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  • 1.
    Bek, Rim
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Lightning Design.
    The Perceptual and Psychological Effects of Artificial Lighting on Peripheral Vision in Humans2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Information processing differences between foveal and peripheral vision allow for different perceptual experiences and emotional responses. A lighting set-up was used to test the spatial perception and emotional state of 14 participants with the use of foveal and peripheral vision in a photograph and immersive environment respectively.  The space was associated with high levels of tension, inspiration, and alertness and was regarded as being more spacious, with higher light intensity, and more uniform lighting distribution when perceived with peripheral vision. 

  • 2.
    Dascalita, Raluca
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Lightning Design.
    That meaningful light: A phenomenological approach to meaning in lighting design2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 3.
    Dastgheib, Seyedehfatemeh
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Lightning Design.
    Light and Perception of safety in-between buildings: The role of lighting in perception of safety from a female perspective in in-between spaces of residential areas2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis will investigate the relationship between lighting and perception of safety through a case study. The main focus of this study is outdoor lighting with consideration of gender equality and perception of safety. Although street lighting is generally recognized as the most important environmental features that influences subjective perception of safety after dark, there is still lack of knowledge regarding the needed quality of light for this purpose and how it may influence perceived safety. Literature review indicates that effect of light on perceived safety works through two different mechanisms: natural surveillance and social integration. The main focus of this thesis is on natural surveillance. Indeed, light by increasing visibility in interaction with presence of people, enhance possibilities of natural surveillance. Based on literature review, a tool has been developed to have a more specific examination of visibility.Besides, the women’s safety audit (WSA) diagnostic tool is used as a qualitative data collection tool to identify unsafe spots in the chosen area by 10 local female participants. The chosen area is a residential area in Eskilstuna city, called Årby neighbourhood. All the participants were asked to determine unsafe spots from their perspective in the chosen area during an exploratory night walk. In the next step, the identified unsafe spots are analysed by means of the developed tool in terms of visibility.The result of this thesis supports the previous findings regarding the relationship between visibility and safety perception. Results show that urban settings with low level of prospect (obstructed view), high level of entrapment (escape difficulty), high level of concealment (lots of hiding spots), lack of illuminated visual spatial boundaries (sky plane, vertical plane and ground plane), low level of facial recognition and obstacle detection, low level of illumination of path, high level of glare and varied lighting distribution are judged as the most unsafe by women. In addition, the study revealed that illuminated ground plane has the minimum impact on sense of safety in comparison with other safety-related environmental factors. Consequently, this study highlighted that standards and guidelines, which are related to ground plane, are not very beneficial for improving perception of safety.

  • 4.
    Lowden, Arne
    et al.
    Stockholm University .
    Favero, Federico
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Lightning Design. KTH MID.
    Ljus och hälsa: En kunskapssammanställning med fokus på dagsljusets betydelse i inomhusmiljö2017Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report reports the published evidence in scientific papers with a focus on Nordic research, but also includes relevant technical reports and books. The results are mainly presented for the non-visual effects of daylight.

    The report indicates that more attention should be paid to the health-promoting effects that natural daylight provides in the living environment. Building design is the most important determining factor for natural daylight exposure in times when the general trend is for reduced time spent outdoors. It is especially important to consider good lighting at schools and in health care facilities.

    Light is crucial for the regulation of circadian rhythms, sleeping and waking cycles, the regulation of mood, and the activation of stress responses. 

    including access to daylight, windows, and views, becomes crucial. Good access to natural daylight in the environment facilitates the regulation of circadian rhythms and improves sleep, and daylight entering through windows promotes orientation in the room, reduces falls, and prevents depressive symptoms.

    There is a linear relation between time spent outdoors and good health, and the more natural daylight that is obtained, the fewer the health complaints that are reported. In an environment devoid of daylight, sensitivity to other evening light sources such as computer screens and tablets increases, and this affects sleep and circadian rhythms negatively.

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