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  • 1.
    Buizza, Giulia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems. Politecnico di Milano, CartCasLab, Department of Electronics Information and Bioengineering, piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 42, Milan 20133, Italy.
    Toma-Dasu, I.
    Lazzeroni, M.
    Paganelli, C.
    Riboldi, M.
    Chang, Yongjun
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems.
    Smedby, Örjan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging.
    Wang, Chunliang
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging.
    Early tumor response prediction for lung cancer patients using novel longitudinal pattern features from sequential PET/CT image scans2018In: Physica medica (Testo stampato), ISSN 1120-1797, E-ISSN 1724-191X, Vol. 54, p. 21-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: A new set of quantitative features that capture intensity changes in PET/CT images over time and space is proposed for assessing the tumor response early during chemoradiotherapy. The hypothesis whether the new features, combined with machine learning, improve outcome prediction is tested. Methods: The proposed method is based on dividing the tumor volume into successive zones depending on the distance to the tumor border. Mean intensity changes are computed within each zone, for CT and PET scans separately, and used as image features for tumor response assessment. Doing so, tumors are described by accounting for temporal and spatial changes at the same time. Using linear support vector machines, the new features were tested on 30 non-small cell lung cancer patients who underwent sequential or concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Prediction of 2-years overall survival was based on two PET-CT scans, acquired before the start and during the first 3 weeks of treatment. The predictive power of the newly proposed longitudinal pattern features was compared to that of previously proposed radiomics features and radiobiological parameters. Results: The highest areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves were 0.98 and 0.93 for patients treated with sequential and concurrent chemoradiotherapy, respectively. Results showed an overall comparable performance with respect to radiomics features and radiobiological parameters. Conclusions: A novel set of quantitative image features, based on underlying tumor physiology, was computed from PET/CT scans and successfully employed to distinguish between early responders and non-responders to chemoradiotherapy. 

  • 2.
    Buizza, Giulia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems. Politecn Milan, CartCasLab, Dept Elect Informat & Bioengn, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 42, I-20133 Milan, Italy..
    Toma-Dasu, Iuliana
    Karolinska Univ Sjukhuset, Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, Med Radiat Phys, S-17176 Solna, Sweden..
    Lazzeroni, Marta
    Karolinska Univ Sjukhuset, Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, Med Radiat Phys, S-17176 Solna, Sweden..
    Paganelli, Chiara
    Politecn Milan, CartCasLab, Dept Elect Informat & Bioengn, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 42, I-20133 Milan, Italy..
    Riboldi, Marco
    Politecn Milan, CartCasLab, Dept Elect Informat & Bioengn, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 42, I-20133 Milan, Italy.;Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Fac Phys, Coloumbwall 1, D-5748 Garching, Germany..
    Chang, Yong Jun
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems.
    Smedby, Örjan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging.
    Wang, Chunliang
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging.
    Early tumor response prediction for lung cancer patients using novel longitudinal pattern features from sequential PET/CT image scans2018In: Physica medica (Testo stampato), ISSN 1120-1797, E-ISSN 1724-191X, Vol. 54, p. 21-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: A new set of quantitative features that capture intensity changes in PET/CT images over time and space is proposed for assessing the tumor response early during chemoradiotherapy. The hypothesis whether the new features, combined with machine learning, improve outcome prediction is tested. Methods: The proposed method is based on dividing the tumor volume into successive zones depending on the distance to the tumor border. Mean intensity changes are computed within each zone, for CT and PET scans separately, and used as image features for tumor response assessment. Doing so, tumors are described by accounting for temporal and spatial changes at the same time. Using linear support vector machines, the new features were tested on 30 non-small cell lung cancer patients who underwent sequential or concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Prediction of 2-years overall survival was based on two PET-CT scans, acquired before the start and during the first 3 weeks of treatment. The predictive power of the newly proposed longitudinal pattern features was compared to that of previously proposed radiomics features and radiobiological parameters. Results: The highest areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves were 0.98 and 0.93 for patients treated with sequential and concurrent chemoradiotherapy, respectively. Results showed an overall comparable performance with respect to radiomics features and radiobiological parameters. Conclusions: A novel set of quantitative image features, based on underlying tumor physiology, was computed from PET/CT scans and successfully employed to distinguish between early responders and non-responders to chemoradiotherapy.

  • 3.
    Chen, Hongjian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging.
    Evangelou, Dimitris
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging.
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging. Karolinska Institutet (KI), CLINTEC – Division of Medical Imaging and Technology.
    Sequence design for ultrasound imaging of polyvinyl alcohol microbubbles2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nonlinear behavior of the ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) offers a unique feature to be distinguished from the surrounding tissue. In a recent years several methods were developed to enhance the nonlinear response of UCA. Crucial for efficient differentiation of the nonlinear response of UCA from the surrounding tissue is to design the contrast pulse sequence specific to the unique nonlinear properties that the particular UCA is offering.

    In the previous study, the nonlinear response from a novel polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) microbubbles (MB), in ultra-harmonic region was investigated over a pressure range from 50 kPa to 300 kPa. In this study, five contrast pulse sequences and reference B-mode sequence were designed to visualize PVA MB. The performance of those sequences were evaluated and compared.

  • 4.
    Chen, Hongjian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging.
    Larsson, David
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging.
    Janerot-Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Colarieti-Tosti, Massimiliano
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging.
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging.
    Polymer Microbubbles as Dual Modal Contrast Agent for Ultrasound and Computed Tomography2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hybrid imaging combines the anatomical information with the functional or metabolic information using different conventional single imaging modalities improving the overall diagnosis outcome of the clinical examination. Since the introduction of the first hybrid imaging device PET-CT in 1998 different combinations of hybrid imaging were developed such as PET-MRI, SPECT-CT.

    However, lack of multimodal contrast agent specifically aimed for hybrid imaging limits the diagnostic outcome of these novel techniques. Initial attempts in fabrication of hybrid contrast agents were made by combining previously existing single modal contrast agents into one. In this study, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) microbubbles (MB) and gold nanoparticles - which by themselves are already established contrast agents used in preclinical studies for ultrasound and CT, respectively - were chosen as parent contrast agents to fabricate the dual modal Contrast Agent for UltraSound and CT (CACTUS).

    Method

    The fabrication of MBs was adapted from Cavalieri et al.[1]. PVA powder (Sigma Aldrich, MO USA) was dissolved in the water at 80°C. The aqueous PVA-chains were cleaved by sodium metaperiodate (NaIO4, purity>99.0%, Sigma Aldrich, MO USA). Vigorous stirring force was applied to the resulting telechelic aldehydic PVA-chains for 2 hours to crosslink the telechelic aldehydic PVA-chains and form the PVA-coated MBs at the water-air interface.

    CACTUS MBs were synthesized in a similar fashion to the above, but adding gold nanoparticles (diameter 1.9nm, Nanoprobes, NY, USA) during formation of the MBs.

    The size distributions of MBs and CACATUS MBs were determined using an optical microscope (ECLIPSE Ci-S, Nikon, Tokyo, Japan) and a Neubauer counting chamber (Brand GmbH, Wertheim, Germany).

    The acoustic attenuation coefficients of the MBs suspension were acquired at peak negative pressure (PNP) from 10 - 300 kPa. Three MBs suspension samples with concentrations of (sample A),  (sample B) and  ml-1 (sample C) were prepared and loaded in a 1 cm thick two-cavity chamber. A flat single crystal ultrasound transducer with central frequency 3.5MHz was used to generate the ultrasound beam. The amplitude of received echoes through samples and water were compared at the fundamental frequency, as well as the 2nd and 3rd harmonic for each value of the concentration used.

    The mass attenuation of water, suspension of gold nanoparticles with concentration 160mg/L, plain MBs, and CACTUS MBs, was measured by quantum FX-CT micro-CT (PerkinElmer Inc, MA, USA). The micro-CT was operated at a current of 200mA with exposure time of 120s and varied voltage 50kV, 70kV and 90kV. Each 3D image has a size of 512*512*512 pixels or 75.8*75.8*75.8 mm. Contrast to noise ratios (CNR) between water and all samples were calculated following Eq. 1.Where S(x,y,z) and W(x,y,z) are the mass attenuation of the sample and water per voxel, respectively. ns(x,y,z) and nw(x,y,z) are the noise function with zero mean of sample and water respectively. Ms and Mw are the mean mass attenuation acquired for the sample and water in the volume of interest. The σs2 and σw2 are the variance of the mass attenuation read out of the sample and water in the volume of interested.

    In addition to the gas-core MBs for the CT tests, liquid-core gold loaded capsules were synthesized in two steps. In the first step, PVA shelled liquid-core capsules were obtained by exposing MBs to 66% v/v ethanol solution. In the second step, the resulting liquid-core capsules were mixed with high concentration gold nanoparticles suspension and homogenized by a shaker (MS 3 basic, IKA, Königswinter Germany) at 500rpm for 1 hour for goal loading. The resulting gold loaded capsules were washed with Milli-Q water using centrifuge (Galaxy 5D digital microcentrifuge, VWR, USA) at a speed of 1000 g for 5 min.

    Results and discussion

    The mean diameter of MBs is 3.6±1.1 μm. The mean diameter of CACTUS MBs is 3.2±0.7 μm. The size distribution of the gold loaded capsules was not investigated separately, but rather assumed identical to the plain MBs. The number and the volume distribution of MBs and CACTUS MBs are shown in figure 1. The results demonstrate that most of the CACTUS MBs and MBs have a diameter from 1 to 6 μm. Therefore, they are able pass through the capillaries and will resonate within typical clinical diagnostic ultrasound frequency below 15 MHz.

    Pressure dependent acoustic attenuation coefficients of the sample A, B, and C are shown in figure 2. The results show that attenuation coefficients of sample A and B at the fundamental frequency stay constant and slightly increase at the second harmonic at the PNP below 100kPa, indicating a linear oscillation of MBs. As the PNP reaches 200kPa, the attenuation coefficient of sample A at fundamental frequency decreases while at 2nd and 3rd harmonics increases, indicating that the energy of the echo shifts from the fundamental frequency to the 2nd and 3rd harmonics. As the PNP goes higher to 300kPa, the attenuation coefficient of sample A at the fundamental frequency, 2nd, and 3rd harmonics decreases, suggesting that the energy shifts to an even higher harmonic. At the same time, the attenuation coefficient of sample B stays constant at fundamental frequency, decreases at 2nd harmonics, and increases at the 3rd harmonic, suggesting the energy starts to shift to the 3rd harmonic. The attenuation coefficient of sample C at fundamental frequency, 2nd and 3rd harmonics keep constant and low due to low sample concentration. The test reveals the energy shifting of the echo to the higher harmonics at PNP higher than 100 kPa, indicating the nonlinear oscillation of MBs at PNP higher than 100 kPa. Moreover, the concentration of the MBs seems to influence the energy shifting: the higher the concentration the earlier the shift to the higher harmonics occurs, in the range of the concentration consider in this study.

    The pilot results of the micro-CT tests are presented in Table 1. The reference, gold nanoparticles solution, has the highest CNR per voxel at all CT operating voltages. The CNR per voxel of CACTUS MBs suspensions is below 0.1, virtually equaling the MBs at all operating voltages, suggesting that no gold or very little gold were loaded into the shell of the CACTUS MBs. The gold loaded capsules suspension has higher CNR per voxel than the capsule supernatant (the surrounding environment of capsules) and the MBs suspension, implying that the gold nanoparticles were loaded into the capsules. However, it is not clear whether the gold nanoparticles were loaded in the core of the MBs or in the MBs shell. The expected sharp increase of CNR per voxel at the k-edge of gold did not appear. We believe that is because even at our highest operating voltage of 90kV, the percentage of the photons with energy higher than 80.7 keV is still low. Introduction of a high-pass metal filter could increase the percentage of high energy photon. On the other hand, the metal filter will reduce the total number of the photons which would increase the noise of the images. Since same current was applied on every CT test, less X-ray photons reached the sensors when the CT was operated at low voltage. Therefore, it might be worth performing additional calibration tests to adjust the operating currents to make sure that the numbers of the photons that reach the sensor at every operating voltage are the same.

    Conclusion

    In this study, the CACTUS MBs and gold loaded capsules were fabricated as potential candidates for dual modal contrast agent. The characterization revealed that gold loaded capsule is a promising initial step. Nevertheless, the method to convert back liquid-core capsules to gas-core MBs needs to be established.

    [1] Cavalieri, F., El Hamassi, A., Chiessi, E., Paradossi, G., Villa, R., & Zaffaroni, N. (2006). Tethering functional ligands onto shell of ultrasound active polymeric microbubbles. Biomacromolecules, 7(2), 604-611.

  • 5.
    Ghorbani, Morteza
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging. Sabanci Univ, Fac Engn & Nat Sci, Mechatron Engn Program, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Numerical study of cavitating flow in orifices and its effect on spray characteristics2018In: Journal of Hydrodynamics, ISSN 1001-6058, E-ISSN 1000-4874, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 908-919Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The bubbly flow regime inside orifices has significant effects on several applications, and studying its trend along an orifice could be helpful in identifying the flow mechanism in various situations. The flow regime inside an orifice depends on the situation which has been specified for the orifice. Orifice geometry has a considerable effect on bubbly flow in injectors. Meanwhile, spray characteristics are influenced by the fuel flow inside an orifice, which has strong effects on the mixture of fuel-air. In this study, spray characteristics are studied for different values of the orifice angle. The cavitation phenomenon which occurs inside an orifice varies in intensity and patterns at different angles of the orifice and consequently has diverse effects on spray characteristics. The governing equations are solved by the SIMPLE algorithm. The spray flow is modeled by the discrete droplet method (DDM), the droplet breakup is modeled by the WAVE model, and the primary breakup is modeled by the DIESEL BREAK UP model. In order to generate cavitation phenomenon inside orifices and investigate its effect on spray characteristics, the angle of orifice with respect to the injector body is varied and the problem is studied for different angles of orifice.

  • 6. Ghorbani, Morteza
    et al.
    Chen, Hongjian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems.
    Villanueva, Luis Guillermo
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging.
    Kocsar, Ali
    Intensifying cavitating flows in microfluidic devices with poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) microbubbles2018In: Physics of Fluids, Vol. 30, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cavitation and the energy associated with the collapse of resulting cavitation bubbles constitute an important research subject. The collapse of the hydrodynamic cavitation bubbles at the outlet of the flow elements leads to a high energy release and generates localized shock waves and a large temperature rise on exposed surfaces. The concept of “hydrodynamic cavitation on chip” is an emerging topic which emphasizes phase change phenomena in microscale and their utilizations in energy and biomedical applications. This study is aimed to investigate the potential of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) Microbubbles (MBs) to generate cavitation bubbles and to evaluate their effects on flow regimes and energy dissipation. For this, three different microchannel configurations with different roughness elements were considered. The structural side wall and surface roughened channels were fabricated along with the smooth channel according to the techniques adopted from semiconductor based microfabrication. The upstream pressure varied from 1 to 7 MPa, and the flow patterns were recorded and analyzed using a high-speed camera. The pressure was locally measured at three locations along the microfluidic devices to determine the conditions for fully developed cavitating flows. The results were compared to the pure water case, and different trends for the cavitating flow pattern transitions were obtained for the water-PVA MB solution case. Accordingly, the twin cavity clouds extended to the end of the side wall roughened channel at a lower upstream pressure for the case of PVA MBs, while the smooth and surface roughened channels do not demonstrate this flow pattern. In addition, the cavitation number has the lowest values under the same working conditions for the case of PVA MBs. Moreover, the impact pressure generated by the bubble collapse inside the side wall roughened channel for the case of PVA MBs was notably higher than that for pure water.

  • 7.
    Ghorbani, Morteza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging.
    Svagan, Anna Justina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Grishenkov, Dmitry
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. Karolinska Institutet (KI), CLINTEC – Division of Medical Imaging and Technology.
    Acoustic Response of a Novel Class of Pickering Stabilized Perfluorodroplets2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Acoustic Droplet Vaporization (ADV) is a phase change phenomenon in which the liquid state, in the form of droplets, is converted to gas as a result of bursts in the excited ultrasound field. Having a wide range of medical applications, ADV has drawn considerable attention in imaging [1], diagnosis and critical medical treatment [2]. Therefore, benefitting from its broad potentials, with the consideration of its capability in localized noninvasive energy exposure, it is possible to utilize its effect in different medical applications from targeted drug delivery [3] to embolotherapy [4].

    Apart from the droplet characterization and ADV effectiveness on the applied region, the physics of ADV and particularly the ultrasound analysis is an essential parameter in the initiation of the vaporization. This part, which is related to acoustic wave physics, implies that ADV is mostly dependent on ultrasound pressure, frequency and temperature. In this sense, Miles et al. [5] tried to find incident negative pressure - called as ADV threshold- which is necessary for the induction of nucleation. It was successfully shown that the negative pressure required for the nucleation prior to collapse can be determined via perturbation analysis of a compressible inviscid flow around a droplet for various frequencies and diameters. In addition, the fluid medium which constitutes the droplet emulsion and the surrounding fluid constructs a significant field within ADV. In this regard, there are many studies which illustrated that the diameter of the droplets subjected to the acoustic waves undergoes a significant expansion of 5 to 6 times of their regular sizes [6-8].

    In this study, a new type of pickering stabilized perfluorodroplets (PFC) was examined under the effect of the different acoustic parameters to evaluate its potential in the acoustic droplet vaporization process. To assess the pressure effects on the stabilized droplets, the acoustic power within the ultrasound tests was varied and the phase trasnition was characterized according to the experimental conditions. Opticell® was utilized as the transparent device to visualize the droplets, which were exposed to the acoustic waves with the aid of the microscope and multi-well microplate.

    Methods

    Materials and emulsion preparation

    Perfluoropentane (PFC5) was purchased from Apollo Scientific (City, U.K.). Bleached sulfite pulp (from Nordic Paper Seffle AB, Sweden) was used in the production of the cationic cellulose nanofibers (CNFs). The CNF suspension (1.32 wt%) were prepared as described previously [9]. The CNFs had a dimension of 3.9 ± 0.8 nm in width and a length in the micrometer range. The amount of cationic groups was 0.13 mmol per g fiber, obtained from conductometric titration [9]. A suspension of CNF (0.28 wt%) was prepared by diluting the stock CNF with MilliQ-water (pH of diluted CNF suspension was 9.5). The suspension was treated with ultra-sonication at amplitude of 90% for 180 s (Sonics, Vibracell W750). The suspension was brought to room temperature. An amount of 36 g of the 0.28 wt% CNF suspension was mixed with 1 g of PFC5. The mixture was sonicated for 60s at an amplitude of 80% (under ice-cooling) to obtain the CNF-stabilized PFC5 droplets.

    The protocol for the acoustic tests

    100 μL of CNF-stabilized PFC5 droplets were added to 1900 μL of deionized water in order to prepare the solution which were exposed to the ultrasound waves. The droplet sample, diluted 1:19 in distilled water was introduced to the Opticell® and the acoustic waves at a fixed frequency and different powers were applied to the trageted area inside the Opticell® which is located inside a water bath. The ultrasound triggered sample then was placed under a 20X magnification objective of upright transmitted light microscope (ECLIPSE Ci-S, Nikon, Tokyo, Japan). 

    The acoustic tests were performed using high-power tone burst pulser-receiver (SNAP Mark IV,  Ritec, Inc., Warwick, RI, USA) equipped with a transducer (V382-SU Olympus NDT, Waltham, MA ) operating at the frequency of 3.5 MHz. The emulsion of CNF-stabilized PFC5 droplets were exposed to the power range which has the acsending trend from -30 to 0 dB at the given frequency. To investigate the droplet size variations at each power between, the droplets were collected inside the Opticell® and the droplet diameter was measured with the aid of the ImageJ software (version 1.50b, National institutes of health, USA) to determine the concentration and size distribution. The Gaussian distribution is ploted with mean value and standad deviation recover from the experimental data. An in-house image edge detection MATLAB™ script (MathWorks Inc., Natick, MA) were applied to analyze the images obtained from the microscope and provides the size and volume distributions.

    Results

    The size of PFP droplets is an important parameter to controll in the therapeutic applications. Here, a new type of Pickering stabilized perfluorodroplets were prepared where the PFP/water interface was stabilized with cellulose nanofibers (CNF) and the size of the droplets could easily be controlled by varying the amount of CNF added.  The resulting droplets were investigated using a single crystal transducer. Apart from the medical applications, controlling the droplet size is important from droplet dynamics point of view, becausethe interfacial energy is crucial in the assumption of the critical nucleus radius. Therefore, it is possible to estimate the negative peak pressure required for the phase transition once the droplet is controlled and interfacial energy deposited inside and on the surface of the droplet are balanced.

    According to the results in Figure 1, there is an appreciable rise of the size of the droplets after ultrasound waves exposure, particularly at -8 dB power. The experiments were performed for 30 seconds at different powers ranging from -30 to 0 dB, while the frequency was kept constant at 3.5 MHz, burst width in cycles was selected as 12 and repetition rate was set to 100. Images included in Figure 1 demonstrate major transitions in the intervals at -16, -8 and 0 dB. As shown in this figure, the droplet size increased with the power rise and more bubbles with bigger sizes appears at higher powers. This outcome implies the significant role of the applied frequency and power on the phase shift and subsequent mechanisms as a result of the acoustic wave exposure on the new nontoxic and incompatible droplet type.

    Figure 2 shows the average number of droplets and volume distribution at the corresponding powers to the Figure 1. It is shown that while the average diameter of the droplets is around 3.5 µm, the generated bubbles, as a result of the ADV, reaches up to 15 µm at the highest possible power. For each set of experiment (corresponding to a given power) 32 images were taken, thus, to reduce the errors and obtain the standard deviation (approximately 0.8 for all the cases), the presented diagrams for the droplet distributions exhibits the mean value for all of the acquired images. Therefore, it is shown that the droplet emulsion exhibited in NO US in Figure 2, which shows the regular view and distribution range of the CNF-stabilized PFC5 droplets at the room temperature, experiences ADV process with the diameter rise of about 5 times at the highest power when the frequency is fixed at 3.5 MHz.

    Conclusions

    The results show that there is appreciable rise on the size of the droplets after ultrasound waves exposure at a fixed frequency. Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) was illustrated at different powers for CNF-stabilized PFC5 droplets as a new class of pickering stabilized perfluorodroplets with the increase in the size of the droplets and following phase trasition to bubbles. Diameter increase of 5 times were obtained after the ultrasound exposure indicating the efficiency of the suggested droplets for the ADV process and therapeutic applications.   

    References

    [1] Arena CB, Novell A, Sheeran PS, Puett C, Moyer LC, Dayton PA, Dual-Frequency Acoustic Droplet Vaporization Detection for Medical Imaging 2015, IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control, 62: 9.

    [2] Kripfgans OD, Fowlkes JB, Miller DL, Eldevik OP, Carson PL, Acoustic droplet vaporization for therapeutic and diagnostic applications 2000, Ultrasound Med. Biol, 26:1177–1189.

    [3] Kang ST, Yeh CK, Intracellular Acoustic Droplet Vaporization in a Single Peritoneal Macrophage for Drug Delivery Applications 2011, Langmuir, 27:13183–13188.

    [4] Zhu M, Jiang L, Fabiilli ML, Zhang A, Fowlkes JB, Xu LX, Treatment of murine tumors using acoustic droplet vaporization-enhanced high intensity focused 2013, Ultrasound Phys. Med. Biol, 58:6179–6191.

    [5] Miles CJ, Doering CR, Kripfgans OD, Nucleation pressure threshold in acoustic droplet vaporization 2016, Journal of Applied Physics, 120:034903.

    [6] Sheeran PS, Wong VP, Luois S, McFarland RJ, Ross WD, Feingold S, Matsunaga TO, Dayton PA, Decafluorobutane as a phase-change contrast agent for low-energy extravascular ultrasonic imaging 2011, Ultrasound Med. Biol, 37:1518–1530.

    [7] Kripfgans OD, Fowlkes JB, Miller DL, Eldevik OP, Carson PL, Acoustic droplet vaporization for therapeutic and diagnostic applications 2000, Ultrasound Med. Biol, 26:1177–1189.

    [8] Kang S, Huang Y, Yeh C, Characterization of acoustic droplet vaporization for control of bubble generation under flow conditions 2014, Ultrasound Med. Biol, 40:551–561.

    [9] Svagan AJ, Benjamins JW, Al-Ansari Z, Shalom DB, Müllertz A, Wågberg L, Löbmann K, Solid cellulose nanofiber based foams–towards facile design of sustained drug delivery systems 2016, J. Control Release, 244:74–82 (Part A).

     

  • 8.
    Jensen, Kristin
    et al.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Diagnost Phys, N-0454 Oslo, Norway.;Univ Oslo, Dept Phys, POB 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo, Norway.;Oslo & Akershus Univ Coll Appl Sci, Dept Life Sci & Hlth, POB 4 St Olavs Plass, N-0130 Oslo, Norway..
    Andersen, Hilde Kjernlie
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Diagnost Phys, N-0454 Oslo, Norway..
    Smedby, Örjan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging.
    Osteras, Bjorn Helge
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Diagnost Phys, N-0454 Oslo, Norway.;Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway..
    Aarsnes, Anette
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Diagnost Phys, N-0454 Oslo, Norway..
    Tingberg, Anders
    Lund Univ, Dept Med Radiat Phys, Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden..
    Fosse, Erik
    Univ Oslo, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.;Natl Hosp Norway, Intervent Ctr, Oslo, Norway..
    Martinsen, Anne Catrine
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Diagnost Phys, N-0454 Oslo, Norway.;Univ Oslo, Dept Phys, POB 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo, Norway..
    Quantitative Measurements Versus Receiver Operating Characteristics and Visual Grading Regression in CT Images Reconstructed with Iterative Reconstruction: A Phantom Study2018In: Academic Radiology, ISSN 1076-6332, E-ISSN 1878-4046, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 509-518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale and Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the correlation of quantitative measurements with visual grading regression (VGR) and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis in computed tomography (CT) images reconstructed with iterative reconstruction. Materials and Methods: CT scans on a liver phantom were performed on CT scanners from GE, Philips, and Toshiba at three dose levels. Images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and hybrid iterative techniques (ASiR, iDose, and AIDR 3D of different strengths). Images were visually assessed by five readers using a four- and five-grade ordinal scale for liver low contrast lesions and for 10 image quality criteria. The results were analyzed with ROC and VGR. Standard deviation, signal-to-noise ratios, and contrast to-noise ratios were measured in the images. Results: All data were compared to FBP. The results of the quantitative measurements were improved for all algorithms. ROC analysis showed improved lesion detection with ASiR and AIDR and decreased lesion detection with iDose. VGR found improved noise properties for all algorithms, increased sharpness with iDose and AIDR, and decreased artifacts from the spine with AIDR, whereas iDose increased the artifacts from the spine. The contrast in the spine decreased with ASiR and iDose. Conclusions: Improved quantitative measurements in images reconstructed with iterative reconstruction compared to FBP are not equivalent to improved diagnostic image accuracy.

  • 9.
    Klintström, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Campus US, S-58185 Linköping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Ctr Med Image Sci & Visualizat CMIV, Campus US, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Klintström, Benjamin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Pahr, Dieter
    Vienna Univ Technol, Inst Lightweight Design & Struct Biomech, Vienna, Austria..
    Brismar, Torkel B.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Radiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Smedby, Örjan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging. Linköping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linköping, Sweden..
    Moreno, Rodrigo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging.
    Direct estimation of human trabecular bone stiffness using cone beam computed tomography2018In: Oral surgery, oral medicine, oral pathology and oral radiology, ISSN 2212-4403, E-ISSN 2212-4411, Vol. 126, no 1, p. 72-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of estimating the biomechanical properties of trabecular bone through finite element simulations by using dental cone beam computed tomography data. Study Design. Fourteen human radius specimens were scanned in 3 cone beam computed tomography devices: 3-D Accuitomo 80 (J. Morita MFG., Kyoto, Japan), NewTom 5 G (QR Verona, Verona, Italy), and Verity (Planmed, Helsinki, Finland). The imaging data were segmented by using 2 different methods. Stiffness (Young modulus), shear moduli, and the size and shape of the stiffness tensor were studied. Corresponding evaluations by using micro-CT were regarded as the reference standard. Results. The 3-D Accuitomo 80 (J. Morita MFG., Kyoto, Japan) showed good performance in estimating stiffness and shear moduli but was sensitive to the choice of segmentation method. Newtom 5 G (QR Verona, Verona, Italy) and Verity (Planmed, Helsinki, Finland) yielded good correlations, but they were not as strong as Accuitomo 80 U. Morita MFG., Kyoto, Japan). The cone beam computed tomography devices overestimated both stiffness and shear compared with the micro-CT estimations. Conclusions. Finite element-based calculations of biomechanics from cone beam computed tomography data are feasible, with strong correlations for the Accuitomo 80 scanner a. Morita MFG., Kyoto, Japan) combined with an appropriate segmentation method. Such measurements might be useful for predicting implant survival by in vivo estimations of bone properties.

  • 10.
    Mahbod, A.
    et al.
    Romania.
    Ellinger, I.
    Romania.
    Ecker, R.
    Romania.
    Smedby, Örjan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging.
    Wang, Chunliang
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging.
    Breast Cancer Histological Image Classification Using Fine-Tuned Deep Network Fusion2018In: 15th International Conference on Image Analysis and Recognition, ICIAR 2018, Springer, 2018, p. 754-762Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer type in women worldwide. Histological evaluation of the breast biopsies is a challenging task even for experienced pathologists. In this paper, we propose a fully automatic method to classify breast cancer histological images to four classes, namely normal, benign, in situ carcinoma and invasive carcinoma. The proposed method takes normalized hematoxylin and eosin stained images as input and gives the final prediction by fusing the output of two residual neural networks (ResNet) of different depth. These ResNets were first pre-trained on ImageNet images, and then fine-tuned on breast histological images. We found that our approach outperformed a previous published method by a large margin when applied on the BioImaging 2015 challenge dataset yielding an accuracy of 97.22%. Moreover, the same approach provided an excellent classification performance with an accuracy of 88.50% when applied on the ICIAR 2018 grand challenge dataset using 5-fold cross validation.

  • 11.
    Nordenfur, Tim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Babic, A.
    Bulatovic, I.
    Giesecke, A.
    Günyeli, E.
    Ripsweden, J.
    Samset, E.
    Winter, R.
    Larsson, Matilda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging.
    Method comparison for cardiac image registration of coronary computed tomography angiography and 3-D echocardiography2018In: Journal of Medical Imaging, ISSN 2329-4302, E-ISSN 2329-4310, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 014001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Treatment decision for coronary artery disease (CAD) is based on both morphological and functional information. Image fusion of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) could combine morphology and function into a single image to facilitate diagnosis. Three semiautomatic feature-based methods for CCTA/3DE registration were implemented and applied on CAD patients. Methods were verified and compared using landmarks manually identified by a cardiologist. All methods were found feasible for CCTA/3DE fusion.

  • 12. Pavoni, Marco
    et al.
    Chang, Yongjun
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Park, Sang-Ho
    Smedby, Örjan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Medical Imaging.
    Convolutional neural network-based image enhancement for x-ray percutaneous coronary intervention2018In: Journal of Medical Imaging, ISSN 2329-4302, E-ISSN 2329-4310, Vol. 5, no 2, article id 024006Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) uses x-ray images, which may give high radiation dose and high concentrations of contrast media, leading to the risk of radiation-induced injury and nephropathy. These drawbacks can be reduced by using lower doses of x-rays and contrast media, with the disadvantage of noisier PCI images with less contrast. Vessel-edge-preserving convolutional neural networks (CNN) were designed to denoise simulated low x-ray dose PCI images, created by adding artificial noise to high-dose images. Objective functions of the designed CNNs have been optimized to achieve an edge-preserving effect of vessel walls, and the results of the proposed objective functions were evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively. Finally, the proposed CNN-based method was compared with two state-of-the-art denoising methods: K-SVD and block-matching and 3D filtering. The results showed promising performance of the proposed CNN-based method for PCI image enhancement with interesting capabilities of CNNs for real-time denoising and contrast enhancement tasks.

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