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  • 1. Dahlquist, Erik
    et al.
    Mirmoshtaghi, Guilnaz
    Larsson, Eva K.
    Thorin, Eva
    Yan, Jinyue
    Engvall, Klas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Process Technology.
    Liliedahl, Truls
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Dong, C.
    Hu, X.
    Lu, Q.
    Modelling and simulation of biomass conversion processes2015In: 2013 8TH EUROSIM CONGRESS ON MODELLING AND SIMULATION (EUROSIM), 2015, p. 506-512Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By utilizing biomass gasification, the energy content of the biomass can be utilized to produce gas to be used for cogeneration of heat and power as well as other energy carriers such as fuels for vehicles. The concept is suitable for application to existing CHP plants as well as for utilizing spent liqour in small scale pulp and paper mills. The introduction would enable flexible energy utilization, use of problematic fuels as well as protects the environment by e.g. avoiding the release of toxic substances. In this paper, the possibilities to develop this concept is discussed. In this paper we compare different gasification processes with respect to what gas quality we get, and how the gasification can be modelled using different modelling approaches, and how these can be combined. Results from simulations are compared to experimental results from pilot plant operations in different scales and with different processes like CFB and BFB Technologies, athmospheric and pressurized, and using steam, air and oxygen as oxidizing media.

  • 2.
    Evangelopoulos, Panagiotis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Arvelakis, Stylianos
    National Technical University of Athens.
    Kantarelis, Efthymios
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Process Technology.
    Yang, Weihong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Experimental investigation of low temperature pyrolysis of printed circuit boards (PCBs) and printed circuit board components (PCB sockets)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Printed circuit boards (PCBs) are the heart of all electronics due to their compact size and the broad spectrum of applications but very challenging when their life ends. Recycling of these components is problematic since they consist of different metallic parts packed on plastic compressed cover. The present study focuses on low temperature pyrolysis of PCBs since this process can separate the organic fraction from the inorganics. The latter, enables further separation and purification of the metals which are not oxidized during mild treatment. The low Br content of the resultant char after treatment at 320 oC for 30 min indicates that it could be used as solid fuel if efficient separation from the inorganic part would be performed. Moreover, the liquids obtained by this process can be used for feedstock recycling since the results indicates that toxic bromine containing on the organic compounds has been decreased both by increasing the residence time of pyrolysis process or by increasing the temperature conditions.

  • 3. Evangelopoulos, Panagiotis
    et al.
    Persson, Henry
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Kantarelis, Efthymios
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Process Technology. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Energy and Furnace Technology.
    Yang, Weihong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Pyrolysis of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) on a single screw reactor for bromine free oil productionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on pyrolysis on waste electrical and electronic equipment or WEEE as it is usually referred in the literature. A new auger reactor has been designed and tested with WEEE material. The performance of the reactor as well as the fate of the bromine has been investigated and evaluated in order to be used for designing of industrial process. The mass balance calculations performed for the tested cases of 400, 500 and 600 °C, showed a high gas yield (44%) at the temperature of 600 °C, which can be used to fulfil the process energy needs. At the low temperature of 400 °C the oil production reach its maximum yield, while the bromine content of the oil has also a maximum percentage of 0.5% wt. Several valuable compounds have been detected in the oil composition, which can be used either as fuels or for feedstock recycling.

  • 4.
    Granestrand, Jonas
    et al.
    KTH.
    Dahlin, Sandra
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Process Technology.
    Immele, O.
    Germany.
    Schmalhorst, L.
    Germany.
    Lantto, C.
    Nilsson, M.
    París, R. S.
    Regali, F.
    Pettersson, L. J.
    Catalytic aftertreatment systems for trucks fueled by biofuels - Aspects on the impact of fuel quality on catalyst deactivation2018In: Catalysis:: Volume 30, Royal Society of Chemistry, 2018, p. 64-145Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The issue of sustainable energy supply is a global problem for pursuing future endeavours in the energy area. In countries such as China and India there is a tremendous growth at the moment, which is envisaged by an ever growing demand for vehicles. Hence, one of the grand challenges of society is to meet the demands for sustainable and environmentally-friendly technologies in the transport sector. One way to tackle the problem of growing concentrations of carbon dioxide, which is believed to contribute to global warming, is the use of biofuels. It is becoming more and more evident that global warming is partly due to increasing anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions. An important contribution to these emissions is the use of fossil fuels in the transport sector. Hence, more efficient engines and an increased use of biofuels would be a step in the right direction. Although new propulsion systems are emerging, such as hybrid power-trains and fuel cell systems, analysis shows that combustion systems with excess oxygen, such as the diesel engine, will be the most important engine concept for the next 20 years. In this paper we will identify the specific challenges related to the production and use of biofuels in heavy-duty trucks and how they influence the catalytic units in the emission after-treatment system in the truck. Biofuels, such as biodiesel, contain potential poisons for the vehicle exhaust after-treatment, such as potassium, sodium, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, sulfur and other compounds.

  • 5. Mesfun, S.
    et al.
    Lundgren, J.
    Toffolo, A.
    Lindbergh, Göran
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Lagergren, Carina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Engvall, Klas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Process Technology.
    Integration of an electrolysis unit for producer gas conditioning in a bio-synthetic natural gas plant2019In: Journal of energy resources technology, ISSN 0195-0738, E-ISSN 1528-8994, Vol. 141, no 1, article id 012002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Producer gas from biomass gasification contains impurities like tars, particles, alkali salts, and sulfur/nitrogen compounds. As a result, a number of process steps are required to condition the producer gas before utilization as a syngas and further upgrading to final chemicals and fuels. Here, we study the concept of using molten carbonate electrolysis cells (MCEC) both to clean and to condition the composition of a raw syngas stream, from biomass gasification, for further upgrading into synthetic natural gas (SNG). A mathematical MCEC model is used to analyze the impact of operational parameters, such as current density, pressure and temperature, on the quality and amount of syngas produced. Internal rate of return (IRR) is evaluated as an economic indicator of the processes considered. Results indicate that, depending on process configuration, the production of SNG can be boosted by approximately 50-60% without the need of an additional carbon source, i.e., for the same biomass input as in standalone operation of the GoBi-Gas plant.

  • 6. Mesfun, Sennai
    et al.
    Lundgren, Joakim
    Toffolo, Andrea
    Lindbergh, Göran
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Lagergren, Carina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Engvall, Klas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Process Technology.
    Integration of an electrolysis unit for producer gas conditioning in a bio-SNG plant2017In: 30th International Conference on Efficiency, Cost, Optimization, Simulation and Environmental Impact of Energy Systems, ECOS 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Producer gas from biomass gasification contains impurities like tars, particles, alkali salts and sulfur/nitrogen compounds. As a result a number of process steps are required to condition the producer gas before utilization as a syngas and further upgrading to final chemicals and fuels. Here, we study the concept of using molten carbonate electrolysis cells (MCEC) both to clean and to condition the composition of a raw syngas stream, from biomass gasification, for further upgrading into SNG. A mathematical MCEC model is used to analyze the impact of operational parameters, such as current density, pressure and temperature, on the quality and amount of tailored syngas produced. Investment opportunity is evaluated as an economic indicator of the processes considered. Results indicate that the production of SNG can be boosted by approximately 50% without the need of an additional carbon source, i.e. for the same biomass input as in standalone operation of the GoBiGas plant.

  • 7.
    Montecchio, Francesco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Process Technology.
    Fluid dynamics model development for scaling-up UV reactors in VOC abatement applicationsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present work focuses on the treatment of VOC emissions from industrial processes, since they represent a very severe environmental hazard. For removing the VOC, an AOP (Advanced Oxidation Process) stage based on UV light and ozone was considered, analyzing the methods for the unit scale-up. An innovative CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) model, combining UV irradiation, reaction kinetics and fluid dynamics, describing the behavior of UV reactors in the laboratory scale, was developed. This model was verified against experimental results, displaying good agreement. Therefore, we concluded the CFD model could adequately describe relevant features regarding the performance of UV reactors. After analyzing the laboratory reactors, two designed and scaled up prototypes, were simulated using the CFD model. While the first prototype has a standard lamps configuration, the second presents an innovative lamps distribution. As for the laboratory cases, the most relevant features in terms of irradiation and reaction were described for the prototypes, comparing their performance. We evaluated both the overall VOC conversion and VOC conversion per UV lamp, analyzing the energy efficiency of each configuration with adequately accuracy. Therefore, we conclude the CFD model to be an important tool for reactor scale-up as a result of the good prediction of experimental results and the accurate description of the governing phenomena. By using the developed model, the scale-up process of UV reactors can be quickly improved, by screening various configurations with the simulator before testing them, saving significant time and effort in the development of full-scale reactors.

  • 8.
    Montecchio, Francesco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Process Technology.
    Process Optimization of UV-Based Advanced Oxidation Processes in VOC Removal Applications2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Air pollution is a major concern in developed countries due to its hazardous health effects. Recent studies by the WHO (World Health Organization) estimate that urban air pollution causes a number of diseases of the respiratory tract and is associated with 150,000 deaths each year. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are among the major pollutants affecting the outdoor air quality. Given that industrial processes are the main source of atmospheric VOC emissions, national and international authorities have issued regulations to limit such emissions. However, traditional removal technologies such as incineration, have low energy efficiency and high investment costs. AOPs (advanced oxidation processes) offer a promising alternative in which very reactive conditions can be achieved at room temperature, thus greatly increasing energy efficiency. However, this is still not a mature technology due to challenges that limit the range of applications.

    This thesis focuses on two types of UV-based AOP: photocatalysis and UV-ozone. The goal is to improve VOC conversion and achieve a process that is competitive with traditional technologies. The research on photocatalysis presents an innovative UV reactor design that is closer to industrial conditions and has the ability to effectively screen different samples. Effort was put into finding a metallic support for the photocatalyst without using additional adhesives. Several electrochemical treatments were performed on metals to restructure the surface. One treatment proved to be superior when it came to stabilizing the TiO2 coating, especially when compared with the traditional ceramic support.

    Research on UV-ozone AOPs focused on reactor modelling, developing a numerical and a fluid dynamics model. The goal was to gain a deep understanding of the governing phenomena of UV-ozone reactors so as to optimize the reactor configuration. The numerical model created described the UV irradiation and the reaction kinetics accurately, while a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulator modelled the fluid a larger scale, simulating two prototypes. The work resulted in general guidelines for the design of UV-ozone UV reactors as well as for full-scale units. 

  • 9. Neugebohren, J.
    et al.
    Borodin, D.
    Hahn, H. W.
    Altschäffel, J.
    Kandratsenka, A.
    Auerbach, D. J.
    Campbell, C. T.
    Schwarzer, D.
    Harding, Dan J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Process Technology. University of Goettingen, Göttingen, German.
    Wodtke, A. M.
    Kitsopoulos, T. N.
    Velocity-resolved kinetics of site-specific carbon monoxide oxidation on platinum surfaces2018In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 558, no 7709, p. 280-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Catalysts are widely used to increase reaction rates. They function by stabilizing the transition state of the reaction at their active site, where the atomic arrangement ensures favourable interactions 1. However, mechanistic understanding is often limited when catalysts possess multiple active sites - such as sites associated with either the step edges or the close-packed terraces of inorganic nanoparticles 2-4 - with distinct activities that cannot be measured simultaneously. An example is the oxidation of carbon monoxide over platinum surfaces, one of the oldest and best studied heterogeneous reactions. In 1824, this reaction was recognized to be crucial for the function of the Davy safety lamp, and today it is used to optimize combustion, hydrogen production and fuel-cell operation 5,6. The carbon dioxide products are formed in a bimodal kinetic energy distribution 7-13 ; however, despite extensive study 5, it remains unclear whether this reflects the involvement of more than one reaction mechanism occurring at multiple active sites 12,13. Here we show that the reaction rates at different active sites can be measured simultaneously, using molecular beams to controllably introduce reactants and slice ion imaging 14,15 to map the velocity vectors of the product molecules, which reflect the symmetry and the orientation of the active site 16. We use this velocity-resolved kinetics approach to map the oxidation rates of carbon monoxide at step edges and terrace sites on platinum surfaces, and find that the reaction proceeds through two distinct channels 11-13 : it is dominated at low temperatures by the more active step sites, and at high temperatures by the more abundant terrace sites. We expect our approach to be applicable to a wide range of heterogeneous reactions and to provide improved mechanistic understanding of the contribution of different active sites, which should be useful in the design of improved catalysts.

  • 10.
    Paulraj, Alagar Raj
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Process Technology.
    Kiros, Yohannes
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Process Technology.
    La0.1Ca0.9MnO3/Co3O4 for oxygen reduction and evolution reactions (ORER) in alkaline electrolyte2018In: Journal of Solid State Electrochemistry, ISSN 1432-8488, E-ISSN 1433-0768, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-precious metal bifunctional catalysts are of great interest for metal–air batteries, electrolysis, and regenerative fuel cell systems due to their performance and cost benefits compared to the Pt group metals (PGM). In this work, metal oxides of La0.1Ca0.9MnO3 and nano Co3O47 catalyst as bifunctional catalysts were used in oxygen reduction and evolution reactions (ORER). The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and N2 adsorption isotherms. The electrocatalytic activity of the perovskite-type La0.1Ca0.9MnO3 and Co3O4 catalysts both as single and mixtures of both were assessed in alkaline solutions at room temperature. Electrocatalyst activity, stability, and electrode kinetics were studied using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and rotating disk electrode (RDE). This study shows that the bifunctional performance of the mixed La0.1Ca0.9MnO3 and nano Co3O4 was superior in comparison to either La0.1Ca0.9MnO3 or nano Co3O4 alone for ORER. The improved activity is due to the synergistic effect between the La0.1Ca0.9MnO3 and nano Co3O4 structural and surface properties. This work illustrates that hybridization between these two metal oxides results in the excellent bifunctional oxygen redox activity, stability, and cyclability, leading to a cost-effective application in energy conversion and storage, albeit to the cost of higher catalyst loadings.

  • 11.
    Wan, Wei
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Process Technology.
    Engvall, Klas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Process Technology.
    Weihong, Yang
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Energy and Furnace Technology.
    Novel Model for the Release and Condensation of Inorganics for a Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Gasification Process: Effects of Gasification Temperature2018In: ACS OMEGA, ISSN 2470-1343, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 6321-6329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A model is established to investigate the release and condensation of inorganics for a wood steam/oxygen-blown fluidized-bed gasification process. In the established model, fates of major elements (C, H, O, N, S, and Cl) and minor elements (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Si, Ti, and Zn) are modeled separately. The composition of gaseous species involving major elements is predicted using Aspen Plus based on a semiempirical model. The release of minor elements and the condensation of inorganics are predicted using software SimuSage. The combination of Aspen Plus with SimuSage is achieved by manually inputting the stream parameters calculated from Aspen Plus into SimuSage. On the basis of this developed model, effects of gasification temperature on the condensation of Na-, K-, and Cl-containing species during gas cooling are studied. Results show that the process model established by combining Aspen Plus and SimuSage is valid and can be used to investigate the release of inorganics during gasification and condensation of inorganics during gas cooling. Under the investigated gasification conditions, regardless of the bed material, there are two temperature ranges within which no salt melt is formed during gas cooling. As the gasification temperature increases, the high-temperature range without salt melt formation becomes successively wider.

  • 12.
    Wan, Wei
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Engvall, Klas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Process Technology.
    Yang, Weihong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Energy and Furnace Technology.
    Möller, Bjorn Fredriksson
    EON Gas Sverige AB, SE-20509 Malmo, Sweden..
    Experimental and modelling studies on condensation of inorganic species during cooling of product gas from pressurized biomass fluidized bed gasification2018In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 153, p. 35-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a biomass gasification process, condensation of inorganic species can cause problems such as corrosion and deposition on the downstream equipment. In this work, in order to investigate the condensation of inorganics during the gas cooling step of the biomass gasification system, both experimental and modelling studies were conducted. Experiments were performed on a pilot-scale steam/oxygen blown fluidized bed gasification facility. A CO2 cooled probe was located at the head of a filter to condense inorganic species. Five thermocouples were used to monitor the probe temperature profile. Deposits on the probe were characterized using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) to analyze the elemental composition of deposits. A process model based on the local chemical and phase equilibriums was developed using software SimuSage to predict both release and condensation of inorganics. A customized thermodynamic database extracted from the FactSage 7.1 was used during model calculations. Two cases including with and without addition of bed material were calculated. Results show that the identified elemental compositions of deposit under different gas cooling temperatures reasonably agree with the elemental compositions predicted by model calculations. This demonstrates that the established model and the customized thermodynamic data are valid. A large amount of carbon is identified in the deposit of low temperature probe sections, which may come from the condensed tar. Additionally, a temperature window is found, where melts are formed during gas cooling.

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