusing on the wrong underlying problem when remedying so-called sick buildings. The study shows the importance of ensuring that factors independent of the school building, including the choices of environments and activities, are important for the indoor environment.

  • 2.
    Granroth, Marko
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Ett VVS-säkerhetsverk skulle stärka branschens positioner2005In: VVS-Forum, ISSN 0346-4644, no 8Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Artikelförfattaren,  konstaterar i detta inlägg att VVS-branschen inte verkar ha insett betydelsen av nya PBL (plan- och bygglagstiftningen). Han pekar också på att remissen om förändringarna i Boverkets byggregler (BBR) kan behöva göras om. Vidare föreslår han att ett VVS-säkerhetsverk inrättas för att stärka branschens positioner inom byggprocessen och att de kommunala VVS-inspektörernas roll förstärks.†Artikelförfattaren anser att många av de föreslagna kraven i nya BBR är luddiga och i många fall saknas krav helt.

  • 3.
    Granroth, Marko
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Luftväxling påverkas av byggmaterial2006In: Husbyggaren, ISSN 0018-7968, no 6, p. 41-43Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Ökade energipriser och krav på energideklaration leder till ökade kravpå åtgärder som tätare hus och minskade luftflöden. Valet påverkas bland annat av vilka emissioner materialet släpper ifrån sig.

  • 4.
    Granroth, Marko
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Holmberg, Sture
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Health and productivity in commercial buildings: thermal and hygienic aspects2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Granroth, Marko
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Holmberg, Sture
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Ventilation Strategy to improve health and productivity conditions2006In: HB - Heal. Build.: Creating Heal. Indoor Environ. People, Proc., 2006, p. 421-424Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper was mainly based on a literature review and focused on control of emissions and on thermal comfort conditions in office buildings. The ultimate goal was to identify optimal conditions for both human health and work productivity in office room environments. Good indoor air quality (IAQ) was to be achieved at low emission rates and correct indoor air temperature. Different ventilation and air conditioning strategies were evaluated and compared. Both energy and environmental aspects were considered. Analyses were made for emission rates of various indoor sources such as outdoor pollution, construction materials, furnishings, office-equipment and consumer products.

  • 6.
    Granroth, Marko
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Holmberg, Sture
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Ventilation Strategy to Improve Health and Productivity in Swedish Offices2006In: Healthy Buildings, 4-8 June, Lisbon, Portugal, 2006: Vol IV, Finland: International Society of Indoor Air Quality and Climate (ISIAQ) , 2006, p. 421-424Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper was mainly based on a literature review and focused on control of emissions and on thermal comfort conditions in office buildings. The ultimate goal was to identify optimal conditions for both human health and work productivity in office room environments. Good indoor air quality (IAQ) was to be achieved at low emission rates and correct indoor air temperature. Different ventilation and air conditioning strategies were evaluated and compared. Both energy and environmental aspects were considered. Analyses were made for emission rates of various indoor sources such as outdoor pollution, construction materials, furnishings, office-equipment and consumer products. 

  • 7.
    Guha, Jaideep
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology.
    Holmberg, Sture
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology.
    A Numerical and Experimental Evaluation of a Natural Wind Driven Suction Cylinder for Building Ventilation2008In: The International Journal of Ventilation, ISSN 1473-3315, E-ISSN 2044-4044, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 197-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The suction cylinder described in this paper is a device to increase the ventilation flow rate, especially in naturally ventilated buildings. Outdoor wind is the driving force. The principle of operation is the development of a pressure drop created by the relative increase in flow velocity as wind driven air flows through a nozzle. This paper basically describes how this pressure drop and resultant momentum can be used to provide exhaust ventilation. The suction cylinder is particularly designed for natural and hybrid ventilation systems, especially for times when the temperature gradient between inside and outside is not enough to drive stack driven ventilation. A 1-dimensional analytical flow model was derived to establish a relationship between the volume of air entering through the inlet and the volume of air sucked by the suction cylinder. The commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code, Fluent, was used to visualise the flow system inside the suction cylinder. A corresponding wind tunnel experiment was also made. Preliminary results show advantages in using a suction cylinder for building ventilation.

  • 8.
    Guha, Jaideep
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Holmberg, Sture
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Effectivity of a Suction Cylinder as Ventilation Equipment2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes to use free wind to create suction pressure within a ventilation duct without consuming commercial energy. Like an ejector pump it creates suction pressure placed above the ventilation exhaust, which is used to draw exhaust air from the ventilation system. Discussing the possibilities of this suction cylinder concept in ventilation system is the objective of this paper. Here, a mathematical model was deduced for a suction cylinder and through CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamic) technique result was simulated later compared with theoretical model. GAMBIT was used as a preprocessor and for processing FLUENT, a commercial CFD code, was used for the simulation. Preliminary result clearly shows the positive advantages of using a suction cylinder as ventilation equipment.

  • 9.
    Holmberg, Sture
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Modelling of low-temperature heating systems in buildings2008In: World Renewable Energy Conference, WREC 2008, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Holmberg, Sture
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    The influence of room air flow and turbulence on heat transfer from human body – a new comfort model consideration2008In: Indoor Air 2008, 11th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Myhren, Jonn Are
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology.
    Low temperature heating in exhaust ventilated rooms: An approach using Computational Fluid Dynamics2008Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
  • 12.
    Myhren, Jonn Are
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology.
    Holmberg, Sture
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology.
    Comfort temperatures and operative temperatures in an office with different heating methods2006In: Proceedings of the Healthy Buildings Conference: Vol. 2: Indoor Climate, 2006, Vol. 2, p. 47-52Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Myhren, Jonn Are
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology.
    Holmberg, Sture
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology.
    Energy savings and thermal comfort with ventilation radiators: a dynamic heating and ventilation system2007In: Proceedings of Clima 2007 WellBeing Indoors, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies indicate that a high ventilation rate with fresh air supply directly from outdoors gives better thermal comfort conditions, less SBS (Sick Building Syndrome) symptoms and increased work productivity. The drawbacks with a high ventilation rate in natural or exhaust ventilated buildings are normally increased energy use for heating and cold air draught. Such problems may be minimized with ventilation radiators, radiators where cold ventilation air is brought directly from outdoors through a wall channel into the radiator where it is heated before entering the room.

    This paper discusses advantages with ventilation radiators in comparison to those of traditional heating systems. Focus has been on energy aspects and thermal comfort. The main conclusions are that ventilation radiators may give a stable and uniform thermal indoor climate. The high thermal gradient between cold ventilation air and the radiator surface inside the ventilation channel also makes the ventilation radiator more efficient than other systems. A method to vary indoor climate on a daily basis according to where people stay is proposed for additional energy savings with ventilation radiators. The deductions were based on results from CFD simulations in a well validated office model.

  • 14.
    Myhren, Jonn Are
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology.
    Holmberg, Sture
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology.
    Flow patterns and thermal comfort in a room with panel, floor and wall heating2008In: Energy and Buildings, ISSN 0378-7788, E-ISSN 1872-6178, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 524-536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal comfort aspects in a room vary with different space heating methods. The main focus in this study was how different heating systems and their position affect the indoor climate in an exhaust-ventilated office under Swedish winter conditions. The heat emitters used were a high and a medium-high temperature radiator, a floor heating system and large wall heating surfaces at low temperature. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were used to investigate possible cold draught problems, differences in vertical temperature gradients, air speed levels and energy consumption. Two office rooms with different ventilation systems and heating needs were evaluated. Both systems had high air exchange rates and cold infiltration air.

    The general conclusions from this study were that low temperature heating systems may improve indoor climate, giving lower air speeds and lower temperature differences in the room than a conventional high temperature radiator system. The disadvantage with low temperature systems is a weakness in counteracting cold down-flow from ventilation supply units. For that reason the location of heat emitters and the design of ventilation systems proved to be of particular importance. Measurements performed in a test chamber were used to validate the results from the CFD simulations.

  • 15.
    Myhren, Jonn Are
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Holmberg, Sture
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Summertime cooling with ventilation radiators2007In: IAQVEC 2007 Proceedings - 6th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality, Ventilation and Energy Conservation in Buildings: Sustainable Built Environment, 2007, p. 533-538Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ventilation radiators, heat emitters where cold ventilation air is brought directly from outdoors into the room via heated radiator surfaces, are becoming more and more common in Scandinavia. Because these systems combine both heating and ventilation several interesting aspects arise that may be used to save energy and improve indoor thermal climate. The heating aspects in wintertime have been discussed in previous papers from KTH STH. This study investigates whether ventilation radiators may be used for cooling in summertime. Results from the study show that condensation of water is the main problem to tackle when ventilation radiators are used for cooling purposes. It is difficult to avoid condensation, especially inside the ventilation channel where incoming ventilation air comes into contact with chilled radiator surfaces. The problem increases with increased temperature difference between radiator surface and ventilation air. This is why ventilation radiators seem unsuitable for cooling in summertime without risking condensation of water. However, if condensation of water is allowed in the ventilation channel only, ventilation radiators may be functional for cooling. The trick is to find a way to drain water from the ventilation channel to avoid hygiene problems.

  • 16.
    Myhren, Jonn Are
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Holmberg, Sture
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Thermal comfort with low temperature heating2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Peng, Shia Hui
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Fluid and Climate Technology (closed 20090101).
    Hybrid RANS-LES modeling based on zero- and one-equation models for turbulent ow simulation2005In: Proc. 4th International Symposium on Turbulence and Shear Flow Phenomena, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 17 of 17
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf