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  • 1.
    Adam, Jonathan
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Analyzing Function and Potential in Cuba's El Paquete: A Postcolonial Approach2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The dire state of Cuban internet connectivity has inspired local informal innovations. One such innovation is El Paquete, a weekly distribution of downloaded content spread through an informal network. Taking a postcolonial approach, I investigate through user experiences how this network operates in a resource-poor environment. This investigation articulates a model of El Paquete centered on social interactions, which inform the system’s function but also shape El Paquete’s design and role in society. Based on this model, a set of speculative design exercises probe possibilities to streamline El Paquete’s compilation, involve consumer preferences in its design directions, or act as a disruption tolerant network. In uncovering the technical possibilities of El Paquete, these designs illuminate how its current design serves Cuban communities by embodying realities and limitations of Cuban society. El Paquete’s embodiment of informal innovation serves as a call to designers to continuously rethink development design processes, centering communities and their knowledge and technical practices.

  • 2.
    Afework, Miriam
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Using Magic Machines to Elaborate Menstrual Self-Tracker­s for Women with Endometriosis2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Existing self-tracking tools for women concentrate on one’s general well-being and keeping track of ovulation and periods. With around 10% of women worldwide suffering from endometriosis there is an unmet need to leverage self-tracking for women whose cycles are affected by more variables. The disease is enigmatic with an unknown cause and cure and the ill­ness differs for each individual in symptoms and working treatments. It is therefore critical to understand how women can learn about their bodies and how to treat their condition. In this research I work with two sufferers to identify their secret de­sires through a workshop and a series of interviews. Results suggest that women with endometriosis could benefit from ex­perimenting with different habits and make personalized routines to suit their own needs. Finally I present design implica­tions for an existing menstrual app in the form of an add-on. The steps of the add-on tool included three steps. Firstly, choosing variables of one’s well being to track (mood, energy, pain etc.), choosing activities for one or more cycles (gluten-free diet, exercising etc.), and lastly viewing an analysis of any changes in the body.

  • 3.
    Almeida, Teresa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Juul Søndergaard, Marie-Louise
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Homewood, Sarah
    IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Morrissey, Kellie
    Newcastle University, UK.
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Woman-Centred Design2018In: DRS 2018: Book of DRS 2018 Conversations / [ed] Sharon Prendeville, Abigail Durrant, Nora O’ Murchú and Keelin Leahy, UK, 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Balaam, Madeline
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Comber, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Clarke, Rachel E
    Northumbria University Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
    Windlin, Charles
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE SICS, Kista, Sweden.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Fitzpatrick, Geraldine
    TU Wien, Vienna, Austria.
    Emotion Work in Experience-Centred Design2019In: CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems Proceedings (CHI 2019), May 4–9, 2019, Glasgow, Scotland UK, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experience Centred Design (ECD) implores us to develop empathic relationships and understanding of participants, to actively work with our senses and emotions within the design process. However, theories of experience-centred design do little to account for emotion work undertaken by design researchers when doing this. As a consequence, how a design researcher’s emotions are experienced, navigated and used as part of an ECD process are rarely published. So, while emotion is clearly a tool that we use, we don’t share with one another how, why and when it gets used. This has a limiting effect on how we understand design processes, and opportunities for training. Here, we share some of our experiences of working with ECD. We analyse these using Hochschild’s framework of emotion work to show how and where this work occurs. We use our analysis to question current ECD practices and provoke debate.

  • 5.
    Bergsmark, Moa
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    From Patchwork to Appliqué: Exploring Material Properties Through an Interaction Design Remake2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Materials and materiality in interaction design has become more and more important perspectives within the field. Material explorations of a specific material could contribute to this ongoing discussion. As means to investigate how material properties affect interactive qualities for a tangible interaction design, a remake of an existing design was created. The starting point for remake is a tangible programming space for children called Patcher where custom built RFID readers is interacted with. For this investigation, Android mobile phones with NFC readers is the material of choice when recreating the same concept. Design values in Patcher are identified as collaborative play and open-ended programming play. The creation process of Alfombra Applique, the remake, is presented, the design choices and how they relate to the shift of material. This leads to learnings regarding how material properties differ when using the prebuild product with a lot of design possibilities in relationship to custom built hardware. These learning can be summarized into three topics. (1) When using a prebuilt product as material there will be more limitations to how a designer can change the material, it can only be bent using software. (2) A consumer market product opens up to getting the artefact available to more users, but it could depend on how the product normally is used. (3) The designer and users will have a lot more preknowledge of the material whish gives implications on expectations. Also, the paper investigates how exploring materials and having a bricolage mindset made it possible to create a meaningful remake with other material of an existing design. It is concluded that the choice of materials and how designers work with their properties changes what is relevant and possible to design. 

  • 6.
    Bälter, Olle
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Helena, Tobiasson
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Toivanen, Susanna
    Mälardalen University.
    Walking Outdoors during Seminars Improved Perceived Seminar Quality and Sense of Well-Being among Participants2018In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 15, no 303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low levels of physical activity and sedentary behaviour are a growing health problem globally. Physical inactivity is associated with increased risk of numerous ailments, cardiovascular disease and mortality. Our primary aim was to perform a feasibility study on how to incorporate physical activity among students and teachers in regular teaching activities. The second aim was to investigate how students and teachers perceived the differences between outdoor walking seminars and regular indoor seminars. By transforming an on-campus course into a blended course, we were able to conduct seminars outdoors in nearby nature while walking. These walking seminars were evaluated among 131 students and nine teachers leading the walking seminars. The responses to the student survey and teacher interviews indicate that discussions, sense of well-being and the general quality of the seminar improved, regardless of how physically active participants were the rest of the time. The study shows one way to increase physical activity with small means; in our case, a reorganization of how we prepared for the seminars which allowed for walking discussions.

  • 7.
    Bälter, Olle
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Riese, Emma
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Enoksson, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Baltatzis, Alexander
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Josefsson, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    The Challenge of Identifying the Importance of Drivers and Barriers for Implementation of Technology Enhanced Learning2018In: The 11th Pan-Hellenic and International Conference: ICT in Education, 2018, p. 283-290Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential of technology enhanced learning (TEL) can have both pedagogical and administrative benefits. In a previous study, we investigated the drivers and barriers for TEL in higher education using Force Field Analysis (FFA). In this follow-up study, we collected new data through a questionnaire to a group of pedagogical developers and at a presentation at a university internal conference for teachers. A Kruskal Wallis test was carried out to test if the groups filling out questionnaire deviated from each other in their ranking. A comparison was also done to the scores in the previous study. As a result of this triangulation, deviations were found between ratings for seven of the 20 identified forces. While the assessments of strengths in FFA is debated, we argue that each group’s view is an important component to understand the situation, and triangulation of data is helpful in understanding the different views.

  • 8.
    Bälter, Olle
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Riese, Emma
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Viberg, Olga
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Effective Feedback for Faster Learning2019In: KTH SoTL 2019, Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose The Open Learning Initiative (OLI) at Carnegie Mellon University and Stanford University showed already in 2008 (Lovett, Meyer & Thille) that by using the OLI methodology, teaching and learning time could be reduced with 50% with maintained results. One key in this methodology is to use online questions with answer-depending feedback. In this workshop we will work with you to formulate OLIinspired questions for your course. Work done/work in progress We have previously worked with online quizzes in several forms (Bälter, Enström & Klingenberg, 2013) and analyzed learning data from OLI courses (Bälter, Zimmaro & Thille, 2018). The online learning material where the questions and feedback is embedded is in campus courses used in flipped classroom settings. In 2017 we ran a pilot of preparatory course in programming based on a Stanford course with OLI methodology in the OpenEdX environment. During the fall semester 2018 questions with answer-depending feedback was added to the course material in an online introductory programming course given in Canvas at KTH. Results/observations/lessons learned While a full implementation of the entire OLI methodology requires infrastructure that is not in place at KTH yet (event handler, analytic engine), the actual learning for the students takes place in the interaction with the questions and their feedback and this part can already be implemented in Canvas at KTH. Take-home message Well-formulated questions with forward focused feedback can dramatically speed up both teaching and 1 2 1 1 2 Page 25 KTH SoTL 2019 (A-K) learning. This workshop brings that speed to your course with practical exercises based on your own course.

  • 9.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ringenson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    The Sustainable Playable City: Making Way for the Playful Citizen2020In: Making Smart Cities More Playable: Exploring Playable Cities / [ed] Anton Nijholt, Singapore: Springer, Singapore , 2020, p. 87-106Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    To play is a legitimate need of urban citizens, and it is therefore important to enable play in cities and to plan for making cities playable. The playable city is not dependent on the digital technologies offered by the smart city. The playable city “happens” when a city offers suitable (playful) affordances and citizens engage in and make use of them. This ultimately implies that also ‘non-smart’ cities can be playable (and may indeed already be so). In this chapter we explore the intersection of playable and sustainable cities. We argue that the playable city can be placed within the realm of what the sustainable city should be and should aim for. The issue of whether this is achieved by applying digital technologies thus becomes decentred, even though digital technologies at the same time could open up for new and exciting possibilities. Key is to ensure that the playable city is a sustainable city and we should therefore aim for designing and building sustainable playable cities.

  • 10.
    Cajander, Åsa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction..
    Grünloh, Christiane
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Electronic Health Records Are More Than a Work Tool: Conflicting Needs of Direct and Indirect Stakeholders2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stakeholder relationships can be complex and include conflicting needs and values, especially in a changing society. However, little is known about details of contradictory perspectives of stakeholders. More discussions are needed in HCI about complex human-centred systems development. In this paper we study the different perspectives of patients and physicians related to Patient Accessible Electronic Health Records (PAEHR) in Sweden. We used themes from interviews with physicians as a lens to analyse survey data from patients. The results show that the needs and wishes of patients conflict with the physicians’ preconceptions of patients’ needs. Moreover, the needs of patients stand in tension with the physicians’ work related preferences. Our paper highlights the necessity to consider the accuracy of stakeholders’ perspectives about other stakeholder groups. We also discuss the implications of the results in relation to design, methods and tools in HCI, and reorientation of work.

  • 11.
    Campo Woytuk, Nadia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Juul Sondergaard, Marie Louise
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ciolfi Felice, Marianela
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Touching and Being in Touch with the Menstruating Body2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe a Research through Design project—Curious Cycles—a collection of objects and interactions which encourage people to be in close contact with their menstruating body. Throughout a full menstrual cycle, five participants used Curious Cycles to look at their bodies in unfamiliar ways and to touch their bodily fluids, specifically, menstrual blood, saliva, and cervical mucus. The act of touching and looking led to the construction of new knowledge about the self and to a nurturing appreciation for the changing body. Yet, participants encountered and reflected upon frictions within themselves, their home, and their social surroundings, which stem from societal stigma and preconceptions about menstruation and bodily fluids. We call for and show how interaction design can engage with technologies that mediate self-touch as a first step towards reconfiguring the way menstruating bodies are treated in society.

  • 12.
    Cheng, Xiaogang
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS). Nanjing Univ Posts & Telecommun, Coll Telecommun & Informat Engn, Nanjing 210003, Jiangsu, Peoples R China.
    Yang, Bin
    Hedman, Anders
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Olofsson, Thomas
    Li, Haibo
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Van Gool, Luc
    NIDL: A pilot study of contactless measurement of skin temperature for intelligent building2019In: Energy and Buildings, ISSN 0378-7788, E-ISSN 1872-6178, Vol. 198, p. 340-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human thermal comfort measurement plays a critical role in giving feedback signals for building energy efficiency. A contactless measuring method based on subtleness magnification and deep learning (NIDL) was designed to achieve a comfortable, energy efficient built environment. The method relies on skin feature data, e.g., subtle motion and texture variation, and a 315-layer deep neural network for constructing the relationship between skin features and skin temperature. A physiological experiment was conducted for collecting feature data (1.44 million) and algorithm validation. The contactless measurement algorithm based on a partly-personalized saturation temperature model (NIPST) was used for algorithm performance comparisons. The results show that the mean error and median error of the NIDL are 0.476 degrees C and 0.343 degrees C which is equivalent to accuracy improvements of 39.07% and 38.76%, respectively.

  • 13.
    Cockton, Gilbert
    et al.
    Northumbria Univ, Sch Design, Commun Design, Squires Bldg, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 8ST, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Kaye, Jofish
    Mozilla, 331 E Evelyn Ave, Mountain View, CA 94041 USA..
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Informat & Media, Box 513, S-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Wynn, Eleanor
    6311 Palomino Way, West Linn, OR 97068 USA..
    Williamson, Julie
    Univ Glasgow, Sch Comp Sci, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    Moving Towards a Journal-centric Publication Model for CHI: Possible Paths, Opportunities and Risks2019In: CHI EA '19 EXTENDED ABSTRACTS: EXTENDED ABSTRACTS OF THE 2019 CHI CONFERENCE ON HUMAN FACTORS IN COMPUTING SYSTEMS, ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a scholarly field, the ACM SIGCHI community maintains a strong focus on conferences as its main outlet for scholarly publication. Historically, this originates in how the field of computer science adopted a conference-centric publication model as well as in the organizational focus of ACM. Lately, this model has become increasingly challenged for a number of reasons, and multiple alternatives are emerging within the SIGCHI community as well as in adjacent communities. Through revisiting examples from other conferences and neighboring communities, this panel explores alternative publication paths and their opportunities and risks.

  • 14.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Julia, Creutz
    Cybercom Group.
    Hasselqvist, Hanna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sustainable IT Business in the Making: An exploratory case study2019In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on ICT for Sustainability, Lappeenranta, Finland, June 10-14, 2019. / [ed] Annika Wolff, 2019, Vol. 2382Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Businesses have historically had a negative impact on the environment by contributing to pollution, the increase of greenhouse emissions, neglection of responsible waste disposal, and deforestation among other things. In this paper we present an exploratory case study of an IT consultancy firm and their perspective and work with sustainable development. As a consultancy firm, the company does not provideservices directly to end users, but rather help clients in their business efforts. The aim with this project has been to explore how sustainability concerns can be integrated into the work processes of an IT consultancy firm, exploring both opportunities and challenges.

  • 15.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    On the inherent contradictions of teaching sustainability at a technical university2017In: Digital Technology and Sustainability: Engaging the Paradox, Taylor and Francis , 2017, p. 154-165Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    On the necessity of rocking the boat Computers and digitalization have greatly shaped our world and are now an unavoidable part of modern society. Weiser’s (1991) vision of ubiquitous computing has in many respects not only been met but has in affluent parts of the world been surpassed (Bell & Dourish, 2007). Digital artifacts and devices surround us and have invisibly and seamlessly permeated everything we do. Our modern societies are however not sustainable. We have overstepped several planetary boundaries and risk overstepping several more (Steffen et al., 2015). We are about to reach limits as to the resources we can extract from the earth (Bardi, 2014), and the changes wreaked are by now so profound that they will likely last for a geological period of time (Steffen et al., 2007). In light of this, it is of utmost importance to strive towards a sustainable society, and this is a responsibility that falls on many disciplines and sectors. We believe that engineering students could be key drivers in this change since many will eventually enter positions of power from which they will make decisions that will shape our future society. 

  • 16.
    Eriksson, Sara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Trichon, Vincent
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    Karlstad University.
    Kjellström, Hedvig
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Dancing with Drones: Crafting Novel Artistic Expressions through Intercorporeality2019In: Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York, NY USA, 2019, p. 617:1-617:12Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, SICS.
    Designing for Joyful Movement2018In: Funology 2: From Usability to Enjoyment / [ed] Mark Blythe and Andrew Monk, Springer , 2018, p. 193-207Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interaction design research has broadened its focus from settings in which people would sit more or less still in front of static computers doing their work tasks, to instead thriving off new interactive materials, mobile use, and ubiquitously available data of all sorts, creating interactions everywhere. These changes have put into question such as play versus learning, work versus leisure, or casual versus serious technology use. As both hardware and software have become mobile—both literally and in terms of transgressing cultural categories—the different social spheres and the rules that they are associated with are changing

  • 18.
    Ferreira, Pedro
    et al.
    IT-University of Copenhagen.
    Helms, Karey
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Brown, Barry
    Stockholm University, DSV.
    Lampinen, Airi
    Stockholm University, DSV.
    From nomadic work to nomadic leisure practice: A study of long-term bike touring2019In: Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction, E-ISSN 2573-0142, Vol. 3, article id 111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobility has long been a central concern in research within the Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) community, particularly when it comes to work and how being on the move calls for reorganizing work practices. We expand this line of work with a focus on nomadic leisure practices. Based on interviews with eleven participants, we present a study that illuminates how digital technologies are used to shape and structure long-distance cycling. Our main analysis centers on bike touring as a nomadic leisure practice and on how it offers a radical departure from traditional modes of structuring work and life, and thus, complicates the relationship between work and leisure. We complement this with an account of managing the uncertainties of nomadicity by focusing on participants’ experiences with arranging overnighting and network hospitality. We offer this study, firstly, as one response to the call for more diversity in the empirical cases drawn upon in theorizing nomadic work and leisure practices, but more productively, as an opportunity to reflect upon the temporal and spatial logics of digital technologies and platforms and how they frame our attitudes towards the interplay between work and leisure.

  • 19. Ferreira, Pedro
    et al.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    The Case for Play in the Developing World: Lessons from Rah Island, Vanuatu2015In: Indigenous People and Mobile Technologies / [ed] Laurel Evelyn Dyson, Stephen Grant, Max Hendriks, Routledge, 2015Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20. Fitzpatrick, G.
    et al.
    Friedman, B.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Olson, J. S.
    Russell, D. M.
    Daring to change: Creating a slower more sustainable academic life2018In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, article id panel06Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous reports and studies point to increasing performance criteria and workplace stress for academics/researchers. Together with the audience, this panel will explore how we experience this in the HCI community, focussing particularly on what we can do to change this for a slower more sustainable academic culture. The future of good quality HCI research is dependent on happy healthy researchers and reasonable realistic academic processes.

  • 21.
    Frid, Emma
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Accessible Digital Musical Instruments: A Review of Musical Interfaces in Inclusive Music Practice2019In: Multimodal Technologies and Interaction, E-ISSN 2414-4088, Vol. 3, no 3, article id 57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current advancements in music technology enable the creation of customized Digital Musical Instruments (DMIs). This paper presents a systematic review of Accessible Digital Musical Instruments (ADMIs) in inclusive music practice. History of research concerned with facilitating inclusion in music-making is outlined, and current state of developments and trends in the field are discussed. Although the use of music technology in music therapy contexts has attracted more attention in recent years, the topic has been relatively unexplored in Computer Music literature. This review investigates a total of 113 publications focusing on ADMIs. Based on the 83 instruments in this dataset, ten control interface types were identified: tangible controllers, touchless controllers, Brain–Computer Music Interfaces (BCMIs), adapted instruments, wearable controllers or prosthetic devices, mouth-operated controllers, audio controllers, gaze controllers, touchscreen controllers and mouse-controlled interfaces. The majority of the AMDIs were tangible or physical controllers. Although the haptic modality could potentially play an important role in musical interaction for many user groups, relatively few of the ADMIs (15.6%) incorporated vibrotactile feedback. Aspects judged to be important for successful ADMI design were instrument adaptability and customization, user participation, iterative prototyping, and interdisciplinary development teams.

  • 22.
    Frid, Emma
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Diverse Sounds: Enabling Inclusive Sonic Interaction2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This compilation thesis collects a series of publications on designing sonic interactions for diversity and inclusion. The presented papers focus on case studies in which musical interfaces were either developed or reviewed. While the described studies are substantially different in their nature, they all contribute to the thesis by providing reflections on how musical interfaces could be designed to enable inclusion rather than exclusion. Building on this work, I introduce two terms: inclusive sonic interaction design and Accessible Digital Musical Instruments (ADMIs). I also define nine properties to consider in the design and evaluation of ADMIs: expressiveness, playability, longevity, customizability, pleasure, sonic quality, robustness, multimodality and causality. Inspired by the experience of playing an acoustic instrument, I propose to enable musical inclusion for under-represented groups (for example persons with visual- and hearing-impairments, as well as elderly people) through the design of Digital Musical Instruments (DMIs) in the form of rich multisensory experiences allowing for multiple modes of interaction. At the same time, it is important to enable customization to fit user needs, both in terms of gestural control and provided sonic output. I conclude that the computer music community has the potential to actively engage more people in music-making activities. In addition, I stress the importance of identifying challenges that people face in these contexts, thereby enabling initiatives towards changing practices.

  • 23.
    Frid, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Interactive sonification of a fluid dance movement: an exploratory study2019In: Journal on Multimodal User Interfaces, ISSN 1783-7677, E-ISSN 1783-8738, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 181-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present three different experiments designed to explore sound properties associated with fluid movement: (1) an experiment in which participants adjusted parameters of a sonification model developed for a fluid dance movement, (2) a vocal sketching experiment in which participants sketched sounds portraying fluid versus nonfluid movements, and (3) a workshop in which participants discussed and selected fluid versus nonfluid sounds. Consistent findings from the three experiments indicated that sounds expressing fluidity generally occupy a lower register and has less high frequency content, as well as a lower bandwidth, than sounds expressing nonfluidity. The ideal sound to express fluidity is continuous, calm, slow, pitched, reminiscent of wind, water or an acoustic musical instrument. The ideal sound to express nonfluidity is harsh, non-continuous, abrupt, dissonant, conceptually associated with metal or wood, unhuman and robotic. Findings presented in this paper can be used as design guidelines for future applications in which the movement property fluidity is to be conveyed through sonification.

  • 24.
    Frid, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KMH Royal College of Music, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sound Forest - Evaluation of an Accessible Multisensory Music Installation2019In: Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM , 2019, p. 1-12, article id 677Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sound Forest is a music installation consisting of a room with light-emitting interactive strings, vibrating platforms and speakers, situated at the Swedish Museum of Performing Arts. In this paper we present an exploratory study focusing on evaluation of Sound Forest based on picture cards and interviews. Since Sound Forest should be accessible for everyone, regardless age or abilities, we invited children, teens and adults with physical and intellectual disabilities to take part in the evaluation. The main contribution of this work lies in its fndings suggesting that multisensory platforms such as Sound Forest, providing whole-body vibrations, can be used to provide visitors of diferent ages and abilities with similar associations to musical experiences. Interviews also revealed positive responses to haptic feedback in this context. Participants of diferent ages used diferent strategies and bodily modes of interaction in Sound Forest, with activities ranging from running to synchronized music-making and collaborative play.

  • 25. Gaver, Bill
    et al.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    In Search of the Elusive CHI Design Paper2017In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 22-23Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Grünloh, Christiane
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Using technological frames as an analytic tool in value sensitive design2018In: Ethics and Information Technology, ISSN 1388-1957, E-ISSN 1572-8439Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article proposes the use of technological frames (TF) as an analytical tool to support the investigations within value sensitive design. TF can help to identify values that are consistent or conflicting within and between stakeholders, which is exemplified with a case of patient accessible electronic health records in Sweden. The article concludes that TF can help to identify values, which may then help to understand and address possible concerns in the design process.

  • 27.
    Grünloh, Christiane
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. Institute of Informatics, Technische Hochschule Köln, University of Applied Sciences, Gummersbach, Germany.
    Myreteg, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Department of Business Studies.
    Cajander, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction..
    Rexhepi, Hanife
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. The Informatics Research Centre.
    “Why Do They Need to Check Me?” Patient Participation Through eHealth and the Doctor-Patient Relationship: Qualitative Study2018In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 20, no 1, article id e11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Roles in the doctor-patient relationship are changing and patient participation in health care is increasingly emphasized. Electronic health (eHealth) services such as patient accessible electronic health records (PAEHRs) have been implemented to support patient participation. Little is known about practical use of PAEHR and its effect on roles of doctors and patients. Objective: This qualitative study aimed to investigate how physicians view the idea of patient participation, in particular in relation to the PAEHR system. Hereby, the paper aims to contribute to a deeper understanding of physicians’ constructions of PAEHR, roles in the doctor-patient relationship, and levels and limits of involvement. Methods: A total of 12 semistructured interviews were conducted with physicians in different fields. Interviews were transcribed, translated, and a theoretically informed thematic analysis was performed. Results: Two important aspects were identified that are related to the doctor-patient relationship: roles and involvement. The physicians viewed their role as being the ones to take on the responsibility, determining treatment options, and to be someone who should be trusted. In relation to the patient’s role, lack of skills (technical or regarding medical jargon), motives to read, and patients’ characteristics were aspects identified in the interviews. Patients were often referred to as static entities disregarding their potential to develop skills and knowledge over time. Involvement captures aspects that support or hinder patients to take an active role in their care. Conclusions: Literature of at least two decades suggests an overall agreement that the paternalistic approach in health care is inappropriate, and a collaborative process with patients should be adopted. Although the physicians in this study stated that they, in principle, were in favor of patient participation, the analysis found little support in their descriptions of their daily practice that participation is actualized. As seen from the results, paternalistic practices are still present, even if professionals might not be aware of this. This can create a conflict between patients who strive to become more informed and their questions being interpreted as signs of critique and mistrust toward the physician. We thus believe that the full potential of PAEHRs is not reached yet and argue that the concept of patient empowerment is problematic as it triggers an interpretation of “power” in health care as a zero-sum, which is not helpful for the maintenance of the relationship between the actors. Patient involvement is often discussed merely in relation to decision making; however, this study emphasizes the need to include also sensemaking and learning activities. This would provide an alternative understanding of patients asking questions, not in terms of “monitoring the doctor” but to make sense of the situation.

  • 28.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Gulz, Torbjörn
    Lindetorp, Hans
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Misgeld, Olof
    Sköld, Mattias
    Student involvement in sound and music research: Current practices at KTH and KMH2019In: Combined proceedings of theNordic Sound and Music Computing Conference 2019and the Interactive Sonification Workshop 2019, 2019, p. 36-41Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper collects experiences of involving students in research from the senior teachers of the Sound and Music Computing group at KTH, including four team members who have taught at KMH for many years and now are enrolled as doctoral students. We describe how students attending our courses are invited to be involved in our research activities, and we argue that this involvement both contributes to our research and benefits the students in the short and long term. To engage students in and beyond course activity has been a working practice both at the KTH Sound and Music Computing group and at KMH since many years. Among the assignments, activities, and tasks we offer are pilot experiments, prototype development, public exhibitions, performing or composing, data collection, analysis challenges, and not least, bachelor and master projects that lead to academic publications.

  • 29.
    Hedin, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    En systematisk forskningsöversikt av digitala interventioner för mer hållbara beteenden kring livsmedelskonsumtion2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Livsmedelsproduktion och livsmedelskonsumtion medför stora hållbarhetsutmaningar, och det blir allt viktigare att hitta sätt att minska miljöpåverkan orsakad av mat, till exempel genom beteendeförändringar hos konsumenterna. Under de senaste åren har digitala interventioner blivit viktiga verktyg för att förändra beteenden på många områden. I detta projekt har vi gjort en systematisk forskningsöversikt där vi gått igenom forskningsläget rörande digitala beteendeinterventioner för hållbar matkonsumtion. Vi har utgått från PRISMA-checklistan för hur sådana systematiska forskningsöversikter ska genomföras, och vi har genomsökt flera forskningsdatabaser för att hitta vetenskapliga artiklar som rör mat, hållbarhet och digitala beteendeinterventioner. Endast studier där de digitala interventionerna har implementerats och testats ur ett förändringsperspektiv har inkluderats, vilket resulterade i 15 primära studier som ingått i vår slutliga granskning. Kvaliteten på studierna utvärderades ur ett beteendeförändringssperspektiv, och de metoder för beteendeförändring som använts har kategoriserats med hjälp av två ramverk, “Behavior Change Wheel” och “Behavior Change Technique taxonomy v1”. Resultaten visade att alla inkluderade studier hade stora kvalitetsproblem när de utvärderades ur ett beteendeförändrings-perspektiv. Det innebär att vi inte kunde hitta några resultat som visade på om de digitala beteendeinterventionerna som undersöktes fungerade eller ej. De flesta studier saknade vidare en teoretisk bas för hur eller varför interventionerna skulle kunna leda till beteendeförändring för mer hållbar livsmedelskonsumtion. Vår huvudsakliga rekommendation för framtida forskning inom området är att gå vidare från en utforskande fas till att genomföra vetenskapliga studier med tydligare teoretisk bas och metodik.

  • 30.
    Heinzel, Tincuta
    et al.
    Loughborough Univ, Text, Loughborough, Leics, England..
    Munthe, Hillevi
    Almeida, Teresa
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Andor, Corina
    Univ Oradea, Oradea, Romania..
    Badut, Anca
    Baker, Camille
    Univ Creat Arts, Epsom, Surrey, England..
    Biro, Anna
    Montreal Arts Interculturels, Montreal, PQ, Canada..
    Chieh, Shih Wei
    Gaui, Renata
    Arango, Maria Paulina Gutierrez
    Kock, Shary
    Univ Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Kurbak, Ebru
    Univ Appl Arts Vienna, Vienna, Austria..
    Santos, Aline Martinez
    Bauhaus Univ, Weimar, Germany..
    Patrascu, Ionut
    Zest Collect, Bucharest, Romania..
    Pennock, Veerle
    Popescu, Ioana
    Ion Mincu Architecture & Urbanism Univ, Bucharest, Romania..
    Popovici, Zoran
    Psarra, Afroditi
    Univ Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Roussel, Natacha
    Schmid, Annette
    Sicchio, Kate
    Virginia Commonwealth Univ, Richmond, VA USA..
    Shupliak, Vitalii
    Stewart, Rebecca
    Queen Mary Univ, London, England..
    Tharakan, Milie John
    Tomasello, Giulia
    van Waardenberg, Bram
    Willem Kooning Acad Art & Design, Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Vierne, Pauline
    Berlin Univ Arts, Berlin, Germany..
    Attempts, Failures, Trials and Errors. Notes on an exhibition of failed prototypes and rejected projects.2019In: The Design Journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 22, p. 1941-1956Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present the history, the concept and the results of " Attempts, Failures, Trials and Errors" exhibition project which was first presented in the frame of Piksel Festival in Bergen, Norway (November 2017) and later on at " Salonul de Proiecte", Bucharest, Romania (February 2018). The project aimed to incite the e-textiles artists and designers to reflect upon the way they are engaging with their failures, as well as to the way in which they use these failures to better understand the context in which they are working and to continue to experiment. Our approach reverses the common R& D constructivist methods, by using deconstruction as a process of investigation in the field of wearable technologies and e-textiles. By questioning the ideas and the concepts of failure and success, the project puts an emphasis on art's capacity to be critical, while at the same time to poetically and self-ironically address contemporary challenges and concerns.

  • 31.
    Helms, Karey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ferreira, Pedro
    IT-University of Copenhagen.
    Brown, Barry
    Stockholm University, DSV.
    Lampinen, Airi
    Stockholm University, DSV.
    Away and (Dis)connection: Reconsidering the Use of Digital Technologies in Light of Long-Term Outdoor Activities2019In: Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction, E-ISSN 2573-0142, Vol. 3, no GROUP, article id 230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a study of long-term outdoor activities, based on altogether 34 interviews with 19 participants. Our goal was not only to explore these enjoyable experiences, but more broadly to examine how technology use was recontextualized ‘away’ from the everyday. Outdoor activities are commonly presented as an escape from our technology-infused world. In contrast, our interviews reveal experiences that are heavily dependent on technology, both digital and not. However, digital technology — and in particular the mobile phone — is reconfigured when taken out of its ordinary, often urban and indoor, context. We first present a diversity of ‘aways’ during outdoor activities by depicting cherished freedoms and interpersonal preferences. We then describe how participants managed connection and disconnection while away and upon coming back. To conclude, we discuss how constructions of away can support more purposeful engagements with digital technology, and how pointed (dis)connection can be useful for technology design also in non-outdoor settings.

  • 32.
    Högfeldt, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Lantz, Ann
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lujara, Suzan
    Univ Dar Es Salaam, UDSM, Coll Informat & Commun Technol, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania..
    Understanding Engineering Education Change With The Introduction of Challenge Driven Education in Tanzania2018In: PROCEEDINGS OF 2018 IEEE GLOBAL ENGINEERING EDUCATION CONFERENCE (EDUCON) - EMERGING TRENDS AND CHALLENGES OF ENGINEERING EDUCATION, IEEE , 2018, p. 1335-1343Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden and Tanzania have collaborated since 1976 in research projects. A PhD sandwich program was established in the 90's in the field of electrical engineering between UDSM (University of Dar es Salam), Tanzania and KTH (Royal Institute of Technology), Sweden. This collaboration has opened up for shared trust, idea exchange and the emergence of the challenge driven education approach. Challenge driven education brings in socio-technical challenges to engineering education, or rather, brings out students and academic faculty, to real life challenges outside academy. The research of the first years' experience reveals factors like high motivation among students, faculty and stakeholders in society. New ways of teaching and learning have evolved, and clear contrasts with traditional education have been found.

  • 33.
    Högfeldt, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Rosén, Anders
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Mwase, Christine
    Univ Dar Es Salaam, Coll Informat & Commun Technol, POB 35091, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania..
    Lantz, Ann
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Shayo, Eva
    Univ Dar Es Salaam, Coll Informat & Commun Technol, POB 35091, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania..
    Lujara, Suzan
    Univ Dar Es Salaam, Coll Informat & Commun Technol, POB 35091, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania..
    Mvungi, Nerey
    Univ Dar Es Salaam, Coll Informat & Commun Technol, POB 35091, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania..
    Mutual Capacity Building through North-South Collaboration Using Challenge-Driven Education2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 24, article id 7236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The urgent need for actions in the light of the global challenges motivates international policy to define roadmaps for education on all levels to step forward and contribute with new knowledge and competencies. Challenge-Driven Education (CDE) is described as an education for Sustainable Development (ESD) approach, which aims to prepare students to work with global challenges and to bring value to society by direct impact. This paper describes, evaluates and discusses a three-year participatory implementation project of Challenge-driven education (CDE) within the engineering education at the University of Dar es Salam, UDSM, which has been carried out in collaboration with the Royal Institute of Technology, KTH in Stockholm. Conclusions are drawn on crucial aspects for engineering education change through the lens of Activity Theory (AT), where CDE is brought forward as a motivating ESD initiative for engineering faculty and students. Furthermore participatory co-creation is notably useful as it aims to embrace social values among the participants. Also, traditional organizational structures will need to be continuously negotiated in the light of the integration of more open-ended approaches in education.

  • 34.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Designing with the Body: Somaesthetic Interaction Design2018Book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    The day i am a researcher - Not my gender2019In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 20-21Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Caramiaux, Baptiste
    UMR STMS Ircam CNRS UPMC, 1 Pl Igor Stravinsky, F-75004 Paris, France.;McGill Univ, Schulich Sch Mus, Montreal, PQ H3A 1E3, Canada.;Univ Paris Saclay, Inria, Univ Paris Sud, CNRS LRI, Bat 650 Noetzlin St, F-91190 Gif Sur Yvette, France..
    Erkut, Cumhur
    Aalborg Univ, Dept Architecture Design & Media Technol, DK-2450 Copenhagen SV, Denmark..
    Forlizzi, Jodi
    Carnegie Mellon Univ, Human Comp Interact Inst, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 USA..
    Hajinejad, Nassrin
    City Univ Appl Sci, Hsch Bremen, Inst Informat & Automat, D-28199 Bremen, Germany..
    Haller, Michael
    Upper Austria Univ Appl Sci, Sch Informat Commun & Media, A-4232 Hagenberg, Austria..
    Hummels, Caroline C. M.
    Univ Technol, Dept Ind Design, NL-5612 AZ Eindhoven, Netherlands..
    Isbister, Katherine
    Univ Calif Santa Cruz, Dept Computat Media, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn Univ, Dept Nat Sci Technol & Environm Studies, S-14189 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Khut, George
    Univ New South Wales, UNSW Art & Design, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia..
    Loke, Lian
    Univ Sydney, Sydney Sch Architecture Design & Planning, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia..
    Lottridge, Danielle
    Yahoo Inc, Sunnyvale, CA 94089 USA..
    Marti, Patrizia
    Univ Technol, Dept Ind Design, NL-5612 AZ Eindhoven, Netherlands.;Dept Social Polit & Cognit Sci, I-53100 Siena, Italy..
    Melcer, Edward
    NYU, Tandon Sch Engn, Brooklyn, NY 11201 USA..
    Muller, Florian Floyd
    RMIT Univ, Exert Games Lab, Melbourne, Vic 3000, Australia..
    Petersen, Marianne Graves
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Comp Sci, DK-8000 Aarhus, Denmark.
    Schiphorst, Thecla
    Simon Fraser Univ, Sch Interact Arts & Technol, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada..
    Segura, Elena Marquez
    Univ Calif Santa Cruz, Dept Computat Media, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE SICS, S-16440 Kista, Sweden..
    Svanaes, Dag
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol NTNU, Dept Comp Sci IDI, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway.;IT Univ Copenhagen, Digital Design Dept, DK-2300 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Comp & Syst Sci DSV, S-11418 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tobiasson, Helena
    Umeå Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, S-90187 Umeå, Sweden..
    Embracing First-Person Perspectives in Soma-Based Design2018In: INFORMATICS-BASEL, ISSN 2227-9709, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A set of prominent designers embarked on a research journey to explore aesthetics in movement-based design. Here we unpack one of the design sensitivities unique to our practice: a strong first person perspective-where the movements, somatics and aesthetic sensibilities of the designer, design researcher and user are at the forefront. We present an annotated portfolio of design exemplars and a brief introduction to some of the design methods and theory we use, together substantiating and explaining the first-person perspective. At the same time, we show how this felt dimension, despite its subjective nature, is what provides rigor and structure to our design research. Our aim is to assist researchers in soma-based design and designers wanting to consider the multiple facets when designing for the aesthetics of movement. The applications span a large field of designs, including slow introspective, contemplative interactions, arts, dance, health applications, games, work applications and many others.

  • 37.
    Josefsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Baltatzis, Alexander
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bälter, Olle
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Enoksson, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Riese, Emma
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    DRIVERS AND BARRIERS FOR PROMOTING TECHNOLOGY ENHANCED LEARNING IN HIGHER EDUCATION2018In: 12TH INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE (INTED) / [ed] Chova, LG Martinez, AL Torres, IC, IATED-INT ASSOC TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION & DEVELOPMENT , 2018, p. 4576-4584Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents a study were drivers and barriers for increased use of Technology Enhanced Learning in higher education were identified. The method included focus groups with Faculty Pedagogical Developers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, followed by a Force Field Analysis. Ten drivers and ten barriers were identified, and are presented in this paper. The most significant drivers found were: collegial discussions, increased automatization, Technology enhanced learning support for the teachers (to assist exploration), tech savvy students and engagement among faculty. The most significant barriers identified were: unclear return on time investment, insufficient funding for purchases and lack of central decisions. The analysis also revealed that some drivers and barriers could act both ways. One example is locally developed systems which are understood to be drivers when it comes to solving (local) problems and encouraging experimentation with IT systems, but when these local systems are cancelled due to lack of funding, or for example replaced by centralized systems, they discourage use and development. The findings constitute a foundation for future discussions about change processes to increase utilization of technology enhanced learning in higher education.

  • 38. Lampinen, Airi
    et al.
    McGregor, Moira
    Comber, Rob
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Brown, Barry
    Member-Owned Alternatives: Exploring Participatory Forms of Organising with Cooperatives2018In: Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 2573-0142, Vol. 2, no CSCW, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cooperatives are member-owned organisations, run for the common benefit of their members. While cooperatives are a longstanding way of organising, they have received little attention in CSCW. In this paper, through interviews with 26 individuals from 24 different cooperatives, our focus is an exploratory inquiry on how cooperatives could expand thinking into what future economies can look like and the part technologies may play in them. We discuss (1) the work to make the co-op work, that is, the special effort involved in managing an enterprise in a democratic and inclusive way, (2) the multiple purposes that cooperatives can serve for their members, well beyond financial benefit, and (3) ICT usage within cooperatives as a site of tension and dialogue. We conclude by discussing the meaning and measures of success in alternative economies, and lessons learned for CSCW scholarship on civic and societal organisations.

  • 39. Liang, Rong-Hao
    et al.
    Chan, Liwei
    Tseng, Hung-Yu
    Kuo, Han-Chih
    Huang, Da-Yuan
    Yang, De-Nian
    Chen, Bing-Yu
    Grosse-Puppendahl, Tobias
    Beck, Sebastian
    Wilbers, Daniel
    Kuijper, Arjan
    Heo, Heejeong
    Park, Hyungkun
    Kim, Seungki
    Chung, Jeeyong
    Lee, Geehyuk
    Lee, Woohun
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Demo Hour2014In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 6-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Lon, Hansson
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Exploring Concerns and Expectations of Future Smart Systems for Managing Domestic Water Services2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With our growing population, we are facing great challenges when it comes to our water consumption. As Stockholm is growing in both population and size, the city’s provider of drinking water, Stockholm Water and Waste, is looking into approaches like smart systems and persuasive strategies that tries to help citizens use water for domestic purposes in more sustainable ways. Some see these approaches as a natural part of the future of urban development and they have already been implemented at several locations around the globe. However, smart systems and persuasive strategies have seen an upswing in critique lately and it have been argued that they tend to treat householders as something separated from the socio-technical context they live in. As a response to this critique, a wide range of suggestions for future development of smart systems and persuasive strategies have been made. While a lot of these suggestions are based on studies that evaluates already existing systems and tend to focus on how to improve them, they still convey a scenario where these systems are a natural part of our future urban lives. However, little research has been made that tries to understand the citizens’ perspective on these systems before they are implemented. By using a future study approach that includes citizens in reflective and exploratory activities of non-existing future smart systems for managing domestic water services, this study aims at exploring their concerns and expectations of said systems and questions the wants and needs for them begin with. This study reveals that citizens might have great concerns when it comes to questions of privacy and control and how smart systems and persuasive strategies run the risk of problematizing individuals. This study also reveals that citizens might be more interested in negotiating and improving current services and infrastructure than having technology negotiate their everyday lives.

  • 41. Lucero, A.
    et al.
    Desjardins, A.
    Neustaedter, C.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hassenzahl, M.
    Cecchinato, M. E.
    A sample of one: First-person research methods in HCI2019In: DIS 2019 Companion - Companion Publication of the 2019 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2019, p. 385-388Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    First-person research (i.e., research that involves data collection and experiences from the researcher themselves) continues to become a viable addition and, possibly even, alternative to more traditional HCI methods. While we have seen the benefits of using methods such as autoethnography, autobiographical design, and autoethnographical research through design, we also see the need to further explore, define, and investigate the practices, techniques, tactics, and implications of first-person research in HCI. To address this, this one-day workshop aims to bring together a community of researchers, designers, and practitioners who are interested in exploring and reimagining research in HCI and interaction design, with an emphasis on first-person methods.

  • 42. Lv, Z.
    et al.
    ur Réhman, S.
    Khan, M. S. L.
    Li, Haibo
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    An anaglyph 2D-3D stereoscopic video visualization approach2020In: Multimedia tools and applications, ISSN 1380-7501, E-ISSN 1573-7721, Vol. 79, no 1-2, p. 825-838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we propose a simple anaglyph 3D stereo generation algorithm from 2D video sequence with a monocular camera. In our novel approach, we employ camera pose estimation method to directly generate stereoscopic 3D from 2D video without building depth map explicitly. Our cost-effective method is suitable for arbitrary real-world video sequence and produces smooth results. We use image stitching based on plane correspondence using fundamental matrix. To this end, we also demonstrate that correspondence plane image stitching based on Homography matrix only cannot generate a better result. Furthermore, we utilize the structure-from-motion (with fundamental matrix) based reconstructed camera pose model to accomplish visual anaglyph 3D illusion. The anaglyph result is visualized by a contour based yellow-blue 3D color code. The proposed approach demonstrates a very good performance for most of the video sequences in the user study.

  • 43.
    Manolas, Christos
    et al.
    Ravensbourne University London.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Soundtrack Loudness as a Depth Cue in Stereoscopic 3D MediaIn: Convergence. The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, ISSN 1354-8565, E-ISSN 1748-7382Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Misgeld, Olof
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Holzapfel, André
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ahlbäck, Sven
    Dancing Dots - Investigating the Link between Dancer and Musician in Swedish Folk Dance2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The link between musicians and dancers is generally described as strong in many traditional musics and this holds also for Scandinavian Folk Music - spelmansmusik. Understanding the interaction of music and dance has potential for developing theories of performance strategies in artistic practice and for developing interactive systems. In this paper we investigate this link by having Swedish folk musicians perform to animations generated from motion capture recordings of dancers. The different stimuli focus on motions of selected body parts as moving white dots on a computer screen with the aim to understand how different movements can provide reliable cues for musicians. Sound recordings of fiddlers playing to the "dancing dot" were analyzed using automatic alignment to the original music performance related to the dance recordings. Interviews were conducted with musicians and comments were collected in order to shed light on strategies when playing for dancing. Results illustrate a reliable alignment to renderings showing full skeletons of dancers, and an advantage of focused displays of movements in the upper back of the dancer.

  • 45. Mueller, Florian "Floyd"
    et al.
    Andres, Josh
    Marshall, Joe
    Svanæs, Dag
    schraefel, m. c.
    Gerling, Kathrin
    Tholander, Jakob
    Martin-Niedecken, Anna Lisa
    Segura, Elena Márquez
    van den Hoven, Elise
    Graham, Nicholas
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sas, Corina
    Body-centric Computing: Results from a Weeklong Dagstuhl Seminar in a German Castle2018In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 34-39Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46. Odom, W.
    et al.
    Lindley, Siân
    Pschetz, Larissa
    Tsaknaki, Vasiliki
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Vallgårda, Anna
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Yoo, Daisy
    Time, temporality, and slowness: Future directions for design research2018In: DIS 2018 - Companion Publication of the 2018 Designing Interactive Systems Conference, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 383-386Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A diverse set of research and design initiatives related to time, temporality, and slowness has emerged in the DIS and HCI communities. The goals of this workshop are to: 1. bring together researchers to reflect on conceptual, methodological, and practice-based outcomes and issues and 2. to develop an agenda for future research in this growing area.

  • 47.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bates, Oliver
    Univ Lancaster, Sch Comp & Commun, Lancaster LA1 4WA, England..
    Kirman, Ben
    Univ York, Dept Theatre Film & Televis, York YO10 5GB, N Yorkshire, England..
    Comber, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hedman, Anders
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    van den Broeck, Martijn
    Umea Univ, Umea Inst Design, Fac Sci & Technol, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    The future of computing and wisdom: Insights from Human-Computer Interaction2019In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 113, article id UNSP 102434Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present a structured report on a dialogue on the Future of Computing and Wisdom. The dialogue consists of a recorded and transcribed discussion between researchers and practitioners in the field of Human-Computer Interaction that was held at workshop in conjunction with the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction in September 2018. However, the dialogue also encompasses workshop participants' preparatory work with writing "fictional abstracts" - abstracts of yet-to-be-written research papers that will be published in 2068. The polyvocal dialogue that is reported upon thus includes not just the voices of researchers and practitioners who attended the workshop, but also includes the voices of the future researchers of 2068 who wrote the abstracts in question as well as the voices of the organisms, individuals, intelligent agents and communities who are the subjects, victims, beneficiaries and bystanders of wise (or unwise) future computing systems.

  • 48.
    Parviainen, Emmi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Juul Sondergaard, Marie Louise
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Experiential Qualities of Whispering with Voice Assistants2020In: Proceedings of CHI 2019, 2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a Research through Design project that explores how whispering influences the ways people experience and interact with voice assistants. The research project includes a co-speculation workshop and the use of a design probe, which culminated in the production of a design fiction short film. Our design-led inquiry contributes with experiential qualities of whispering with voice assistants: creepiness, trust, and intimacy. Furthermore, we present how whispering opens up new dimensions of how and when voice interaction could be used. We propose that designers of whispering voice assistants should reflect on how they facilitate the experiential qualities of creepiness, trust, and intimacy, and reflect on the potential challenges whispering brings to the relation between a user and a voice assistant.

  • 49.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    ALIVE Exhibition: Art between Life and Science2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 50.
    Qarabash, Haneen
    et al.
    Baghdad Univ, Baghdad, Iraq..
    Heslop, Philip
    Newcastle Univ, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Kharrufa, Ahmed
    Newcastle Univ, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Devlin, Marie
    Newcastle Univ, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Group tagging: Using video tagging to facilitate reflection on small group activities2019In: British Journal of Educational Technology, ISSN 0007-1013, E-ISSN 1467-8535, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 1913-1928Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative learning in class-based teaching presents a challenge for a tutor to ensure every group and individual student has the best learning experience. We present Group Tagging, a web application that supports reflection on collaborative, group-based classroom activities. Group Tagging provides students with an opportunity to record important moments within the class-based group work and enables reflection on and promotion of professional skills such as communication, collaboration and critical thinking. After class, students use the tagged clips to create short videos showcasing their group work activities, which can later be reviewed by the teacher. We report on a deployment of Group Tagging in an undergraduate Computing Science class with 48 students over a semester. Through our analysis of interviews and log data, we show that Group Tagging helped the students remain attentive and on-task during group work, and encouraged them to participate more during group activities.

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