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  • 1.
    Chang, Fangyuan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Technology in Health Care.
    Östlund, Britt
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Technology in Health Care.
    Perspectives of older adults and informal caregivers on information visualization for smart home monitoring systems: A critical review2019In: 20th Congress of the International Ergonomics Association, IEA 2018, Springer, 2019, Vol. 822, p. 681-690Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although health monitoring systems in smart homes have been revealed as a significant tool to help people ageing in place, the density of data poses a challenge on the information visualization. This review aims to make contributions to find gaps in the field of information visualization regarding smart home monitoring for older people. Three kinds of information needs of older adults and their informal caregivers regarding smart home monitoring are categorized, including physical needs, emotional needs and cognitive needs. The research studies reflect that these needs are mainly used to discuss ideas of, design approaches for, the information visualization from ten aspects in the visceral level, behavioral level and reflective level. Results show that there is still a big gap existing in enabling older people and their informal caregivers to better understand smart home monitoring information. Some existing design recommendations can be improved while at the same time, some needs have not been manifested through information visualization. A wider understanding of older adults, informal caregivers and home living environment in all aspects are necessary.

  • 2. Fernández-Ardèvol, M.
    et al.
    Rosales, A.
    Loos, E.
    Peine, A.
    Beneito-Montagut, R.
    Blanche, D.
    Fischer, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Technology in Health Care.
    Katz, S.
    Östlund, Britt
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Technology in Health Care.
    Methodological Strategies to Understand Smartphone Practices for Social Connectedness in Later Life2019In: Proceedings 5th International Conference on Human Aspects of IT for the Aged Population, ITAP 2019, held as part of the 21st International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCI International 2019, Springer Verlag , 2019, p. 46-64Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital practices in later life are not yet well understood. Therefore, this paper discusses the framework for a research design project that aims at tracing differences and similarities in how older adults use their smartphones in circumstances in and outside their homes in Spain, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Canada. The research questions of this international research project focus on the extent to which digital mobile practices relate to perceived social connectedness among older adults aged 55–79 years old. While studies have shown that the subjective experience of ‘being connected’ supports continued wellbeing in later life, there remains an insufficient understanding of the processes through which digital mediated social interaction is effective for social connectedness. The analytical framework of the project prioritizes the co-constituency of (digital) technology and ageing, and takes digital practices in everyday life as its entry point. The main data collection tool will be the tracking of smartphone activity of 600 older adults (150 per country) during four weeks. An online survey and qualitative interviews will gather data about the meanings of the quantified digital practices, and how they shape (if they do) the participants’ connection to the world. This approach will allow us not only to get insight into what older adults say how they used their smartphone but also to gain insight into their real-life daily use. The assessment of the challenges, strengths, and weaknesses of the methods contributes towards an accurate and appropriate interpretation of empirical results and their implications.

  • 3.
    Frennert, Susanne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Technology in Health Care.
    Literature review: The current levels of understanding of interactive robotics2018In: Gerontechnology, ISSN 1569-1101, E-ISSN 1569-111X, Vol. 17, no s, p. 160-160Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Frennert, Susanne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Technology in Health Care.
    Lost in digitalization?: Municipality employment of welfare technologies2019In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 635-642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Swedish municipalities face a number of daunting challenges; an aging population, the public's increased demands and expectations on municipality services, and a strained economy to mention some. Welfare technology, a Scandinavian concept launched to promote digitalization, is seen as one solution to meet these challenges. Objective: Despite these promises, few welfare technology applications are offered by local Swedish municipalities and care organizations. Numerous studies have shown that Swedish municipalities have a great interest in welfare technologies. Methods: In this article, we draw on empirical research in one Swedish municipality. Through two case studies it is illustrated how technological change and municipality employment of welfare technologies are employed. Results: These case studies show how core values of care are being lost in the quest for digitalization due to the lack of organizational skills and knowledge in transforming the relationship of caregiving and care-receiving through the use of digital technology. Conclusions: Digitalization and welfare technologies deployed ought to represent and support the core values of caregiving and to receive care. Thus, digital transformation most likely will transform conditions for care receivers and working conditions for care workers. New work processes will evolve, which in turn produce new meanings of home help service work and caregiving.

  • 5.
    Frennert, Susanne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Technology in Health Care.
    Narrative Review: Technologies in Eldercare2018In: Journal of Science and TechnologyArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Frennert, Susanne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Technology in Health Care.
    Social companion robots in eldercare – who gains and who loses?2013In: Proceeding at ICSR2013 at the workshop on social companion robots, Bristol, UK, October 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Frennert, Susanne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Technology in Health Care.
    The CPS triangle: A suggested framework for evaluating robots in everyday life2018In: 10th International Conference on Social Robotics, ICSR 2018, Springer Verlag , 2018, p. 369-379Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces a conceptual framework: the CPS triangle, which has evolved over four years of research on ‘older people meet robots’. It is a synthesis of domestication theory, modern social practice theory and empirical data. Case studies on the domestication of one current technology, the robotic vacuum cleaner, and two emergent technologies, the eHealth system and the service robot, provide empirical evidence. Considering ‘older people meet robots’ within the framework of the proposed CPS triangle can help us to understand older people’s domestication or rejection of robots. In the CPS triangle, C represents the cognitive dimension; P, the practical dimension; and S, the symbolic dimension. The CPS triangle is meant to serve as a tool rather than a rule. It is recommended that the CPS triangle be tested more widely in a range of contexts. It will require adaptation and customisation for the context of use.

  • 8.
    Frennert, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Technology in Health Care.
    Baudin, Katarina
    Mälardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    The concept of welfare technology in Swedish municipal eldercare2019In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: An ageing population presents a challenge for municipal eldercare in Sweden due to difficulties recruiting staff and there being a strained economy. A strategy involving welfare technology is presented as one such solution. An important group to carry out this strategy involves those who work with welfare technology in municipal eldercare. In this paper we describe their perception of welfare technology, and the challenges and opportunities they perceive in utilizing it. Methods: A self-administered online questionnaire was distributed to all Swedish municipalities and answered by 393 respondents. Analyses show that the respondents were representative of the different professions who work with welfare technology within municipal eldercare. Results: Welfare technology was perceived as being more reliable and safer than humans with regards to supervisions and reminders. The respondents acknowledged factors that slowed down the implementation of welfare technology in municipal eldercare organizations, such as resistance to change, lack of finances, lack of supporting evidence, lack of infrastructure, high staff turnover, difficulties with procurement and uncertainties about responsibility and laws. Conclusions: We found that the people who work with and make decisions about welfare technology in municipal eldercare organizations were generally very positive about the deployment and use of such technology, but there appear to be problems within municipal eldercare organizations to realize this vision. The lack of structured implementation processes and coherent evaluation models indicates inequality of the access to welfare technology and, as a result, even though Swedish eldercare is publicly funded, the availability of welfare technologies and their usage differ between municipalities.

  • 9.
    Frennert, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Technology in Health Care.
    Östlund, Britt
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Technology in Health Care.
    How Do Older People Think and Feel About Robots in Health- and Elderly Care?2020In: Biosystems and Biorobotics, Springer International Publishing , 2020, p. 167-174Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This extended abstract is a report on older people’s perception of interactive robots in health- and elderly care. A series of focus groups was conducted. In total 31 older people participated. The majority of the participants viewed interactive robots in health- and elderly care as an asset but they also voiced concerns regarding reliability, practical handling, costs and fear of mechanical care.

  • 10. Mattsson, Janet
    et al.
    Östlund, Britt
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Technology in Health Care.
    Björling, Gunilla
    Williamsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Interprofessional Learning for Enhanced Patient Safety: Biomedical Engineering Students and Nursing Students in Joint Learning Activities.2019In: Journal of Research in Interprofessional Practice and Education, ISSN 1916-7342, E-ISSN 1916-7342, Vol. 9, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In the last decade, research has highlighted the importance of interprofessional approaches to education and practice. Collaboration between medical practice and engineering has been identified as particularly relevant to developing accountable models for sustainable healthcare and overcoming increased specialization leading to professional barriers. This study aims to analyze insights and understanding expressed by nursing students and biomedical engineering students following a joint learning activity regarding a medical device used in the hospital setting.

    Method: A qualitative approach deriving from a phenomenological view examined an interprofessional learning activity where the focus was on active integration and knowledge exchange.

    Conclusion: The activity was expressed as a positive opportunity for getting insights into perspectives from other professional groups as well as insights into the importance of a system perspective in patient safety. The learning and insights listed in the evaluations included ideas about how the two professional groups could collaborate in the future.

  • 11.
    Östlund, Britt
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Technology in Health Care.
    Narrative Review: Technologies in Eldercare2018In: Nordic Journal of Science and Technology Studies, ISSN 1894-4647, Vol. 6, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 11 of 11
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