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  • 1.
    Kourtit, Karima
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places.
    Nijkamp, Peter
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places.
    Big data dashboards as smart decision support tools for i-cities - An experiment on stockholm2018In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 71, p. 24-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study addresses the strategic governance challenges of modern smart cities from the new viewpoint of big data management. It seeks to develop and highlight a systematic methodological framework for handling multivariate big data in a smart urban decision support context in the 'New Urban World', so as to enhance the cities' competitive performance through the design and development of operational urban management principles and strategies. The specific aim of this paper is to provide the critical and basic cornerstones for an applicable interactive dashboard architecture as a supporting tool in a structured process of innovative city strategies and consequent enhanced socio-economic performance. A core element in the present paper is formed by a smart urban dashboard system that acts as an interactive navigation tool supporting operational choices of all stakeholders involved. This dashboard is able to integrate complex and ever-changing big data bases serving as 'signposts' of city intelligence (or i-city smartness) for daily or strategic decisions of all urban stakeholders. This study thus outlines successively the concept of smart i-cities in our 'urban century', the great potential of digital technology for managing big data in governing i-cities, and the foundations of an urban dashboard on the basis of the so-called Pentagon model as a policy strategy vehicle. Starting from extensive data on a broad set of global cities, the potential of this approach is exemplified by means of an illustrative application of a smart urban dashboard for the city of Stockholm.

  • 2.
    Mehaffy, Michael West
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places.
    Neighborhood “choice architecture”: A new strategy for lower-emissions urban planning?2018In: Urban Planning, ISSN 2183-7635, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 113-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent advances in the field of behavioral economics offer intriguing insights into the ways that consumer decisions are influenced and may be influenced more deliberately to better meet community-wide and democratic goals. We demonstrate that these insights open a door to urban planners who may thereby develop strategies to alter urban-scale consumption behaviors that may significantly reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions per capita. We first hypothesize that it is possible, through feasible changes in neighborhood structure, to alter the “choice architecture” of neighborhoods in order to achieve meaningful GHG reductions. We then formulate a number of elements of “choice architecture” that may be applied as tools at the neighborhood scale. We examine several neighborhoods that demonstrate variations in these elements, and from known inventories, we generate a preliminary assessment of the possible magnitude of GHG reductions that may be available. Although we acknowledge many remaining challenges, we conclude that “neighborhood choice architecture” offers a promising new strategy meriting further research and development.

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