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  • 1. Carosio, F.
    et al.
    Ghanadpour, Maryam
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Alongi, J
    Wågberg, L
    Layer-by-layer assembled chitosan/phosphporylated nanocellulose as a bio-based and flame protecting nano-exoskeleton on PU foams2018In: Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Colson, Jerome
    et al.
    Univ Nat Resources & Life Sci Vienna, Dept Mat Sci & Proc Engn, Inst Wood Technol & Renewable Mat, Konrad Lorenz Str 24, A-3430 Tulin, Austria..
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Asaadi, Shirin
    Aalto Univ, Sch Chem Engn, Dept Bioprod & Biosyst, Vuorimiehentie 1, Espoo 02150, Finland..
    Sixta, Herbert
    Aalto Univ, Sch Chem Engn, Dept Bioprod & Biosyst, Vuorimiehentie 1, Espoo 02150, Finland..
    Nypelo, Tiina
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Chem & Chem Technol, Kemigarden 4, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Mautner, Andreas
    Univ Vienna, Fac Chem, Inst Mat Chem & Res, Wahringer Str 42, A-1090 Vienna, Austria..
    Konnerth, Johannes
    Univ Nat Resources & Life Sci Vienna, Dept Mat Sci & Proc Engn, Inst Wood Technol & Renewable Mat, Konrad Lorenz Str 24, A-3430 Tulin, Austria..
    Adhesion properties of regenerated lignocellulosic fibres towards poly (lactic acid) microspheres assessed by colloidal probe technique2018In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 532, p. 819-829Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the field of polymer reinforcement, it is important to understand the interactions involved between the polymer matrix and the reinforcing component. This paper is a contribution to the fundamental understanding of the adhesion mechanisms involved in natural fibre reinforced composites. We report on the use of the colloidal probe technique for the assessment of the adhesion behaviour between poly(lactic acid) microspheres and embedded cross-sections of regenerated lignocellulosic fibres. These fibres consisted of tailored mixtures of cellulose, lignin and xylan, the amount of which was determined beforehand. The influence of the chemical composition of the fibres on the adhesion behaviour was studied in ambient air and in dry atmosphere. In ambient air, capillary forces resulted in larger adhesion between the sphere and the fibres. Changing the ambient medium to a dry nitrogen atmosphere allowed reducing the capillary forces, leading to a drop in the adhesion forces. Differences between fibres of distinct chemical compositions could be measured only on freshly cut surfaces. Moreover, the surface energy of the fibres was assessed by inverse gas chromatography. Compared to fibres containing solely cellulose, the presence of lignin and/or hemicellulose led to higher adhesion and lower surface energy, suggesting that these chemicals could serve as natural coupling agents between hydrophobic and hydrophilic components.

  • 3.
    Ghanadpour, Maryam
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Phosphorylated Cellulose Nanofibrils: A Nano-Tool for Preparing Cellulose-Based Flame-Retardant Materials2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing awareness of the need for a circular society and a circular chemistry has spurred the interest in using wood-based cellulose as a raw material for the preparation of new macroscopic devices and construction materials. The interest has been particularly focused on cellulose nanofibrils (CNF), which has led to the development of new material concepts through a nanoscale bottom-up engineering using renewable CNF. In order to be industrially applicable, the CNF must however possess a set of properties among which good flame-retardation is crucial. This thesis presents a) a way to chemically modify delignified wood fibers by phosphorylation to produce phosphorylated CNF, b) the fabrication and characterization of flame-retardant thin films, coatings and nanocomposite foams from the phosphorylated fibrils and c) the flame-retardant mechanisms of the phosphorylated CNF-based substances.

    Chemically delignified fibers have been phosphorylated by (NH4)2HPO4 in the presence of urea, and the resulting material has been used to prepare phosphorylated CNF (P-CNF). The flame-retardant properties of the phosphorylated fibrils were significantly improved by the phosphorus functionalization of the cellulose chain, converting the fibrils to an inherently flame-retardant material. The P-CNF was applied to make thin films/coatings using the Layer-by-Layer (LbL) technique. All-cellulose free-standing films were prepared through LbL self-assembly of the P-CNF and fibrils prepared from aminated cellulose-rich fibers (cationic CNF). The LbL-assembled film showed a high thermal stability, excellent flame resistance and superior mechanical performance. P-CNF/chitosan (CH) assemblies were also prepared as a fire protection for polyurethane (PU) foams. The five bilayer CH/P-CNF coating yielded a nano-exoskeleton on the surface of PU foam, shown to be capable of increasing the modulus of the foam by a factor of three and entirely preventing its melt dripping during the flammability testing.

    P-CNF/montmorillonite (MMT), sepiolite (Sep) clay or sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP) films were also fabricated by vacuum filtration/solvent casting of the composite suspensions, and the structural and compositional features of these different films were used to study the mechanisms behind their flame-retardant properties. Only the P-CNF/MMT films were able to completely prevent ignition during cone calorimetry, when used as coatings for highly flammable polyethylene (PE) films and this was mainly ascribed to the excellent barrier properties of these films. The results also showed that the excellent strength and stiffness of the P-CNF/MMT samples, compared to those of the P-CNF/Sep and P-CNF/SHMP films, were essential for maintaining the barrier effect during combustion. Finally, nanostructured foams were prepared by freeze-casting of the P-CNF/Sep suspensions. The foams showed extensive flame-resistance, maintaining a temperature drop of more than 600 °C across the thickness during the flame penetration test. This performance was related mainly to the charring capability of the phosphorylated fibrils combined with the significant thermal insulation of Sep clay.

  • 4.
    Ghanadpour, Maryam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Carosio, F
    Ruda, M.C.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Flame-retardant nanocomposite thin films based on phosphorylated cellulose nanofibrils: A study of flame-retardant mechanisms2018In: Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Ghanadpour, Maryam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wicklein, Bernd
    Carosio, Federico
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    All-natural and highly flame-resistant freeze-cast foams based on phosphorylated cellulose nanofibrils2018In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 10, no 8, p. 4085-4095Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pure cellulosic foams suffer from low thermal stability and high flammability, limiting their fields of application. Here, light-weight and flame-resistant nanostructured foams are produced by combining cellulose nanofibrils prepared from phosphorylated pulp fibers (P-CNF) with microfibrous sepiolite clay using the freeze-casting technique. The resultant nanocomposite foams show excellent flame-retardant properties such as self-extinguishing behavior and extremely low heat release rates in addition to high flame penetration resistance attributed mainly to the intrinsic charring ability of the phosphorylated fibrils and the capability of sepiolite to form heat-protective intumescent-like barrier on the surface of the material. Investigation of the chemical structure of the charred residue by FTIR and solid state NMR spectroscopy reveals the extensive graphitization of the carbohydrate as a result of dephosphorylation of the modified cellulose and further dehydration due to acidic catalytic effects. Originating from the nanoscale dimensions of sepiolite particles, their high specific surface area and stiffness as well as its close interaction with the phosphorylated fibrils, the incorporation of clay nanorods also significantly improves the mechanical strength and stiffness of the nanocomposite foams. The novel foams prepared in this study are expected to have great potential for application in sustainable building construction.

  • 6.
    Granskog, Viktor
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Garcia-Gallego, Sandra
    KTH.
    von Kieseritzky, Johanna
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Pettersson, Jennifer
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Boras, Sweden..
    Stenlund, Patrik
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Boras, Sweden..
    Zhang, Yuning
    KTH.
    Petronis, Sarunas
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Boras, Sweden..
    Lyven, Benny
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Boras, Sweden..
    Arner, Marianne
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hakansson, Joakim
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Boras, Sweden..
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    High-performance and biocompatible thiol-ene based adhesive for bone fracture fixation2018In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 256Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Hellwig, Johannes
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    López Durán, Vernica
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Measuring elasticity of wet cellulose fibres with AFM using indentation and a linearized Hertz model2018In: Analytical Methods, ISSN 1759-9660, E-ISSN 1759-9679, Vol. 10, no 31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanical properties of different pulp fibres in liquid were measured using an atomic force microscope. Specifically a custom-made sample holder was used to indent the fibre surface, without causing any motion, and the Young's modulus was calculated from the indentation using a linearized Hertz model.

  • 8.
    Koklukaya, Oruc
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Flame-Retardant Cellulose Fibre/Fibril Based Materials via Layer-by-Layer Technique2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    According to an analysis conducted by the Swedish Chemicals Inspectorate in 2006, the approximate numbers of fire injuries per year in Sweden are 100 deaths, 700 major and 700 minor injuries.1 Observations also show that there has been an increase in the number of house fires during recent years. One possible explanation can be the increased use of plastics in the building industry and in furniture. The advantages of easy processing, light weight and low cost make plastic materials most prevalent in the market.  However, plastics behave significantly differently from natural materials in the case of fire. Polymeric materials, including rigid polyurethane foams (PU) which are widely used in the building industry due to their insulating properties, are highly flammable and they release heat at a very high rate. In addition, polymeric materials release more harmful smoke, toxic gases and combustion products than natural materials. A house fire typically starts with the ignition of a combustible material. Flames then spread to nearby materials and shortly thereafter the heat radiation generated reaches a point where the contents of the room suddenly and simultaneously ignite. This stage is called a flash over. After this stage, the fire is fully developed and it continues until everything is consumed. The higher rate of heat and smoke production from plastic materials reduces the time to flash over and hence the time to escape from a fire. The traditional flame-retardant treatments are based mainly on halogenated compounds which are classified as gas phase flame-retardants. The halogenated flame-retardants are under severe investigation due to their adverse effect on health and on the environment since they release toxic gases during combustion and they may leach out and accumulate in the food chain.2-3 The restrictions due to growing environmental concerns have been a driving force to develop alternative flame-retardants by using natural and renewable resources. In recent years, the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique has been used as a simple and versatile surface engineering technique to construct functional nanocoatings through the sequential adsorption of polyelectrolytes and charged nanoparticles in an effort to impart flame-retardant characteristics by inhibiting the combustion cycle.4-5 This thesis presents the physical modification of cellulose fibre/fibril based materials as a means of improving flame-retardant properties.

    In the first part of work described in this thesis, the adsorption of polyelectrolyte multilayers onto pulp fibres was investigated as a way to impart flame-retardant characteristics to paper-based materials. It was found that intumescent nanocoatings consisting of nitrogen and phosphorus containing polyelectrolytes such as chitosan (CH) and poly(vinylphosphonic acid) (PVPA) were able to significantly improve the thermal stability and flame-retardant properties of sheets made of LbL-treated fibres, and were able to self-extinguish the flame in the horizontal flame test (HFT). High magnification images revealed that this improvement in flame-retardancy was due to the formation of a coherent char layer on the fibres (Paper I).6 In addition to imparting flame-retardancy by the LbL-coating of polyethylenimine (PEI) and sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP), it was also possible to improve the mechanical properties of the paper material with this treatment (Paper III).7

    In the second part of the work, wet-stable porous cellulose fibril-based aerogels were developed by freeze-drying and used as a template for the build-up of intumescent nano-brick wall assemblies. The formation of multilayers of CH, PVPA and montmorillonite clay (MMT) was investigated as a function of solution concentration, and it was found that five quadlayers (QL) of CH/PVPA/CH/MMT treated aerogels using 5 g/L solutions of the respective components were able to self-extinguish the flame in HFT and that they showed no ignition under the heat flux of 35 kW/m2 used in cone calorimetry (Paper II).8 In a different application, a novel low density, porous, wet-stable cellulose fibre network was developed using chemically modified cellulose fibres by solvent exchange from water to acetone followed by drying at room temperature. The fibre networks (FN) were modified using the LbL technique to construct a flame-retardant nanocoating consisting of CH, SHMP, and inorganic particles (i.e., MMT, sepiolite (SEP), and colloidal silica (SNP)). The influence of the shape of the nanoparticles on flame-retardancy was investigated and it was found that plate-like and rod-like clays with a high aspect ratio showed self-extinguishing behaviour in HFT. A 5 QL of CH/SHMP/CH/SEP reduced the peak heat release rate and total smoke release by 47% and 43%, respectively, with an addition of only ~8 wt% to FN (Paper IV).

    Finally, non-crystalline cellulose gel beads were used as a substrate for the LbL assembly of CH and SHMP in model studies aimed at identifying the molecular mechanisms responsible for the fire-retardant properties of the LbL structures. The beads were formed by precipitating the dissolved cellulose-rich fibres according to an earlier described procedure,9 and it was shown that these smooth cellulose beads can be utilized as a model substrate to study the influence of LbL chemistry and nanostructure on flame-retardancy. These new types of model systems thus constitute a new important tool for clarifying the mechanism behind flame-retardant nanocoating systems (Paper V).  

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-12-31 10:00
  • 9.
    Koklukaya, Oruc
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Carosio, Federico
    López Durán, Vernica
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Development of hybrid coatings to reduce flammability of low density cellulose fiber networks via layer-by-layer assemblyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Koklukaya, Oruc
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Carosio, Federico
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Tailoring flame-retardancy and strength of papers via layer-by-layer treatment of cellulose fibers2018In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 2691-2709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The layer-by-layer (LbL) technology was used to adsorb polyelectrolyte multilayers consisting of cationic polyethylenimine (PEI) and anionic sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP) onto cellulose fibers in order to enhance the flame-retardancy and tensile strength of paper sheets made from these fibers. The fundamental effect of PEI molecular mass on the build-up of the multilayer film was investigated using model cellulose surfaces and a quartz crystal microbalance technique. The adsorption of a low (LMw) and a high molecular weight (HMw) PEI onto cellulose fibers and carboxymethylated (CM) cellulose fibers was investigated using polyelectrolyte titration. The fibers were consecutively treated with PEI and SHMP to deposit 3.5 bilayers (BL) on the fiber surfaces, and the treated fibers were then used to prepare sheets. In addition, a wet-strength paper sheet was prepared and treated with the same LbL coatings. Thermal gravimetric analysis of LbL-treated fibers showed that the onset temperature for cellulose degradation was lowered and that the amount of residue at 800 °C increased. A horizontal flame test and a vertical flame test were used to evaluate the combustion behavior of the paper sheets. Papers prepared from both cellulose fibers and CM-cellulose fibers treated with HMw-PEI/SHMP LbL-combination self-extinguished in a horizontal configuration despite the rather low amounts of adsorbed polymer which form very thin films (wet thickness of ca. 17 nm). The tensile properties of handsheets showed that 3.5 BL of HMw-PEI and SHMP increased the stress at break by 100% compared to sheets prepared from untreated cellulose fibers.

  • 11.
    Koklukaya, Oruc
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Karlsson, Rose-Marie Pernilla
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Carosio, Federico
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    A study of layer-by-layer nanocoatings on model cellulose gel beads to clarify their flame-retardant characteristicsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 12.
    López Durán, Veronica
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Fibre & Polymer Technol, Teknikringen 56-58, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, BiMaC Innovat, Teknikringen 56-58, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Larsson, Per A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Novel, Cellulose-Based, Lightweight, Wet-Resilient Materials with Tunable Porosity, Density, and Strength2018In: ACS SUSTAINABLE CHEMISTRY & ENGINEERING, ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 6, no 8, p. 9951-9957Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Highly porous materials with low density were developed from chemically modified cellulose fibers using solvent-exchange and air drying. Periodate oxidation was initially performed to introduce aldehydes into the cellulose chain, which were then further oxidized to carboxyl groups by chlorite oxidation. Low-density materials were finally achieved by a second periodate oxidation under which the fibers self-assembled into porous fibrous networks. Following a solvent exchange to acetone, these networks could be air-dried without shrinkage. The properties of the materials were tuned by mechanical mixing with a high intensity mixer for different times prior to the second periodate oxidation, which resulted in porosities between 94.4% and 96.3% (i.e., densities between 54 and 82 kg/m(3)). The compressive strength of the materials was between 400 and 1600 kPa in the dry state and between 20 and 50 kPa in the wet state. It was also observed that in the wet state the fiber networks could be compressed up to 80% while still being able to recover their shape. These networks are highly interesting for use in different types of absorption products, and since they also have a high wet integrity, they can be modified with physical methods for different high-value-added end-use applications.

  • 13.
    López Durán, Verónica
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Chemical Modification of Cellulose Fibres and Fibrils for Design of New Materials2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the growing interest in biobased materials in today’s society, where the need for a cyclic economy is obvious, there has been a huge increase in the  interest for using cellulose due to its excellent mechanical and chemical properties. However, the properties of cellulose have to be modified and improved in order to satisfy advanced material applications where the cellulose properties can be tuned to fit the properties of other components in composite mixtures. This thesis explores the heterogeneous chemical modification of cellulose for improved material properties of cellulose-based materials and the use of cellulose fibres and fibrils in novel applications.

    In the first part of the work described in this thesis, a fundamental study was performed to clarify how the chemical composition and the fibre/fibril structure of the cellulose following chemical modification affect the material properties. The second part of the work was aimed at exploring the potential for using the chemically modified fibres/fibrils in novel material applications. 

    Lignocellulosic fibres with different chemical compositions were modified by periodate oxidation and borohydride reduction, and it was found that the most important factor was the amount of holocellulose present in the fibres, since lignin-rich fibres were less reactive and less responsive to the treatments. Despite the lower reactivity of lignin-rich fibres, it was however possible to improve their mechanical properties and to achieve a significant increase in the compressive strength of papers prepared from modified unbleached kraft fibres.

    The chemical modifications were then expanded to nine different molecular structures and two different degrees of modification. Fibres modified at low degrees of modification were used to prepare handsheets, followed by mechanical and physical characterization. Highly modified fibres were also used to prepare cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs). It was found that the properties of handsheets and films prepared from modified fibres/fibrils are highly dependent on the chemical structure of the modified cellulose and, as an example, the ductility was greatly improved by converting secondary alcohols to primary alcohols. A detailed analysis of the modified fibres and fibrils also showed that, due to the heterogeneous chemical reaction used, the modified fibrils had a core-shell structure with a shell of modified cellulose with a lower crystalline order surrounding a core of crystalline cellulose. The results also showed that the chemical structure of the modified shell dramatically affects the interaction with moisture. Materials from fibrils containing covalent crosslinks have shown to be less sensitive to moisture at the cost of being more brittle. 

    In a different application, modified CNFs were used as paper strength additives. Three differently modified CNFs were used: carboxymethylated CNFs, periodate-oxidised carboxymethylated CNFs and dopamine-grafted carboxymethylated CNFs. The properties of these CNFs were compared with that of a microfibrillated cellulose from unbleached kraft fibres. In general, a great improvement in the dry mechanical properties of handsheets was observed with the addition of the periodate-oxidised oxidised and dopamine-grafted modified fibrils, whereas only the periodate-oxidised carboxymethylated CNFs improved the wet strength.

    Finally, it was found that the chemically modified fibres could be used to prepare a novel low-density material with good mechanical strength, both wet and dry, and excellent shape recovery capacity in the wet state after mechanical compression. The fibre networks were produced by solvent exchange from water to acetone followed by air drying at room temperature. The properties of the fibre networks could also fairly easily be tuned in terms of porosity, density and strength.

  • 14.
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. Linkoping Univ, IFM, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Elfwing, Anders
    Linkoping Univ, IFM, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Ponseca, Carlito
    Linkoping Univ, IFM, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Cai, Wanzhu
    Linkoping Univ, IFM, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Inganas, Olle
    Linkoping Univ, IFM, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Decorating biomolecules and bio-structures with metallic conducting polymers2018In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 256Article in journal (Other academic)
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