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  • 1.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Havtun, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Wingård, Lasse
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Andersson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Kjellgren, Björn
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Language and communication.
    THE PEDAGOGICAL DEVELOPERS INITIATIVE: SYSTEMATIC SHIFTS, SERENDIPITIES, AND SETBACKS2017In: 13th International CDIO Conference in Calgary, Canada, June 18-22, 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pedagogical projects have often, at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, as well as elsewhere, been initiated and managed by individual enthusiasts rather than dedicated teams. This generally decreases the possibility of successful implementation of more ambitious ideas, e.g., changing educational programs, implementing the CDIO syllabus, or strengthening the pedagogical development of larger parts of the faculty. To enable wider and more effective change, KTH top management therefore launched a universityencompassing three-year project in 2014, in which a group of highly motivated teachers from all schools at KTH were appointed part-time pedagogical developers (PDs). The PDs were given the task of promoting pedagogical development and facilitate cooperation and knowledge exchange among faculty members, as described in two previous papers at CDIO conferences. From 2017, the outcomes of this project are supposed to be integrated parts of the KTH line organization. The project has led to numerous actions, which would have been difficult to set in motion unless given the freedom in time to explore and to develop into a collective effort rather than a myriad of individual “stand-alone” examples. By addressing key areas for pedagogical development, our group of dedicated faculty have tried to surpass the suboptimal "lock-in" of strict individual reasoning and to deal with surfaced questions and relevant issues in a broader collective manner. A major insight confirmed by the project and its many sub-projects has indeed been the fundamental importance of collegial discussions and the creation of processes that facilitate and support teacher cooperation. We have also, through discussions with faculty at KTH, confirmed the need for clearly defined, tangible incentives for teachers, motivating them to participate in pedagogical development activities, even if this means less time left for the traditional pathway to rewards within academia, i.e. research. In this paper, we chart changes that have occurred in the educational practices at KTH by describing and discussing the project’s focus on pedagogical development of faculty, actual execution of changes in the engineering educations, lessons learned along the way, and visions yet to be realised.

  • 2.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH.
    Havtun, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology. KTH.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management. KTH.
    Wingård, Lasse
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering. KTH.
    Andersson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Soulard, Juliette
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Kjellgren, Björn
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Language and communication.
    The pedagogical developers initiative - development, implementation and lessons learned from a systematic approach to faculty development2016In: Proceedings of the 12th International CDIO Conference, Turku University of Applied Sciences, Turku, Finland, June 12-16, 2016, Turku University , 2016, p. 497-508Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a systematic, university--wide approach to creating an encompassing movement towards faculty development. In 2014, KTH Royal Institute of Technology launched the pedagogical developers initiative, appointing part--time pedagogical developers among teachers from all schools of KTH, to implement and strengthen good teaching and learning practices among faculty and students. They are teachers active in different educational programmes, with experience of, and interest in, pedagogical issues. In line with CDIO standard 10, the purpose of the pedagogical developers’ initiative is to facilitate cooperation and knowledge exchange between faculty members, and to establish communities of practice. The paper presents the activities, processes for developing these activities and preliminary results from the initiative’s second year, which focused much on supporting faculty development by putting into place a series of workshops, a format chosen for its combination of active community-building learning and time efficiency. The topics of the workshops emerged to meet faculty needs identified by the pedagogical developers during the first year. The workshops were created by smaller teams of pedagogical developers from different schools of KTH. This enabled a wide array of experiences and perspectives to be incorporated into the workshops. Main focuses of the workshops have been on creating internal discussions in dynamic communities of practice on specific subjects of interest, and on creating forums for exchange of ideas, open to the whole faculty. During Autumn 2015, the workshops have been offered as voluntary add-on parts of the basic course in teaching and learning offered to faculty at KTH. This first round of workshops generated a positive interest from teachers, and participant feedback indicates that they particularly appreciated the opportunity to work directly with their own courses and the opportunity to discuss pedagogical aspects with peers. 

  • 3.
    Bjorkman, Beyza
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Language and communication.
    Pragmatic strategies in English as an academic lingua franca: Ways of achieving communicative effectiveness?2011In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 950-964Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper will report the findings of a study that has investigated spoken English as a lingua franca (ELF) usage in Swedish higher education. The material comprises digital recordings of lectures and student group-work sessions, all being naturally occurring, authentic high-stakes spoken exchange, i.e. from non-language-teaching contexts. The aim of the present paper, which constitutes a part of a larger study, has been to investigate the role pragmatic strategies play in the communicative effectiveness of English as a lingua franca. The paper will document types of pragmatic strategies as well as point to important differences between the two speech event types and the implications of these differences for English-medium education. The findings show that lecturers in ELF settings make less frequent use of pragmatic strategies than students who deploy these strategies frequently in group-work sessions. Earlier stages of the present study (Bjorkman, 2008a, 2008b, 2009) showed that despite frequent non-standardness in the morphosyntax level, there is little overt disturbance in student group-work, and it is highly likely that a variety of pragmatic strategies that students deploy prevents some disturbance. It is reasonable to assume that, in the absence of appropriate pragmatic strategies used often in lectures, there is an increased risk for covert disturbance.

  • 4.
    Björkman, Beyza
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Language and communication.
    An analysis of polyadic English as a lingua franca (ELF) speech: A communicative strategies framework2014In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 66, p. 122-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on an analysis of the communicative strategies (CSs) used by speakers in spoken lingua franca English (ELF) in an academic setting. The purpose of the work has primarily been to outline the CSs used in polyadic ELF speech which are used to ensure communication effectiveness in consequential situations and to present a framework that shows the different communicative functions of a number of CSs. The data comprise fifteen group sessions of naturally occurring student group-work talk in content courses at a technical university. Detailed qualitative analyses have been carried out, resulting in a framework of the communication strategies used by the speakers. The methodology here provides us with a taxonomy of CSs in natural ELF interactions. The results show that other than explicitness strategies, comprehension checks, confirmation checks and clarification requests were frequently employed CSs in the data. There were very few instances of self and other-initiated word replacement, most likely owing to the nature of the high-stakes interactions where the focus is on the task and not the language. The results overall also show that the speakers in these ELF interactions employed other-initiated strategies as frequently as self-initiated communicative strategies.

  • 5.
    Björkman, Beyza
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Language and communication.
    English as a lingua franca in higher education: Implications for EAP2011In: Ibérica, ISSN 1139-7241, E-ISSN 2340-2784, Vol. 22, p. 79-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The last decade has brought a number of changes for higher education in continental Europe and elsewhere, a major one being the increasing use of English as a lingua franca (ELF) as the medium of instruction. With this change, EAP is faced with a new group of learners who will need to use it predominantly in ELF settings to communicate with speakers from other first language backgrounds. This overview paper first discusses the changes that have taken place in the field of EAP in terms of student body, followed by an outline of the main findings of research carried out on ELF. These changes and the results of recent ELF research have important implications for EAP instruction and testing. It is argued here that EAP needs to be modified accordingly to cater for the needs of this group. These revolve around the two major issues: norms and standards for spoken English and target use. If the aim of EAP instruction and testing is to prepare speakers for academic settings where English is the lingua franca, the findings of ELF research need to be taken into consideration and then integrated into EAP curriculum design and testing, rethinking norms and target use. The norms and standards used by EAP instruction must be based on this realistic English, and educational resources should be deployed more realistically, including the usage of ELF, thereby validating the pluralism of English. This paper argues that any practice that excludes this perspective would be reducing EAP qualitatively and quantitatively.

  • 6.
    Björkman, Beyza
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Language and communication.
    Investigating English as a Lingua Franca in Applied Science Education: Aims, methods and norms2012In: (Re-)conceptualising LSP research: Methods and Aims / [ed] Pedersen, Margrethe; Englund, Jan, Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2012Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Björkman, Beyza
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Language and communication.
    Linguistic Justice for Europe and for the World2012In: International Studies in the Philosophy of Science, ISSN 0269-8595, E-ISSN 1469-9281, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 354-357Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Björkman, Beyza
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Language and communication.
    Questions in academic ELF interaction2012In: Journal of English as a Lingua Franca, ISSN 2191-9216, E-ISSN 2191-933X, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 93-120Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Björkman, Beyza
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Language and communication.
    The Grammar of English as a Lingua Franca2013In: The Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics / [ed] Chapelle, C. A., Wiley-Blackwell, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Björkman, Beyza
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Language and communication.
    The pragmatics of English as a lingua franca in the international university: Introduction2011In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 923-925Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11. de Leeuw, Esther
    et al.
    Opitz, Conny
    Lubinska, Dorota
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Language and communication.
    Dynamics of first language attrition across the lifespan Introduction2013In: International Journal of Bilingualism, ISSN 1367-0069, E-ISSN 1756-6878, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 667-674Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Hincks, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Language and communication.
    Akademisk engelska på distans2018In: Digitalisering av högre utbildning / [ed] Stefan Hrastinski, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 181-184Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    KTH Språk & kommunikation samarbetade med ett företag och andra universitet för att ta fram en nätbaserad kurs som stödjer studenter som ska påbörja en engelskspråkig högskoleutbildning. Resultatet blev en nätbaserad kurs som fungerar mycket bra i en kontext där studenterna kommer från många olika program på olika campus och med begränsat utrymme för valfria kurser.

  • 13.
    Hincks, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Language and communication.
    Measures and perceptions of liveliness in student presentation speech: A proposal for an automatic feedback mechanism2005In: Systeme, ISSN 1022-9280, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 575-591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes prosodic variables in a corpus of eighteen oral presentations made by students of Technical English, all of whom were native speakers of Swedish. The focus is on the extent to which speakers were able to use their voices in a lively manner, and the hypothesis tested is that speakers who had high pitch variation as they spoke would be perceived as livelier speakers. A metric (termed PVQ), derived from the standard deviation in fundamental frequency, is proposed as a measure of pitch variation. Composite listener ratings of liveliness for nine 10-s samples of speech per speaker correlate strongly (r = .83, n = 18, p < .01) with the PVQ metric. Liveliness ratings for individual 10-s samples of speech show moderate but significant (n = 81, p < .01) correlations: r = .70 for males and r = .64 for females. The paper also investigates rate of speech and fluency variables in this corpus of L2 English. An application for this research is in presentation skills training, where computer feedback could be provided for speaking rate and the extent to which speakers have been able to use their voices in an engaging manner.

  • 14.
    Hincks, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Language and communication.
    Measuring liveliness in presentation speech2005In: Proceedings of Interspeech 2005, Lisbon, 2005, p. 765-768Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes that speech analysis be used to quantifyprosodic variables in presentation speech, and reports theresults of a perception test of speaker liveliness. The test materialwas taken from a corpus of oral presentations made by18 Swedish native students of Technical English. Livelinessratings from a panel of eight judges correlated strongly withnormalized standard deviation of F0 and, for female speakers,with mean length of runs, which is the number of syllablesbetween pauses of >250 ms. An application of these findingswould be in the development of a feedback mechanism for theprosody of public speaking.

  • 15.
    Hincks, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Language and communication.
    Presenting in English or Swedish: Differences in speaking rate2008In: Proceedings of Fonetik 2008 / [ed] Eriksson, A.; Lindh, J., Gothenburg: Gothenburg University Department of Linguistics, 2008, p. 21-24Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper attempts to quantify differences in speaking rates in first and second languages, in the context of the growth of English as a lingua franca, where more L2 speakers than ever be-fore are using English to perform tasks in their working environments. One such task is the oral presentation. The subjects in this study were fourteen fluent English second language speakers who held the same oral presentation twice, once in English and once in their native Swedish. The temporal variables of phrase length (mean length of runs in syllables) and speaking rate in syllables per second were cal-culated for each language. Speaking rate was found to be 23% slower when using the second language, and phrase length was found to be 24% shorter.

  • 16.
    Hincks, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Language and communication.
    Pronouncing the Academic Word List: Features of L2 Student Presentations2003In: Proceedings International Congress of Phonetic Science 2003, Barcelona, 2003, p. 1545-1548Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is an analysis of lexical choices, pronunciation errors, and discourse features found in a corpus of student presentation speech. The speakers were Swedish natives studying Technical English. Particular emphasis is given to the pronunciation of the words most often used in academic texts. 93% of words used in the corpus came from the most frequent 2570 lexemes of academic written English, 99% of all words were acceptably pronounced, disfluencies occurred at relatively stable inter-student rates, and 30% of all new sentences began with the conjunction ‘and’.

  • 17.
    Hincks, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Language and communication.
    Recently hired tenure-track faculty and Swedish: An unsolicited report for KTH leadership2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The new KTH development plan acknowledges that many KTH environments are no longer bilingual, and that efforts must be made to strengthen the position of Swedish. Unfortunately, it appears that many KTH leaders underestimate the time and resources necessary for most adults to learn a second language to the high proficiency level necessary for teaching or for academic leadership.

    An examination of job advertisements found that it is at present a common practice across northern Europe to specify that applicants to faculty positions be prepared to learn the local language well enough to use it for teaching within two years. The language expectations placed on newly hired KTH faculty hired to tenure-track positions were investigated to find out what extent this is true at KTH. Of 49 non-Swedish speakers who answered a survey, eight were met with the teaching-within-two-year expectation when hired, and 14 are meeting the expectation at present. The Swedish learning is to take place mostly in one’s free time, and little progress toward adequate proficiency is being made among the faculty. These findings are discussed in light of what is known about the time it takes for adults to learn a second language to a high level of professional proficiency.

    If departments seriously expect transnational faculty to teach in Swedish within two years, they should allow the individual the equivalent of six months of full-time study of the language. A more reasonable timeframe for learning high-proficiency Swedish would be five or six years. Language-learning plans should be written for all new hires to tenure-track positions, and followed up at regular intervals.

  • 18.
    Hincks, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Language and communication.
    Speech technologies for pronunciation feedback and evaluation2003In: ReCALL, ISSN 0958-3440, E-ISSN 1474-0109, ISSN ISSN 0958-3440, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 3-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Educators and researchers in the acquisition of L2 phonology have called for empirical assessment of the progress students make after using new methods for learning (Chun, 1998, Morley, 1991). The present study investigated whether unlimited access to a speech-recognition-based language-learning program would improve the general standard of pronunciation of a group of middle-aged immigrant professionals studying English in Sweden. Eleven students were given a copy of the program Talk to Me from Auralog as a supplement to a 200-hour course in Technical English, and were encouraged to practise on their home computers. Their development in spoken English was compared with a control group of fifteen students who did not use the program. The program is evaluated in this paper according to Chapelle’s (2001) six criteria for CALL assessment. Since objective human ratings of pronunciation are costly and can be unreliable, our students were pre- and post-tested with the automatic PhonePass SET-10 test from Ordinate Corp. Results indicate that practice with the program was beneficial to those students who began the course with a strong foreign accent but was of limited value for students who began the course with better pronunciation. The paper begins with an overview of the state of the art of using speech recognition in L2 applications.

  • 19.
    Hincks, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Language and communication.
    Standard deviation of F0 in student monologue2004In: Proc of The XVIIth Swedish Phonetics Conference, Fonetik 2004, Stockholm University, 2004, p. 132-135Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Twenty ten-minute oral presentations made by Swedish students speaking English have been analyzed with respect to the standard deviation of F0 over long stretches of speech. Values have been normalized by division with the mean. Results show a strong correlation between pro-ficiency in English and pitch variation for male speakers but not for females. The results also identify monotone and disfluent speakers.

  • 20.
    Hincks, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Language and communication.
    Suprasegmentals: Stress2013In: The Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics / [ed] Chapelle, C., Wiley Blackwell , 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stress is a feature of pronunciation in which a syllable is given more emphasis than surrounding syllables.

  • 21.
    Hincks, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Language and communication.
    Technology and Learning Pronunciation2015In: Handbook of English Pronunciation / [ed] M. Reed and J. Levis, John Wiley & Sons, 2015, p. 501-515Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Hincks, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Language and communication.
    Technology and Phonetics2013In: The Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics / [ed] Chapelle, C., Wiley Blackwell , 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sound cannot be studied methodically unless it can be captured in some way, and so from the phonograph to the tape recorder to the computer, the development of new technologies has facilitated the study of phonetics. Indeed, it is difficult to imagine studying phonetics without technology. Other entries in this encyclopedia discuss the topics of acoustic phonetics, speech analysis software, automatic speech recognition, text-to-speech synthesis, and computer-assisted pronunciation teaching. This entry will thus simply provide an overview of the position of technology in phonetics.

  • 23.
    Hincks, Rebecca
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Language and communication.
    Edlund, Jens
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Transient visual feedback on pitch variation for Chinese speakers of English2009In: Proc. of Fonetik 2009, Stockholm, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on an experimental study comparing two groups of seven Chinese students of English who practiced oral presentations with computer feedback. Both groups imitated teacher models and could listen to recordings of their own production. The test group was also shown flashing lights that responded to the standard deviation of the fundamental frequency over the previous two seconds. The speech of the test group increased significantly more in pitch variation than the control group. These positive results suggest that this novel type of feedback could be used in training systems for speakers who have a tendency to speak in a monotone when making oral presentations.

  • 24.
    Kann, Viggo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Nordberg, Richard
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Language and communication.
    Hur kan en språkpolicy bli verklighet?2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    KTH antog år 2010 en språkpolicy som beskriver universitetets ambitioner vad gäller språklig kvalitet och språkliga förmågor. För att ett policydokument verkligen ska påverka verksamheten krävs att några arbetar med att göra policyn känd och implementera den [2]. Därför inrättades KTH:s språkkommitté, som sedan 2011 har arbetat med att bevaka språkfrågor i vid mening på KTH. Kommittén ska implementera KTH:s språkpolicy i verksamheten och ge råd och tips i språkliga frågor av generell art. Detta bidrag beskriver några aktiviteter som språkkommittén har genomfört i detta syfte och diskuterar hur dessa har påverkat verksamheten. År 2011 och 2012 genomförde språkkommittén två enkäter för att få en aktuell bild av språkanvändningen på KTH och vilka problem som kan finnas. Första enkäten vände sig till alla lärare på KTH och gav över 500 svar. Andra enkäten gick till alla studenter och doktorander vid KTH och gav över 3 000 svar. Båda enkäterna visade att språkintresset är mycket stort och att både lärare och studenter gärna vill gå språkkurser. Många öppna svar bekräftar resultaten från en liknande enkät vid SU [1], till exempel de komplexa problem som uppstår då masterprogram börjar undervisas på engelska. Lärarenkäten visade att bara 40 % av kurserna följer språkpolicyns rekommendationer att presentera fackterminologin både på svenska och engelska. Både lärare och studenter anser att det är ett problem att studenterna inte har parallell fackspråkskompetens på svenska och engelska. Många studenter på masterprogrammen exponeras inte heller för det svenska fackspråket vilket kan ge problem i examensarbetet och vid första anställningen. För att komma tillrätta med fackspråksproblematiken har språkkommittén gett ett seminarium om fackspråk i samarbete med TNC och anordnat en workshop för lärare där idéer till hur parallellspråkig terminologi i undervisningen ska tillhandahållas och övas. Idéerna har sedan sammanställts, strukturerats och publicerats på språkkommitténs webbplats, där såväl KTH:s lärare som övriga intresserade kan hitta dem och inspireras av dem. På webbplatsen finns också länkar till språkresurser och språkverktyg, bland annat en svensk-engelsk KTH-ordbok med ettusen administrativa termer, som språkkommittén utvecklat för att den engelska terminologin ska bli mindre yvig. En webbsida med vanliga språkliga frågor svarar till exempel på frågor om användning av svenska och engelska vid examination, i examensarbetsrapporter och avhandlingar. Lärare och administratörer vid KTH kan prenumerera på språkkommitténs gruppwebb och får därigenom meddelande om när nyheter läggs upp på webben. Språkkommitténs aktiva arbete med att medvetandegöra språkfrågor har gjort språkpolicyns genomslag större på KTH.

  • 25.
    Kjellgren, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Language and communication.
    Havtun, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Wingård, Lasse
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Andersson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Hjelm, Niclas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Berglund, Anders
    The Pedagogical Developers Initiative – Sustainable Impact of Falling into Oblivion?2018In: Proceedings of the 14th International CDIO Conference / [ed] Bean Bennedsen, Edström, Hugo, Roslöf, Songer & Yamamoto, Kanazawa: Kanazawa Institute of Technology , 2018, p. 738-747Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Between 2014-16, KTH Royal Institute of Technology set aside considerable resources in its biggest pedagogical project to date, the Pedagogical Developers Initiative. The project has been continuously reported on at recent CDIO conferences. While aimed primarily at CDIO Standard 10, enhancement of faculty teaching competence, the project managed, by design as much as through accident, to strengthen many CDIO standards and syllabus items. With the conclusion of the project, the constructive practices and ideas that emerged from the initiative were meant to be incorporated into the regular operations of the university, a task that was delegated to each of KTH’s ten schools. However, even though KTH officially labelled the project a success, the schools have taken a non-uniform approach to this endeavour, as they indeed had done to the project as a whole during its duration. Following up on our earlier reports, and primarily using data from interviews and our own observations, the paper looks at which of the initiative’s ideas and practices have survived the end of the project, in what forms, by what means, and what insights and lessons one can draw from this when designing mechanisms for continuous and sustainable improvement of pedagogical practices at a technical university.

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