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  • 1.
    Haas, Tigran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Mehaffy, Michael W.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places.
    Introduction: the future of public space2019In: Urban Design International, ISSN 1357-5317, E-ISSN 1468-4519, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 1-3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Haas, Tigran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places.
    Mehaffy, Michael W.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places.
    Introduction: the future of public space (vol 24, pg 1, 2019)2019In: Urban Design International, ISSN 1357-5317, E-ISSN 1468-4519, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 75-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The following paragraph on page 2 (bottom of first column) has been moved.

  • 3.
    Kourtit, Karima
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places.
    Nijkamp, Peter
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places.
    Big data dashboards as smart decision support tools for i-cities - An experiment on stockholm2018In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 71, p. 24-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study addresses the strategic governance challenges of modern smart cities from the new viewpoint of big data management. It seeks to develop and highlight a systematic methodological framework for handling multivariate big data in a smart urban decision support context in the 'New Urban World', so as to enhance the cities' competitive performance through the design and development of operational urban management principles and strategies. The specific aim of this paper is to provide the critical and basic cornerstones for an applicable interactive dashboard architecture as a supporting tool in a structured process of innovative city strategies and consequent enhanced socio-economic performance. A core element in the present paper is formed by a smart urban dashboard system that acts as an interactive navigation tool supporting operational choices of all stakeholders involved. This dashboard is able to integrate complex and ever-changing big data bases serving as 'signposts' of city intelligence (or i-city smartness) for daily or strategic decisions of all urban stakeholders. This study thus outlines successively the concept of smart i-cities in our 'urban century', the great potential of digital technology for managing big data in governing i-cities, and the foundations of an urban dashboard on the basis of the so-called Pentagon model as a policy strategy vehicle. Starting from extensive data on a broad set of global cities, the potential of this approach is exemplified by means of an illustrative application of a smart urban dashboard for the city of Stockholm.

  • 4.
    Locke, Ryan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Elmlund, Peter
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places.
    Mehaffy, Michael
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places.
    Evaluating Landscape Urbanism: evidence from Lafayette Park, Detroit2019In: Journal of Urbanism: International Research on Placemaking and Urban Sustainability, ISSN 1754-9175, E-ISSN 1754-9183, ISSN 1754-9175, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 34-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The claims made for Landscape Urbanism have been difficult to evaluate, since they rely heavily on theoretical and aspirational arguments, and new projects to date have offered little post-occupancy evidence. However, more specific claims have also been made about historic projects as proposed precedents for Landscape Urbanism, and these offer a more substantial evidence base for the evaluation of claims. Here we take the claimed precedent of Detroit’s Lafayette Park, and evaluate the stated claims for its performance on social, economic and ecological criteria, in light of the available evidence. We conclude with an assessment of broader claims for Landscape Urbanism in light of the evidence we find in Lafayette Park.

  • 5.
    Mehaffy, M. W.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places.
    Haas, Tigran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places.
    Informality in the new urban agenda: A “new paradigm?”2018In: Berkeley Planning Journal, ISSN 1047-5192, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 6-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The New Urban Agenda, the outcome document of the United Nations Habitat III conference in 2016, was adopted by consensus by all 193 member states of the United Nations. The Habitat III leadership has proclaimed that the document represents a “new paradigm” in urban planning, reversing the “over-determined” model of 20th century Western-dominated planning, and embracing more locally-determined forms of informality. This paper examines the intellectual history of the document, and compares it to its antecedents, thereby evaluating the claim that it represents a new paradigm. The conclusion assesses implications for future planning practice, particularly as we confront an age of rapid urbanization in many parts of the globe.

  • 6.
    Mehaffy, Michael W.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places.
    Elmlund, Peter
    Farrell, Kyle
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Correction to: Implementing the New Urban Agenda: the central role of public space (URBAN DESIGN International, (2019), 24, 1, (4-6), 10.1057/s41289-018-0063-2)2019In: Urban Design International, ISSN 1357-5317, E-ISSN 1468-4519, Vol. 24, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the second paragraph in the second column on page 2 beginning “1. How important are public spaces as engines of human well-being, economic development and social justice, and what are the threats to them, especially from private interests?” the following sentence has been removed: “Setha Low also points to a worrisome diminution of the capacity of public spaces to promote social justice and diversity, replaced by a “politics of exclusion”.” On page 3 of the final sentence of the first paragraph “Ali Madanipour and Setha Low again warn of the danger of unequal access when private sector actors have increasing control over public spaces” has been replaced by “Ali Madanipour again warns of the danger of unequal access when private sector actors have increasing control over public spaces”. 

  • 7.
    Mehaffy, Michael W.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places.
    Elmlund, Peter
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Farrell, Kyle
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places.
    Implementing the New Urban Agenda: the central role of public space2019In: Urban Design International, ISSN 1357-5317, E-ISSN 1468-4519, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 4-6Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Mehaffy, Michael West
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places.
    Neighborhood “choice architecture”: A new strategy for lower-emissions urban planning?2018In: Urban Planning, ISSN 2183-7635, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 113-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent advances in the field of behavioral economics offer intriguing insights into the ways that consumer decisions are influenced and may be influenced more deliberately to better meet community-wide and democratic goals. We demonstrate that these insights open a door to urban planners who may thereby develop strategies to alter urban-scale consumption behaviors that may significantly reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions per capita. We first hypothesize that it is possible, through feasible changes in neighborhood structure, to alter the “choice architecture” of neighborhoods in order to achieve meaningful GHG reductions. We then formulate a number of elements of “choice architecture” that may be applied as tools at the neighborhood scale. We examine several neighborhoods that demonstrate variations in these elements, and from known inventories, we generate a preliminary assessment of the possible magnitude of GHG reductions that may be available. Although we acknowledge many remaining challenges, we conclude that “neighborhood choice architecture” offers a promising new strategy meriting further research and development.

1 - 8 of 8
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