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  • 1.
    Antonsson Lundberg, Ann-Beth
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Environmental Technology and Work Science.
    Relation to other tools for the working environment2004In: Working environment in life-cycle assessment / [ed] Poulsen, Pia Brunn; Jensen, Allan Astrup, Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC), 2004, p. 3-8Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Antonsson Lundberg, Ann-Beth
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Environmental Technology and Work Science.
    Riskhantering och tillsyn i Strategier för bättre arbetsmiljö i små företag2004In: Framtidens arbetsmiljö- och tillsynsarbete / [ed] Johansson, Bo; Frick, Kaj; Johansson, Jan, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2004Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Backström, Tomas
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Environmental Technology and Work Science.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    EFFECTS OF FOUR DIFFERENT TYPES OF LEARNING ORGANISATIONS2004In: International Journal of Human Resources Development and Management, ISSN 1465-6612, E-ISSN 1741-5160Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Dalemo, M.
    et al.
    Sonesson, U.
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Environmental Technology and Work Science.
    Mingarini, K.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Environmental Technology and Work Science.
    Frostell, Björn M
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Environmental Technology and Work Science.
    Jönsson, H.
    Nybrant, T.
    Sundqvist, J-O
    Thyselius, L.
    ORWARE – A simulation model for organic waste handling systems.: Part 1: Model description1997In: Resources, Conservation and Recycling, ISSN 0921-3449, E-ISSN 1879-0658, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 17-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A simulation model, ORWARE (ORganic WAste REsearch), for the handling of organic waste in urban areas has been constructed. The model provides a comprehensive view of the environmental effects, plant nutrient utilisation and energy turnover for this large and complex system. The ORWARE model consists of several sub-models; sewage plant, incineration, landfill, compost, anaerobic digestion, truck transport, transport by sewers, residue transport and spreading of residues on arable land. The model is intended for simulating different scenarios, and the results are: emissions to air and water, energy turnover and the amount of residues returned to arable land. All results are presented, both as the gross figure for the entire system and figures for each process. Throughout the model all physical flows are described by the same variable vector, consisting of 43 substances. This extensive vector facilitates a thorough analysis of the results, but involves some difficulties in acquiring relevant data. In this paper, the model is described. Results from a hypothetical case study are presented in a companion paper.

  • 5.
    Fernström, Elisabeth
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Environmental Technology and Work Science.
    Physical load in computerized office work: with special reference to work tasks and equipment1997Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The main purpose of the studies presented in this thesis wasto measure and quantify shoulder load in computerised officework. Shoulder load was studied during a whole working day andin different work tasks. Shoulder and arm load during keyboardwork and with different modes of physical computer interactionwas also studied. The purpose was to determine whether load, orshoulder and neck complaints change with changes in workcontent or work task distribution. This thesis is based on fivepapers, of which two are from laboratory studies and three froma field study ranging over 1.5 years.

    Shoulder and forearm load in keyboard work with threetypewriters (mechanical, electromechanical and electronic) andtwo personal computer keyboards (traditional and angled) wasexamined with electromyography. The task was input of a giventext. As expected work on the mechanical typewriter increasedforearm muscular activity. Work on the electronic typewriter,which had extremely low key stroke force, increased righttrapezius musclar activity compared to the mechanicaltypewriter and to the angled keyboard. Work on this typewriteralso increased flexor forearm activity compared to work on thetraditional keyboard, as weill as forearm extensor activitycompared to the angled keyboard. No differences were foundbetween using the ordinary keyboard and the angledkeyboard.

    Shoulder and arm load in work with different modes ofphysical computer interaction was also studied withelectromyography. The four modes tested in word processingwere: keyboard, keyboard supplemented with a computer mouse,keyboard with computer mouse and arm support movable in threeplanes, and keyboard with Trackpoint device placed in thecentre of the keyboard. The interaction modes were evaluatedthrough perceived strain and individual preference. Muscularload from ordinary handwriting was tested as well. Shoulderload was higher during mouse work, while Trackpoint andkeyboard-only use increased forearm load. The two latter werealso found more strenuous to the forearm. Use of the armsupport decreased shoulder muscular load, as did Trackpointuse. However, the arm support increased forearm load comparedto computer mouse use without support. Handwriting increasedforearm muscular load.

    Physical and psychosocial effects of the reorganisation of adata processing unit were studied at the workplaces. Thereorganisation aimed at providing the data entry operators withother, less repetitive work tasks. Shoulder load was measuredwith electromyography. Work postures and movements wereexamined via the parameters upper-arm elevation, time seatedand distance walked. Work tasks were studied usingself-reported diaries and video recordings, whilemusculoskeletal disorders were examined clinically. This studywas conducted over 1.5 years with two main data collectingparts. The subjects had more desk work time afterthereorganisation. Desk work involved more muscular load than dataentry did. However, the reorganisation did not affect whole-dayshoulder muscular activity. Work postures changed withincreased upper-arm elevation but there were no changes in timeseated or in distance walked. An improvement inneck-and-shoulder disorders was noted. There was a greatdivergence between the subjects experienced data entry time andthe actual time read from the video recordings.

    Conclusions. Different office work tasks involve differentwork load, which might allow an important variation in muscularload. Different computer interaction modes also affordalterations in muscular load. Operators should thereforeperform different and varied work tasks, using different inputdevices; and they should change between them. Touch-sensitivekeys with short key travel should be avoided.

    Keywords:arm; data entry; disorder; electromyography;input device; neck; shoulder; upper-arm; work movement; workorganisation; work posture; work task; work taskdistribution

  • 6.
    Larsson, Tore J.
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Environmental Technology and Work Science.
    et al.,
    Allvarliga arbetsskador och långvarig sjukfrånvaro i Sverige 2003: Severe work-related injury and long-term absence from work in Sweden 20032003Report (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Larsson, Tore J.
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Environmental Technology and Work Science.
    Field, Brian
    Victorian Workcover Authority, Melbourne, Australia.
    The distribution of occupational injury risks in the State of Victoria2002In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 419-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a merger of workers' compensation data from the public fund Victorian Work-cover Authority for the period 1992-1998 and denominator data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics 1996 Census, the relative distribution of occupational injury risk in the state of Victoria has been calculated. A reconstituted occupational code, made from combining the present Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) occupational and industrial codes, was used to differentiate occupations in relation to hazards. A four-part injury severity index, generated by the claims settling process, has been used to differentiate occupations, tasks and activities in terms of priorities for intervention and prevention. Occupational injury incidence and severity in Victoria between 1992 and 1998 has been analysed. Among large and small occupational groups the combined criteria of high annual injury incidence and extreme injury severity have identified the following occupational groups as the top priorities for prevention counter-measures in Victoria: Glass, clay, stone workers; Miners, drillers; Forestry and logging workers; Roof layers; Car and delivery drivers; Wood industry workers; Other construction workers. Ergonomic interventions, together with the prevention of falls and power tool incidents related to the relevant occupational exposures, were discussed.

  • 8.
    Larsson, Tore J.
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Environmental Technology and Work Science.
    m.fl, m.fl
    Allvarliga arbetsskador och långvarig sjukfrånvaro i Sverige 2004: Severe work-related injury and long-term absence from work in Sweden 20042004Report (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Mårtensson, Lena
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Environmental Technology and Work Science.
    Hur Farligt Är Det Att Resa: flygtrafikens risker2004In: Risker i tekniska system, Studentlitteratur, 2004Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Mårtensson, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Environmental Technology and Work Science.
    Ericson, Mats
    Den mänskliga faktorn2004In: Risker i tekniska system / [ed] Grimvall, G, Jacobsson, P, Thedeen, T, Studentlitteratur, 2004Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11. Ramirez, J. J.
    et al.
    Frostell, Björn
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Environmental Technology and Work Science.
    Galindo, R.
    A systems approach evaluation of sludge management strategies: sludge management in Valparaiso and Aconcagua, Chile2002In: Water Science and Technology, ISSN 0273-1223, E-ISSN 1996-9732, Vol. 46, no 05-apr, p. 381-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the 5th Region, located in central Chile, infrastructure projects are being implemented in order to increase the capacity to treat and dispose of sewage. In order to analyse the sludge management alternatives the ORWARE model was used. The research project was divided in two stages: in the first stage, the sewage and sludge management strategies to be compared as well as the objectives were established. The management alternatives chosen were for chemical or biological treatment of sewage while for sludge the management alternatives were based on digestion, composting or lime stabilisation. The second stage included simulation and analysis of results. The main conclusions of the work were: if lowest possible emissions is the main objective of sewage treatment, biological treatment should be applied. Regarding pathogen reduction, both chemical precipitation and biological treatment attain an adequate reduction if the treated sewage is to be discharged to the sea. On the other hand, additional disinfection is needed in the case of discharge to rivers. Control at source should be stressed to avoid heavy metals and toxic organic compounds in the sludge.

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