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  • 1. Armstronga, D. A.
    et al.
    Huie, R. E.
    Lymar, S.
    Koppenol, W. H.
    Merényi, Gabor
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Neta, P.
    Stanbury, D. M.
    Steenken, S.
    Wardman, P.
    Standard electrode potentials involving radicals in aqueous solution: Inorganic radicals2013In: BioInorganic Reaction Mechanisms, ISSN 2191-2491, Vol. 9, no 1-4, p. 59-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inorganic radicals, such as superoxide and hydroxyl, play an important role in biology. Their tendency to oxidize or to reduce other compounds has been studied by pulse radiolysis; electrode potentials can be derived when equilibrium is established with a well-known reference compound. An IUPAC Task Group has evaluated the literature and produced the recommended standard electrode potentials for such couples as (O2/O2 ·-), (HO·, H+/H2O), (O3/O3 ·-), (Cl2/Cl2 ·-), (Br2 ·-/2Br-), (NO2 ·/NO2 -), and (CO3 ·-/CO3 2-). 

  • 2.
    Bernhem, Kristoffer
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Blom, H.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Brismar, Hjalmar
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Quantification of endogenous and exogenous protein expressions of Na,K-ATPase with super-resolution PALM/STORM imaging2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 4, article id e0195825Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transient transfection of fluorescent fusion proteins is a key enabling technology in fluorescent microscopy to spatio-temporally map cellular protein distributions. Transient transfection of proteins may however bypass normal regulation of expression, leading to overexpression artefacts like misallocations and excess amounts. In this study we investigate the use of STORM and PALM microscopy to quantitatively monitor endogenous and exogenous protein expression. Through incorporation of an N-terminal hemagglutinin epitope to a mMaple3 fused Na,K-ATPase (α1 isoform), we analyze the spatial and quantitative changes of plasma membrane Na,K-ATPase localization during competitive transient expression. Quantification of plasma membrane protein density revealed a time dependent increase of Na,K-ATPase, but no increase in size of protein clusters. Results show that after 41h transfection, the total plasma membrane density of Na,K-ATPase increased by 63% while the endogenous contribution was reduced by 16%. © 2018 Bernhem et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

  • 3.
    Bhagavathiachari, Muthuraaman
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Elumalai, V.
    Gao, Jiajia
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Kloo, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Polymer-doped molten salt mixtures as a new concept for electrolyte systems in dye-sensitized solar cells2017In: ACS Omega, ISSN 2470-1343, Vol. 2, no 10, p. 6570-6575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A conceptually new polymer electrolyte for dye-sensitized solar cells is reported and investigated. The benefits of using this type of electrolyte based on ionic liquid mixtures (ILMs) and room temperature ionic liquids are highlighted. Impedance spectroscopy and transient electron measurements have been used to elucidate the background of the photovoltaic performance. Even though larger recombination losses were noted, the high ion mobility and conductivity induced in the ILMs by the added polymer result in enhanced overall conversion efficiencies.

  • 4.
    Cifelli, M.
    et al.
    Univ Pisa, Dipartimento Chim & Chim Ind, I-56124 Pisa, Italy..
    Domenici, V.
    Univ Pisa, Dipartimento Chim & Chim Ind, I-56124 Pisa, Italy..
    Chizhik, V. I.
    St Petersburg State Univ, Dept Phys, St Petersburg 199034, Russia..
    Dvinskikh, Sergey
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry. St Petersburg State Univ, Lab Biomol NMR, St Petersburg 199034, Russia.
    N-15-C-13 Dipole Couplings in Smectic Mesophase of a Thermotropic Ionic Liquid2018In: Applied Magnetic Resonance, ISSN 0937-9347, E-ISSN 1613-7507, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 553-562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unique combination of ionic conductivity and anisotropic physical properties in ionic liquid crystals leads to new dynamic properties exploited in modern technological applications. Structural and dynamics information at atomic level for molecules and ions in mesophases can be obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy through the measurements of dipole-dipole spin couplings. While C-13-H-1 and N-15-H-1 dipolar NMR spectra can be routinely acquired in samples with natural isotopic abundance, recording N-15-C-13 dipolar NMR spectra is challenging because of the unfavourable combination of two rare isotopes. In the present study, an approach to measure N-15-C-13 dipole-dipole NMR spectra in static liquid crystalline samples with natural abundance is introduced. We demonstrate that well-resolved spectra can be recorded within 10 h of experimental time using a conventional NMR probe and a moderately strong magnetic field. The technique is applied to a thermotropic smectic mesophase formed by an ionic liquid with imidazolium-based organic cation.

  • 5.
    Dai, Jing
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Div Appl Phys Chem, Dept Chem, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ferreira Fernandes, Ricardo Manuel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Div Appl Phys Chem, Dept Chem, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Porto, CIQUP, Dept Chem & Biochem, Fac Sci, P-4169007 Porto, Portugal..
    Regev, Oren
    Ben Gurion Univ Negev, Dept Chem Engn, IL-84105 Beer Sheva, Israel.;Ben Gurion Univ Negev, Ilse Katz Inst Nanotechnol, IL-84105 Beer Sheva, Israel..
    Marques, Eduardo F.
    Univ Porto, CIQUP, Dept Chem & Biochem, Fac Sci, P-4169007 Porto, Portugal..
    Furo, Istvan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Industrial NMR Centre. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Div Appl Phys Chem, Dept Chem, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Dispersing Carbon Nanotubes in Water with Amphiphiles: Dispersant Adsorption, Kinetics, and Bundle Size Distribution as Defining Factors2018In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 122, no 42, p. 24386-24393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Debundling and dispersing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is essential for applications, but the process is not well understood. In this work, aqueous SWNT dispersions were produced by sonicating pristine SWNT powder in the presence of an amphiphilic triblock copolymer (Pluronic F127) as dispersant. Upon centrifugation, one obtains a supernatant with suspended individual tubes and thin bundles and a precipitate with large bundles (and impurities). In the supernatant, that constitutes the final dispersion, we determined the dispersed SWNT concentration by thermogravi-metric analysis (TGA) and UV-vis spectroscopy, and the dispersant concentration by NMR The fraction of dispersant adsorbed at the SWNT surface was obtained by H-1 diffusion NMR Sigmoidal dispersion curves recording the concentration of dispersed SWNTs as a function of supernatant dispersant concentration were obtained at different SWNT loadings and sonication times. As SWNT bundles are debundled into smaller and smaller ones, the essential role of the dispersant is to sufficiently quickly cover the freshly exposed surfaces created by shear forces induced during sonication. Primarily kinetic reasons are behind the need for dispersant concentrations required to reach a substantial SWNT concentration. Centrifugation sets the size threshold below which SWNT particles are retained in the dispersion and consequently determines the SWNT concentration as a function of sonication time.

  • 6.
    Elwinger, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry. GE Healthcare Biosci AB, Bjorkgatan 31, SE-75184 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Wernersson, Jonny
    GE Healthcare Biosci AB, Bjorkgatan 31, SE-75184 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Furo, Istvan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry. GE Healthcare Biosci AB, Bjorkgatan 31, SE-75184 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Quantifying Size Exclusion by Diffusion NMR: A Versatile Method to Measure Pore Access and Pore Size2018In: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 90, no 19, p. 11431-11438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Size-exclusion quantification NMR spectroscopy (SEQNMR) is introduced for measuring equilibrium distribution coefficients, K-eq, in porous media. The porous medium is equilibrated with a polydisperse polymer solution. The original bulk polymer solution and the polymer solution after equilibration but in the absence of the porous medium are analyzed by NMR diffusion experiments. The joint evaluation of the two diffusion attenuation curves under suitable constraints provides the extent by which polymer fractions of particular size were depleted from the solution by pore access. This procedure yields K-eq versus polymer probe size, the selectivity curve that in turn can provide the pore size and its distribution. Simulations probe the performance of the method that is demonstrated experimentally in chromatographic media using dextran polymers. SEQ-NMR and inverse size- exclusion chromatography (ISEC) yield selectivity curves that virtually coincide. Crucial advantages with SEQ-NMR, such as versatility with regard to both the polymer used and porous system explored, high speed, potential for automation, and small required sample volume, are discussed.

  • 7.
    Gustafsson, Camilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Vassiliev, Serguei
    Department of Biological Sciences, Brock University, Ontario, Canada.
    Kürten, Charlotte
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Syrén, Per-Olof
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Brinck, Tore
    MD Simulations Reveal Complex Water Paths in Squalene–Hopene Cyclase: Tunnel-Obstructing Mutations Increase the Flow of Water in the Active Site2017In: ACS Omega, ISSN 2470-1343, Vol. 2, no 11, p. 8495-8506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Squalene–hopene cyclase catalyzes the cyclization of squalene to hopanoids. A previous study has identified a network of tunnels in the protein, where water molecules have been indicated to move. Blocking these tunnels by site-directed mutagenesis was found to change the activation entropy of the catalytic reaction from positive to negative with a concomitant lowering of the activation enthalpy. As a consequence, some variants are faster and others are slower than the wild type (wt) in vitro under optimal reaction conditions for the wt. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed for the wt and the variants to investigate how the mutations affect the protein structure and the water flow in the enzyme, hypothetically influencing the activation parameters. Interestingly, the tunnel-obstructing variants are associated with an increased flow of water in the active site, particularly close to the catalytic residue Asp376. MD simulations with the substrate present in the active site indicate that the distance for the rate-determining proton transfer between Asp376 and the substrate is longer in the tunnel-obstructing protein variants than in the wt. On the basis of the previous experimental results and the current MD results, we propose that the tunnel-obstructing variants, at least partly, could operate by a different catalytic mechanism, where the proton transfer may have contributions from a Grotthuss-like mechanism.

  • 8.
    Hao, Yan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Yang, Wenxing
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Chem, Angstrom Lab, Phys Chem, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden.;Emory Univ, Dept Chem, 1515 Dickey Dr NE, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA..
    Karlsson, Karl Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Cong, Jiayan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Wang, Shihuai
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Chem, Angstrom Lab, Phys Chem, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Lo, Xing
    East China Univ Sci & Technol, Inst Fine Chem, Sch Chem & Mol Engn, Key Lab Adv Mat, Shanghai 200237, Peoples R China..
    Xu, Bo
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Chem, Angstrom Lab, Phys Chem, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hua, Jianli
    East China Univ Sci & Technol, Inst Fine Chem, Sch Chem & Mol Engn, Key Lab Adv Mat, Shanghai 200237, Peoples R China..
    Kloo, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Boschloo, Gerrit
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Chem, Angstrom Lab, Phys Chem, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Efficient Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells with Voltages Exceeding 1 V through Exploring Tris(4-alkoxyphenyl)amine Mediators in Combination with the Tris(bipyridine) Cobalt Redox System2018In: ACS ENERGY LETTERS, ISSN 2380-8195, Vol. 3, no 8, p. 1929-1937Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tandem redox electrolytes, prepared by the addition of a tris(p-anisyl)amine mediator into classic tris(bipyridine)cobalt-based electrolytes, demonstrate favorable electron transfer and reduced energy loss in dye-sensitized solar cells. Here, we have successfully explored three tris(4-alkoxyphenyl)-amine mediators with bulky molecular structures and generated more effective tandem redox systems. This series of tandem redox electrolytes rendered solar cells with very high photovoltages exceeding 1 V, which approaches the theoretical voltage limit of tris(bipyridine)cobalt-based electrolytes. Solar cells with power conversion efficiencies of 9.7-11.0% under 1 sun illumination were manufactured. This corresponds to an efficiency improvement of up to 50% as compared to solar cells based on pure tris(bipyridine)cobalt-based electrolytes. The photovoltage increases with increasing steric effects of the tris(4-alkoxyphenyl)amine mediators, which is attributed to a retarded recombination kinetics. These results highlight the importance of structural design for optimized charge transfer at the sensitized semiconductor/electrolyte interface and provide insights for the future development of efficient dye-sensitized solar cells.

  • 9.
    Hua, Yong
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Liu, Peng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Li, Yuanyuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Kloo, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Composite Hole-Transport Materials Based on a Metal-Organic Copper Complex and Spiro-OMeTAD for Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells2018In: SOLAR RRL, ISSN 2367-198X, Vol. 2, no 5, article id UNSP 1700073Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spiro-OMeTAD has been the most commonly used hole-transport material in perovskite solar cells. However, this material shows intrinisic drawbacks, such as low hole mobility and conductivity in its pristine form, as well as self-aggregation when deposited as thin film. These are not beneficial properties for efficient hole transport and extraction. In order to address these issues, we have designed a new type of composite hole-transport materials based on a new metal-organic copper complex (CuH) and Spiro-OMeTAD. The incorporation of the molecularly bulky HTM CuH into the Spiro-OMeTAD material efficiently improves the hole mobility and suppresses the aggregation in the Spiro-OMeTAD film. As a result, the conversion efficiencies obtained for perovskite solar cells based on the composite HTM system reached as high as 18.83%, which is superior to solar cells based on the individual hole-transport materials CuH (15.75%) or Spiro-OMeTAD (14.47%) under the same working conditions. These results show that composite HTM systems may constitute an effective strategy to further improve the efficiency of perovskite solar cells.

  • 10. Janosik, T.
    et al.
    Rannug, A.
    Rannug, U.
    Wahlström, N.
    Slätt, Johnny
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Bergman, J.
    Chemistry and Properties of Indolocarbazoles2018In: Chemical Reviews, ISSN 0009-2665, E-ISSN 1520-6890, Vol. 118, no 18, p. 9058-9128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The indolocarbazoles are an important class of nitrogen heterocycles which has evolved significantly in recent years, with numerous studies focusing on their diverse biological effects, or targeting new materials with potential applications in organic electronics. This review aims at providing a broad survey of the chemistry and properties of indolocarbazoles from an interdisciplinary point of view, with particular emphasis on practical synthetic aspects, as well as certain topics which have not been previously accounted for in detail, such as the occurrence, formation, biological activities, and metabolism of indolo[3,2-b]carbazoles. The literature of the past decade forms the basis of the text, which is further supplemented with older key references.

  • 11.
    Johansson, F. O. L.
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Mol & Condensed Matter Phys, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Ivanovic, M.
    Univ Tubingen, Inst Phys & Theoret Chem, Morgenstelle 18, D-72076 Tubingen, Germany..
    Svanstrom, S.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Mol & Condensed Matter Phys, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Cappel, Ute B.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry. Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Mol & Condensed Matter Phys, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Peisert, H.
    Univ Tubingen, Inst Phys & Theoret Chem, Morgenstelle 18, D-72076 Tubingen, Germany..
    Chasse, T.
    Univ Tubingen, Inst Phys & Theoret Chem, Morgenstelle 18, D-72076 Tubingen, Germany..
    Lindblad, A.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Mol & Condensed Matter Phys, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Femtosecond and Attosecond Electron-Transfer Dynamics in PCPDTBT:PCBM Bulk Heterojunctions2018In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 122, no 24, p. 12605-12614Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Charge separation efficiency is a crucial parameter for photovoltaic devices-polymers consisting of alternating electron-rich and electron-deficient parts can achieve high such efficiencies, for instance, together with a fullerene electron acceptor. This offers a viable path toward solar cells with organic bulk heterojunctions. Here, we measured the charge-transfer times in the femtosecond and attosecond regimes via the decay of sulfur is X-ray core excited states (with the core-hole clock method) in blends of a low-band gap polymer {PCPDTBT [poly[2,6-(4,4-bis (2-ethylhexyl)-4H-cyclopenta [2,1-b;3,4-1/1 dithiophene)-alt-4,7- (2,1,3-benzothiadiazole)]]} consisting of a cyclopentadithiophene electron-rich part and a benzothiadiazole electron-deficient part. The constituting parts of the bulk heterojunction were varied by adding the fullerene derivative PCBM ([6,6]-phenyl-C-61-butyric acid methyl ester) (weight ratio of polymer/PCBM as 1:0, 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3). For low-energy excitations, the charge-transfer time varies to the largest extent for the thiophene donor part. The charge-transfer time in the 1:2 blend is reduced by 86% compared to that of pristine PCPDTBT. At higher energy excitations, the charge-transfer time does not vary with the chemical environment, as this regime is dominated by intramolecular conduction that yields ultrafast charge-transfer times for all blends, approaching 170 as. We thus demonstrate that the core-hole clock method applied to a series with changing composition can give information about local electron dynamics (with chemical specificity) at interfaces between the constituting parts the crucial part of a bulk heterojunction where the initial charge separation occurs.

  • 12.
    Leandri, Valentina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Daniel, Quentin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Chen, Hong
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Gardner, James M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Kloo, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Electronic and Structural Effects of Inner Sphere Coordination of Chloride to a Homoleptic Copper(II) Diimine Complex2018In: Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0020-1669, E-ISSN 1520-510X, Vol. 57, no 8, p. 4556-4562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The reaction of CuCl2 with 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (dmp) does not lead to the formation of [Cu(dmp)(2)](Cl)(2) but instead to [Cu(dmp)(2)Cl]Cl, a 5-coordinated complex, in which one chloride is directly coordinated to the metal center. Attempts at removing the coordinated chloride by changing the counterion by metathesis were unsuccessful and resulted only in the exchange of the noncoordinated chloride, as confirmed from a crystal structure analysis. Complex [Cu-(dmp)(2)Cl]PF6 exhibits a reversible cyclic voltammogram characterized by a significant peak splitting between the reductive and oxidative waves (0.85 and 0.60 V vs NHE, respectively), with a half-wave potential E-1/2 = 0.73 V vs NHE. When reduced electrochemically, the complex does not convert into [Cu(dmp)(2)](+), as one may expect. Instead, [Cu(dmp)(2)](+) is isolated as a product when the reduction of [Cu(dmp)(2)Cl]PF6 is performed with L-ascorbic acid, as confirmed by electrochemistry, NMR spectroscopy, and diffractometry. [Cu(dmp)(2)](2+) complexes can be synthesized starting from Cu(II) salts with weakly and noncoordinating counterions, such as perchlorate. Growth of [Cu(dmp)(2)](ClO4)(2) crystals in acetonitrile results in a 5-coordinated complex, [Cu(dmp)(2)(CH3CN)](ClO4)(2), in which a solvent molecule is coordinated to the metal center. However, solvent coordination is associated with a dynamic decoordination-coordination behavior upon reduction and oxidation. Hence, the cyclic voltammogram of [Cu(dmp)(2)(CH3CN)](2+) is identical to the one of [Cu(dmp)(2)](+), if the measurements are performed in acetonitrile. The current results show that halide ions in precursors to Cu(II) metal-organic coordination compound synthesis, and most likely also other multivalent coordination centers, are not readily exchanged when exposed to presumed strongly binding and chelating ligand, and thus special care needs to be taken with respect to product characterization.

  • 13.
    Liljenberg, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Halldin Stenlid, Joakim
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Brinck, Tore
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Mechanism and regioselectivity of electrophilic aromatic nitration in solution: the validity of the transition state approach2018In: Journal of Molecular Modeling, ISSN 1610-2940, E-ISSN 0948-5023, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential energy surfaces in gas phase and in aqueous solution for the nitration of benzene, chlorobenzene, and phenol have been elucidated with density functional theory at theM06-2X/6-311G(d,p) level combined with the polarizable continuum solvent model (PCM). Three reaction intermediates have been identified along both surfaces: the unoriented pi-complex (I), the oriented reaction complex (II), and the sigma-complex (III). In order to obtain quantitatively reliable results for positional selectivity and for modeling the expulsion of the proton, it is crucial to take solvent effects into consideration. The results are in agreement with Olah's conclusion from over 40 years ago that the transition state leading to (II) is the rate-determining step in activated cases, while it is the one leading to (III) for deactivated cases. The simplified reactivity approach of using the free energy for the formation of (III) as a model of the rate-determining transition state has previously been shown to be very successful for halogenations, but problematic for nitrations. These observations are rationalized with the geometric and energetic resemblance, and lack of resemblance respectively, between (III) and the corresponding rate determining transition state. At this level of theory, neither the sigma-complex (III) nor the reaction complex (II) can be used to accurately model the rate-determining transition state for nitrations.

  • 14. Lindman, Björn
    et al.
    Stilbs, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Molecular diffusion in microemulsions2018In: Microemulsions: Structure and Dynamics, CRC Press, 2018, p. 119-152Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The interest in studies of diffusional processes in microemulsions has grown rapidly during the past few years. The reasons are an increased number of available techniques providing easily interpretable data and the realization that self-diffusion data give unique information on the molecular organization and structure of microemulsions. Furthermore, many current and potential applications of microemulsions are dependent on molecular transport over macroscopic distances.

  • 15. Matveev, V. V.
    et al.
    Markelov, D. A.
    Dvinskikh, Sergey
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Shishkin, A. N.
    Tyutyukin, K. V.
    Penkova, A. V.
    Tatarinova, E. A.
    Ignat'Eva, G. M.
    Milenin, S. A.
    Investigation of Melts of Polybutylcarbosilane Dendrimers by 1H NMR Spectroscopy2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 13710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Melts of polybutylcarbosilane (PBC) dendrimers from third (G3) up to sixth (G6) generations are investigated by 1H NMR spectroscopy in a wide temperature range up to 493 K. At room temperature, NMR spectra of G3-G5 dendrimers exhibit resolved, solution-like spectra ("liquid" phase). In contrast, the spectrum of the G6 dendrimer is characterized by a single unresolved broad line at whole temperature range, which supports the presence of an anomalous phase state of G6 at temperatures higher than glass transition temperature. For the first time, an unexpected transition of G5 dendrimer from a molecular liquid state to an anomalous state/phase upon temperature increase has been detected using NMR data. Specifically, an additional wide background line appears in the G5 spectrum above 473 K, and this line corresponds to a G5 state characterized by restricted molecular mobility, i.e., a state similar to the "anomalous" phase of G6 melt. The fraction of the G5 dendrimers in "anomalous" phase at 493 K is approximately 40%. Analysis of the spectral shapes suggests that changes in the G5 dendrimers are reversible with temperature.

  • 16. Nadiv, R.
    et al.
    Fernandes, Ricardo M. F.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Ochbaum, G.
    Dai, Jing
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Buzaglo, M.
    Varenik, M.
    Biton, R.
    Furo, Istvan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Regev, O.
    Polymer nanocomposites: Insights on rheology, percolation and molecular mobility2018In: Polymer, ISSN 0032-3861, E-ISSN 1873-2291, Vol. 153, p. 52-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The integration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into a polymer matrix strongly affects the rheological behavior that in turn may hamper the overall performance of the resulting composite. Research in this topic has focused on bulk rheological properties, while here we employ NMR diffusion experiments to explore the mobility (diffusivity) of epoxy molecules when loaded with CNTs. Rheology and light microscopy indicate percolation of CNT aggregates. Those aggregates cage a substantial amount of epoxy molecules while small angle X-ray scattering indicates some rearrangement of epoxy molecules in the vicinity of the nanotubes. NMR diffusion experiments distinguish between the slow diffusion of the caged molecules and that of the free ones, and relate the fraction of the former to the macroscopic system viscosity. The demonstrated surface-induced slowing-down of diffusion is attributed to strong intermolecular π-π interactions among the epoxy molecules, and between them and the CNT surface. These findings demonstrate the utility of NMR diffusion experiments as an additional method applied to nanocomposites. 

  • 17.
    Norrfors, K. Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Björkbacka, Åsa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Kessler, Amanda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Wold, Susanna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Jonsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    γ-radiation induced corrosion of copper in bentonite-water systems under anaerobic conditions2018In: Radiation Physics and Chemistry, ISSN 0969-806X, E-ISSN 1879-0895, Vol. 144, p. 8-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work we have experimentally studied the impact of bentonite clay on the process of radiation-induced copper corrosion in anoxic water. The motivation for this is to further develop our understanding of radiation-driven processes occurring in deep geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel where copper canisters containing the spent nuclear fuel will be embedded in compacted bentonite. Experiments on radiation-induced corrosion in the presence and absence of bentonite were performed along with experiments elucidating the impact irradiation on the Cu2+ adsorption capacity of bentonite. The experiments presented in this work show that the presence of bentonite clay has no or very little effect on the magnitude of radiation-induced corrosion of copper in anoxic aqueous systems. The absence of a protective effect similar to that observed for radiation-induced dissolution of UO2 is attributed to differences in the corrosion mechanism. This provides further support for the previously proposed mechanism where the hydroxyl radical is the key radiolytic oxidant responsible for the corrosion of copper. The radiation effect on the bentonite sorption capacity of Cu2+ (reduced capacity) is in line with what has previously been reported for other cations. The reduced cation sorption capacity is partly attributed to a loss of Al-OH sites upon irradiation.

  • 18.
    Phuyal, Dibya
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Solid State Phys, Angstrom Lab, Box 516, SE-75121 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Safdari, Majid
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Pazoki, Meysam
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Engn Sci, Solid State Phys, Angstrom Lab, SE-75121 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Liu, Peng
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Material Physics. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Philippe, Bertrand
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Solid State Phys, Angstrom Lab, Box 516, SE-75121 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Kyashnina, Kristina O.
    ESRF, Rossendorf Beamline, CS40220, F-38043 Grenoble 9, France.;HZDR, Inst Resource Ecol, POB 510119, D-01314 Dresden, Germany..
    Karis, Olof
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Solid State Phys, Angstrom Lab, Box 516, SE-75121 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Butorin, Sergei M.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Solid State Phys, Angstrom Lab, Box 516, SE-75121 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Rensmo, Hakan
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Solid State Phys, Angstrom Lab, Box 516, SE-75121 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Edvinsson, Tomas
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Engn Sci, Solid State Phys, Angstrom Lab, SE-75121 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Kloo, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Gardner, James M.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Electronic Structure of Two-Dimensional Lead(II) Iodide Perovskites: An Experimental and Theoretical Study2018In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 30, no 15, p. 4959-4967Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Layered two-dimensional (2D) hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites (HOP) are promising materials for light-harvesting applications because of their chemical stability, wide flexibility in composition and dimensionality, and increases in photovoltaic power conversion efficiencies. Three 2D lead iodide perovskites were studied through various X-ray spectroscopic techniques to derive detailed electronic structures and band energetics profiles at a titania interface. Core-level and valence band photoelectron spectra of HOP were analyzed to resolve the electronic structure changes due to the reduced dimensionality of inorganic layers. The results show orbital narrowing when comparing the HOP, the layered precursor PbI2, and the conventional 3D (CH3NH3)PbI3 such that different localizations of band edge states and narrow band states are unambiguously due to the decrease in dimensionality of the layered HOPs. Support from density functional theory calculations provide further details on the interaction and band gap variations of the electronic structure. We observed an interlayer distance dependent dispersion in the near band edge electronic states. The results show how tuning the interlayer distance between the inorganic layers affects the electronic properties and provides important design principles for control of the interlayer charge transport properties, such as the change in effective charge masses as a function of the organic cation length. The results of these findings can be used to tune layered materials for optimal functionality and new applications.

  • 19.
    Pourmand, Payam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Chemistry.
    Hedenqvist, Mikael S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Furo, Istvan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Chemistry.
    Gedde, Ulf W
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Deterioration of highly filled EPDM rubber by thermal ageing in air: Kinetics and non-destructive monitoring2017In: Polymer testing, ISSN 0142-9418, E-ISSN 1873-2348, Vol. 64, p. 267-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of air ageing at different temperatures between 110 and 170 degrees C on cable transit seals based on highly filled EPDM rubber used in nuclear power plants were studied. The changes of the macroscopic mechanical properties (Young's modulus, indentation modulus and strain-at-break) were in accordance with the Arrhenius equation with an activation energy of 110 kJ mol(-1). Profiling to assess the structure and property gradients within aged blocks was performed via IR spectroscopy, micro-indentation, gravimetric analysis of n-heptane-extracted samples and non-invasive portable NMR spectroscopy. A previously developed methodology was used to separate the deterioration into three different processes: polymer oxidation that was diffusion-limited at all temperatures, migration of low-molar-mass species to the surrounding media and anaerobic changes to the polymer network. The methodology allowed the assessment of the kinetics (rate as a function of time and temperature) of the different processes. It was noticed that polymer oxidation yielded more crosslinking at higher temperatures than at lower temperatures. The data obtained by both the portable NMR (a non-invasive method) and the indentation modulus profiling showed correlations with strain-at-break data, indicating their usefulness as condition monitoring methods.

  • 20.
    Romson, Joakim
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Methods for protein analysis by capillary electrophoresis and mass spectrometry2018Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Protein analysis is important to understanding biological systems, but sample diversity necessitates a multitude of analysis techniques and methods. Challenges that are addressed include analysis of low abundance samples, fractionation to reduce sample complexity, and automation to reduce time and cost.

    Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is an important technique for protein characterization. In Paper I, the sensitivity of MALDI-MS was enhanced through the fabrication of a hydrophobic coating for the MALDI target plate, yielding analyte concentration. The plate outperformed a commercial concentration plate.

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) separation offers low sample consumption and high efficiency, and in Paper II, offline CE-MALDI-MS fractionation was employed. A robot system for automation was constructed and used in analysis of spermatophore proteins from the butterfly Pieris napi. The robot was also used in automated on-target trypsin digestion under a lid of liquid fluorocarbons, a simpler and cheaper alternative to controlled humidity chambers. An indication of indigenous proteolysis of the sample was seen.

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) is the other technique for protein analysis in MS. In Paper III, the biomarker protein osteopontin (OPN) was analyzed by ESI-MS in order to find suitable conditions for its detection. A preliminary optimization of solvents and ionization conditions was done, and tandem MS (MSn) performed to increase the reliability of identification.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-12-19 11:25
  • 21.
    Romson, Joakim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Emmer, Åsa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    ESI-MSn Analysis of Recombinant Human OsteopontinManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The low-abundance protein osteopontin is implicated in several serious diseases, where its concentration andglycosylation patterns might be analyzed for its use as a biomarker. The glycosylation has previously been studied andcharacterized mainly on digested protein. Allowing analysis of glycosylation using the intact protein would reduce theworkload and analysis time, as well as introducing less potential sources of error and bias. Here, the detection of intactosteopontin by ESI-MS is presented. By using a matrix with a high proportion of isopropanol, osteopontin could be detectedand fragmented in tandem MS at 10 µg/mL by direct infusion. A lower osteopontin mass was also present in the sample. Theresults open the possibilities of further analysis of osteopontin by tandem MS and suggests a reporter ion.

  • 22.
    Romson, Joakim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Jacksén, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Emmer, Åsa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    An automated system for CE-MALDI and on-target digestion under a fluorocarbon lid applied on spermatophore proteins from Pieris napiIn: Journal of chromatography. B, ISSN 1570-0232, E-ISSN 1873-376XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method for off-line CE‑MALDI‑TOF-MS and MS2, and on-target digestion under a fluorocarbon lid was developed and applied for the analysis of proteins in the spermatophore of the butterfly Pieris napi. Fractionation revealed many peptides otherwise not detected or resolved. Automated fractionation was performed with an in-lab developed robotic system, and automated on-target tryptic digestion under a fluorocarbon lid was demonstrated with the same system. Fractionation onto a pre-structured MALDI-concentration plate facilitated aligned deposition of trypsin and MALDI-matrix with the deposited sample, also under the fluorocarbon lid. Some indications of indigenous proteolysis of spermatophore proteins were seen, and searching MS2 spectra suggested three tentative sequence homologies to P. rapae. The study demonstrates the functionality of the lab-made robot. Detailed manufacturing instructions and code are provided. The feasibility of automated on-target digestion under a fluorocarbon lid, and the usefulness of a structured concentration plate in CE-MALDI fractionation was shown. Further, it constitutes a preliminary study of P. napi spermatophore proteins.

  • 23.
    Saki, Zahra
    et al.
    Sharif Univ Technol, Phys Dept, Tehran 14588, Iran.;Uppsala Univ, Dept Chem, Angstrom Lab, Phys Chem, Box 523, S-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Aitola, Kerttu
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Chem, Angstrom Lab, Phys Chem, Box 523, S-75120 Uppsala, Sweden.;Aalto Univ Sch Sci, New Energy Technol Grp, Dept Appl Phys, POB 15100, Aalto 00076, Finland..
    Sveinbjornsson, Kari
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Chem, Angstrom Lab, Phys Chem, Box 523, S-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Yang, Wenxing
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Chem, Angstrom Lab, Phys Chem, Box 523, S-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Svanstrom, Sebastian
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron Mol & Condensed Matter Phys, Box 516, S-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Cappel, Ute B.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry. Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron Mol & Condensed Matter Phys, Box 516, S-75120 Uppsala, Sweden.;.
    Rensmo, Hakan
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron Mol & Condensed Matter Phys, Box 516, S-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Johansson, Erik M. J.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Chem, Angstrom Lab, Phys Chem, Box 523, S-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Taghavinia, Nima
    Sharif Univ Technol, Phys Dept, Tehran 14588, Iran.;Sharif Univ Technol, Inst Nanosci & Nanotechnol, Tehran 14588, Iran..
    Boschloo, Gerrit
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Chem, Angstrom Lab, Phys Chem, Box 523, S-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    The synergistic effect of dimethyl sulfoxide vapor treatment and C-60 electron transporting layer towards enhancing current collection in mixed-ion inverted perovskite solar cells2018In: Journal of Power Sources, ISSN 0378-7753, E-ISSN 1873-2755, Vol. 405, p. 70-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inverted perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have been introduced as better candidate for roll-to-roll printing and scaleup than their conventional configuration counterparts, while their fabrication is technically more demanding. The common light absorbing layer in inverted PSCs is the single cation methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI(3)) perovskite, whereas mixed-ion perovskites are chemically more stable. In mixed-ion perovskites, where FA (formamidinium) is the main replacement for MA, the electron affinity is larger than in MAPbI3 perovskites, leading to possible barriers against photoelectron collection by the electron transporting layer (ETL). In this paper we report on a mixed-ion (FAPbI(3))(0.83)(MAPbBr(3))(0.17) inverted PSC with improved photocurrent through using a dimethyl sulfoxide vapor treatment of perovskite layer and replacing the conventional [6,6]-phenyl-C-71 butyric acid methyl ester (PC70BM) with C-60/bathocuproine (BCP) as more effective ETL. The treatment of perovskite layer results in reduction of impurity phases of 8-FAPbI(3) and Pbl(2). Photoluminescence and open circuit voltage decay data demonstrate better charge carrier collection by the C-60/BCP compared to the PC70BM ETL, and an electron barrier for the back flow of electrons from ETL to perovskite. Our improvements in perovskite crystalization and electron transfer layer simultaneously lead to increasing the current density from 10 to 21 mA cm(-2).

  • 24.
    Schaefer, A.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Synchrotron Radiat Res, POB 118, SE-22100 Lund, Sweden.;Chalmers Univ Technol, Competence Ctr Catalysis, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Lanzilotto, V.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, POB 516, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Cappel, Ute B.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry. Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, POB 516, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Uvdal, P.
    Lund Univ, Dept Chem, Chem Phys, POB 124, SE-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Borg, A.
    NTNU Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Phys, NO-07491 Trondheim, Norway..
    Sandell, A.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, POB 516, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    First layer water phases on anatase TiO2(101)2018In: Surface Science, ISSN 0039-6028, E-ISSN 1879-2758, Vol. 674, p. 25-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The anatase TiO2(101) surface and its interaction with water is an important topic in oxide surface chemistry. Firstly, it benchmarks the properties of the majority facet of TiO2 nanoparticles and, secondly, there is a controversy as to whether the water molecule adsorbs intact or deprotonates. We have addressed the adsorption of water on anatase TiO2(101) by synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy. Three two-dimensional water structures are found during growth at different temperatures: at 100 K, a metastable structure forms with no hydrogen bonding between the water molecules. In accord with prior literature, we assign this phase to chains of disordered molecules. Growth 160 K results in a metastable structure with expressed hydrogen bonding between the water molecules. At 190 K, the water molecules become disordered as the thermal energy is too high and hence the hydrogen bonds break. The result is a structure with isolated monomers. Partial dissociation is observed for all three growths, with the molecular state only slightly favored in energy (20-40 meV) over the dissociated state. Heating of a thick film leads to more dissociation compared to a bilayer, when formed at 100 K. Thus, extending the water network facilitates proton transport and hence dissociation. The results reconcile apparent conflicting experimental results previously obtained by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and core level photoelectron spectroscopy.

  • 25.
    Schaefer, A.
    et al.
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Chem & Chem Engn, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Chalmers Univ Technol, Competence Ctr Catalysis, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Lanzilotto, V.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, POB 516, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Cappel, Ute
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry. Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, POB 516, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Uvdal, P.
    Lund Univ, Dept Chem, Chem Phys, POB 124, SE-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Borg, A.
    NTNU Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Phys, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway..
    Sandell, A.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, POB 516, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Defect-Induced Water Bilayer Growth on Anatase TiO2(101)2018In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 34, no 37, p. 10856-10864Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preparing an anatase TiO2(101) surface with a high density of oxygen vacancies and associated reduced Ti species in the near-surface region results in drastic changes in the water adsorption chemistry compared to adsorption on a highly stoichiometric surface. Using synchrotron radiation excited photoelectron spectroscopy, we observe a change in the water growth mode, from layer-by-layer growth on the highly stoichiometric surface to bilayer growth on the reduced surface. Furthermore, we have been able to observe enrichment at the surface upon water adsorption. The Ti3+ enrichment occurs concomitant with effective water dissociation into hydroxyls with a very high thermal stability. The water bilayer on the reduced surface is thermally more stable than that on the stoichiometric surface, and it is more efficient in promoting further water dissociation upon heating. The results thus show how the presence of subsurface defects can alter the wetting mechanism of an oxide surface.

  • 26.
    Wei, Zheng
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Edin, Jonathan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Karlsson, Anna Emelie
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Petrovic, Katarina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Soroka, Inna L.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Odnevall Wallinder, Inger
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Hedberg, Yolanda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Can gamma irradiation during radiotherapy influence the metal release process for biomedical CoCrMo and 316L alloys?2018In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials, ISSN 1552-4973, E-ISSN 1552-4981, Vol. 106, no 7, p. 2673-2680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extent of metal release from implant materials that are irradiated during radiotherapy may be influenced by irradiation-formed radicals. The influence of gamma irradiation, with a total dose of relevance for radiotherapy (e.g., for cancer treatments) on the extent of metal release from biomedical stainless steel AISI 316L and a cobalt-chromium alloy (CoCrMo) was investigated in physiological relevant solutions (phosphate buffered saline with and without 10 g/L bovine serum albumin) at pH 7.3. Directly after irradiation, the released amounts of metals were significantly higher for irradiated CoCrMo as compared to nonirradiated CoCrMo, resulting in an increased surface passivation (enhanced passive conditions) that hindered further release. A similar effect was observed for 316L showing lower nickel release after 1 h of initially irradiated samples as compared to nonirradiated samples. However, the effect of irradiation (total dose of 16.5 Gy) on metal release and surface oxide composition and thickness was generally small. Most metals were released initially (within seconds) upon immersion from CoCrMo but not from 316L. Albumin induced an increased amount of released metals from AISI 316L but not from CoCrMo. Albumin was not found to aggregate to any greater extent either upon gamma irradiation or in the presence of trace metal ions, as determined using different light scattering techniques. Further studies should elucidate the effect of repeated friction and fractionated low irradiation doses on the short- and long term metal release process of biomedical materials.

  • 27.
    Xia, Songqin
    et al.
    Univ Sci & Technol Beijing, State Key Lab Adv Met & Mat, Beijing, Peoples R China.;Peking Univ, State Key Lab Nucl Phys & Technol, Beijing, Peoples R China.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lousada, Claudio M.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Mao, Huahai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering. Thermocalc Software AB, Solna, Sweden..
    Maier, Annika C.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Korzhavyi, Pavel A.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Sandström, Rolf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Wang, Yugang
    Peking Univ, State Key Lab Nucl Phys & Technol, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Yong
    Univ Sci & Technol Beijing, State Key Lab Adv Met & Mat, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Nonlinear Oxidation Behavior in Pure Ni and Ni-Containing Entropic Alloys (vol 5, 53, 2018)2018In: FRONTIERS IN MATERIALS, ISSN 2296-8016, Vol. 5, article id 73Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Yang, Wenxing
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Angstrom Lab, Dept Chem, Box 523, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden.;Imperial Coll London, Dept Chem, London SW7 2AZ, England..
    Hao, Yan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Kloo, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Boschloo, Gerrit
    Uppsala Univ, Angstrom Lab, Dept Chem, Box 523, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Carrier Dynamics of Dye Sensitized-TiO2 in Contact with Different Cobalt Complexes in the Presence of Tri(p-anisyl)amine Intermediates2018In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 122, no 26, p. 14345-14354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heterogeneous charge transfer processes at sensitized wide bandgap semiconductor surfaces are imperative for both fundamental knowledge and technical applications. Herein, we focus on the investigation of carrier dynamics of a triphenylamine-based dye, LEG4, sensitized TiO2 (LEG4/TiO2) in contact with two types of electrolyte systems: pure cobalt-based electrolytes and in combination with an organic donor, tri(p-anisyl)amine (TPAA). Four different cobalt redox systems with potentials spanning a 0.3 V range were studied, and the carrier recombination and regeneration kinetics were monitored both at low and at high TiO2 (e(-)) densities (1.3 X 10(18) and 1.3 X 10(19) cm(-3), respectively). The results reveal that the introduction of the TPAA intermediate more effectively suppress the recombination loss of TiO2 (e(-)) under high charge conditions, close to open-circuit, as compared to low charge conditions. As a result, the charge transfer from the cobalt complexes to the oxidized dyes is significantly improved by the addition of TPAA. Dye-sensitized solar cells fabricated with the TPAA-containing electrolytes demonstrate remarkable improvement in both V-OC and J(SC) and lead to more than 25% increase of the light-to-electricity conversion efficiency. Furthermore, an unprecedented detrimental impact of TPAA on the device performance was identified when the redox potential of the TPAA donor and the cobalt complexes are close. This is ascribed to the formation of TPAA(center dot+) which can act as an active recombination centers and thus lower the solar cell performance. These insights point at a strategy to enhance the lifetimes of electrons generated in sensitized semiconductor electrodes by overcoming the charge recombination between TiO2 and the oxidized dye under high carrier densities in the semiconductor substrate and offer practical guidance to the design of future efficient electrolyte systems for dye-sensitized solar cells.

  • 29.
    Ye, Xinchen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Hedenqvist, Mikael S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Langton, Maud
    Lendel, Christofer
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    On the role of peptide hydrolysis for fibrillation kinetics and amyloid fibril morphology2018In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 8, no 13, p. 6915-6924Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-assembly of proteins into amyloid-like nanofibrils is not only a key event in several diseases, but such fibrils are also associated with intriguing biological function and constitute promising components for new biobased materials. The bovine whey protein beta-lactoglobulin has emerged as an important model protein for the development of such materials. We here report that peptide hydrolysis is the rate-determining step for fibrillation of beta-lactoglobulin in whey protein isolate. We also explore the observation that beta-lactoglobulin nanofibrils of distinct morphologies are obtained by simply changing the initial protein concentration. We find that the morphological switch is related to different nucleation mechanisms and that the two classes of nanofibrils are associated with variations of the peptide building blocks. Based on the results, we propose that the balance between protein concentration and the hydrolysis rate determines the structure of the formed nanofibrils.

  • 30.
    Zhang, Fuguo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Cong, Jiayan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Li, Yuanyuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Bergstrand, Jan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Liu, Haichun
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Cai, Bin
    State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology (DUT).
    Hajian, Alireza
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Yao, Zhaoyang
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Wang, Linqin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Hao, Yan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Yang, Xichuan
    State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology (DUT).
    Gardner, James M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Ågren, Hans
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Widengren, Jerker
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Kloo, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry. State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology (DUT).
    A facile route to grain morphology controllable perovskite thin films towards highly efficient perovskite solar cells2018In: Nano Energy, ISSN 2211-2855, E-ISSN 2211-3282, Vol. 53, p. 405-414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perovskite photovoltaics have recently attracted extensive attention due to their unprecedented high power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) in combination with primitive manufacturing conditions. However, the inherent polycrystalline nature of perovskite films renders an exceptional density of structural defects, especially at the grain boundaries (GBs) and film surfaces, representing a key challenge that impedes the further performance improvement of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) and large solar module ambitions towards commercialization. Here, a novel strategy is presented utilizing a simple ethylammonium chloride (EACl) additive in combination with a facile solvent bathing approach to achieve high quality methyammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) films. Well-oriented, micron-sized grains were observed, which contribute to an extended carrier lifetime and reduced trap density. Further investigations unraveled the distinctively prominent effects of EACl in modulating the perovskite film quality. The EACl was found to promote the perovskite grain growing without undergoing the formation of intermediate phases. Moreover, the EACl was also revealed to deplete at relative low temperature to enhance the film quality without compromising the beneficial bandgap for solar cell applications. This new strategy boosts the power conversion efficiency (PCE) to 20.9% and 19.0% for devices with effective areas of 0.126 cm2 and 1.020 cm2, respectively, with negligible current hysteresis and enhanced stability. Besides, perovskite films with a size of 10 × 10 cm2, and an assembled 16 cm2(5 × 5 cm2 module) perovskite solar module with a PCE of over 11% were constructed.

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