Change search
Refine search result
123 1 - 50 of 106
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Adam, Jonathan
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Analyzing Function and Potential in Cuba's El Paquete: A Postcolonial Approach2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The dire state of Cuban internet connectivity has inspired local informal innovations. One such innovation is El Paquete, a weekly distribution of downloaded content spread through an informal network. Taking a postcolonial approach, I investigate through user experiences how this network operates in a resource-poor environment. This investigation articulates a model of El Paquete centered on social interactions, which inform the system’s function but also shape El Paquete’s design and role in society. Based on this model, a set of speculative design exercises probe possibilities to streamline El Paquete’s compilation, involve consumer preferences in its design directions, or act as a disruption tolerant network. In uncovering the technical possibilities of El Paquete, these designs illuminate how its current design serves Cuban communities by embodying realities and limitations of Cuban society. El Paquete’s embodiment of informal innovation serves as a call to designers to continuously rethink development design processes, centering communities and their knowledge and technical practices.

  • 2.
    Afework, Miriam
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Using Magic Machines to Elaborate Menstrual Self-Tracker­s for Women with Endometriosis2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Existing self-tracking tools for women concentrate on one’s general well-being and keeping track of ovulation and periods. With around 10% of women worldwide suffering from endometriosis there is an unmet need to leverage self-tracking for women whose cycles are affected by more variables. The disease is enigmatic with an unknown cause and cure and the ill­ness differs for each individual in symptoms and working treatments. It is therefore critical to understand how women can learn about their bodies and how to treat their condition. In this research I work with two sufferers to identify their secret de­sires through a workshop and a series of interviews. Results suggest that women with endometriosis could benefit from ex­perimenting with different habits and make personalized routines to suit their own needs. Finally I present design implica­tions for an existing menstrual app in the form of an add-on. The steps of the add-on tool included three steps. Firstly, choosing variables of one’s well being to track (mood, energy, pain etc.), choosing activities for one or more cycles (gluten-free diet, exercising etc.), and lastly viewing an analysis of any changes in the body.

  • 3.
    Ahlström, Marcus
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Broadening the Reading Experience on Mobile Devices using Tilt-based Input: An Explorative Design Study2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is an explorative study aimed at the possibility of integrating tilt-based input to improve the reading experience on smartphones. Previous works from the early 2000s have been skeptical towards tilt-based navigation, deeming it unruly and imprecise. To investigate if today’s technology has unlocked new possibilities; two experimental reading methods were designed, created and tested iteratively on 20, respectively 18 participants. The first method is a reassessment of tilt-based auto-scrolling and the second is a novel approach comparable to tilt-based paging. Data from the reading sessions were collected quantitatively in tandem with qualitative data from post-session interviews. The results indicate good potential and a reading performance similar to the standard navigation method. The importance of accommodating people with different reading behaviours was also discussed.

  • 4. Ahmed, A. A.
    et al.
    Almeida, Teresa
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Choi, J. O.
    Pincus, J.
    Ireland, K.
    What’s at issue: Sex, stigma, and politics in ACM publishing2018In: Proceeding CHI EA '18 Extended Abstracts of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, article id alt07Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Because publishing with the ACM is essentially required to advance our careers, we must examine its practices critically and constructively. To this end, we reflect on our experience working with the ACM student publication Crossroads. We encountered rigid content limitations related to sex and sexuality, preventing some contributors from foregrounding their connection to political activism, and others from publishing altogether. We explore the underlying institutional and sociopolitical problems and propose starting points for future action, including developing a transparent content approval policy and new organizations for politically-engaged computing researchers, all of which should center the leadership of marginalized individuals.

  • 5.
    Albrecht, Tomás
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Designing the Publikvitto, a system to make government expenditure tangible2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Air transportation is essential to our society. It enables global trading, brings people together, and lets travelers explore distant parts of the world. However, flying is a highly unsustainable behavior and accounts for roughly 2% of all carbon emissions; with industry and research forecasting constant growth in the coming years. The economic benefits rhetoric often prevails over the environmental costs, though; motivating governments to give incentives to airports and airlines. The Swedish Government, despite its green goals and pro-sustainability actions, is no exception, and both municipal and federal funds support the air route network.

    This thesis reports on the development of the Publikvitto, a system designed to help citizen make sense of the government's incentives to the flying industry. The process is based on research through design and inspired by reflective practices. The primary outcome are insights into the relationship between designer, social issues, and government's actions; and how these elements can be approached in order to design artifacts that motivate people to engage in political discussions.

  • 6.
    Almeida, Teresa
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Designing for Women: Situated Knowledge, Intimate Health and Everyday Life2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Almeida, Teresa
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Designing Technologies for Intimate Care in Women2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Almeida, Teresa
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Haré lo que deseo/I Will What I Want: Women, Design, and Empowerment: diseño y empoderamiento femenino2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [es]

    El catálogo y la exposición Haré lo que deseo/I Will What I Want: Women, Design, and Empowerment: diseño y empoderamiento femenino son un concepto curatorial desarrollado por Jimena Acosta Romero y Michelle Millar Fisher. En Abril de 2017 esta exposición fue organizada para exhibirse por primera vez en Arnold and Sheila Aronson Galleries, en el Sheila C. Johnson Design Center (Parsons School of Design / The New School, Nueva York) del 11 al 23 de abril de 2017. Su segunda sede fue en MUCA-Roma, Ciudad de México (Enero 18 - Mayo 22, 2018).

    El catálogo y la exposición Will What I Want: Women, Design, and Empowerment / Haré lo que deseo: Diseño y empoderamiento femenino explora el complejo y contradictorio rol que ha jugado el diseño desde la mitad del siglo XX, pasando por la segunda ola feminista, hasta las intersecciones no binarias del presente. La exhibición presenta objetos, interfaces e indumentaria que ha buscado habilitar como sujetos independientes y creativos, a aquellos que tienen úteros, menstrúan o se identifican como mujer; en un mundo material en su mayoría diseñado por hombres y para hombres.

    Haré lo que deseo: Diseño y empoderamiento femenino invita al lector que contemple, desde su propia perspectiva, las maneras en que estos productos, interfaces e indumentaria han - a veces para bien y otras para mal - gobernado, formado, y facilitado las experiencias modernas y contemporáneas.

  • 9.
    Almeida, Teresa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Juul Søndergaard, Marie Louise
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Homewood, Sarah
    IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Morrissey, Kellie
    Open Lab, Newcastle University, England.
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Woman-Centered Design2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This Conversation seeks to examine woman-centered design as a novel form of inquiry in design research practice. Drawing on the ‘woman-centered approach’ put forward in (Almeida 2017), this Conversation contributes to discussions on the intersection of feminism(s), gender and design research. In the Conversation we will explore how design of technologies and interactions can act critically in the ways that they serve, refigure and redefine women’s bodies in light of what woman is. Through analyzing design artefacts, we will discuss what impact the understandings of woman have in the design of technology and interventions. Through making as a catalyst for discussion, we will explore how these understandings can contribute to inform the design of technologies for women. As suggested by Judith Butler, “what’s a woman is a question that should remain open” (Kotz and Bankowsky 1992), and we aim to facilitate an open Conversation about the challenges and opportunities of designing for and with woman, which will support the development of a conceptual framework for a woman-centered design methodology.

  • 10. Artman, Henrik
    et al.
    Brynielsson, Joel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Herzing, Mathias
    Stockholm University.
    Jacobson, Adam
    Stockholm University.
    More efficient environmental inspections and enforcement2016In: Efficient Environmental Inspections and Enforcement / [ed] Herzing, M., Jacobsson, Adam, Naturvårdsverket , 2016, p. 246-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11. Bellini, R.
    et al.
    Strohmayer, A.
    Alabdulqader, E.
    Ahmed, A. A.
    Spiel, K.
    Bardzell, S.
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Feminist hci: Taking stock, moving forward, and engaging community2018In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, article id W09Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Feminist HCI has made a profound impact on perceptions of women’s health, emancipation through design, as well as gender identity, inclusion, and diversity. However, there is a distinct lack of connection between these disparate but inherently connected research spaces. This SIG meeting aims to bring scholars together to discuss emerging and evolving issues of feminist research, and finding ways of using feminist theory and practice as a tool in future HCI research. Ultimately, the SIG will facilitate the engagement of a community of feminist HCI researchers, designers, and practitioners. It brings together those who may feel isolated in their respective research groups or universities to create a platform for feminist thought within SIGCHI and facilitate collaboration to proactively move towards the mainstreaming of feminism in HCI.

  • 12.
    Bergsmark, Moa
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    From Patchwork to Appliqué: Exploring Material Properties Through an Interaction Design Remake2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Materials and materiality in interaction design has become more and more important perspectives within the field. Material explorations of a specific material could contribute to this ongoing discussion. As means to investigate how material properties affect interactive qualities for a tangible interaction design, a remake of an existing design was created. The starting point for remake is a tangible programming space for children called Patcher where custom built RFID readers is interacted with. For this investigation, Android mobile phones with NFC readers is the material of choice when recreating the same concept. Design values in Patcher are identified as collaborative play and open-ended programming play. The creation process of Alfombra Applique, the remake, is presented, the design choices and how they relate to the shift of material. This leads to learnings regarding how material properties differ when using the prebuild product with a lot of design possibilities in relationship to custom built hardware. These learning can be summarized into three topics. (1) When using a prebuilt product as material there will be more limitations to how a designer can change the material, it can only be bent using software. (2) A consumer market product opens up to getting the artefact available to more users, but it could depend on how the product normally is used. (3) The designer and users will have a lot more preknowledge of the material whish gives implications on expectations. Also, the paper investigates how exploring materials and having a bricolage mindset made it possible to create a meaningful remake with other material of an existing design. It is concluded that the choice of materials and how designers work with their properties changes what is relevant and possible to design. 

  • 13.
    Blomqvist, Alexandra
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Online Engagement in the Eye of the Young Beholder: A study on what youth appreciate on mobile-friendly websites2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today's youth use their mobile phones in the same way as earlier generations used their computers. Therefore, web designers need to make websites mobile-friendly when aiming for the younger generation’s attention. In collaboration with Ashoka and Raoul Wallenberg Academy, within a project named Changemakers’ Yard, this thesis investigates what factors in terms of content and design youth in the age of 16-23 appreciate on a mobile application or website. The outcome of the thesis aims to guide web designers on what to keep in mind when designing mobile applications or websites for today’s youth. A quantitative and qualitative research was done by performing interviews, an online survey and two customized lectures with the target group. Data and comments from the research were then analyzed and summarized to form a paper prototype which was developed into a digital prototype. Both prototypes were evaluated via user tests with the target group. Finally, ten guidelines were compiled on what youth appreciate when it comes to the content and design on mobile-friendly websites. The guidelines focused on communication and usability, as well as site owners taking responsibility for updates and minimize the amount of data used. The responsibility of keeping the website updated as well as minimizing the amount of data, were both new findings. In addition, arguing against prior research, there were indications of differences between the genders regarding preferred content.

  • 14. Bowyer, A.
    et al.
    Montague, K.
    Wheater, S.
    McGovern, R.
    Lingam, R.
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Understanding the family perspective on the storage, sharing and handling of family civic data2018In: CHI '18 Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Across social care, healthcare and public policy, enabled by the "big data" revolution (which has normalized large-scale data-based decision-making), there are moves to "join up" citizen databases to provide care workers with holistic views of families they support. In this context, questions of personal data privacy, security, access, control and (dis-)empowerment are critical considerations for system designers and policy makers alike. To explore the family perspective on this landscape of what we call Family Civic Data, we carried out ethnographic interviews with four North-East families. Our design-gamebased interviews were effective for engaging both adults and children to talk about the impact of this dry, technical topic on their lives. Our findings, delivered in the form of design guidelines, show support for dynamic consent: families would feel most empowered if involved in an ongoing co-operative relationship with state welfare and civic authorities through shared interaction with their data.

  • 15.
    Burt Kut, Melis
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Key Tension Points and Design Guidelines for GDPR Compliance: Designing for a News Service Application2018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Digitization poses a threat to the fundamental rights of individuals' personal sphere. This is due to deficiency within the current bylaws to protect data subjects' privacy and the lack of social codes for handling privacy in the virtual space. Colossal amount of implicit data processing, takes away data subject's control over their personal data. In order to protect data subjects from this treacherous relationship, between stakeholders and data subjects, the European Union has issued the new General Data Protection Regulation that was enforced in May 2018. Companies operating within EU thereby face substantive legislative reform in data protection. However, there are no current guidelines for how to acclimatize to the new regulation of processing personal data, especially for subsidiary companies. This study therefore addresses this gap by detailing the design process of attaining GDPR compliance for a subsidiary news service application. From this process, nine key tension points were identified and reformulated into five design guidelines more broadly applicable to design for privacy. In addition, two boundary objects and a transparency-layer strategy were formulated.

  • 16.
    Bälter, Olle
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Helena, Tobiasson
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Toivanen, Susanna
    Mälardalen University.
    Walking Outdoors during Seminars Improved Perceived Seminar Quality and Sense of Well-Being among Participants2018In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 15, no 303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low levels of physical activity and sedentary behaviour are a growing health problem globally. Physical inactivity is associated with increased risk of numerous ailments, cardiovascular disease and mortality. Our primary aim was to perform a feasibility study on how to incorporate physical activity among students and teachers in regular teaching activities. The second aim was to investigate how students and teachers perceived the differences between outdoor walking seminars and regular indoor seminars. By transforming an on-campus course into a blended course, we were able to conduct seminars outdoors in nearby nature while walking. These walking seminars were evaluated among 131 students and nine teachers leading the walking seminars. The responses to the student survey and teacher interviews indicate that discussions, sense of well-being and the general quality of the seminar improved, regardless of how physically active participants were the rest of the time. The study shows one way to increase physical activity with small means; in our case, a reorganization of how we prepared for the seminars which allowed for walking discussions.

  • 17.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Björn, Michael
    Lund School of Economics and Management.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Why share?: An outline of a policy framework for sharing.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

     The sharing economy has received much attention in recent years, partly because it carries a promise of reducing environmental impacts. This decrease is expected to take place through higher utilization of raw materials and energy when physical products are shared to a greater extent . However, our reading of current literature on sharing suggests that such environmental impacts have rarely been assessed at the societal level, e.g. nationally or along a supply chain. Neither are definitions and classifications of sharing found in literature, in general, particularly helpful for estimating environmental potentials and risks. We argue that there is a need for a framework supporting policy to clarify the importance of policy when it comes to the final effects of sharing.

    The aim of this paper is to outline a policy framework for environmental potentials and risks of the sharing economy. We have here delimited this paper to discuss levels of energy use as an example of environmental impact, but argue that the tentative policy framework presented can be used for any sustainability factor. In the paper we populate the policy framework with a spectrum of sharing initiatives and discuss the possible changes in energy use connected to these initiatives. Furthermore, we also discuss in what areas research on the environmental impacts of sharing initiatives could be specifically important, based on the outcome of populating the policy framework for potentials and risks.

  • 18.
    Cajander, Åsa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction..
    Grünloh, Christiane
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Electronic Health Records Are More Than a Work Tool: Conflicting Needs of Direct and Indirect Stakeholders2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stakeholder relationships can be complex and include conflicting needs and values, especially in a changing society. However, little is known about details of contradictory perspectives of stakeholders. More discussions are needed in HCI about complex human-centred systems development. In this paper we study the different perspectives of patients and physicians related to Patient Accessible Electronic Health Records (PAEHR) in Sweden. We used themes from interviews with physicians as a lens to analyse survey data from patients. The results show that the needs and wishes of patients conflict with the physicians’ preconceptions of patients’ needs. Moreover, the needs of patients stand in tension with the physicians’ work related preferences. Our paper highlights the necessity to consider the accuracy of stakeholders’ perspectives about other stakeholder groups. We also discuss the implications of the results in relation to design, methods and tools in HCI, and reorientation of work.

  • 19. Carpendale, S.
    et al.
    Bardzell, S.
    Burnett, M.
    Kumar, N.
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Panel: Extending conversations about gender and HCI2018In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, article id panel03Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This panel aims to create a space for participants at CHI 2018 to see how far we have come as a community in raising and addressing issues of gender, and how far we have yet to go. Our intent is for open discussion to support the community’s intentions to move towards greater equity, inclusivity, and diversity.

  • 20.
    Chanapai, Robin
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Tearing down barriers of photovoltaics with usability design: Winter is coming2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Photovoltaics has so far not seen much success in Sweden. Recent studies have shown that one of the reasons could be a lack of understanding of the technology, and a feeling that the lack of energy production during winter when a house’s energy consumption is the highest makes photovoltaics uninteresting. The ongoing research project Holistic business models and ICT solutions for prosumers seeks to increase the use of photovoltaics in Sweden, and have created business model concepts in an attempt to break perceived barriers of photovoltaics. My task in this project was to design a tailor made ICT solution with the users’ needs in focus.

    A series of interviews were conducted with households interested in photovoltaics to investigate what information is relevant to understand the business model, and create a starting point for the design process. To ensure a high level of usability of the ICT solution, an iterative design process was conducted with user tests between iterations.

    This resulted in a low fidelity prototype of a smartphone application, consisting of greyscale mockups. The prototype has as much as possible taken the interviewed households’ wishes into account, while adhering to design principles set for usability design. The interviews and user tests also gave some new insights into the informants’ attitudes towards the business model suggested by the research project, which is discussed at the end of the report.

  • 21. Concannon, S. J.
    et al.
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Comber, R.
    Simpson, E.
    Applying computational analysis to textual data from the wild: A feminist perspective2018In: CHI '18 Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With technologies that afford much larger-scale data collection than previously imagined, new ways of processing and interpreting qualitative textual data are required. HCI researchers use a range of methods for interpreting the 'full range of human experience' from qualitative data, however, such approaches are not always scalable. Feminist geography seeks to explore how diverse and varied accounts of place can be understood and represented, whilst avoiding reductive classification systems. In this paper, we assess the extent to which unsupervised topic models can support such a research agenda. Drawing on literature from Feminist and Critical GIS, we present a case study analysis of a Volunteered Geographic Information dataset of reviews about breastfeeding in public spaces. We demonstrate that topic modelling can offer novel insights and nuanced interpretations of complex concepts such as privacy and be integrated into a critically reflexive feminist data analysis approach that captures and represents diverse experiences of place.

  • 22.
    Cupitt, Rebekah
    et al.
    University College London, UK.
    Forstorp, Per-Anders
    Linkopings Universitet, Sweden.
    Lantz, Ann
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Visuality Without Form: Video-Mediated Communication and Research Practice Across Disciplinary Contexts2018In: Qualitative Inquiry, ISSN 1077-8004, E-ISSN 1552-7565, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Visuality is a concept that crosses boundaries of practice and meaning, making it an ideal subject for interdisciplinary research. In this article, we discuss visuality using a fragment from a video meeting of television producers at Swedish Television’s group for programming in Swedish Sign Language. This example argues for the importance of recognizing the diversity of analytical and practice-derived visualities and their effect on the ways in which we interpret cultures. These different visualities have consequences for the methods and means with which we present scholarly research. The role of methods, methodology, and analysis of visual practices in an organizational and bilingual setting are key. We explore the challenges of incorporating deaf visualities, hearing visualities, and different paradigms of interdisciplinary research as necessary when visibility, invisibility, and their materialities are of concern. We conclude that in certain contexts, breaking with disciplinary traditions makes visible that which is otherwise invisible.

  • 23.
    Dang, Sandra
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    The design of a smartphone-based AR application to support the experiential quality of life-like in a museum2018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the perfect scenario, augmented reality (AR) is described to blend the physical world with virtual elements in such way that the user can’t differentiate them, having the potential to make the interactions with virtual objects in an AR experience feel life-like. With the latest advancements in AR for mobile devices, applications that use this technology are increasing. Many cultural heritage sites and museums take advantage of integrating AR in their programs to create enriched environments and increased engagement from their audience. This study investigated how to design for a life-like experience in a museum environment, presenting animated virtual animals that represent the same preserved animals exhibited in the physical environment. The study was grounded in a Research through Design process where a smartphone application prototype was developed and tested to find important elements that create life-like interactions. The functionalities that were developed for the prototype were discussed by their experiential qualities and summarized into points that a designer should consider when designing for a similar life-like experience.

  • 24.
    de Haan, Sophie
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Application Design for the Quantified Pet Domain from a User Centered Design Perspective2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Quantifying personal information is a rapidly emerging lifestyle that has now extended to tracking non-personal information as well. The Quantified Pet (QP) domain enablespet owners to gain insights in their pet’s behavior and wellbeing. This study investigates how to design a QP application using the User Centered Design Method. To gain understanding in the inner drivers that form the human-pet relationship, five dog owners are interviewed. Three inner drivers that trigger interaction are revealed: habits, love and guilt. By surveying 104 users of existing QP applications, this study examined what motivates users to use a pet activity tracker and what sustains this usage. After performing a thematic analysis on this data, it was found that Activities,interest in activity data, and Health, improving and ensuringthe dog’s health, are dominantly portraited in the results. These themes provide the foundation for the establishment of two personas, of which the Health persona is chosen to be the primary design target. Next to user requirements following from the persona design, a heuristic evaluation is performed on one QP application (FitBark) to provide an additional set of design requirements. From these requirements, a design solution is proposed and evaluated amongst ten participants by means of a task list, semi- structured interview and a questionnaire. This revealed high usability for navigation and successful implementation of most requirements. However, design flaws, in specific of data visualization, and some misunderstanding of informational components remain. Future work proposes an improved design and provides additional suggestions for implementation and examination.

  • 25. Fan, Liangdong
    et al.
    Zhu, Bin
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Su, Pei-Chen
    He, Chuanxin
    Nanomaterials and technologies for low temperature solid oxide fuel cells: Recent advances, challenges and opportunities2018In: Nano Energy, ISSN 2211-2855, E-ISSN 2211-3282, Vol. 45, p. 148-176Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) show considerable promise for meeting the current ever-increasing energy demand and environmental sustainability requirements because of their high efficiency, low environmental impact, and distinct fuel diversity. In the past few decades, extensive R&D efforts have been focused on lowering operational temperatures in order to decrease the system (stack and balance-of-plant) cost and improve the longevity of operationally useful devices of commercial relevance. Nanomaterials and related nanotechnologies have the potential to improve SOFC performance because of their advantageous functionalities, namely, their enlarged surface area and unique surface and interface properties compared to their microscale analogs. Recently, the use of nanomaterials has increased rapidly, as reflected by the exponential growth in the number of publications since 2002. In this work, we present a comprehensive summary of nanoparticles, nano-thin films and nanocomposites with different crystal phases, morphologies, microstructures, electronic properties, and electrochemical performances for low temperature SOFCs (LT-SOFCs), with focus on efforts to enhance electrical efficiency, to induce novel fundamental properties that are inaccessible in microcrystalline materials, and to promote the commercialization of LT-SOFCs. Recent progress in the applications of many classically or newly chemical and physical nanomaterials and nanofabrication techniques, such as thin film vacuum deposition, impregnation, electrospinning, spark plasma sintering, hard-and soft-template methods, and in-situ nanoparticle surface exsolution are also thoroughly described. The technological and scientific advantages and limitations related to the use of nanomaterials and nanotechnologies are highlighted, along with our expectations for future research within this emerging field.

  • 26. Fitzpatrick, G.
    et al.
    Friedman, B.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Olson, J. S.
    Russell, D. M.
    Daring to change: Creating a slower more sustainable academic life2018In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, article id panel06Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous reports and studies point to increasing performance criteria and workplace stress for academics/researchers. Together with the audience, this panel will explore how we experience this in the HCI community, focussing particularly on what we can do to change this for a slower more sustainable academic culture. The future of good quality HCI research is dependent on happy healthy researchers and reasonable realistic academic processes.

  • 27.
    Frid, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sallnäs Pysander, Eva-Lotta
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Moll, Jonas
    Uppsala University.
    An Exploratory Study On The Effect Of Auditory Feedback On Gaze Behavior In a Virtual Throwing Task With and Without Haptic Feedback2017In: Proceedings of the 14th Sound and Music Computing Conference / [ed] Tapio Lokki, Jukka Pätynen, and Vesa Välimäki, Espoo, Finland, 2017, p. 242-249Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents findings from an exploratory study on the effect of auditory feedback on gaze behavior. A total of 20 participants took part in an experiment where the task was to throw a virtual ball into a goal in different conditions: visual only, audiovisual, visuohaptic and audio- visuohaptic. Two different sound models were compared in the audio conditions. Analysis of eye tracking metrics indicated large inter-subject variability; difference between subjects was greater than difference between feedback conditions. No significant effect of condition could be observed, but clusters of similar behaviors were identified. Some of the participants’ gaze behaviors appeared to have been affected by the presence of auditory feedback, but the effect of sound model was not consistent across subjects. We discuss individual behaviors and illustrate gaze behavior through sonification of gaze trajectories. Findings from this study raise intriguing questions that motivate future large-scale studies on the effect of auditory feedback on gaze behavior. 

  • 28.
    Gedik, Ali Cenk
    et al.
    Department of Musicology, Dokuz Eylül University.
    Holzapfel, André
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    The Meaning of Music in Ethnomusicology and Music Information Retrieval: Obstacles Against Computational Ethnomusicology2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Gillner, Disa
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Exploring the Design Space of Web-based Solutions for Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy2018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    More and more people are affected by stress in their work lives, and it is in society’s interest to decrease the levels of stress [15]. There are several approaches that can be used to reduce stress, such as bodily exercises, digital aids, psychological treatment programs, or relaxation exercises. A new psychological program called Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT), originally used to prevent relapses in depression, can also help to treat stress. However, not much research has been conducted on the effects of MBCT to treat stress, and even less on how to design for web solutions for this treatment. The aim of this study is to investigate and explore how web solutions for mindfulness-based cognitive therapy used to treat stress can be designed, with the research question Based on an informed understanding of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy, how might we, from a design perspective, design a novel web application for it? To investigate this, a research through design approach was used, and the method “future workshop” for the evaluation of the design prototype. The results of this study suggest that when designing websites for MBCT treatments, the most important features to include are visual representations of the patient’s progress and regulated home assignments. The visual representations should show the correlation between stressors and mood, and the regulation would provide assurance to the therapist that the patient does the home assignments. However, more research should be done to further explore the design space in web solutions for mindfulness-based cognitive therapy.

  • 30.
    Grünloh, Christiane
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Harmful or Empowering?: Stakeholders’ Expectations and Experiences of Patient Accessible Electronic Health Records2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Healthcare systems worldwide face organisational and financial challenges due to increasing number of people with chronic conditions, increasing costs, and an ageing population. eHealth services have the potential to address some of these challenges, for example, by supporting patients who are engaged in self-care, improving quality of care, and reducing medical costs.

    In 2012, Region Uppsala in Sweden launched an eHealth service that enabled patients to access their electronic health records through the Internet. The launch of the service was accompanied by strong criticism from healthcare professionals (HCPs) and was heavily debated in the media. Patients on the other hand were very positive towards the service.

    Albeit promising, the potential of Patient Accessible Electronic Health Records (PAEHRs) cannot be realised if HCPs still have reservations towards the service and their concerns are not fully understood. The purpose of this research is therefore to enhance our understanding of how physicians view PAEHR in relation to both their work environment and the level of patient participation. Furthermore, the aim is to shed light on whether their concerns related to patients’ well-being have materialised in practice and how patients view and make use of the service. Finally, this thesis identifies implicated human values and value tensions related to PAEHR.

    To enhance our understanding of the physicians’ perspective, semi-structured interviews with 12 physicians in Uppsala were thematically analysed. A national patient survey was conducted to investigate patients’ use of and their experiences with PAEHR. Furthermore, empirical and conceptual investigations were carried out to identify human values and value tensions.

    The results of this research show that the physicians’ assumptions and views of PAEHR and its consequences for patients were different from the views and actual experiences of patients using the PAEHR system. The physicians were mainly concerned about potential increase in their workload and that it could be harmful for patients to access their Electronic Health Record (EHR), for example, as it might evoke anxiety or worry. The vast majority of patients appreciated timely access to their results, felt more involved in their care, and read their records to become more involved. The investigation of human values associated with PAEHR identified values such as Ownership & Property, Professional Autonomy, Responsibility, Human Well-Being, Accountability & Transparency, and Trust. Furthermore, value tensions were identified that may occur between direct and indirect stakeholders (here: patients and physicians), or are related to an interpretation of PAEHR.

    This thesis contributes to current research on eHealth in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) by instigating a critical discussion of values associated with eHealth technologies that might be perceived as conflicting given a stakeholder’s framing of the technology. For example, tensions that emerge between values that prioritise placing the responsibility on a physician for their patients versus a value system that prioritises patient autonomy. The findings of this thesis suggest that while policymakers and government agencies adhere to a system of values that place a premium on patient empowerment, paternalistic tendencies are still present among physicians. However, an eHealth service like PAEHR is an important first step towards patient participation. The results of this thesis suggest that the support of patient participation in their own care through PAEHR outweighs the potential harm.

  • 31.
    Grünloh, Christiane
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Using technological frames as an analytic tool in value sensitive design2018In: Ethics and Information Technology, ISSN 1388-1957, E-ISSN 1572-8439Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article proposes the use of technological frames (TF) as an analytical tool to support the investigations within value sensitive design. TF can help to identify values that are consistent or conflicting within and between stakeholders, which is exemplified with a case of patient accessible electronic health records in Sweden. The article concludes that TF can help to identify values, which may then help to understand and address possible concerns in the design process.

  • 32.
    Grünloh, Christiane
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. Institute of Informatics, Technische Hochschule Köln, University of Applied Sciences, Gummersbach, Germany.
    Myreteg, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Department of Business Studies.
    Cajander, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction..
    Rexhepi, Hanife
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. The Informatics Research Centre.
    “Why Do They Need to Check Me?” Patient Participation Through eHealth and the Doctor-Patient Relationship: Qualitative Study2018In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 20, no 1, article id e11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Roles in the doctor-patient relationship are changing and patient participation in health care is increasingly emphasized. Electronic health (eHealth) services such as patient accessible electronic health records (PAEHRs) have been implemented to support patient participation. Little is known about practical use of PAEHR and its effect on roles of doctors and patients. Objective: This qualitative study aimed to investigate how physicians view the idea of patient participation, in particular in relation to the PAEHR system. Hereby, the paper aims to contribute to a deeper understanding of physicians’ constructions of PAEHR, roles in the doctor-patient relationship, and levels and limits of involvement. Methods: A total of 12 semistructured interviews were conducted with physicians in different fields. Interviews were transcribed, translated, and a theoretically informed thematic analysis was performed. Results: Two important aspects were identified that are related to the doctor-patient relationship: roles and involvement. The physicians viewed their role as being the ones to take on the responsibility, determining treatment options, and to be someone who should be trusted. In relation to the patient’s role, lack of skills (technical or regarding medical jargon), motives to read, and patients’ characteristics were aspects identified in the interviews. Patients were often referred to as static entities disregarding their potential to develop skills and knowledge over time. Involvement captures aspects that support or hinder patients to take an active role in their care. Conclusions: Literature of at least two decades suggests an overall agreement that the paternalistic approach in health care is inappropriate, and a collaborative process with patients should be adopted. Although the physicians in this study stated that they, in principle, were in favor of patient participation, the analysis found little support in their descriptions of their daily practice that participation is actualized. As seen from the results, paternalistic practices are still present, even if professionals might not be aware of this. This can create a conflict between patients who strive to become more informed and their questions being interpreted as signs of critique and mistrust toward the physician. We thus believe that the full potential of PAEHRs is not reached yet and argue that the concept of patient empowerment is problematic as it triggers an interpretation of “power” in health care as a zero-sum, which is not helpful for the maintenance of the relationship between the actors. Patient involvement is often discussed merely in relation to decision making; however, this study emphasizes the need to include also sensemaking and learning activities. This would provide an alternative understanding of patients asking questions, not in terms of “monitoring the doctor” but to make sense of the situation.

  • 33.
    Hasselqvist, Hanna
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Designing for shared energy responsibility2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A significant part of the world’s carbon emissions is related to energy use for housing and personal transport, and there are many efforts to make this energy use more sustainable. In the field of Sustainable Human-Computer Interaction, there has been a great interest in exploring how interactive systems can be used to influence people’s energy use, often with a focus on providing information and encouraging energy users to change their behaviours. Similar ideas have been implemented in commercial products aiming to raise households’ awareness of their energy use. This approach suggests that energy use is a matter of individual choice, and that it is the energy user’s responsibility to change energy-related practices such as driving, cooking and heating the home. The effectiveness of the approach has, however, been questioned and it has been proposed to extend the focus beyond the individual – to the communities, corporations and governments that influence people’s energy practices.

    With my research, I have aimed to contribute to an understanding of how various stakeholders can share responsibility for energy use and of how to take shared responsibility into account in design. The research has a starting point in studies of sustainable mobility and energy management in housing cooperatives. For these two cases, I have used design interventions to explore energy-intensive practices and more sustainable alternatives from the perspectives of both energy users and other stakeholders. In the thesis, I present ways that stakeholders influence, or could influence, energy use in terms of adoption of more sustainable practices and maintenance of these practices over time. Building on these findings, I suggest opportunities for interactive systems to amplify stakeholder initiatives and support shared responsibility for energy use, for example by contributing to transparency and trust between households and more powerful stakeholders. This includes to consider design sensitivities such as tensions between “odd” and “normal” practices, when and how to engage different stakeholders, and designing for other values than resource optimisation.

  • 34.
    Hasselqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Designing for Diverse Stakeholder Engagement in Resource-Intensive Practices2018In: Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite many contributions to Sustainable HCI stressing the importance of “moving beyond the individual”, a majority of HCI work is still targeted mainly at consumers or resource users. However, many stakeholders influence resource use and including such stakeholders in design work can open up new design opportunities for supporting sustainable practices. In this paper, we present results from a longitudinal study of practices related to energy improvement work in housing cooperatives. During the study, we discovered new opportunities for interactive technologies to support this work when we involved various stakeholders other than housing cooperatives. In addition, we discuss more general implications for design aiming to support diverse stakeholder engagement in practices related to resource use: which stakeholders and practices to include, temporal aspects of engagement, and opportunities for supporting shared responsibility for resource use.

  • 35.
    Hedberg, Evelina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Runhem, Alexandra
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    En undersökning om miljömärkning av kläder på en e-handelsplattform2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether an information gap exists between Lindex way of displaying sustainable choices for clothes on their web shop and what the customer perceives the meaning as. The focus is also to discuss if there would be useful for the consumer of a more specific sorting system when it comes to sustainable aspects and online purchases of clothes. The study was conducted with students as a primary group and Lindex web shop as the primary testing environment. The data was collected through a survey of students taking the course DM1578 Programintegrerande kurs i Medieteknik at KTH Royal Institute of Technology. The results show that there is an information gap between the meaning of Lindex sustainable tag and how our user group perceived it. It also shows that our target group had different opinions on which of the sustainability factors, social and ecological, were of importance. Due to the fact that the test subjects were students, the results cannot be generalized to a wide population. The study provides insight in how environmental attitudes towards the clothing industry looks like among students and what could be improved in order to make the consumer gain more knowledge about the clothing production as well as reevaluate their decisions when shopping online in favor for sustainability.

  • 36.
    Hedin, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Jorge Luis, Zapico
    Department of Computer Science and Media Technology, Linnaeus University.
    What Can You Do with 100 kWh? A Longitudinal Study of Using an Interactive Energy Comparison Tool to Increase Energy Awareness2018In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 7, article id 2269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reducing the use of energy is important for several reasons, such as saving money and reducing impact on the climate. However, the awareness among non-experts of how much energy is required by different activities and appliances is generally low, which can lead to wrong prioritizations. In this study, we have developed an interactive tool to increase “energy awareness”, and performed a longitudinal study to evaluate its effect. A group of 58 students first did a test to benchmark their current energy awareness, where their current knowledge of energy used for 14 different activities, such as driving vehicles and using home appliances, was measured. They then tried the interactive learning tool for 10 min. Next, they did the same test immediately after trying the tool, then again one week after trying the tool, and finally again six months after trying the tool. The results showed a significant learning effect in energy awareness with a “huge” effect size of 2.25 immediately after the intervention, a “very large” effect size of 1.70 after one week, and a “large” effect size of 0.93 after six months. The results further showed that the respondents consistently underestimated what 100 kWh could be used for, and especially so for appliances and activities requiring little energy. Before the intervention, on average they underestimated how much 100 kWh could be used for by 95.2%, and six months after the intervention the underestimation was 86.8%.

  • 37.
    Helms, Karey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Brown, Barry
    Stockholm University, DSV.
    Sahlgren, Magnus
    RISE SICS.
    Lampinen, Airi
    Stockholm University, DSV.
    Design Methods to Investigate User Experiences of Artificial Intelligence2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper engages with the challenges of designing "implicit interaction", systems (or system features) in which actions are not actively guided or chosen by users but instead come from inference driven system activity. We discuss the difficulty of designing for such systems and outline three Research through Design approaches we have engaged with - first, creating a design workbook for implicit interaction, second, a workshop on designing with data that subverted the usual relationship with data, and lastly, an exploration of how a computer science notion, “leaky abstraction”, could be in turn misinterpreted to imagine new system uses and activities. Together these design activities outline some inventive new ways of designing User Experiences of Artificial Intelligence. 

  • 38.
    Helms, Karey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Humor in Design Fiction to Suspend Disbelief and Belief2018In: NordiCHI '18 Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates humor as a resource and strategy for design with discourse as an intended outcome. While humor can incite empathy and understanding, it can also lead to alienation and disengagement. Through the detailing of the pre-narrative and narrative processes of a design fiction, we describe why and how elements of humor, in particular puns, parody, and pastiche, were employed. Following the presentation of the fiction and its use in the design of an exhibition of diegetic prototypes, the paper presents responses from participants and audience members to reflect upon how the humor was received. Following a discussion on these reflections, as the near-future scenario was written four years prior and is now situated within the present-day, it then concludes with a post-mortem reflection on the floating nature of humor. 

  • 39. Hodge, J.
    et al.
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hastings, S.
    Morrissey, K.
    Exploring the design of tailored virtual reality experiences for people with dementia2018In: CHI '18 Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, Vol. 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite indications that recreational virtual reality (VR) experiences could be beneficial for people with dementia, this area remains unexplored in contrast to the body of work on neurological rehabilitation through VR in dementia. With recreational VR applications coming to the market for dementia, we must consider how VR experiences for people with dementia can be sensitively designed to provide comfortable and enriching experiences. Working with seven participants from a local dementia care charity, we outline some of the opportunities and challenges inherent to the design and use of VR experiences with people with dementia and their carers through an inductive thematic analysis. We also provide a series of future directions for work in VR and dementia: 1) careful physical design, 2) making room for sharing, 3) utilizing all senses, 4) personalization, and 5) positioning the person with dementia as an active participant.

  • 40.
    Holzapfel, André
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sturm, Bob
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Coeckelbergh, Mark
    Department of Philosophy, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Ethical Dimensions of Music Information Retrieval Technology2018In: Transactions of the International Society for Music Information Retrieval, E-ISSN 2514-3298, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 44-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines ethical dimensions of Music Information Retrieval (MIR) technology.  It uses practical ethics (especially computer ethics and engineering ethics) and socio-technical approaches to provide a theoretical basis that can inform discussions of ethics in MIR. To help ground the discussion, the article engages with concrete examples and discourse drawn from the MIR field. This article argues that MIR technology is not value-neutral but is influenced by design choices, and so has unintended and ethically relevant implications. These can be invisible unless one considers how the technology relates to wider society. The article points to the blurring of boundaries between music and technology, and frames music as “informationally enriched” and as a “total social fact.” The article calls attention to biases that are introduced by algorithms and data used for MIR technology, cultural issues related to copyright, and ethical problems in MIR as a scientific practice. The article concludes with tentative ethical guidelines for MIR developers, and calls for addressing key ethical problems with MIR technology and practice, especially those related to forms of bias and the remoteness of the technology development from end users.

  • 41. Hultén, G.
    et al.
    Picha Edwardsson, Malin
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Storylab lessons: A collaborative project between courses in journalism and media technology2018In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 3-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines Storylab, a collaborative learning project between the journalism programme at Stockholm University and the engineering programme in media technology at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, designed to combine journalistic storytelling with pervasive media technology. The aim of the study is to identify and reflect on the challenges associated with the approach. The methods used are a survey and semi-structured interviews with the students. The analyses draw on research concerning the current main challenges for the news industry and journalism educators. The results show that Storylab was highly appreciated, and provided students with useful skills for their professional lives. However, not all groups worked well together, and some students wished that the collaboration had been more extensive. Differences in motivations and priorities were mentioned as restraining factors. Therefore, it is argued that for a sustainable media landscape, journalists and engineers must collaborate, and that this cooperation can be brought about during professional training.

  • 42.
    Högfeldt, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Lantz, Ann
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lujara, Suzan
    Univ Dar Es Salaam, UDSM, Coll Informat & Commun Technol, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania..
    Understanding Engineering Education Change With The Introduction of Challenge Driven Education in Tanzania2018In: PROCEEDINGS OF 2018 IEEE GLOBAL ENGINEERING EDUCATION CONFERENCE (EDUCON) - EMERGING TRENDS AND CHALLENGES OF ENGINEERING EDUCATION, IEEE , 2018, p. 1335-1343Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden and Tanzania have collaborated since 1976 in research projects. A PhD sandwich program was established in the 90's in the field of electrical engineering between UDSM (University of Dar es Salam), Tanzania and KTH (Royal Institute of Technology), Sweden. This collaboration has opened up for shared trust, idea exchange and the emergence of the challenge driven education approach. Challenge driven education brings in socio-technical challenges to engineering education, or rather, brings out students and academic faculty, to real life challenges outside academy. The research of the first years' experience reveals factors like high motivation among students, faculty and stakeholders in society. New ways of teaching and learning have evolved, and clear contrasts with traditional education have been found.

  • 43.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Caramiaux, Baptiste
    UMR STMS Ircam CNRS UPMC, 1 Pl Igor Stravinsky, F-75004 Paris, France.;McGill Univ, Schulich Sch Mus, Montreal, PQ H3A 1E3, Canada.;Univ Paris Saclay, Inria, Univ Paris Sud, CNRS LRI, Bat 650 Noetzlin St, F-91190 Gif Sur Yvette, France..
    Erkut, Cumhur
    Aalborg Univ, Dept Architecture Design & Media Technol, DK-2450 Copenhagen SV, Denmark..
    Forlizzi, Jodi
    Carnegie Mellon Univ, Human Comp Interact Inst, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 USA..
    Hajinejad, Nassrin
    City Univ Appl Sci, Hsch Bremen, Inst Informat & Automat, D-28199 Bremen, Germany..
    Haller, Michael
    Upper Austria Univ Appl Sci, Sch Informat Commun & Media, A-4232 Hagenberg, Austria..
    Hummels, Caroline C. M.
    Univ Technol, Dept Ind Design, NL-5612 AZ Eindhoven, Netherlands..
    Isbister, Katherine
    Univ Calif Santa Cruz, Dept Computat Media, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn Univ, Dept Nat Sci Technol & Environm Studies, S-14189 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Khut, George
    Univ New South Wales, UNSW Art & Design, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia..
    Loke, Lian
    Univ Sydney, Sydney Sch Architecture Design & Planning, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia..
    Lottridge, Danielle
    Yahoo Inc, Sunnyvale, CA 94089 USA..
    Marti, Patrizia
    Univ Technol, Dept Ind Design, NL-5612 AZ Eindhoven, Netherlands.;Dept Social Polit & Cognit Sci, I-53100 Siena, Italy..
    Melcer, Edward
    NYU, Tandon Sch Engn, Brooklyn, NY 11201 USA..
    Muller, Florian Floyd
    RMIT Univ, Exert Games Lab, Melbourne, Vic 3000, Australia..
    Petersen, Marianne Graves
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Comp Sci, DK-8000 Aarhus, Denmark.
    Schiphorst, Thecla
    Simon Fraser Univ, Sch Interact Arts & Technol, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada..
    Segura, Elena Marquez
    Univ Calif Santa Cruz, Dept Computat Media, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE SICS, S-16440 Kista, Sweden..
    Svanaes, Dag
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol NTNU, Dept Comp Sci IDI, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway.;IT Univ Copenhagen, Digital Design Dept, DK-2300 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Comp & Syst Sci DSV, S-11418 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tobiasson, Helena
    Umeå Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, S-90187 Umeå, Sweden..
    Embracing First-Person Perspectives in Soma-Based Design2018In: INFORMATICS-BASEL, ISSN 2227-9709, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A set of prominent designers embarked on a research journey to explore aesthetics in movement-based design. Here we unpack one of the design sensitivities unique to our practice: a strong first person perspective-where the movements, somatics and aesthetic sensibilities of the designer, design researcher and user are at the forefront. We present an annotated portfolio of design exemplars and a brief introduction to some of the design methods and theory we use, together substantiating and explaining the first-person perspective. At the same time, we show how this felt dimension, despite its subjective nature, is what provides rigor and structure to our design research. Our aim is to assist researchers in soma-based design and designers wanting to consider the multiple facets when designing for the aesthetics of movement. The applications span a large field of designs, including slow introspective, contemplative interactions, arts, dance, health applications, games, work applications and many others.

  • 44.
    Ilstedt, Sara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Hesselgren, Mia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Sustainable lifestyles: How values affect sustainable practises2017In: Design + Power / [ed] Andrew Morrisson, Dagny Stuedahl, 2017, p. 1-7Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a project that explores how different values and lifestyle choices are related to sustainable practices. The goal has been to develop an understanding of both complexity in people’s everyday practices as well as patterns in this complexity to be used when designing interventions for sustainable lifestyles. In the project, we have used a mixed methods approach in order to develop a more comprehensive picture of both the larger patterns of the complexities of everyday practices as well as the particulars of sustainability engagement in Sweden. In this paper we present the initial results from a Swedish study of people with different values and their relations to sustainability, based on Schwartz Theory of Basic Human Values. In particular, we present their overall perspective on sustainability, their existing sustainable practices, and their needs for transitions towards more sustainable lifestyles.

  • 45.
    Isaksson, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Smart interactions for the quantified self2018In: Challenges and Solutions in Smart Learning: Proceeding of 2018 International Conference on Smart Learning Environments, Beijing, China, Springer International Publishing , 2018, p. 67-72Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Quantified Self is a movement for collecting personal data with the goal of providing possibilities for new insights through reflecting on own relevant data, with applications in areas such as physical exercise, food, and health. When collecting personal data, difficulties may arise, such as information from different sources which cannot easily be combined, closed access to information sources, inflexible tooling for producing desired quantifications, varying precision of data used for producing quantifications, and a lack of control over data sharing for supporting relevant comparisons with others. In this paper, we introduce the concept of smart interactions, backed by linked data, as a means of introducing the QS through smart and personal learning environments, both for reducing the associated difficulties and further empowering the QS.

  • 46.
    Jonsson, Martina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Exploring Designs for Enhancing the In-store Customer Experience through Digital Product Information in Fashion Retail2018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The ongoing consumer transition from offline to online shopping in the fashion retail industry requires retailers to take action. Not only do consumers shop more online, they also go online for research of retail products. Forecasts tell that bringing the online experience to offline stores might bridge the gap between the two channels. The online experience provides high-end digital content, and puts a demand on the product information offline as this was found crucial for the customer experience. The marketing possibilities in-store was found to be an advantage to bricks-and-mortar retailers. Thus, this study aims to investigate how the customer experience can be enhanced in retail bricks-and-mortar stores through digital product information. A survey was conducted to identify user requirements in terms of product information. An augmented reality prototype was formed to satisfy the identified user requirements. The prototype was tested in two user studies that evaluated the content, visualization, interaction and satisfaction. The prototype was iterated between the two user studies. The most crucial parameters of fashion retail product information were established, together with implications for the visual representation and interaction. It was found that there were unfulfilled user needs with existing service options, which were satisfied with the use of an augmented reality prototype for product information retrieval. The use of AR for this purpose also proved to be able to contribute to an omnichannel solution for multi-channel retailers. The conclusion was thus that the customer in-store experience could be enhanced by the introduction of an augmented reality prototype for product information retrieval, taking into account the implications for content, visualization and interaction provided in this study.

  • 47.
    Josefsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Baltatzis, Alexander
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bälter, Olof
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Enoksson, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Riese, Emma
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    DRIVERS AND BARRIERS FOR PROMOTING TECHNOLOGY ENHANCED LEARNING IN HIGHER EDUCATION2018In: 12TH INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE (INTED) / [ed] Chova, LG Martinez, AL Torres, IC, IATED-INT ASSOC TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION & DEVELOPMENT , 2018, p. 4576-4584Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents a study were drivers and barriers for increased use of Technology Enhanced Learning in higher education were identified. The method included focus groups with Faculty Pedagogical Developers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, followed by a Force Field Analysis. Ten drivers and ten barriers were identified, and are presented in this paper. The most significant drivers found were: collegial discussions, increased automatization, Technology enhanced learning support for the teachers (to assist exploration), tech savvy students and engagement among faculty. The most significant barriers identified were: unclear return on time investment, insufficient funding for purchases and lack of central decisions. The analysis also revealed that some drivers and barriers could act both ways. One example is locally developed systems which are understood to be drivers when it comes to solving (local) problems and encouraging experimentation with IT systems, but when these local systems are cancelled due to lack of funding, or for example replaced by centralized systems, they discourage use and development. The findings constitute a foundation for future discussions about change processes to increase utilization of technology enhanced learning in higher education.

  • 48.
    Jutterström, Ellinor
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    News for Everyone - Investigating Universal Accessibility with Cognitively Disabled Users on Swedish News Sites2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As more readers consume news through digital platforms such as computers, mobiles and tablets, it is essential to make these interfaces accessible to as many users as possible, both from an economic and social standpoint. The terms ‘universal accessibility’, ‘inclusive design’ and ‘design-for-all’ refer to the method of designing for users both with and without disabilities, which is a widely debated subject among researchers in the field where some say that it improves the usability for everyone, while others argue that it is impossible to create a design that fits all needs. The aim of this thesis is to investigate this ‘universal design’ method on news sites and answer the question whether a more accessible design can improve the experience for all users regardless of cognitive abilities. In order to do so, five current news sites were evaluated and compared to accessibility guidelines and previous research. Based on the results, two prototypes were developed and tested in a qualitative user study together with the existing sites. The user study consisted of two test groups of students with (Group 1) and without (Group 2) cognitive disabilities, with 5 users in the first group and 9 users in the second. Oral opinions were compared within and between the groups together with results from a hierarchical sorting of sites based on general preference, appearance and credibility. The results showed both differences and similarities between the groups, whereas the greatest common factor was the preference for the “clean” and “calm” design, ranking both prototypes higher than their originals. The conclusion was that it is indeed difficult to design for everybody because of individual needs and preferences, but including disabled users in the design process highlights general problems that could otherwise have been missed, while also making it easier to implement customizable options for disabled users.

  • 49. Kannabiran, G.
    et al.
    Ahmed, A. A.
    Wood, M.
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Tanenbaum, J. G.
    Bardzell, S.
    Bardzell, J.
    Design for sexual wellbeing in HCI2018In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, article id W09Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This workshop focuses on the design of digital interactive technology for promoting sexual wellbeing as a fundamental human rights issue and social justice concern in the field of Human Computer Interaction (HCI). Sexuality related topics have garnered much interest in recent years and there is a need to explicitly engage with the intersections of sexuality and social justice as applicable to the design and development of digital interfaces and interactive experiences. This one day workshop will raise interdisciplinary issues, identify research gaps, gather resources, and share innovation strategies for designing sociotechnical interfaces that promote sexual wellbeing in HCI.

  • 50. Kazakos, K.
    et al.
    Asthana, S.
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Duggal, M.
    Holden, A.
    Jamir, L.
    Kannuri, N. K.
    Kumar, S.
    Mamindla, A. R.
    Manikam, S. A.
    Murthy, G. V. S.
    Nahar, P.
    Phillimore, P.
    Sathyanath, S.
    Singh, P.
    Singh, M.
    Wright, P.
    Yadav, D.
    Olivier, P.
    A real-time IVR platform for community radio2016In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interactive Voice Response (IVR) platforms have been widely deployed in resource-limited settings. These systems tend to afford asynchronous push interactions, and within the context of health, provide medication reminders, descriptions of symptoms and tips on self-management. Here, we present the development of an IVR system for resource-limited settings that enables real-time, synchronous interaction. Inspired by community radio, and calls for health systems that are truly local, we developed ’Sehat ki Vaani’. Sehat ki Vaani is a real-time IVR platform that enables hosting and participation in radio chat shows on community-led topics. We deployed Sehat ki Vaani with two communities in North India on topics related to the management of Type 2 diabetes and maternal health. Our deployments highlight the potential for synchronous IVR systems to offer community connection and localised sharing of experience, while also highlighting the complexity of producing, hosting and participating in radio shows in real time through IVR. We discuss the relative strengths and weaknesses of synchronous IVR systems, and highlight lessons learnt for interaction design in this area.

123 1 - 50 of 106
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf