Change search
Refine search result
1 - 14 of 14
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Arseneault, Mathieu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Granskog, Viktor
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Khosravi, Sara
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Heckler, Ilona
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Mesa-Antunez, Pablo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Hult, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Zhang, Yuning
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Highly crosslinked triazine-trione materials for fracture fixation based on TEC and TYC chemistryManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Cobo Sanchez, Carmen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Inorganic and organic polymer-grafted nanoparticles: their nanocomposites and characterization2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocomposites (NCs) have been widely studied in the past decades due to the promising properties that nanoparticles (NPs) offer to a polymer matrix, such as increased thermal stability and non-linear electrical resistivity. It has also been shown that the interphase between the two components is the key to achieving the desired improvements. In addition, polymer matrices are often hydrophobic while NPs are generally hydrophilic, leading to NP aggregation. To overcome these challenges, NPs can be surface-modified by adding specific molecules and polymers. In the present work, a range of organic and inorganic NPs have been surface-modified with polymers synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) or surface-initiated ATRP (SI-ATRP).Cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) and cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) are highly crystalline NPs that can potentially increase the Young’s modulus of the NC. In this study, a matrix-free NC was prepared by physisorption of a block-copolymer containing a positively charged (quaternized poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate), qPDMAEMA) and a thermo-responsive (poly di(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate, PDEGMA). The modified CNF exhibited a thermo-responsive, reversible behavior. CNCs were polymer-modified either via SI-ATRP or physisorbed with poly (butyl methacrylate) (PBMA) to improve the dispersion and interphase between them and a polycaprolactone (PCL) matrix during extrusion. The mechanical properties of the NCs containing CNC modified via SI-ATRP were superior to the reference and unmodified materials, even at a high relative humidity.Reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and aluminum oxide (Al2O3) are interesting for electrical and electronic applications. However, the matrices used for these applications, such as poly(ethylene-co-butyl acrylate) (EBA) and low density polyethylene (LDPE) are mainly hydrophobic, while the NPs are hydrophilic. rGO was modified via SI-ATRP using different chain lengths of PBMA and subsequently mixed with an EBA matrix. Al2O3 was modified with two lengths of poly(lauryl methacrylate) (PLMA), and added to LDPE prior to extrusion. Agglomeration and dispersion of the NCs were dependent on the lengths and miscibilities of the grafted polymers and the matrices. rGO-EBA NCs showed non-linear direct current (DC) resistivity upon modification, as the NP dispersion improved with increasing PBMA length. Al2O3-LDPE systems improved the mechanical properties of the NCs when low amounts of NPs (0.5 to 1 wt%) were added, while decreasing power dissipation on the material.Finally, PLMA-grafted NPs with high polymer quantities and two grafting densities in Al2O3 and silicon oxide (SiO2) nanoparticles were synthesized by de-attaching some of the silane groups from the surfaces, either by hydrolysis or by a mild tetrabutylammonium fluoride (TBAF) cleavage. These compounds were characterized and compared to the bulk PLMA, and were found to have very interesting thermal properties.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-04-24 14:42
  • 3.
    Granskog, Viktor
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Thiol-Ene/Yne Adhesives for Tissue Fixation2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The utilization of adhesives in surgery has not reached its full potential and research in the field is encouraged by the surgeons’ desire for improved alternatives to today’s tissue fixation strategies. Here, adhesive resins based on thiol-ene coupling (TEC) chemistry or thiol-yne coupling (TYC) chemistry are exploited to develop tissue adhesives that cure fast and on-demand via photoinitiation. In order to make safer adhesives, macromolecular components and systems with high conversion of functional groups were developed to minimize leakage of unreacted monomers.To develop macromolecular resin components, allyl-functional dendritic-linear-dendritic (DLD) co-polymers were synthesized with a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) core chain and hyperbranched structures of 2,2-bis(hydroxymethyl) propionic acid (bis-MPA) to capitalize on the rheological properties of dendritic structures. The dendritic structures interfered with the crystallization of the PEG segment and the DLD’s liquid appearance enabled their use as macromolecular components without solvent. The DLDs were cured with a thiol crosslinker and the strategy disclosed degradable soft tissue adhesives with good adhesion to wet porcine skin.Mussel inspired dopamine derivatives was evaluated as adhesion-enhancing primers for bone adhesives. The addition of NaOH to the primer solutions increased the shear bond strengths of the adhesive to bone. The highest bond strengths with the tested dopamine derivatives were obtained when a combination of thiol and ene-functional derivatives were used.With inspiration from dental resin adhesives, a fully TEC based adhesive system was developed with excellent shear bond strength to wet bone substrates. The adhesive system enabled superior fixation of phalangeal fracture models compared to the daily used Kirschner wires and could even compete with a screw fixated metal plate. The adhesive materials proved biocompatible in initial in vitro and in vivo studies.Strong and rigid materials for fracture fixation were developed via a strategy of using highly crosslinked triazine-trione monomers and TEC or TYC chemistry. The development resulted in TYC resin based materials with mechanical properties that very well can compete with poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) that is used in biomedical load bearing applications due to its high strength, toughness and inertness.

  • 4.
    Granskog, Viktor
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    García-Gallego, Sandra
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    von Kieseritzky, Johanna
    Department of Clinical Science and Education and the Department of Hand Surgery, Karolinska Institutet.
    Rosendahl, Jennifer
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials–Medical Device Technology.
    Stenlund, Patrik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials–Medical Device Technology.
    Zhang, Yuning
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Petronis, Sarunas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials–Medical Device Technology.
    Lyvén, Benny
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials–Medical Device Technology.
    Arner, Marianne
    Department of Clinical Science and Education and the Department of Hand Surgery, Karolinska Institutet.
    Håkansson, Joakim
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials–Medical Device Technology.
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    High-Performance Thiol–Ene Composites Unveil a New Era of Adhesives Suited for Bone Repair2018In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of adhesives for fracture fixation can revolutionize the surgical procedures toward more personalized bone repairs. However, there are still no commercially available adhesive solutions mainly due to the lack of biocompatibility, poor adhesive strength, or inadequate fixation protocols. Here, a surgically realizable adhesive system capitalizing on visible light thiol–ene coupling chemistry is presented. The adhesives are carefully designed and formulated from a novel class of chemical constituents influenced by dental resin composites and self-etch primers. Validation of the adhesive strengthis conducted on wet bone substrates and accomplished via fiber-reinforced adhesive patch (FRAP) methodology. The results unravel, for the first time, on the promise of a thiol–ene adhesive with an unprecedented shear bondstrength of 9.0 MPa and that surpasses, by 55%, the commercially available acrylate dental adhesive system Clearfil SE Bond of 5.8 MPa. Preclinical validation of FRAPs on rat femur fracture models details good adhesion to the bone throughout the healing process, and are found biocompatible not giving rise to any inflammatory response. Remarkably, the FRAPs are found to withstand loads up to 70 N for 1000 cycles on porcine metacarpal fractures outperforming clinically used K-wires and match metal plates and screw implants.

  • 5.
    Hult, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Versatile Synthetic Strategies to Highly Functional Polyesters and Polycarbonates2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Polymers have become ubiquitous in today’s society and are found in everything from household items to airplanes and automobiles. Synthetic polymeric materials are as diverse as their applications and their final properties are highly reliant on the building blocks and methods used to assemble them. In the field of biomedical materials, polyesters and polycarbonates have been hailed as excellent materials in large part due to their inherent hydrolytic degradability. With this in mind, careful choice of monomers can ensure that materials not only conform to the desired physical properties, but also elicit a favorable biological response. The utilization of post-polymerization modification of these promising materials has the capability of opening up further avenues to target even more advanced applications. Unfortunately, rigorous and difficult reaction conditions, including multi-step synthesis have to a certain extent held back the adoption of these complex functional materials in applied research. In a pragmatic approach, a sustainable framework was developed in this thesis to seek out more practical methods, limiting the amount of reaction steps and overtly hazardous chemicals.

    In a first study, we set out to simplify and scale-up the synthesis of cyclic carbonates with pendant functional groups, capable of undergoing controlled ring-opening polymerization. By avoiding the use of protective-group chemistry we were able two devise a two-step method to create a library of functional monomers. Results in this study show that reactive intermediates could be isolated on 100 g scales, which in a second step was functionalized with a desired alcohol.

    With this framework in mind, key practical decisions were made to drastically re-think the work up procedures for greater scalability of bis-MPA dendrimers. In this work, a more efficient, scalable and sustainable approach was devised. Elimination of traditional arduous purification steps led to the synthesis of monodisperse dendrimers up to the sixth generation, with 192 functional groups on 50 g scales. Further work included the omission of protective group-chemistry, using orthogonal functional groups to cut the number of synthetic steps by half.

    The know-how developed in the first two projects led us to pursue greater scalability of functional polycarbonates through a simpler polymerization technique. The method allowed the step-growth polymerization of functional materials from more easily accessible monomers isolated on 100 g scales. Subsequent polymerization afforded materials with glass transition temperatures in the range of -45 °C to 169 °C. The method served as a complement to cyclic carbonates, offering a wider range of functional monomers. Furthermore, by careful choice of assembly method, both alternating and scrambled compositions could be achieved.

    In a final study, we set out to take advantage of the scrambling mechanism. Control of the final composition of highly rigid degradable polycarbonates was pursued, using renewable building-blocks derived from sugar. In a proof of concept study, thermal and hydrolytic stability of these materials is shown to be dependent on both amount and configuration of each monomer in the final material.

  • 6.
    Hult, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Garcia-Gallego, Sandra
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Ingverud, Tobias
    Andrén, Oliver
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Degradable High Tg Sugar Derived Polycarbonates from Isosorbide and Dihydroxyacetone2018In: Polymer Chemistry, ISSN 1759-9954, E-ISSN 1759-9962Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polycarbonates from isosorbide and dihydroxyacetone (DHA) have been synthesised using organocatalytic step-growth polymerization of their corresponding diols and bis-carbonylimidazolides monomers. By choice of feed ratio and monomer activation, either isosorbide or ketal protected DHA, random and alternating poly(Iso-co-DHA) carbonates have been formed. Thermal properties by DSC and TGA were herein strongly correlated to monomer composition. Dilution studies using 1H-NMR of a model compound DHA-diethyl carbonate in acetonitrile and deuterated water highlighted the influence of α-substituents on the keto/hydrate equilibrium of DHA. Further kinetics studies of in the pH* range of 4.7 to 9.6 serve to show the hydrolytic pH-profile of DHA-carbonates. The Hydrolytic degradation of deprotected polymer pellets show an increased degradation with increasing DHA content. Pellets with a random or alternating configuration show different characteristics in terms of mass loss and molecular weight loss profile over time.

  • 7.
    Kürten, Charlotte
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Eriksson, Adam
    Maddalo, Gianluca
    Edfors, Fredrik
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Syrén, Per-Olof
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Engineering of water networks in class II terpene cyclases underscores the importance of amino acid hydration and entropy in biocatalysis and enzyme designManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Martin-Serrano Ortiz, Angela
    et al.
    IBIMA Reg Univ Hosp Malaga UMA, Hosp Civil, Res Lab, Plaza Hosp Civil, Malaga 29009, Spain.;IBIMA Reg Univ Hosp Malaga UMA, Hosp Civil, Allergy Unit, Plaza Hosp Civil, Malaga 29009, Spain.;BIONAND Andalusian Ctr Nanomed & Biotechnol, Parque Tecnol Andalucia, Malaga 29590, Spain..
    Stenström, Patrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Antunez, Pablo Mesa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Andrén, Oliver C. J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Torres, Maria J.
    IBIMA Reg Univ Hosp Malaga UMA, Hosp Civil, Res Lab, Plaza Hosp Civil, Malaga 29009, Spain.;IBIMA Reg Univ Hosp Malaga UMA, Hosp Civil, Allergy Unit, Plaza Hosp Civil, Malaga 29009, Spain.;BIONAND Andalusian Ctr Nanomed & Biotechnol, Parque Tecnol Andalucia, Malaga 29590, Spain..
    Montanez, Maria I.
    IBIMA Reg Univ Hosp Malaga UMA, Hosp Civil, Res Lab, Plaza Hosp Civil, Malaga 29009, Spain.;IBIMA Reg Univ Hosp Malaga UMA, Hosp Civil, Allergy Unit, Plaza Hosp Civil, Malaga 29009, Spain.;BIONAND Andalusian Ctr Nanomed & Biotechnol, Parque Tecnol Andalucia, Malaga 29590, Spain..
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Design of multivalent fluorescent dendritic probes for site-specific labeling of biomolecules2018In: Journal of Polymer Science Part A: Polymer Chemistry, ISSN 0887-624X, E-ISSN 1099-0518, Vol. 56, no 15, p. 1609-1616Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein, the synthesis and characterization of orthogonal dendrons decorated with multiple units of fluorescent and a chemoselective group at a focal point, followed by specific antibody labeling, is presented. Fluorescence results confirm the applicability of the fluorescent probes for biomolecule labeling and fluorescent signal amplification.

  • 9.
    Nameer, Samer
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Larsen, Daniel B.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Dept Chem & Biochem Engn, DPC, Soltofts Plads Bldg 227, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark.;Tech Univ Denmark, Dept Chem, Bygning 207, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark..
    Duus, Jens O.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Dept Chem, Bygning 207, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark..
    Daugaard, Anders E.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Dept Chem & Biochem Engn, DPC, Soltofts Plads Bldg 227, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark..
    Johansson, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Biobased Cationically Polymerizable Epoxy Thermosets from Furan and Fatty Acid Derivatives2018In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 6, no 7, p. 9442-9450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the pursuit of environmentally friendly building blocks in polymer chemistry the utilization of biobased monomers is highly desired. In the present study, the biobased monomer 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) has been extended into epoxy thermosets. The study presents the synthesis of diallyl furan-2,5-dicarboxylate (DAFDC) followed by an epoxidation of the allyls to form diglycidyl furan-2,5-dicarboxylate (DGFDC). DGFDC was then copolymerized in both stoichiometric and off-stoichiometric ratios with epoxidized fatty methyl esters to form a range of thermosets. The cross-linking reaction was either thermally or UV-induced cationic polymerization utilizing onium salt initiators where the reactivity was studied by DSC and real-time fourier transform infrared analysis. Furthermore, the structure-property relationships of the final thermosets were determined by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis revealing a possibility to tune the properties over a wide range. In addition thermosets were made from diglycidyl Bisphenol-A (DGEBA) with epoxidized fatty methyl esters made for comparative purposes.

  • 10.
    Nordström, Randi
    et al.
    Ms, Dept Pharm, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Nyström, Lina
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Pharm, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Andrén, Oliver C. J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Umerska, Anita
    MINT Univ Angers, Angers, France..
    Davoudi, Mina
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    Schmidtchen, Artur
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    Malmsten, Martin
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Pharm, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Poly(acrylic acid) microgels as carriers for antimicrobial peptides2018In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 255Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Norström, Emelie
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Hemicelluloses and other Polysaccharides for Wood Adhesive Applications2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing environmental awareness has led to an increased interest in bio-based polymers as replacement for fossil-based materials. The purpose of the work described in this thesis was to investigate the possibility of using hemicelluloses and other polysaccharides as replacement for fossil-based polymers in wood adhesives. Together with cellulose and lignin, hemicellulose is the main constituent of wood. In the pulp industry, significant amounts of hemicelluloses are obtained as by-products and combusted for energy recovery, but there is a growing interest in the biorefinery concept where all side-streams are utilized. If valuable applications, such as adhesives, of hemicelluloses and other by-products are found, large amounts can be obtained from the pulp industry. Water dispersions of hemicelluloses and other polysaccharides have been prepared and evaluated as adhesives for bonding different wood substrates together. The dry bond strength, water resistance, and heat resistance were investigated by exposing the bonded wood specimens to different conditioning methods and thereafter measuring the tensile shear strengths. As a replacement, the bio-based wood adhesive must possess similar or even better properties than the fossil-based adhesives. A commercial poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) wood adhesive used for indoor applications has been used as a reference benchmark. Wood hemicelluloses themselves do not have sufficient bonding performance probably because their low molecular weight does not provide adequate strength and makes the adhesive too brittle. The addition of dispersing agents and crosslinkers to the hemicellulose dispersions can significantly improve the bonding performance, and hemicellulose in combination with poly(vinyl amine) showed promising results superior those of PVAc. A fully bio-based adhesive comprising of hemicellulose and chitosan, another bio-based polysaccharide, obtain surprisingly good bonding performance especially with regard to water resistance. Gums, polysaccharides with similar structures to those of hemicelluloses but with higher molecular weights, have also been studied and locust bean gum dispersions without any modification showed a very good bonding performance with high dry bond strength and water resistance on a par with those of PVAc and a heat resistance superior to that of PVAc. Chitosan has very good adhesive properties especially with regard to water resistance, but the high viscosity of the chitosan dispersion makes it difficult to apply. Chitosan-grafted-PVAc dispersions were therefore prepared and an adhesive very similar in appearance to PVAc was obtained with a good bonding performance as well as good applicability.

  • 12. Pavlidis, I. V.
    et al.
    Hendrikse, Natalie
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Syrén, Per-Olof
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Chapter 5: Computational Techniques for Efficient Biocatalysis2018In: RSC Catalysis Series, no 32, p. 119-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Addressing some of the most challenging problems that we face today, including depletion of natural resources, sustainable energy production and the generation of green polymeric materials by the biocatalytic upcycling of renewable synthons, requires an expansion of the current available biochemical reaction space. Creating biocatalysts harboring novel chemistries - whether inside or outside the cell - is dependent on the discovery of novel enzymes and metabolic pathways, together with the de novo design of enzymes and directed evolution. Herein we review the high potential of using bioinformatics and in silico computer modelling tools to guide protein engineering and to enhance our fundamental understanding of biocatalysis. Following an overview of technical considerations and the current state-of-the art in sequence- and structure-based protein engineering methodologies, we highlight recent successful examples of their implementation in biocatalysis and synthetic biology. Moreover, we discuss how selected computational tools in concert with experimental biocatalysis could decipher how the sequence, structure and dynamics of proteins dictate their function. Using the methodologies discussed in this chapter, an accelerated biocatalytic manufacturing of chemicals, pharmaceuticals, biofuels and monomeric building blocks is envisioned.

  • 13. Reverdy, C.
    et al.
    Belgacem, N.
    Moghaddam, M. S.
    Sundin, M.
    Swerin, Agne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden – Bioscience and Materials, Box 5607, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bras, J.
    One-step superhydrophobic coating using hydrophobized cellulose nanofibrils2018In: Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, ISSN 0927-7757, E-ISSN 1873-4359, Vol. 544, p. 152-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Superhydrophobic surfaces have high potential in self-cleaning and anti-fouling applications. We developed a one-step superhydrophobic coating formulation containing sodium oleate (NaOl), hydrophobized precipitated calcium carbonate and biobased cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) hydrophobized with either alkyl ketene dimer (AKD) or amino propyl trimethoxy silane (APMS) as a binder to fix and distribute the particles. Coatings were made on paperboard and the wetting behavior of the surface was assessed. Static, advancing and receding contact angles with water as well as roll-off and water shedding angle were compared to coatings made with styrene butadiene latex as binder instead of CNFs. Modifications with alkyl ketene dimer showed most promising results for a viable process in achieving superhydrophobic paperboard but required reformulation of the coating with optimized and reduced amount of NaOl to avoid surfactant-induced wetting via excess NaOl. A static water contact angle of 150° was reached for the CNF-AKD. The use of CNFs enables the improvement of coating quality avoiding cracking with the use of nanocellulose as a renewable binder.

  • 14.
    Syrén, Per-Olof
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth, Sci Life Lab, Dept Fibre & Polymer Technol, S-17165 Solna, Sweden.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Prot Sci, S-17165 Solna, Sweden..
    Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Tertiary Amide Bonds by anti Nucleophilic Attack and Protonation2018In: Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0022-3263, E-ISSN 1520-6904, Vol. 83, no 21, p. 13543-13548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The molecular mechanisms conferring high resistance of planar tertiary amide bonds to hydrolysis by most enzymes have remained elusive. To provide a chemical explanation to this unresolved puzzle, UB3LYP calculations were performed on an active site model of Xaa-Pro peptidases. The calculated reaction mechanism demonstrates that biocatalysts capable of tertiary amide bond hydrolysis capitalize on anti nucleophilic attack and protonation of the amide nitrogen, in contrast to the traditional syn displayed by amidases and proteases acting on secondary amide bonds.

1 - 14 of 14
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf