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  • 1. Anand, N.
    et al.
    Meijer, D.
    van Duin, J. H. R.
    Tavasszy, L.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics. Delft Univ Technol, Netherlands.
    Validation of an agent based model using a participatory simulation gaming approach: The case of city logistics2016In: Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies, ISSN 0968-090X, E-ISSN 1879-2359, Vol. 71, p. 489-499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agent-based modeling is used for simulating the actions and interactions of autonomous entities aiming to assessing their effects on the system as a whole. At an abstract level, an agent-based model (ABM) is a representation of the many simple agents and interactions among them. The decision making of the agents is based on the rules given to them. In an ABM, the model output is the result of internal decision-making and may differ with alteration in the decision path. On the contrary, with the set of rules embedded in agents, their behavior is modeled to take a ‘certain action’ in a ‘certain situation’. It suggests that the internal decision making behavior of agents is truly responsible for the model output and thus it cannot be ignored while validating ABMs. This research article focuses on the validating agents’ behavior by evaluating decision-making processes of agents. For this purpose, we propose a validation framework based on a participatory simulation game. Using this framework we engage a human player (i.e. a domain stakeholder) to allow us to collect information about choices and validate the behavior of an individual agent. A proof-of-concept game is developed for a city logistics ABM to test the framework.

  • 2. Aydoǧan, R.
    et al.
    Lo, J. C.
    Meijer, Sebastian A.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Jonker, C. M.
    Modeling network controller decisions based upon situation awareness through agent-based negotiation2014In: 44th International Simulation and Gaming Association Conference, ISAGA 2013 and 17th IFIP WG 5.7 Workshop on Experimental Interactive Learning in Industrial Management, Springer-Verlag Tokyo Inc., 2014, p. 191-200Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Dutch railway traffic control is in an urgent need for innovation and therefore turns to gaming simulation as a platform to test and train future configurations of the system. The presence of relevant participants is necessary to keep the fidelity of the gaming simulation high. Network controllers are often needed in such games, but are expensive, scarce, and often have limited action, thus making their involvement less than desirable. To overcome this, the current paper introduces the use of intelligent software agents to replace some roles. The cognitive construct of situation awareness is required to model the evaluation of an offer in a negotiation setting, in which a situation awareness model (SAM) is introduced for evaluating offers in complex and dynamic systems.

  • 3.
    Azhari, Mohammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    A Design and Implementation of Interactive Visualizations and Simulation in Transportation2014In: The Shift from Teaching to Learning: Individual, Collective and Organizational Learning Through Gaming Simulation: Proceedings of the 45th Conferenceof the International Simulation and Gaming Association, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transportation Planners have a long history of using Geographical Information Systems, Simulation Models and Visualizations for decision support. A frame-work that integrates all three can provide enhanced decision support, opportuni-ties for training and planning future scenarios. In the current paper, we describe the concept of such a framework and the first steps toward its development.

  • 4.
    Hauge, Jannicke
    et al.
    KTH. BIBA, Bremer Institut für Produktion und Logistik an der Universität Bremen, Germany.
    Carretero, Ramos Miguel
    KTH.
    Kodjabachian, J.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Duqueroie, B.
    Protoworld: a simulation based gaming environment to model and plan urban mobility2016In: 4th International Conference on Games and Learning Alliance, GALA 2015, Springer, 2016, p. 393-400Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This workshop will offer the participants the opportunity to explore and test a gaming environment integrating simulation data from different sources. The participants will model and play different mobility options for five European cities. The ProtoWorld solution integrates different simulations and street maps in Unity and allows a playful experience in urban mobility planning. The software will be available for the participants also after the workshop for further experimentation.

  • 5. Lo, Julia C.
    et al.
    Pluyter, Kari R.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan A.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Individual Markers of Resilience in Train Traffic Control: The Role of Operators' Goals and Strategic Mental Models and Implications for Variation, Expertise, and Performance2016In: Human Factors, ISSN 0018-7208, E-ISSN 1547-8181, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 80-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine individual markers of resilience and obtain quantitative insights into the understanding and the implications of variation and expertise levels in train traffic operators' goals and strategic mental models and their impact on performance. Background: The Dutch railways are one of the world's most heavy utilized railway networks and have been identified to be weak in system and organizational resilience. Method: Twenty-two train traffic controllers enacted two scenarios in a human-in-the-loop simulator. Their experience, goals, strategic mental models, and performance were assessed through questionnaires and simulator logs. Goals were operationalized through performance indicators and strategic mental models through train completion strategies. Results: A variation was found between operators for both self-reported primary performance indicators and completion strategies. Further, the primary goal of only 14% of the operators reflected the primary organizational goal (i.e., arrival punctuality). An incongruence was also found between train traffic controllers' self-reported performance indicators and objective performance in a more disrupted condition. The level of experience tends to affect performance differently. Conclusion: There is a gap between primary organizational goals and preferred individual goals. Further, the relative strong diversity in primary operator goals and strategic mental models indicates weak resilience at the individual level. Application: With recent and upcoming large-scale changes throughout the sociotechnical space of the railway infrastructure organization, the findings are useful to facilitate future railway traffic control and the development of a resilient system.

  • 6.
    Magal Shreenath, Vinutha
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Opening the search space for the design of a future transport system using ‘big data’2017In: 15th International Conference on Computers in Urban Planning and Urban Management, 2017, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2017, Vol. Part F4, p. 247-261Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The advent of ‘big data’ already enables a wide range of conveniences to citizens. However, the dominant utilization of this data for systematic improvement is geared towards operations such as informing on real-time events in cities. The impact of big data on the long-term planning and design purposes in cities is still unclear. This chapter presents an application of big data where locations, suitable for deploying charging infrastructure for vehicles, are mined. We conducted an experiment to observe the impact of this information on designs of Electrical Road Systems (ERS). Results prove that insights mined from big data outside the design process do influence the designing process and the resulting designs. Therefore it seems promising to further explore this influence on the quality of designing.

  • 7.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics. Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    The Power of Sponges: Comparing High-Tech and Low-Tech Gaming for Innovation2015In: Journal Simulation & Gaming, ISSN 1046-8781, E-ISSN 1552-826X, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 512-535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Innovation in transport systems has a need for simulated environments to experiment with new configurations, ideas, and solutions. Gaming is one such environment. This article applies the approach to the context of capacity allocation and traffic control innovation in the Dutch railway system. Both high-tech and low-tech games are built and applied. Aim and method. By comparing cases using low-tech and high-tech games for innovation in a related bundle of projects in the railway sector, this article aims to identify different patterns emerging from a retrospective cross case comparison. The cases aimed at testing and assessing various ideas about the innovation process through high- and low-tech gaming. Results. The high-tech cases were used to generate more quantitative data, for purposes where a concept had to be tested that has been formulated at a higher level of detail. It shows that, despite the higher precision, fidelity of high-tech simulators was not necessarily better than that of low-tech cases. None of the cases were set up to formally accept or reject hypotheses, but followed the typical innovation logic of testing and assessing ideas early in the process. Conclusions. The numerous qualitative data, gathered during the gaming sessions, illustrated the benefits and drawbacks of high- and low-tech gaming. The real world decisions made by the client, based on the gaming sessions, show that the scope of the project was broader than merely an intervention in an existing transport system. Low-tech games showed to be useful for dealing with rapid systems development (prototyping). They allow flexible role settings, varying rules, and resources. High-tech games did not provide obvious fidelity advantages, but yielded more quantitative data suitable for analysis. Recommendations. The article identifies the need for a new methodological approach: gaming supporting system/organization design.

  • 8.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Integrating Computational and Participatory Simulations for Design in Complex Systems2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The understanding and conceptualization of cities and its constituent systems such as transportation and healthcare as open and complex is shifting the debates around the technical and communicative rationales of planning. Viewing cities in a holistic manner presents methodological challenges, where our understanding of complexity is applied in a tangible fashion to planning processes. Bridging the two rationales in the tools and methodologies of planning is necessary for the emergence of a 'non-linear rationality' of planning, one that accounts for and is premised upon complexity. Simulations representing complex systems provide evidence and support for planning, and have the potential to serve as an interface between the more abstract and political decision making and the material city systems.

    Moving beyond current planning methods, this thesis explores the role of simulations in planning. Recognizing the need for holistic representations, the thesis integrates multiple disparate simulations into a holistic whole achieving complex representations of systems. These representations are then applied and studied in an interactive environment to address planning problems in different contexts. The thesis contributes an approach towards the development of complex representations of systems; improvements on participatory methods to integrate computational simulations; a nuanced understanding of the relative value of simulation constructs; technologies and frameworks that facilitate the easy development of integrated simulations that can support participatory planning processes.

    The thesis develops contributions through experiments which involved problems and stakeholders from real world systems. The approach towards development of integrated simulations is realized in an open source framework. The framework creates computationally efficient, scalable and interactive simulations of complex systems, which used in a participatory manner delivers tangible plans and designs.

  • 9.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Evaluating City Operations Design using Interactive SimulationsIn: Journal Simulation & Gaming, ISSN 1046-8781, E-ISSN 1552-826XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Games and simulations are evaluated for serving different functions, such as learning, design, communication and collaboration. Research on the relationship between the constructs of games and their outcomes can provide insights on the design of future games, to steer towards particular outcomes.

     

    Aim. The article aims to relate the constructs of two high fidelity, high tech and free form games to a conceptual evaluation framework, to better understand the relationships between constructs such as fidelity, validity and the functions a game is meant to serve.

     

    Method. The games are built for designing operational procedures for city management. The games are built using the ProtoWorld framework, and simulate the cities of Rome and Haifa through the integration of simulations. The framework enables run time interaction and intervention within the simulated city, such that players can manage and design procedures for their cities through a large scale, realistic simulation system. Controllers from both cities play the games for their respective cities, and attempt to design and manage their simulated cities. As experts on the system, their reflections on the use of such tools in their planning practice and the outcomes of the game sessions are analyzed to evaluate the games and game sessions.

     

    Results. Results point to the free form nature of the game enabling the design of tangible outcomes, which can be immediately validated and implemented in practice. The high fidelity nature of the simulation restricts facilitation, but enhances the players’ ability to comprehend complexity. The agency of the players enables their identification with the simulation, but restricts their creativity in the game. 

  • 10.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Hanchi, Hamza
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Hybrid, composable approach to simulations in healthcare operations and management2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 Winter Simulation Conference / [ed] W. K. V. Chan, A. D'Ambrogio, G. Zacharewicz, N. Mustafee, G. Wainer, and E. Page, ACM Digital Library, 2017, Vol. F134102, p. 2857-2868Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation has been used for modeling in healthcare for many decades. Ranging from the modeling of physiological processes to group dynamics to the modeling of strategic and system-wide models of healthcare provision, simulation promises to be an effective approach to analyze healthcare operations. Effective application of simulations in healthcare operations requires that simulation deal with wide variability and unpredictability in workflow processes, the complexity of healthcare organizations and enables the participation of human experts in the modeling and operations processes. In this paper, based on requirements drawn from a participatory simulation with healthcare practitioners, we define a hybrid, composable approach to healthcare simulations. Both the participatory simulation and the composable simulation are applied in the context of the New Karolinska Solna hospital in Sweden, a highly specialized new hospital. Results point to the need to accounting for variability in workflow processes and integration with existing IT infrastructure in hospitals. 

  • 11.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Complexity and Context: Meta-requirements for Simulation GamesIn: Simulation and Gaming, ISSN 10468781Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Simulations and models mediate between actors, and between actors and reality. Researching their context of use in policy making and their interpretation by policy makers is essential, since it might lead to different requirements and considerations for a modeler and the modeling process. 

     

    Aim. In this article, we investigate and attempt to define the demands and requirements policy makers might have from simulation models, especially in the context of decision making in complex systems. Another goal of this article is to contribute to the ongoing discussion on fidelity and validity, and their relationship with representation of systems in models.

     

    Method. Policy makers have expert knowledge of the systems they work with, as well as considerable experience in working with analytical tools such as simulations that provide them with evidence to support their policy processes. As potential clients and users of simulations, the reflections of 18 policy makers on the use of simulations are triggered through structured, play based exploration of a systems dynamics model. The system dynamics model simulates is specific to the local context and simulates the region they work in. It is implemented within Democracy 3, a commercially available game. This model is explored through game play in a workshop. Through forms and debriefing, insights were gathered from the players’ reflections on the use of models and simulations in policy practice.

     

    Results. Our results point to different requirements from policy makers on simulations and models. Policy makers prefer complete, open models which are flexible and facilitate exploration. Results also demonstrate the linked nature of fidelity and validity. 

  • 12.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Shreenath, Vinutha Magal
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Analytics on public transport delays with spatial big data2016In: Proceedings of the 5th ACM SIGSPATIAL International Workshop on Analytics for Big Geospatial Data, BigSpatial 2016, ACM Digital Library, 2016, p. 28-33Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing pervasiveness of location-aware technologies is leading to the rise of large, spatio-temporal datasets and to the opportunity of discovering usable knowledge about the behaviors of people and objects. Applied extensively in transportation, spatial big data and its analytics can deliver useful insights on a number of different issues such as congestion, delays, public transport reliability and so on. Predominantly studied for its use in operational management, spatial big data can be used to provide insight in strategic applications as well, from planning and design to evaluation and management. Such large scale, streaming spatial big data can be used in the improvement of public transport, for example the design of public transport networks and reliability. In this paper, we analyze GTFS data from the cities of Stockholm and Rome to gain insight on the sources and factors influencing public transport delays in the cities. The analysis is performed on a combination of GTFS data with data from other sources. The paper points to key issues in the analysis of real time data, driven by the contextual setting in the two cities. © 2016, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 13.
    Shreenath, Vinutha Magal
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    A Feasibility Study for Gamification in Transport Maintenance: Requirements to implement gamification in heterogeneous organizations2015In: Games and Virtual Worlds for Serious Applications (VS-Games), 2015 7th International Conference on, IEEE conference proceedings, 2015, p. 1-7Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gamification has been successfully applied in many domains, but mostly for simple, isolated and operational tasks. The hope for gamification as a method to radically change and improve behavior, to provide incentives for sustained engagement has proven to be more difficult to get right. Applying gamification in large networked organizations with heterogeneous tasks remains a challenge. Applying gamification in such enterprise environments posits different requirements, and a match between these requirements and the institution needs to be investigated before venturing into the design and implementation of gamification. The current paper contributes a study where the authors investigate the feasibility of implementing gamification in Trafikverket, the Swedish transport administration. Through an investigation of the institutional arrangements around data collection, procurement processes and links to institutional structures, the study finds areas within Trafikverket where gamification could be successfully applied, and suggests gaps and methods to apply gamification in other areas.

  • 14. van den Hoogen, J.
    et al.
    Lo, J.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Debriefing Research Games: Context, Substance and Method2016In: Journal Simulation & Gaming, ISSN 1046-8781, E-ISSN 1552-826X, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 368-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Debriefing is an intrinsic part of games for learning and proper debriefing can also be beneficial to research games. However, the literature on how to debrief research games is sparse and only provides the professional with an abstract topic guide. Aim. The purpose of this study was to design a framework for the debriefing of research games that are used in ongoing innovation processes. Method. We used the literature on debriefing and experimental research and our experience as game designers to build a framework that tackles the context, substance and method of debriefing research games. Results. Our framework provides three contributions. First, it shows how the context in which a research game is applied sometimes impacts the functionality of the game in negative ways. This can be helped by designing both the game and the debriefing together. Second, we operationalize validity to a greater extent, as this is the core of a good research game. Third, we provide a methodology for debriefing professionals that opens up the black box of the gaming simulation session. Conclusion. The debriefing framework provides a method to collectively assess the validity, reliability and robustness of the causal claims associated with the research conducted.

  • 15. van den Hoogen, J.
    et al.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics. Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Gaming and Simulation for Railway Innovation: A Case Study of the Dutch Railway System2015In: Journal Simulation & Gaming, ISSN 1046-8781, E-ISSN 1552-826X, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 489-511Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Gaming simulation allows decision-makers to experiment with sociotechnical systems, similar to computer simulation. However, the value of these tools in comparison with each other remains uncertain, especially when focusing on their real-life application in systemic innovation processes. Aim. This article builds a framework based on the literature related to innovation of complex systems in a multi-actor environment and intends to use this framework to differentiate between the value of computer simulation and gaming simulation in innovation processes. Method. Using a case study of the introduction of gaming simulation to ProRail, the Dutch railway infrastructure manager, this article explores the advantages and disadvantages of using the two tools in situations where radical innovations need to be invented, explored, tested, and implemented in an incumbent system. Results. Computer simulations, as closed exercises, allow for more radical innovations to be studied. The openness of gaming sessions as well as the need for gamers to interact with a recognizable system inhibit the use of gaming simulation in envisioning radical innovations. However, they are more suitable for the joint commissioning of research and the stepwise testing of small-scale improvements. Gaming simulation is therefore a more appropriate tool for planning a concerted transition in a multi-actor setting. Conclusion. Computer simulation better allows for the building of experimental niches, and gaming simulation better helps in the concerted planning of the implementation of innovations. The article ends with concrete directions for further research as well as ideas about combining the two tools.

  • 16. Van den Hoogen, J.
    et al.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Gaming Simulation Hybrids in the Railway Domain: How Games Impact the Volatility of Innovation Processes2016In: SIMULATION AND GAMING IN THE NETWORK SOCIETY / [ed] Kaneda, T Kanegae, H Toyoda, Y Rizzi, P, SPRINGER-VERLAG SINGAPORE PTE LTD , 2016, p. 291-307Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation processes in the railway domain are highly chaotic due to the reciprocal influences of technological, social, and institutional dynamics over time. The ways by which gaming simulation can contribute to these processes is therefore highly context, time, and history dependent. Using three case studies, we explore basic recurrent patterns in these innovation processes and how the employment of gaming simulation has alleviated or attenuated these patterns. For different product architectures that characterize the innovation artifact, different patterns arise in different sequences for the process. We conclude that gaming's main active substance is in the opening up or closing down of technological, social, and institutional spaces. In addition, this impact is again highly moderated by the specific constellation of these spaces when a game is designed, executed, and analyzed. Broadly we see that in stable times, gaming simulation is able to decrease stability and thereby front-load much of the volatility otherwise found at later stages of the innovation process. In contrast, gaming simulation's ability to decrease volatility in volatile times is more problematic.

  • 17. van Lankveld, G.
    et al.
    Sehic, E.
    Lo, J. C.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan A.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics. Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Assessing Gaming Simulation Validity for Training Traffic Controllers2017In: Journal Simulation & Gaming, ISSN 1046-8781, E-ISSN 1552-826X, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 219-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The Dutch railway company ProRail is performing large-scale capacity upgrades to their infrastructure network. As part of these upgrades, ProRail uses gaming simulations to help prepare train traffic controllers for new infrastructure situations. Researching the validity of these gaming simulations is essential, since the conclusions drawn from gaming simulation use may result in decisions with large financial and social impact for ProRail and Dutch train passengers. Aim. In this article, we aim to investigate the validity of the gaming simulations for training traffic controllers for new situations in rail infrastructure. We also aim to contribute to the discussion on the minimum level of fidelity required to develop and conduct gaming simulations in a valid way. Method. We investigate the validity by using training sessions in conjunction with questionnaires. We based the approach and questionnaires on the earlier work of Raser. Results. Our results show that the validity of the gaming simulation ranges from medium to good. They also show that while the fidelity of the gaming simulation is not like the real-world operating conditions, this does not reduce validity to low levels. Conclusions. We conclude that the gaming simulation used in this study was of medium to good validity. We also conclude that maximum fidelity is not required in order to run a valid gaming simulation session.

  • 18.
    Zhang, Chen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Hanchi, Hamza
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Evaluating the Effect of Centralized Administration on Health Care Performances Using Discrete-Event Simulation2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Zhang, Chen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Hanchi, Hamza
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Identifying Influential Factors of Patient Length of Stay In a Surgery Center: a Simulation Modelling Approach2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Zomer, Lara-Britt
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Daamen, Winnie
    TU Delft.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Hoogendoorn, Serge
    TU Delft.
    Managing Crowds: The Possibilities and Limitations of Crowd Information During Urban Mass Events2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thischapter,basedonamixedmethodresearchapproach,offersinsights into possibilities and limitations of using ICT measures for crowd management and distribution during urban mass events (UMEs). Based on literature, practical applications and analyses of research results, we propose crowd management should consider characteristics of both crowds and UMEs to increase information effectiveness. In relation to urban planning, results show that possibilities to influence a crowd’s behavior depend on available (and known) choice sets offered in various locations, while distances towards locations across city centers appear less important. Limitations appear to be related to scarce knowledge on what drives crowd members to adapt or adhere to their activity choice behavior. Such insights are essential for smart cities striving for an optimal use of infrastructural capacity, as both the ambiguous effects of ICT measures, as well as a crowd’s self-organizing capacity should be taken into account for delaying, solving and preventing dis- ruptions of pedestrian flows in city centers. 

  • 21. Zomer, Lara-Britt
    et al.
    Moustaid, Elhabib
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    A Meta-Model for Including Social Behavior and Data into Simulation in the Smart City Context2015In: Proceedings of the 2015 Winter Simulation Conference / [ed] L. Yilmaz, W. K. V. Chan, I. Moon, T. M. K. Roeder, C. Macal, and M. D. Rossetti, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    mart city management can be regarded to bridge different realms of thinking about cities, i.e., 1) the city as complex-adaptive system, 2) socio-technical operational control center and 3) multi-actor policy-making. Underpinned by different world views and theoretical bodies, integration of the three realms puts forward new demands on simulation approaches and challenges current knowledge and available technology regarding integration of sub-models across different systems. In order to support urban transportation management, a holistic approach is needed that semantically connects the three realms by incorporation of human behavior and knowledge. Combining research on knowledge management and computer science, this paper presents a novel meta-framework as socio-technical hybrid simulation language to generalize integration of simulations, gaming and data for modeling urban transportation.

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