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  • 1.
    Abbasi, M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Backstrom, J.
    Mid Sweden Univ, FSCN Mat Phys, Dept Nat Sci, SE-85170 Sundsvall, Sweden..
    Cornell, Ann M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Fabrication of Spin-Coated Ti/TiHx/Ni-Sb-SnO2 Electrode: Stability and Electrocatalytic Activity2018In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 165, no 9, p. H568-H574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel three-layer anode having the composition Ti/TiHx/Ni-Sb-SnO2 (Ti/TiHx/NATO) was successfully prepared by a spin-coating and pyrolysis process aiming at a long service lifetime and good electrocatalytic properties for ozone formation. The TiHx as an interlayer was produced by electrochemical cathodic reduction of a coated layer of the TiOx on the titanium substrate. Spin coating and thermal decomposition were used to deposit the Sn-Sb-Ni precursor on the surface of the prepared Ti/TiHx electrode. Cyclic and linear scanning voltammetry, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to reveal the electrode performance and morphology. Results show that the onset potential for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) of Ti/TiHx /NATO is higher than for Ti/NATO. They also indicate that the service lifetime of the Ti/TiHx/NATO is twice as long as the Ti/NATO at a current density of 50 mA.cm(-2) at room temperature. Electrochemical ozone generation and degradation of the methylene blue were investigated to confirm selectivity and activity of the electrodes. After 5 min electrolysis, a current efficiency for ozone generation of 56% was obtained the electrode with TiHx while 38% was obtained on Ti/NATO under same conditions. The results also confirm that the Ti/TiH x /NATO has a higher kinetic rate constant and decolorization efficiency for removal of the methylene blue compare to the Ti/NATO. The rate constant for the pseudo-first ordered reaction of methylene blue degradation showed high values of 350 x 10(-3) min(-1) for Ti/NATO and 440 x 10(-3) min(-1) for Ti/TiHx/NATO. 

  • 2.
    Abdel-Magied, Ahmed F.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Nasser Abdelhamid, Hani
    Ashour, Radwa M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Hierarchical porous zeolitic imidazolate framework nanoparticles for efficient adsorption of rare-earth elements2019In: Microporous and Mesoporous Materials, ISSN 1387-1811, E-ISSN 1873-3093, Vol. 278, p. 175-184Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Alemrajabi, Mahmood
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Transport Phenomena.
    Recovery of Rare Earth Elements from an Apatite Concentrate2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Rare earth elements (REE) are a group of 17 elements including lanthanides, yttrium and scandium; which are found in a variety of classes of minerals worldwide. The criticality of the application, lack of high grade and economically feasible REE resources and a monopolistic supply situation has raised significant attention in recovery of these metals from low grade ores and waste materials. In this thesis, the recovery of REE from an apatite concentrate, containing 0.5 mass% of REE, within the nitrophosphate route of fertilizer production has been investigated. Most of the REE (≥ 95%) content can be recovered into a phosphate precipitate with almost 30 mass% REE. Different processes have been developed to convert the REE phosphate precipitate into a more soluble form to obtain a solution suitable for further REE purification and individual separation. It has been shown that after reprecipitation of the REE phosphate concentrate as REE sodium double sulphate and then transformation into a REE hydroxide concentrate, a solution containing 45g/L REE free of Ca, Fe and P can be obtained. The results suggest that the apatite waste after processing of iron ore have the potential to be a very important source for REE in Europe and that the economy is strongly supported by the simultaneous extraction of phosphorous.

    The potential of using hollow fiber supported liquid membrane (HFSLM) extraction in individual and group separation of REE has been investigated. A hollow fiber supported liquid membrane plant in pilot scale has been operated according to the three main configurations: standard hollow fiber supported liquid membrane technology (HFSLM); hollow fiber renewal liquid membrane technology (HFRSLM) and emulsion pertraction technology (EPT). The standard HFSLM operation is more selective than HFRSLM and EPT, while higher metal transport rate is observed in EPT followed by HFRSLM and HFSLM. The HFRLM configuration helps to maintain the performance of the liquid membrane.

  • 4.
    Alemrajabi, Mahmood
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Korkmaz, Kivanc
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Rasmsuon, Å.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Isolation of Rare Earth Element Phosphate Precipitates in the Nitrophosphate Process for Manufacturing of Fertilizer2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Alemrajabi, Mahmood
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Korkmaz, Kivanc
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Rasmuson, Å.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Dephosphorization and impurity removal from a rare earth phosphate concentrate2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Alemrajabi, Mahmood
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Rasmuson, Å.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Recovery of phosphorous and rare earth elements from an apatite concentrate2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Alemrajabi, Mahmood
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Rasmuson, Åke
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Korkmaz, Kivanc
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Upgrading of a rare earth phosphate concentrate within the nitrophosphate process2018In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 198, p. 551-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the nitrophosphate process of fertilizer production, rare earth elements (REE) can be recovered as a REE phosphate concentrate. In this process, after digestion of apatite in concentrated nitric acid, Ca(NO3)2.4H2O is first separated by cooling crystallization and then the REE are precipitated in phosphate form by a partial neutralization step using ammonia. The obtained REE phosphate concentrate is contaminated by mainly calcium and iron, and the main solid phases are CaHPO4.2H2O, FePO4.2H2O and REEPO4.nH2O.

    In this study, a process to obtain a concentrate more enriched with REE with low concentration of calcium and iron and free of phosphorous is developed. In the developed process, enrichment and dephosphorization of the rare earth phosphate concentrate has been achieved by selective dissolution and re-precipitation of the REE as a sodium REE double sulfate salt. It is shown that by selective dissolution of the REE concentrate in nitric acid at a pH of 2.4, most of the calcium and phosphorus are dissolved, and a solid phase more enriched in REE is obtained. Thereafter, the REE phosphate concentrate is first dissolved in a mixture of sulfuric-phosphoric acid and then the REE are reprecipitated as NaREE(SO4)2.H2O by addition of a sodium salt. More than 95% of the Ca, Fe and P are removed and a REE concentrate containing almost 30 mass% total REE is obtained.

  • 8.
    Alemrajabi, Mahmoud
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Forsberg, K.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Rasmuson, Å.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Recovery of REE from an apatite concentrate in the nitrophosphate process of fertilizer production.2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Ashour, Radwa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering. Nuclear Materials Authority, P.O. Box 530, 11381 El Maadi, Cairo, Egypt.
    Samouhos, Michail
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Molecular Sciences, Uppsala BioCentre.
    Polido Legaria, Elizabeth
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Molecular Sciences, Uppsala BioCentre.
    Svärd, Michael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Högblom, Joakim
    AkzoNobel, Pulp and Performance Chemicals AB.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Palmlöf, Magnus
    Kessler, Vadim G.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Molecular Sciences, Uppsala BioCentre.
    Seisenbaeva, Gulaim A.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Molecular Sciences, Uppsala BioCentre.
    Rasmuson, Åke C.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    DTPA-Functionalized Silica Nano- and Microparticles for Adsorption and Chromatographic Separation of Rare Earth Elements2018In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 6, no 5, p. 6889-6900Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Silica nanoparticles and porous microparticles have been successfully functionalized with a monolayer of DTPA-derived ligands. The ligand grafting is chemically robust and does not appreciably influence the morphology or the structure of the material. The produced particles exhibit quick kinetics and high capacity for REE adsorption. The feasibility of using the DTPA-functionalized microparticles for chromatographic separation of rare earth elements has been investigated for different sample concentrations, elution modes, eluent concentrations, eluent flow rates, and column temperatures. Good separation of the La(III), Ce(III), Pr(III), Nd(III), and Dy(III) ions was achieved using HNO3 as eluent using a linear concentration gradient from 0 to 0.15 M over 55 min. The long-term performance of the functionalized column has been verified, with very little deterioration recorded over more than 50 experiments. The results of this study demonstrate the potential for using DTPA-functionalized silica particles in a chromatographic process for separating these valuable elements from waste sources, as an environmentally preferable alternative to standard solvent-intensive processes.

  • 10.
    Atasoy, Merve
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Owusu-Agyeman, Isaac
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Plaza, Elzbieta
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Cetecioglu, Zeynep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Bio-based volatile fatty acid production and recovery from waste streams: Current status and future challenges2018In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 268, p. 773-786Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bio-based volatile fatty acid (VFA) production from waste-stream is getting attention due to increasing market demand and wide range usage area as well as its cost-effective and environmentally friendly approach. The aim of this paper is to give a comprehensive review of bio-based VFA production and recovery methods and to give an opinion on future research outlook. Effects of operation conditions including pH, temperature, retention time, type of substrate and mixed microbial cultures on VFA production and composition were reviewed. The recovery methods in terms of gas stripping with absorption, adsorption, solvent extraction, electrodialysis, reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, and membrane contractor of VFA were evaluated. Furthermore, strategies to enhance bio-based VFA production and recovery from waste streams, specifically, in-line VFA recovery and bioaugmentation, which are currently not used in common practice, are seen as some of the approaches to enhance bio-based VFA production.

  • 11.
    Bessman, Alexander
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Interactions between battery and power electronics in an electric vehicle drivetrain2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The electric machine and power electronics in electric and hybrid electric vehicles inevitably cause AC harmonics on the vehicle's DC-link. These harmonics can be partially filtered out by large capacitors, which today are overdimensioned in order to protect the vehicle's battery pack. This is done as a precaution, since it is not known whether ripple-current has any harmful effect on Li-ion  cells.

    We have measured and analyzed the ripple-current present in a hybrid electric bus, and found that a majority of the power was carried by frequencies in the range 100~Hz to 1~kHz. The single most energetic harmonic in this particular vehicle is believed to have been caused  by a misaligned resolver in the motor.

    We have also designed and built an advanced experimental set-up in order to study the effect of ripple-current on Li-ion cells in the lab. The set-up can cycle up to 16 cells simultaneously, with currents of up to 50~A including a superimposed AC signal with a frequency of up to 2~kHz. The cells' temperatures are controlled by means of a climate chamber. The set-up also includes a sophisticated safety system which automatically acts to prevent dangerous situations before they arise.

    Using this set-up we tested whether superimposing AC with a specific frequency improves the charging performance of Li-ion cells. Statistical analysis found no improvement over regular DC cycling, and a physics-based model explains the experimental findings.

    We have also investigated whether ripple-current accelerates the aging of Li-ion cells. Twelve cells were either calendar or cycle  aged for one year, with some cells being exposed to superimposed AC with a frequency of 1~Hz, 100~Hz, or 1~kHz. No effect was observed on any of capacity fade, power fade, or aging mechanism.

    Finally we also tested whether it is possible to heat Li-ion cells from low temperatures using only AC. We propose a method for AC heating of Li-ion cells, and open the discussion for generalizing the technique to larger battery packs.

    In conclusion, ripple-current has negligible effect on Li-ion cells, except for heating them slightly.

  • 12.
    Bessman, Alexander
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Soares, Rudi
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electromagnetic Engineering.
    Software documentation for current-rippleequipment2018Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Bessman, Alexander
    et al.
    KTH.
    Soares, Rúdi
    KTH.
    Wallmark, Oskar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Svens, Pontus
    KTH.
    Lindbergh, Göran
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Aging effects of AC harmonics on lithium-ion cellsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Campana, Pietro Elia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Energy Processes.
    Zhang, J.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Geog Sci, College Pk, MD 20742 USA..
    Yao, T.
    Sci Syst & Applicat Inc SSAI, Lanham, MD 20706 USA.;NASA, Goddard Space Flight Ctr, Greenbelt, MD 20771 USA..
    Andersson, S.
    Swedish Meteorol & Hydrol Inst, SE-60176 Norrkoping, Sweden..
    Landelius, T.
    Swedish Meteorol & Hydrol Inst, SE-60176 Norrkoping, Sweden..
    Melton, F.
    NASA ARC CREST, Moffett Field, CA 94035 USA.;Calif State Univ Monterey Bay, Sch Nat Sci, Seaside, CA 93955 USA..
    Yan, Jerry
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Energy Processes. Malardalen Univ, Future Energy Ctr, Sch Business Soc & Engn, SE-72123 Vasteras, Sweden.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Chem Engn, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Managing agricultural drought in Sweden using a novel spatially-explicit model from the perspective of water-food-energy nexus2018In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 197, p. 1382-1393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a multi-disciplinary approach, this paper integrated spatial analysis with agricultural and energy system modelling to assess the impacts of drought on crop water demand, water availability, crop yield, and electricity requirements for irrigation. This was done by a novel spatially-explicit and integrated water-food-energy nexus model, using the spatial climatic data generated by the mesoscale MESAN and STRANG models. In this study, the model was applied to quantify the effects of drought on the Swedish irrigation sector in 2013, a typical drought year, for a specific crop. The results show that drought can severely affect the crop yield if irrigation is not applied, with a peak yield reduction of 18 t/ha, about 50 % loss as compared to the potential yield in irrigated conditions. Accordingly, the water and energy requirements for irrigation to halt the negative drought effects and maintain high yields are significant, with the peaks up to 350 mm and 700 kWh per hectare. The developed model can be used to provide near real-time guidelines for a comprehensive drought management system. The model also has significant potentials for applications in precision agriculture, especially using high-resolution satellite data.

  • 15.
    Carlson, Annika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Shapturenka, Pavel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Eriksson, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Lindbergh, Göran
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Lagergren, Carina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Wreland Lindström, Rakel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Electrode parameters and operating conditions influencing the performance of anion exchange membrane fuel cells2018In: Electrochimica Acta, ISSN 0013-4686, E-ISSN 1873-3859, Vol. 277, p. 151-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A deeper understanding of porous electrode preparation and performance losses is necessary to advance the anion exchange membrane fuel cell (AEMFC) technology. This study has investigated the performance losses at 50 °C for varied: Tokuyama AS-4 ionomer content in the catalyst layer, Pt/C loading and catalyst layer thickness at the anode and cathode, relative humidity, and anode catalyst. The prepared gas diffusion electrodes in the interval of ionomer-to-Pt/C weight ratio of 0.4–0.8 or 29–44 wt% ionomer content show the highest performance. Varying the loading and catalyst layer thickness simultaneously shows that both the cathode and the anode influence the cell performance. The effects of the two electrodes are shown to vary with current density and this is assumed to be due to non-uniform current distribution throughout the electrodes. Further, lowering the relative humidity at the anode and cathode separately shows small performance losses for both electrodes that could be related to lowered ionomer conductivity. Continued studies are needed to optimize, and understand limitations of, each of the two electrodes to obtain improved cell performance.

  • 16.
    Chen, Song
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Abdel-Magied, Ahmed F.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Fu, Le
    Uppsala Universitet, Department of Engineering Sciences.
    Jonsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Incorporation of strontium and europium in crystals of α-calcium isosaccharinate2019In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 364, p. 309-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The final repository for short-lived, low and intermediate level radioactive waste in Sweden is built to act as a passive repository. Already within a few years after closure water will penetrate the repository and conditions of high alkalinity (pH 10.5―13.5) and low temperature (< 7 °C) will prevail. The mobility of radionuclides in the repository is dependent on the radionuclides distribution between solid and liquid phases. In the present work the incorporation of strontium (II) and europium (III) in α-calcium isosaccharinate (ISA) under alkaline conditions (pH ~10) at 5 °C and 50 °C have been studied. The results show that strontium and europium are incorporated into α-Ca(ISA)2 when crystallized both at 5 °C and 50 °C. Europium is incorporated to a greater extent than strontium. The highest incorporation of europium and strontium at 5 °C rendered the phase compositions Ca0.986Eu0.014(ISA)2 (2.4% of Eu(ISA)3 by mass) and Ca0.98Sr0.02(ISA)2 (2.2% of Sr(ISA)2 by mass). XPS spectra show that both trivalent and divalent Eu coexist in the Eu incorporated samples. Strontium ions were found to retard the elongated growth of the Ca(ISA)2crystals. The incorporation of Sr2+ and Eu3+ into the solid phase of Ca(ISA)2 is expected to contribute to a decreased mobility of these ions in the repository.

  • 17.
    Chen, Song
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Wang, Shihuai
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Kemiska sektionen, Institutionen för kemi - Ångström, Fysikalisk kemi.
    Li, Hu
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Tillämpad materialvetenskap..
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Eu3+ doped monetite and its use as fluorescent agent for dental restorations2018In: Ceramics International, ISSN 0272-8842, E-ISSN 1873-3956, Vol. 44, no 9, p. 10510-10516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is essential but challenging to distinguish the dental restorations from the surrounding teeth when removing filling materials from cavity. In this study, Eu3+ doped monetite was proposed as a fluorescent agent for dental restorations to meet this challenge. Eu3+ doped monetite with enhanced fluorescent property was obtained via a precipitation method. The presence of Eu3+ could prevent the phase transformation of brushite to monetite. However, all the brushite particles transformed to monetite at 300 °C and to tricalcium phosphate at 800 °C. The emission intensity increased with the addition of Eu3+ and reached the maximum when 12 mol% Eu3+ was added into the aqueous solution. With either 254 nm or 393 nm excitation, Eu3+ doped monetite showed the strongest fluorescence emission peaking at 616 nm and other two moderate bands peaking at 699 nm and 593 nm. The excitation spectra at the emission wavelength of 616 nm showed strong absorption peaks at 254 nm and 393 nm. We further investigate the fluorescence properties of Eu3+ doped monetite in one type of dental restorations. Glass ionomer cement with Eu3+ doped monetite exhibited clear fluoresce with origin color under UV irradiation at 254 nm, showing that Eu3+doped monetite is a promising fluorescent agent for dental restorations.

  • 18.
    Chernyshev, Alexander
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Jonsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Impact of organic cement additives on the mobility of radionuclides in a radioactive waste repository2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Chernyshev, Alexander N.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Jonsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Characterization and degradation of a polyaryl ether based superplasticizer for use in concrete barriers in deep geological repositories2018In: Applied Geochemistry, ISSN 0883-2927, E-ISSN 1872-9134, Vol. 95, p. 172-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Superplasticizers are important additives used in concrete barriers in geological waste repositories. Superplasticizers have been a major concern in the long-term assessments of safe geological disposal for radioactive waste since superplasticizers and their degradation products can act as complexing ligands and thereby increase the mobility of radionuclides. In this work a new type of superplasticizer, based on a polyaryl ether polymer, has been characterized. It was found that the superplasticizer combines the structural features of polycarboxylate ether based superplasticizers and sulfonated naphthalene-formaldehyde based superplasticizers and that it contains organophosphatecharged groups. A novel method for evaluating the rate of degradation of the superplasticizer under alkaline conditions was elaborated and the degradation products and rate constant of the process was determined. The results demonstrate that degradation occurs rapidly compared to the typical lifetime of a repository.

  • 20.
    Cornell, Ann
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Rodrigo, Manuel
    Univ Castilla La Mancha, Dept Chem Engn, Ciudad Real, Spain..
    Bouzek, Karel
    Univ Chem & Technol Prague, Prague, Czech Republic..
    Special Issue: 11th European Symposium in Electrochemical Engineering (ESEE 11) Foreword2018In: Journal of Applied Electrochemistry, ISSN 0021-891X, E-ISSN 1572-8838, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 559-560Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21. Dahlquist, Erik
    et al.
    Mirmoshtaghi, Guilnaz
    Larsson, Eva K.
    Thorin, Eva
    Yan, Jinyue
    Engvall, Klas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Process Technology.
    Liliedahl, Truls
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Dong, C.
    Hu, X.
    Lu, Q.
    Modelling and simulation of biomass conversion processes2015In: 2013 8TH EUROSIM CONGRESS ON MODELLING AND SIMULATION (EUROSIM), 2015, p. 506-512Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By utilizing biomass gasification, the energy content of the biomass can be utilized to produce gas to be used for cogeneration of heat and power as well as other energy carriers such as fuels for vehicles. The concept is suitable for application to existing CHP plants as well as for utilizing spent liqour in small scale pulp and paper mills. The introduction would enable flexible energy utilization, use of problematic fuels as well as protects the environment by e.g. avoiding the release of toxic substances. In this paper, the possibilities to develop this concept is discussed. In this paper we compare different gasification processes with respect to what gas quality we get, and how the gasification can be modelled using different modelling approaches, and how these can be combined. Results from simulations are compared to experimental results from pilot plant operations in different scales and with different processes like CFB and BFB Technologies, athmospheric and pressurized, and using steam, air and oxygen as oxidizing media.

  • 22.
    Ding, Jing
    et al.
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Sch Engn, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Du, Lichan
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Sch Engn, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Pan, Gechuanqi
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Sch Engn, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Lu, Jianfeng
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Sch Engn, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Wei, Xiaolan
    South China Univ Technol, Sch Chem & Chem Engn, Guangzhou 510640, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Li, Jiang
    Natl Supercomp Ctr Guangzhou, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Weilong
    Sun Yat Sen Univ, Sch Engn, Guangzhou 510006, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Energy Processes. Malardalen Univ, Sch Business Soc & Energy, Vasteras, Sweden.
    Molecular dynamics simulations of the local structures and thermodynamic properties on molten alkali carbonate K2CO32018In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 220, p. 536-544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molten carbonate salts have received particular attention for high-temperature thermal energy storage and heat Molecular dynamics simulation transfer applications due to desirable thermal characteristics, such as wide operating temperature range, low Molten alkali carbonates causticity and excellent thermal stability. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed Local structures on molten alkali carbonate K2CO3 based on an effective pair potential model, a Born-Mayer type combined with Thermodynamic properties a Coulomb term. The radial distribution functions (RDF) and coordination number curves of the molten salt were characterized to explore the temperature dependences of macroscopic properties from microscopic view. The results suggest that the distance between K2CO3 particles is getting larger with temperature increasing, resulting in the increase of molar volume and the diminished ability of resistance to shear deformation and heat transfer by vibration between ions. Besides, it can be concluded that the structure of CO32- is inferred reasonably to be ortho-triangular pyramid from the comprehensive analysis of local structures including the angular distribution functions (ADF). Moreover, the thermodynamic properties were simulated in detail from 1200 to 1600 K including the density, thermal expansion coefficient, specific heat capacity, sheer viscosity, thermal conductivity and ion self-diffusion coefficient, which was hard to be measured from experiments under high-temperature extreme conditions, All the simulation results are in satisfactory agreement with available experimental data with high accuracy, and the minimum simulation error is as low as 1.42%.

  • 23. Ding, Y.
    et al.
    Shao, C.
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Energy Processes. School of Business, Society and Engineering, Mälardalen University, SE-72123 Västerås, Sweden.
    Song, Y.
    Zhang, C.
    Guo, C.
    Economical flexibility options for integrating fluctuating wind energy in power systems: The case of China2018In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 228, p. 426-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The inherent stochastic nature of wind power requires additional flexibility during power system operation. Traditionally, conventional generation is the only option to provide the required flexibility. However, the provision of the flexibility from the conventional generation such as coal-fired generating units comes at the cost of significantly additional fuel consumption and carbon emissions. Fortunately, with the development of the technologies, energy storage and customer demand response would be able to compete with the conventional generation in providing the flexibility. Give that power systems should deploy the most economic resources for provision of the required operational flexibility, this paper presents a detailed analysis of the economic characteristics of these key flexibility options. The concept of “balancing cost” is proposed to represent the cost of utilizing the flexible resources to integrate the variable wind power. The key indicators are proposed respectively for the different flexible resources to measure the balancing cost. Moreover, the optimization models are developed to evaluate the indicators to find out the balancing costs when utilizing different flexible resources. The results illustrate that exploiting the potential of flexibility from demand side management is the preferred option for integrating variable wind power when the penetration level is below 10%, preventing additional fuel consumption and carbon emissions. However, it may require 8% of the customer demand to be flexible and available. Moreover, although energy storage is currently relatively expensive, it is likely to prevail over conventional generation by 2025 to 2030, when the capital cost of energy storage is projected to drop to approximately $ 400/kWh or lower. 

  • 24.
    Ekström, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Fridholm, B.
    Lindbergh, Göran
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Comparison of lumped diffusion models for voltage prediction of a lithium-ion battery cell during dynamic loads2018In: Journal of Power Sources, ISSN 0378-7753, E-ISSN 1873-2755, Vol. 402, p. 296-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three different time-dependent lumped battery models are presented, using a limited set of only either three or four fitting parameters. The models all include one linear (resistive), one non-linear (kinetic) and one time-dependent element, the latter describing the diffusive processes in the battery. The voltage predictive capabilities of the models versus experimental dynamic load data for a plug-in hybrid vehicle battery are compared. It is shown that models based on a diffusion equation in an idealized particle perform similarly to a model based on an RC (resistive-capacitor) pair. In addition, by exchanging the RC element by a diffusion equation in an idealized particle it is also shown that it is possible to reduce the number of needed fitting parameters by one. 

  • 25.
    Endrődi, Balázs
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Sandin, Staffan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Smulders, V.
    Simic, N.
    Wildlock, M.
    Mul, G.
    Mei, B. T.
    Cornell, Ann
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Towards sustainable chlorate production: The effect of permanganate addition on current efficiency2018In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 182, p. 529-537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sodium dichromate is an essential solution additive for the electrocatalytic production of sodium chlorate, assuring selective hydrogen evolution. Unfortunately, the serious environmental and health concerns related to hexavalent chromium mean there is an urgent need to find an alternative solution to achieve the required selectivity. In this study sodium permanganate is evaluated as a possible alternative to chromate, with positive results. The permanganate additive is stable in hypochlorite-containing solutions, and during electrolysis a thin film is reductively deposited on the cathode. The deposit is identified as amorphous manganese oxide by Raman spectroscopic and X-ray diffraction studies. Using different electrochemical techniques (potentiodynamic measurements, galvanostatic polarization curves) we demonstrate that the reduction of hypochlorite is suppressed, while the hydrogen evolution reaction can still proceed. In addition, the formed manganese oxide film acts as a barrier for the reduction of dissolved oxygen. The extent of hydrogen evolution selectivity in hypochlorite solutions was quantified in an undivided electrochemical cell using mass spectrometry. The cathodic current efficiency is significantly enhanced after the addition of permanganate, while the effect on the anodic selectivity and the decomposition of hypochlorite in solution is negligible. Importantly, similar results were obtained using electrodes with manganese oxide films formed ex situ. In conclusion, manganese oxides show great promise in inducing selective hydrogen evolution, and may open new research avenues to the rational design of selective cathodes, both for the chlorate process and for related processes such as photocatalytic water splitting.

  • 26.
    Evangelopoulos, Panagiotis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Arato, Samantha
    Persson, Henry
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Kantarelis, Efthymios
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Yang, Weihong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Reduction of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in plastics from waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) by solvent extraction and the influence on their thermal decompositionIn: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Consumption of electronics increases due to modern society’s growing needs, which leads to increasing generation of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE). Recycling of WEEE has been a global concern during the last few decades because of the toxic compounds that are produced during recycling. Different recycling techniques have been adapted on a commercial scale in order to overcome this issue, but the recycling of WEEE still lacks the technology to treat different kinds of feedstocks and to maximise the recycling rates. Pyrolysis is an alternative that has not been commercialised yet. One of the challenges for the implementation of this technology is the toxic brominated organic compounds that can be found in the pyrolysis oils.

    In this study, tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), one of the major flame retardants, is reduced in three different WEEE fractions through solvent extraction as a treatment prior to pyrolysis. Two solvents have been experimentally investigated: isopropanol and toluene, the latter of which can be derived from pyrolysis oil. The results indicate that TBBPA was extracted during pre-treatment. Moreover, the total bromine content of WEEE material was reduced after the treatment with a maximum reduction of 36.5%. The pyrolysis experiments indicate that reduction of several brominated organic compounds was achieved in almost all the tested cases, and two brominated compounds (2,4,6-tribromophenol and 2,5-Dibromobenzo(b)thiophene) reached complete removal. Also, the thermal decomposition behaviour of the raw samples and the treated was investigated, showing that the reduction of TBBPA influences the decomposition by shifting the starting decomposition temperature.

  • 27.
    Evangelopoulos, Panagiotis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Arvelakis, Stylianos
    National Technical University of Athens.
    Kantarelis, Efthymios
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Process Technology.
    Yang, Weihong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Experimental investigation of low temperature pyrolysis of printed circuit boards (PCBs) and printed circuit board components (PCB sockets)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Printed circuit boards (PCBs) are the heart of all electronics due to their compact size and the broad spectrum of applications but very challenging when their life ends. Recycling of these components is problematic since they consist of different metallic parts packed on plastic compressed cover. The present study focuses on low temperature pyrolysis of PCBs since this process can separate the organic fraction from the inorganics. The latter, enables further separation and purification of the metals which are not oxidized during mild treatment. The low Br content of the resultant char after treatment at 320 oC for 30 min indicates that it could be used as solid fuel if efficient separation from the inorganic part would be performed. Moreover, the liquids obtained by this process can be used for feedstock recycling since the results indicates that toxic bromine containing on the organic compounds has been decreased both by increasing the residence time of pyrolysis process or by increasing the temperature conditions.

  • 28. Evangelopoulos, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Persson, Henry
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Kantarelis, Efthymios
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Process Technology. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Energy and Furnace Technology.
    Yang, Weihong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Pyrolysis of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) on a single screw reactor for bromine free oil productionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on pyrolysis on waste electrical and electronic equipment or WEEE as it is usually referred in the literature. A new auger reactor has been designed and tested with WEEE material. The performance of the reactor as well as the fate of the bromine has been investigated and evaluated in order to be used for designing of industrial process. The mass balance calculations performed for the tested cases of 400, 500 and 600 °C, showed a high gas yield (44%) at the temperature of 600 °C, which can be used to fulfil the process energy needs. At the low temperature of 400 °C the oil production reach its maximum yield, while the bromine content of the oil has also a maximum percentage of 0.5% wt. Several valuable compounds have been detected in the oil composition, which can be used either as fuels or for feedstock recycling.

  • 29.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Valorisation of phosphate rock by hydrometallurgical processing2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Forsberg, Kerstin M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Mohammadi, M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Ghafarnejad Parto, S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Martínez de la Cruz, Joaquin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Rasmuson, Å.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Fredriksson, A.
    LKAB.
    Recovery of REE from an apatite concentrate2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Mohammadi, M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Ghafarnejad Parto, S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Alemrajabi, Mahmoud
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Korkmaz, Kivanc
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Martínez De La Cruz, Joaquin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Rasmuson, Å.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Novel hydrometallurgical methods for recovery and separation of REE2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Nénert, G.
    Malvern Panalytical.
    Martineau, C.
    Institut Lavoisier de Versailles.
    Tao, T.
    University of Houston.
    Halasyamani, Shiv
    University of Houston.
    Crystal structure of hydrated fluorides M F 2 ·4H 2 O ( M = Zn, Ni, Co): a combined approach2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Rodríguez Varela, Raquel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Martínez, Joaquin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Kloo, L.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Rasmuson, Å.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Processing of a rare earth element concentrate by hollow fibre supported liquid membrane extraction2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Galanopoulos, Christos
    et al.
    Bremen Univ, Inst Environm Sci & Technol, D-28359 Bremen, Germany..
    Yan, Jinying
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering. Vattenfall AB, R&D, SE-16992 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Li, Hailong
    Malardalen Univ, SE-72123 Vasteras, Sweden..
    Liu, Longcheng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Impacts of acidic gas components on combustion of contaminated biomass fuels2018In: Biomass and Bioenergy, ISSN 0961-9534, E-ISSN 1873-2909, Vol. 111, p. 263-277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The formation of high concentrations of acid gases; in combustion with large variations in fuel qualities, represents a major challenge for energy production from contaminated biomass fuels. This paper provides a comprehensive evaluation of the effects of acid gas formation and retention in the combustion of recycled wood fuels. A model has been developed based on the chemical reactions involved and empirical correlations from plant monitoring and testing. The model has been used to study the behaviour of acidic gas components in critical stages of a bubbling fluidised bed boiler process. Results indicate that the variation in type of fuel contamination is the most important issue to deal with in the combustion of recycled wood fuels. Peaks in the flue gas chlorine concentrations cannot be suppressed easily by conventional flue gas cleaning measures. Upon applying ammonium sulphate dosing for the protection of chlorine induced corrosions, it is sometimes difficult to maintain the required S/Cl ratio when large variations of fuel chlorine occur. Moreover, a high level of chlorine in the fuel can also indirectly affect the emission control of sulphur dioxide because it would require an increased level of ammonium sulphate decomposition, which results in a high level of SO2 in flue gas. The study also shows a beneficial effect of the recirculation of quench water from the flue gas condenser to the boiler. It offers opportunities for the optimisation of flue gas cleaning and flue gas condensation, for improving the efficiencies of water and wastewater treatment, as well as for emission reduction with a sustainable way.

  • 35. Ghadami Yazdi, M.
    et al.
    Moud, Pouya H.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Marks, K.
    Piskorz, W.
    Öström, H.
    Hansson, T.
    Kotarba, A.
    Engvall, Klas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Göthelid, M.
    Naphthalene on Ni(111): Experimental and Theoretical Insights into Adsorption, Dehydrogenation, and Carbon Passivation2017In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 121, no 40, p. 22199-22207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An attractive solution to mitigate tars and also to decompose lighter hydrocarbons in biomass gasification is secondary catalytic reforming, converting hydrocarbons to useful permanent gases. Albeit that it has been in use for a long time in fossil feedstock catalytic steam reforming, understanding of the catalytic processes is still limited. Naphthalene is typically present in the biomass gasification gas and to further understand the elementary steps of naphthalene transformation, we investigated the temperature dependent naphthalene adsorption, dehydrogenation and passivation on Ni(111). TPD (temperature-programmed desorption) and STM (scanning tunneling microscopy) in ultrahigh vacuum environment from 110 K up to 780 K, combined with DFT (density functional theory) were used in the study. Room temperature adsorption results in a flat naphthalene monolayer. DFT favors the dibridge[7] geometry but the potential energy surface is rather smooth and other adsorption geometries may coexist. DFT also reveals a pronounced dearomatization and charge transfer from the adsorbed molecule into the nickel surface. Dehydrogenation occurs in two steps, with two desorption peaks at approximately 450 and 600 K. The first step is due to partial dehydrogenation generating active hydrocarbon species that at higher temperatures migrates over the surface forming graphene. The graphene formation is accompanied by desorption of hydrogen in the high temperature TPD peak. The formation of graphene effectively passivates the surface both for hydrogen adsorption and naphthalene dissociation. In conclusion, the obtained results on the model naphthalene and Ni(111) system, provides insight into elementary steps of naphthalene adsorption, dehydrogenation, and carbon passivation, which may serve as a good starting point for rational design, development and optimization of the Ni catalyst surface, as well as process conditions, for the aromatic hydrocarbon reforming process.

  • 36.
    Gomez, Yasna Acevedo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Oyarce, Alejandro
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Lindbergh, Göran
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Lagergren, Carina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Ammonia contamination of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell2018In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 165, no 3, p. F189-F197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reformate hydrogen from biogas is an attractive fuel alternative for energy conversion in PEM fuel cells. However, in the reformate traces of ammonia may be found, e.g. if the biogas is produced from agricultural resources. In this investigation the effect of ammonia in the fuel gas, on each part of the fuel cell, is studied by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), symmetrical hydrogen cell (H2|H2)- and real fuel cell operation. A considerable degradation in performance is observed by introducing 200 ppm ammonia. The results show that ammonia not only affects the polymer electrolyte membrane but also the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and catalyst ionomer in both electrodes, whereas the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) is the worst affected. In the short-term, the performance is reversible if running the cell on neat hydrogen after ammonia exposure, but this does not apply for long-term exposure. A mitigation method with air bleed is tested but gives no improvement of the performance.

  • 37.
    Granestrand, Jonas
    et al.
    KTH.
    Dahlin, Sandra
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Process Technology.
    Immele, O.
    Germany.
    Schmalhorst, L.
    Germany.
    Lantto, C.
    Nilsson, M.
    París, R. S.
    Regali, F.
    Pettersson, L. J.
    Catalytic aftertreatment systems for trucks fueled by biofuels - Aspects on the impact of fuel quality on catalyst deactivation2018In: Catalysis:: Volume 30, Royal Society of Chemistry, 2018, p. 64-145Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The issue of sustainable energy supply is a global problem for pursuing future endeavours in the energy area. In countries such as China and India there is a tremendous growth at the moment, which is envisaged by an ever growing demand for vehicles. Hence, one of the grand challenges of society is to meet the demands for sustainable and environmentally-friendly technologies in the transport sector. One way to tackle the problem of growing concentrations of carbon dioxide, which is believed to contribute to global warming, is the use of biofuels. It is becoming more and more evident that global warming is partly due to increasing anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions. An important contribution to these emissions is the use of fossil fuels in the transport sector. Hence, more efficient engines and an increased use of biofuels would be a step in the right direction. Although new propulsion systems are emerging, such as hybrid power-trains and fuel cell systems, analysis shows that combustion systems with excess oxygen, such as the diesel engine, will be the most important engine concept for the next 20 years. In this paper we will identify the specific challenges related to the production and use of biofuels in heavy-duty trucks and how they influence the catalytic units in the emission after-treatment system in the truck. Biofuels, such as biodiesel, contain potential poisons for the vehicle exhaust after-treatment, such as potassium, sodium, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, sulfur and other compounds.

  • 38. Guo, S.
    et al.
    Liu, Q.
    Zhao, J.
    Jin, G.
    Wu, W.
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Energy Processes. School of Business, Society and Engineering, Mälardalen University, 721 23 Västerås, Sweden.
    Li, H.
    Jin, H.
    Mobilized thermal energy storage: Materials, containers and economic evaluation2018In: Energy Conversion and Management, ISSN 0196-8904, E-ISSN 1879-2227, Vol. 177, p. 315-329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transportation of thermal energy is essential for users who are located far away from heat sources. The networks connecting them achieve the goal in efficient heat delivery and reasonable cost, especially for the users with large heat demands. However, it is difficult to satisfy the heat supply of the detached or emergent users with the existing pipelines. Therefore, a promising alternative, called mobilized thermal energy storage (M-TES), was proposed to deliver the heat flexibly without the restriction of networks. In this paper, a review of studies on M-TES is conducted in terms of materials, containers and economic evaluation. The potential candidates of materials, such as sugar alcohols, hydrated salts, alkalies and zeolite are reviewed and compared based on their thermophysical properties, price, advantages and disadvantages. Various containers, including the shell-and-tube, encapsulated, direct-contact, detachable and sorptive types, are discussed from the aspects of configuration, performance and utilization. Furthermore, the studies on the economic evaluation of M-TES systems are summarized and discussed based on the analysis of the economic indicators, including initial cost, operating cost, revenue, subsidy and energy cost. Finally, the challenges and future perspectives for developing M-TES are presented.

  • 39.
    Hagberg, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Carbon Fibres for Multifunctional Lithium-Ion Batteries2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The transportation industry today faces many challenges because of the rapid movement towards electrification. One major challenge is the weight of the battery, which limits the effectiveness of the vehicles. One of the possible routes to reduce the weight on a system-level is introducing structural batteries, batteries that simultaneously storeenergy and hold a mechanical load. Placing these batteries in a load-bearing part of the structure reduces weight and increases effectiveness on a system level. Carbon fibres are especially suited for structural batteries because of the high performance as reinforcement material in a polymer composite, as well as the ability to insert lithium to function as negative electrodes in batteries.

    Another field that has attracted attention the latest years is flexible batteries due to the emerging of flexible displays and wearable electronics. Carbon fibres can be a suitable material in flexible batteries due to the good conductivity, mechanical integrity and ability to forman integrated flexible film with cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) as binder.

    This thesis focuses on the usage of carbon fibres in structural and flexible batteries. Lignin based and commercial carbon fibres are evaluated as negative electrodes using a combination of electrochemical methods, material characterization and mechanical testing. Further, the diffusion is characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, revealing an inequality of axial and radial diffusion in carbon fibres. The carbon fibres with a largely disordered structure show most promise as a negative electrode, with a capacity similar to graphite and having a high coulombic efficiency.

    Carbon fibres used as current collectors are evaluated as well, both continuous LiFePO4 coated carbon fibres with electrophoretic deposition for structural positive electrode applications and chopped carbonfibres bounded by CNF as a layer in a flexible electrode. The LiFePO4 coated carbon fibres show promise as a structural electrode with moderatecapacity, high coulombic efficiency, good rate performance and good adhesion between fibres and coating. The flexible electrodes with carbon fibres as current collectors perform well with a high capacity, good rate performance, low weight and high flexibility. The electrodes withstand bending for 4000 times without any performance degradation.

  • 40.
    Hagberg, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Maples, Henry A.
    Polymer and Composite Engineering (PaCE) Group, Institute of Materials Chemistry and Research, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, Währinger Straße 42, A-1090 Vienna, Austria .
    Alvim, Kayne S. P.
    Polymer and Composite Engineering (PaCE) Group, Institute of Materials Chemistry and Research, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, Währinger Straße 42, A-1090 Vienna, Austria .
    Xu, Johanna
    Polymeric Composite Materials, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, SE-97187 Luleå, Sweden .
    Johannisson, Wilhelm
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Bismarck, Alexander
    Polymer and Composite Engineering (PaCE) Group, Institute of Materials Chemistry and Research, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, Währinger Straße 42, A-1090 Vienna, Austria ; Polymer and Composite Engineering (PaCE) Group, Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, UK .
    Zenkert, Dan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Lindbergh, Göran
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Lithium iron phosphate coated carbon fiber electrodes for structural lithium ion batteries2018In: Composites Science And Technology, ISSN 0266-3538, E-ISSN 1879-1050Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A structural lithium ion battery is a material that can carry load and simultaneously be used to store electrical energy. We describe a path to manufacture structural positive electrodes via electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of LiFePO4 (LFP), carbon black and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) onto carbon fibers. The carbon fibers act as load-bearers as well as current collectors. The quality of the coating was studied using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The active electrode material (LFP particles), conductive additive (carbon black) and binder (PVDF) were found to be well dispersed on the surface of the carbon fibers. Electrochemical characterization revealed a specific capacity of around 60–110 mAh g−1 with good rate performance and high coulombic efficiency. The cell was stable during cycling, with a capacity retention of around 0.5 after 1000 cycles, which indicates that the coating remained well adhered to the fibers. To investigate the adhesion of the coating, the carbon fibers were made into composite laminae in epoxy resin, and then tested using 3-point bending and double cantilever beam (DCB) tests. The former showed a small difference between coated and uncoated carbon fibers, suggesting good adhesion. The latter showed a critical strain energy release rate of ∼200–600 J m−2 for coated carbon fibers and ∼500 J m−2 for uncoated fibers, which also indicates good adhesion. This study shows that EPD can be used to produce viable structural positive electrodes.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-05-03 13:06
  • 41. Hao, Y.
    et al.
    Li, W.
    Tian, Z.
    Campana, Pietro Elia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Energy Processes. School of Business, Society and Engineering, Mälardalen University, SE 72123 Västerås, Sweden.
    Li, H.
    Jin, H.
    Yan, Jinyue
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering. School of Business, Society and Engineering, Mälardalen University, SE 72123 Västerås, Sweden.
    Integration of concentrating PVs in anaerobic digestion for biomethane production2018In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 231, p. 80-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biogas produced from anaerobic digestion processes is considered as an important alternative to natural gas and plays a key role in the emerging market for renewable energy. Aiming at achieving a more sustainable and efficient biomethane production, this work proposed a novel energy system, which integrates concentrating photovoltaic/thermal (C-PV/T) hybrid modules into a biogas plant with chemical absorption for biogas upgrading. The investigated energy system was optimized based on the data from an existing biogas plant, and its techno-economic feasibility was evaluated. Results show that about 7% of the heat consumption and 12% of the electricity consumption of the biogas plant can be covered by solar energy, by using the produced heat in a cascade way according to the operating temperature of different processes. The production of biomethane can also be improved by 25,800 N m3/yr (or 1.7%). The net present value of the integrated system is about 2.78 MSEK and the payback period is around 10 years. In order to further improve the economic performance, it is of great importance to lower the capital cost of the C-PV/T module. 

  • 42.
    Harnden, Ross
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Peuvot, Kevin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Zenkert, Dan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Lindbergh, Göran
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Multifunctional Performance of Sodiated Carbon Fibers2018In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 165, no 13, p. B616-B622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An investigation is conducted into the potential for sodiated PAN-based carbon fibers (CFs) to be used in multifunctional actuation, sensing, and energy harvesting. Axial CF expansion/contraction is measured during sodiation/desodiation using operando strain measurements. The reversible expansion/contraction is found to be 0.1% - which is lower than that of lithiated CFs. The axial sodiation expansion occurs in two well-defined stages, corresponding to the sloping and plateau regions of the galvanostatic cycling curve. The results indicate that the sloping region most likely corresponds to sodium insertion between graphitic sheets, while the plateau region corresponds to sodium insertion in micropores. A voltage-strain coupling is found for the CFs, with a maximum coupling factor of 0.15 +/- 0.01 V/unit strain, which could be used for strain sensing in multifunctional structures. This voltage-strain coupling is too small to be exploited for harvesting mechanical energy. The measured axial expansion is further used to estimate the capacity loss due to solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation, as well as capacity loss due to sodium trapped in the CF microstructure. The outcomes of this research suggest that sodiated CFs show some potential for use as actuators and sensors in future multifunctional structures, but that lithiated CFs show more promise.

  • 43.
    Hua, Yong
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Liu, Peng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Li, Yuanyuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Kloo, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Composite Hole-Transport Materials Based on a Metal-Organic Copper Complex and Spiro-OMeTAD for Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells2018In: SOLAR RRL, ISSN 2367-198X, Vol. 2, no 5, article id UNSP 1700073Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spiro-OMeTAD has been the most commonly used hole-transport material in perovskite solar cells. However, this material shows intrinisic drawbacks, such as low hole mobility and conductivity in its pristine form, as well as self-aggregation when deposited as thin film. These are not beneficial properties for efficient hole transport and extraction. In order to address these issues, we have designed a new type of composite hole-transport materials based on a new metal-organic copper complex (CuH) and Spiro-OMeTAD. The incorporation of the molecularly bulky HTM CuH into the Spiro-OMeTAD material efficiently improves the hole mobility and suppresses the aggregation in the Spiro-OMeTAD film. As a result, the conversion efficiencies obtained for perovskite solar cells based on the composite HTM system reached as high as 18.83%, which is superior to solar cells based on the individual hole-transport materials CuH (15.75%) or Spiro-OMeTAD (14.47%) under the same working conditions. These results show that composite HTM systems may constitute an effective strategy to further improve the efficiency of perovskite solar cells.

  • 44.
    Hult, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Garcia-Gallego, Sandra
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Ingverud, Tobias
    Andrén, Oliver
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Degradable High Tg Sugar Derived Polycarbonates from Isosorbide and Dihydroxyacetone2018In: Polymer Chemistry, ISSN 1759-9954, E-ISSN 1759-9962Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polycarbonates from isosorbide and dihydroxyacetone (DHA) have been synthesised using organocatalytic step-growth polymerization of their corresponding diols and bis-carbonylimidazolides monomers. By choice of feed ratio and monomer activation, either isosorbide or ketal protected DHA, random and alternating poly(Iso-co-DHA) carbonates have been formed. Thermal properties by DSC and TGA were herein strongly correlated to monomer composition. Dilution studies using 1H-NMR of a model compound DHA-diethyl carbonate in acetonitrile and deuterated water highlighted the influence of α-substituents on the keto/hydrate equilibrium of DHA. Further kinetics studies of in the pH* range of 4.7 to 9.6 serve to show the hydrolytic pH-profile of DHA-carbonates. The Hydrolytic degradation of deprotected polymer pellets show an increased degradation with increasing DHA content. Pellets with a random or alternating configuration show different characteristics in terms of mass loss and molecular weight loss profile over time.

  • 45.
    Kanninen, Petri
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry. Aalto Univ, Dept Chem & Mat Sci, POB 16100, Aalto 00076, Finland.
    Kallio, Tanja
    Aalto Univ, Dept Chem & Mat Sci, POB 16100, Aalto 00076, Finland..
    Activation of commercial Pt/C catalyst toward glucose electro-oxidation by irreversible Bi adsorption2018In: Journal of Energy Challenges and Mechanics, ISSN 2095-4956, E-ISSN 2056-9386, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 1446-1452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of irreversibly adsorbed Bi on commercial Pt/C catalyst toward glucose electro-oxidation reaction (GOR) in different electrolytes (acidic, neutral, alkaline) is studied. Bi is successfully deposited on Pt/C from Bi3+ containing acidic solution from 0 to 90% coverage degree. The stability of the Bi layer in acid and alkaline corresponded to previous studies and started to dissolve at 0.7 V and 0.8 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), respectively. However, in neutral phosphate buffer the layer showed remarkable stability to at least 1.2 V versus RHE. Bi modification at low (20%) and high (80%) coverage showed the highest increase in the activity of Pt/C toward GOR by a factor up to 7 due to the increased poisoning resistance of the modified catalyst. The effect of poisoning was especially reduced at high Bi coverage (80%), which shows that adsorbate blocked by Bi through the third-body effect is effective. Finally, with or without Bi modification GOR on Pt/C was most active in alkaline conditions.

  • 46.
    Kantarelis, Efthymios
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Javed, Rashed
    Stefanidis, Stylianos
    Psarras, Antonios
    Iliopoulou, Eleni
    Lappas, Angelos
    Upgrading biomass pyrolysis vapors over hierarchical Co/HZSM5: Activity and coking characteristics2018In: 18th Nordic Symposium on Catalysis Book of Abstracts, Copenhagen, 2018, p. 29-29, article id O3.2Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Kaya, Şerif
    et al.
    Middle East Technical University.
    Peters, Edward Michael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Dittrich, Carsten
    MEAB Chemie Technik GmbH.
    Stopic, Srecko
    RWTH Aachen University.
    Friedrich, Bernd
    RWTH Aachen University.
    Scandium Recovery from an Ammonium Fluoride Strip Liquor by Anti-Solvent Crystallization2018In: Metals, ISSN 2075-4701, Vol. 8, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the crystallization of scandium from ammonium fluoride strip liquor, obtained by solvent extraction, was investigated using an anti-solvent crystallization technique. Acetone, ethanol, methanol and isopropanol were added individually to the strip liquor as the anti-solvent and scandium was precipitated and obtained in the form of (NH4)3ScF6 crystals. The results show that scandium can be effectively crystallized from the strip liquor to obtain an intermediate, marketable scandium product. Yields greater than 98% were obtained using an anti-solvent to strip liquor volumetric ratio of 0.8. Acetone had the least performance at lower anti-solvent to strip liquor volumetric ratios, possibly due to its limited H bonding capability with water molecules when compared to alcohols.

  • 48.
    Kluczny, Maksymilian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Synthesis and Electrochemical Evaluation of Perovskite related oxide for Active Cathode for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs)2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Solid oxide fuel cells are used as stationary power plants for electricity production. Despite having a very high efficiency of 90% they haven’t gained a world-wide commercial usage, due to their very high operating temperatures, and high production cost. However, there is a lot of ongoing research with the aim of developing intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs) that could operate at temperatures below 800°C.

    Cathodes are the most studied components of IT-SOFCs, since decreasing operating temperature results in slow oxygen reduction reaction(ORR) kinetics and large polarization losses. Perovskite related metal oxides have become very popular materials that could make suitable cathodes for IT-SOFCs. In this work an evaluation of several materials belonging to three different material groups have been studied: single layer perovskites, with a general formula of ABO3, double layer perovskites, with a general formula of AA’B2O6 and Ruddlesden-Popper phase, with a general formula of An+1BnO3n+1. Power generating capabilities of those materials have been studied on an electrolyte supported cell, cathode/LSGM9182/Ni-Fe. IR drop and overpotential of the cathode was measured and activation energy of the ORR for each material has been calculated.

    The double layer perovskite cobaltites offer a significant drop in overpotential, increase in conductivity compared to their single layer counterpart, while being able to generate significant amount of power. Ruddlesden-Popper phase materials offer the lowest activation energy values amongst the researched materials, but offer limited power generation values in the setup they were tested. Both of double layer perovskites and Ruddlesden-Popper based materials have opportunities for their performance to be improved.

  • 49.
    Korkmaz, Kivanc
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Alemrajabi, Mahmood
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Rasmuson, Åke C.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Recovery of rare earth elements from spent NiMH HEV batteries via selective roasting and water leaching2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Korkmaz, Kivanc
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Alemrajabi, Mahmood
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Rasmuson, Åke C.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Recoveries of Valuable Metals from Spent Nickel Metal Hydride Vehicle Batteries via Sulfation, Selective Roasting, and Water Leaching2018In: Journal of Sustainable Metallurgy, ISSN 2199-3823, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 313-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recoveries of rare earth elements (REEs), nickel, and cobalt from hybrid electric vehicle batteries by sulfation, selective roasting, and water leaching have been studied. The cathode and anode materials of a Panasonic Prismatic Module nickel metal hydride (NiMH) battery were used in the study. The optimal conditions for each step of the process were determined by performing lab-scale experiments. It was found that 8 mol/L of sulfuric acid was sufficient for the sulfation with a solid-to-liquid ratio of 1/5. The optimal roasting conditions was determined to be 850 °C for 2 h. Under optimal conditions, 96% of the REEs could be obtained in the aqueous phase with negligible contamination of Ni and Co. The Ni and Co remained in solid phase as oxides together with traces of aluminum, zinc, and iron oxides. This method provides a way for the separation of the REEs from nickel, cobalt, and other elements present in the NiMH battery, into a leachate suitable for further processing.

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