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  • 1.
    Aronson, Eran
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Design, Work Environment, Safety and Health, DASH.
    Research Project: Lighting Häggvik Tunnel, Sollentuna2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A reserch paper investigating the posibility of lowering light levels in tunnel while using LED's. Done with and for Trafikverket as part of an ongoing research regarding tunnel lighting.

  • 2.
    Danielsson, Christina
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Design, Work Environment, Safety and Health, DASH.
    Office Design: Applying Lynch’s Theory on Office Environments2005In: Nordisk arkitekturforskning, ISSN 1102-5824, no 4, p. 69-79Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Danielsson, Christina
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Design, Work Environment, Safety and Health, DASH.
    Office Environment and Employee Satisfaction: The Impact of Office-type.Manuscript (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Ilskog, Elisabeth
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Design, Work Environment, Safety and Health, DASH.
    And Then They Lived Sustainably Ever After?: Experiences from Rural Electrification in Tanzania, Zambia and Kenya2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Accelerating the introduction of basic, clean energy services is seen as a key strategy for promoting sustainable development in rural areas. Still, many people worldwide lack access to modern energy such as electricity, and Africa lags behind other developing regions of the world. Support to rural electrification is therefore given high priority by the national governments and donor organisations.

    There is a trend to encourage the involvement of other actors than national utilities for implementation of rural electrification. At the same time, it is required that the activities shall contribute to sustainable development.

    The objective of the work presented in this thesis has been to reach increased knowledge on the impact from organisational factors on project sustainability, and to examine whether rural electrification implemented by private entrepreneurs or other non-governmental organisations contribute more effectively to sustainable development than the conventional approach where rural electrification is the responsibility of a government utility. A key activity of the research work has been to improve and develop the present methodologies used for evaluations, as to attain a more functional in-field evaluation method.

    The thesis presents findings from seven rural electrification cases in Eastern and Southern Africa and shows how these can be used to illustrate different dimensions of sustainability by means of indicators. The evaluation indicates that the national utilities perform better from a social/ethical perspective, whereas the private organisations and the community-based organisations manage their client-relation issues in a more sustainable way.

    In addition, a literature survey shows that among stakeholders there are a number of “concepts-taken-for-granted” as regards to rural electrification. These are not supported by the findings from the seven cases. The observed deviations between expectations and realities can obstruct the development as decision-makers may have unrealistic expectations when planning for new electrification activities. Instead, activities have to be implemented with the empirical reality in mind. By doing so the ambiguities, complexities and all the paradoxes of rural electrification can hopefully be better managed.

    The study has been funded by The Swedish International Development Agency, Department for Research Cooperation (SAREC), and Ångpanneföreningen’s Foundation for Research and Development (ÅFORSK).

  • 5.
    Ilskog, Elisabeth
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Design, Work Environment, Safety and Health, DASH.
    Indicators for assessment of rural electrification: an approach for the comparison of apples and pears2008In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 36, no 7, p. 2665-2673Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite a large number of rural electrification projects being implemented in developing countries, there are few published in-depth evaluations of the effects of these projects on sustainable development. There is also no generally accepted method for the assessment of such effects that includes all relevant aspects of sustainability.

    An issue of growing importance is whether rural electrification implemented by private entrepreneurs or other non-governmental organisations contribute more effectively to sustainable development than the conventional approach where rural electrification is the responsibility of a government utility.

    This paper presents a method for sustainability evaluation based on the use of 39 indicators. The proposed indicators cover the five dimensions of sustainability: technical, economical, social/ethical, environmental and institutional sustainability. The paper presents the indicators and gives a detailed example of the procedure to calculate an indicator based on information that can realistically be collected in field studies.

    It is suggested that this interdisciplinary approach will lead to an improved basis for evaluation of projects than previous, more limited approaches. Projects promoted on the basis of information only about prioritised dimensions of sustainability, such as environment, may fail as a result of weaknesses in other dimensions. The proposed method may reduce this risk.

  • 6.
    Ilskog, Elisabeth
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Design, Work Environment, Safety and Health, DASH.
    Rural electrification sustainability indicators: - Manual for field workers2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite a large number of rural electrification projects being implemented in developing countries, there are few published in-depth evaluations of the effects of these projects on sustainable development. There is also no generally accepted method for assessment of such effects that includes all relevant aspects of sustainability.

    This report presents a manual for field based evaluation of rural electrification projects. The manual consists of a method for sustainability evaluation based on the use of 39 indicators. The proposed indicators cover the five dimensions of sustainability: technical, economical, social/ethical, environmental and institutional sustainability. The manual presents the indicators and gives detailed instruction on the procedure to calculate the indicators based on information that can realistically be collected in field studies. Lastly, SWOT-analyses have been made based on information received from discussions with stakeholders. The SWOT-analysis is seen as a simple and useful complement to the evaluation method that can bring additional information to the evaluation, which will not be covered by the selected indicators.

    The manual is a result from a PhD study. The aim of the study has been to investigate the reasons behind successful/less successful implementation of rural electrification, with the overall objective to facilitate for decision-makers to improve their basis for future decisions and measures on rural electrification activities.

  • 7.
    Ilskog, Elisabeth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Design, Work Environment, Safety and Health, DASH.
    Kjellström, Björn
    Luleå University of Technology.
    And then they lived sustainably ever after?: Assessment of rural electrification cases by means of indicators2008In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 36, no 7, p. 2674-2684Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing the current low level of access to electricity in developing countries is important for economic development and poverty eradication. Encouraging the involvement of new actors for implementation of rural electrification projects is a relatively new policy. At the same time, it is required that the projects contribute to sustainable development. It is therefore of interest to investigate whether, for instance, private sector involvement can contribute more to some aspects of sustainability than the conventional approach where rural electrification is the responsibility of a government utility. It seems that so far no studies have addressed this issue.

    This paper presents findings from field trips to seven rural electrification areas in Eastern and Southern Africa and shows how these studies can be used to illustrate different dimensions of sustainability by means of indicators.

    The field studies generated valuable experiences regarding collection of data for evaluation of the indicators and illustrate some difficulties associated with comparing the different aspects of sustainability.

    The evaluation indicates that the national utilities perform better from a social/ethical perspective, whereas the private organisations and the community-based organisations manage their client-relation issues in a more sustainable way.

  • 8.
    Larsson, Tore Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Design, Work Environment, Safety and Health, DASH.
    Hagvide, Mona-Lisa
    Svanborg, Maria
    Borell, Lena
    Falls prevention through community intervention: A Swedish example2009In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 204-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to control and reduce fall-related injuries, particularly among women over the age of 55, a safety management and falls prevention campaign was structured and implemented during 2006-2007 in the small industrial town of Sodertalje, Sweden. A local campaign was launched to recruit falls prevention agents, to inform key target groups in the local community, and to educate older people about fall risks. A survey showed that the campaign had a greater impact among professionals with a special relation to fall risk than among the general population. Medical records were used in the evaluation of the outcomes. The results show that between 2005 and 2007 there was a drop of fractures related to falls in the council: an overall drop of 16.7% in the population; among men 55 or older a drop of 12%, among women 55 or older a drop of 15%, among home-dwelling women 55 or older a drop of 5.7% and among women in special accommodation a drop of 44.4%. Expressed in terms of years lost to disability (YLD), the overall drop in hip fractures treated at the local hospital between 2005 and 2007 was 48%. A comparison with National medical records for the same period shows the drop for the intervention area to be much larger than that for Sweden as a whole, although the effect was not statistically significant. The study demonstrates the advantages of a broad, community-based approach to injury prevention.

  • 9.
    Lundberg, Stefan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Design, Work Environment, Safety and Health, DASH.
    Facilities Management and Health Care at Home2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The topic of this thesis is the new requirements that will be put upon the facilities management when the elderly are living longer in their own homes, in spite of illness, impairment and old age. For many reasons, especially demographic ones, this issue has come to the fore and since it has substantial political impact and considerably affects our living conditions, it will most certainly appear on the agenda of most Swedish housing companies in the near future.

    The growing number of inhabitants in need of care and rehabilitation is a current subject in many countries of the industrial world. More medical conditions can be treated, but often at an ever increasing cost. Care and housing are often interlinked and more interest is being paid to the possibility of offering care to elderly in their own homes.

    This development must lead to a discussion of the home as a hospital ward from time to time, and the demands it places on facilities management and security. So far the prospects of telecare services and "Smart homes" has been very little discussed in parallel, although in many aspects they share the same technological base.

    The principal interest of the housing companies is to find a role in accordance with their mainstream business, and at the same time co-operate with other municipal actors directly in charge of offering assistance and service. There has been only limited study and research into the complex interaction between technology, home-based social service and the housing company.

    The purpose here is to develop an understanding of the requirements placed on both the housing company and the CP when a tenant is to be subjected to minor and more extensive care at home, or suffers from an illness or an impairment which requires special equipment or technical adjustment in the home. A model to interpret this situation has been developed in this thesis.

  • 10.
    Lundberg, Stefan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Design, Work Environment, Safety and Health, DASH.
    The Building Infrastructure and Home Care2007In: Safety Science Monitor, ISSN 1443-8844, Vol. 11, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Puropse - To discus the importance of the facilities management in Home Care service.

    Design/methodology/approach - A case study of a project where new assistive technolgy was used to improve the security for elderly in Home Care service.

    Findings - The infrastructure of a multi-story building is of vital importance for the delivery chain of Home Care. The care provider is depending on the functionality of the communication network in the home to sustain the care during the time of "care absence" from the tenatn or the patient.

    Research limitations/implications - The study is performed in Sweden on one sample. The sample is from a project performed by a Home Service agency. In the project 142 elderly people living in their own homes were included in a test of a new safety alarm system. Further research must be performed to identify how care and medical treatment could interact with the facilities management in order to provide safe and secure health care in the home.

    Practical implications - It is important for the facilitiesmanagement to be aware of the fact that more and more advanced medical care will be given in peoples own homes. The infrastructure in the buildings is of vital importance for such activities. The facilities manager should take a more active part in the developement of home care.

    Value of paper - This is a new area of research. The realtion between the facilities management and the care provider in home care is mostly unknown tho the professional within the facilities management but is of high importance.

  • 11. Peppard, Joe
    et al.
    Rylander, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Design, Work Environment, Safety and Health, DASH.
    Products and services in cyberspace2005In: International Journal of Information Management, ISSN 0268-4012, E-ISSN 1873-4707, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 335-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the physical world, products and services are traditionally distinguished from each other on the basis of tangibility and intangibility; indeed, services are often described as intangible products. In the virtual world of the fixed and mobile Internet, however, this distinction is no longer appropriate: both products and services become intangible. This is essentially because the Internet is not merely a technology but represents an entirely new medium for conducting business, a fact that was overlooked by many of the early entrants into this space. This medium is defined by information and fundamentally different from the physical space where business has traditionally been transacted. Consequently, the concept of products and services requires study. In this paper we focus on business-to-consumer (B2C) markets and explore consumer products and services in cyberspace, distinguishing them along a number of dimensions.

  • 12.
    Rylander, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Design, Work Environment, Safety and Health, DASH.
    Bringing the “I” Back Into the Self: Body, Place and Emotion in Identity ConstructionManuscript (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Rylander, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Design, Work Environment, Safety and Health, DASH.
    Peppard, Joe
    What Really is a Knowledge-Intensive Firm? (Re)framing Research in the “Knowledge Economy"2005Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of a knowledge intensive firm (KIF) is seemingly an important category of organizations that is being increasingly studied. The underlying inference from the literature is that the KIF constitutes a category of organizations that is distinct and different from other organizational categories. The research reported in this paper explores how scholars are using the concept in their studies, analyzing how it is portrayed in the literature, and critiquing the implications that are drawn from these studies. As categories are important for ordering reality and in shaping meaning, the consequence of our analysis surfaces a number of problems that this research raises for the perpetuation of the knowledge economy rhetoric and its potential flaws. We suggests that what is needed is not a better definition of a KIF, but a better understanding of the classification systems and their underpinning assumptions that guide how we present research on knowledge in organizations.

1 - 13 of 13
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