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  • 1.
    Abbasi Aval, Negar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Khati, Vamakshi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Layer-by-Layer cellulose nanofibril coating for spheroid formation combined with decellularized extracellular matrix for 3D tumor modelingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Abbasi Aval, Negar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Khati, Vamakshi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Influence of Decellularized Extra Cellular Matrix on 3D spheroids formed on Layer-by-Layer cellulose nanofibril/Polyelectrolytes coating as an in-vitro model for Hepatocellular CarcinomaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Abbasi Aval, Negar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Lahchaichi, Ekeram
    Fayazbakhsh, Farzaneh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Tudoran, Oana
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Evaluating the Impact of Positively Charged Polyelectrolyte Molecular Weightand Bilayer Number on Tumor Spheroid Formation in the Interaction with Negatively Charged Cellulose Nanofibrils in layer by layer assembly2023Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Abbasi Aval, Negar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Lahchaichi, Ekeram
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Tudoran, Oana
    Department of Genetics, Genomics and Experimental Pathology, The Oncology Institute “Prof. Dr. I. Chiricuta”, 400015 Cluj-Napoca, Romania.
    Fayazbakhsh, Farzaneh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Heuchel, Rainer
    Pancreas Cancer Research Lab, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Löhr, Matthias
    Pancreas Cancer Research Lab, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Assessing the Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Cellulose Nanofibrils and Polyelectrolytes in Pancreatic Tumor Spheroid Formation2023In: Biomedicines, E-ISSN 2227-9059, Vol. 11, no 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroids are regarded as promising models for utilization as preclinical assessments of chemo-sensitivity. However, the creation of these tumor spheroids presents challenges, given that not all tumor cell lines are able to form consistent and regular spheroids. In this context, we have developed a novel layer-by-layer coating of cellulose nanofibril–polyelectrolyte bilayers for the generation of spheroids. This technique builds bilayers of cellulose nanofibrils and polyelectrolytes and is used here to coat two distinct 96-well plate types: nontreated/non-sterilized and Nunclon Delta. In this work, we optimized the protocol aimed at generating and characterizing spheroids on difficult-to-grow pancreatic tumor cell lines. Here, diverse parameters were explored, encompassing the bilayer count (five and ten) and multiple cell-seeding concentrations (10, 100, 200, 500, and 1000 cells per well), using four pancreatic tumor cell lines—KPCT, PANC-1, MiaPaCa-2, and CFPAC-I. The evaluation includes the quantification (number of spheroids, size, and morphology) and proliferation of the produced spheroids, as well as an assessment of their viability. Notably, our findings reveal a significant influence from both the number of bilayers and the plate type used on the successful formation of spheroids. The novel and simple layer-by-layer-based coating method has the potential to offer the large-scale production of spheroids across a spectrum of tumor cell lines.

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  • 5.
    Adolfsson, Karin H.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Xie, L.
    Hassanzadeh, Salman
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Zero-Dimensional and Highly Oxygenated Graphene Oxide for Multifunctional Poly(lactic acid) Bionanocomposites2016In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, E-ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 4, no 10, p. 5618-5631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The unique strengths of 2D graphene oxide nanosheets (GONSs) in polymer composites are thwarted by nanosheet agglomeration due to strong intersheet attractions. Here, we reveal that shrinking the planar size to 0D graphene oxide quantum dots (GOQDs), together with the intercalation of rich oxygen functional groups, reduces filler aggregation and enhances interfacial interactions with the host polymer. With poly(lactic acid) (PLA) as a model matrix, atomic force microscopy colloidal probe measurements illustrated that a triple increase in adhesion force to PLA was achieved for GOQDs (234.8 nN) compared to GONSs (80.4 nN), accounting for the excellent exfoliation and dispersion of GOQDs in PLA, in contrast to the notable agglomeration of GONSs. Although present at trace amount (0.05 wt %), GOQDs made a significant contribution to nucleation activity, mechanical strength and ductility, and gas barrier properties of PLA, which contrasted the inferior efficacy of GONSs, accompanied by clear distinction in film transparency (91% and 50%, respectively). Moreover, the GOQDs with higher hydrophilicity accelerated the degradation of PLA by enhancing water erosion, while the GONSs with large sheet surfaces gave a higher hydrolytic resistance. Our findings provide conceptual insights into the importance of the dimensionality and surface chemistry of GO nanostructures in the promising field of bionanocomposites integrating high strength and multifunction (e.g., enhanced transparency, degradation and gas barrier).

  • 6.
    Aljadi, Zenib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Abbasi Aval, Negar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Kumar, Tharagan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Qin, Taoyu
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Ramachandraiah, Harisha
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Layer-by-Layer Cellulose Nanofibrils: A New Coating Strategy for Development and Characterization of Tumor Spheroids as a Model for In Vitro Anticancer Drug Screening2022In: Macromolecular Bioscience, ISSN 1616-5187, E-ISSN 1616-5195, Vol. 22, no 10, article id 2200137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three-dimensional multicellular spheroids (MCSs) are complex structure of cellular aggregates and cell-to-matrix interaction that emulates the in-vivo microenvironment. This research field has grown to develop and improve spheroid generation techniques. Here, we present a new platform for spheroid generation using Layer-by-Layer (LbL) technology. Layer-by-Layer (LbL) containing cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) assemble on a standard 96 well plate. Various bi-layer numbers, multiple cell seeding concentration, and two tumor cell lines (HEK 293 T, HCT 116) are utilized to generate and characterize spheroids. The number and proliferation of generated spheroids, the viability, and the response to the anti-cancer drug are examined. The spheroids are formed and proliferated on the LbL-CNF coated wells with no significant difference in connection to the number of LbL-CNF bi-layers; however, the number of formed spheroids correlates positively with the cell seeding concentration (122 ± 17) and (42 ± 8) for HCT 116 and HEK 293T respectively at 700 cells ml−1. The spheroids proliferate progressively up to (309, 663) µm of HCT 116 and HEK 293T respectively on 5 bi-layers coated wells with maintaining viability. The (HCT 116) spheroids react to the anti-cancer drug. We demonstrate a new (LbL-CNF) coating strategy for spheroids generation, with high performance and efficiency to test anti-cancer drugs.

  • 7.
    Ankerfors, Caroline
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Johansson, Erik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Lars, Wågberg
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Use of PECs and PEMs from polymers and nanoparticles to create sacrificial bonds between surfacesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Ankerfors, Caroline
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Johansson, Erik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Use of polyelectrolyte complexes and multilayers from polymers and nanoparticles to create sacrificial bonds between surfaces2013In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 391, p. 28-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, particle polyelectrolyte complexes (PPECs) were formed by mixing cationic polyacrylamide (CPAM) and silica nanoparticles using the jet mixing technique. Within certain limits, the size of the formed PPECs could be controlled. The aim was to prepare PPECs with embedded sacrificial bonds, similar to those found in bones. Examination of PPEC adsorption to silica model surfaces indicated that,smaller PPECs adsorbed to a higher level than larger ones, due to the higher diffusion speed of smaller complexes. Adsorption studies of the same components as in the PPECs, but arranged in multilayers, that is, particle polyelectrolyte multilayers (PPEMs), indicated a stable, gradual build-up of material on the surface with smaller nanoparticles, whereas PPEMs comprising elongated nanoparticles appeared to be more loosely adsorbed onto the surface when the nanoparticles were in the outer layer, due to repulsive forces within the adsorbed layer. The AFM colloidal probe technique was used to study the interaction between surfaces treated with PPECs, multilayers, or polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs). The results showed that the expected long-range disentanglement could be achieved with PPECs but that the pull-off forces were generally low. Treatment with PPEMs comprising the same polymer and nanoparticle components produced higher pull-off values, together with disentanglement behaviour, possibly due to better contact between the surfaces. Adhesion experiments with polymer PECs showed significantly higher pull-off values than with the PPECs, probably due to polymer interdiffusion across the surface boundary.

  • 9.
    Ankerfors, Caroline
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    AFM adhesion imaging for comparison of polyelectrolyte complexes and polyelectrolyte multilayers2012Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Ankerfors, Caroline
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    AFM adhesion imaging for the comparison of polyelectrolyte complexes and polyelectrolyte multilayers2012In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, E-ISSN 1744-6848, Vol. 8, no 32, p. 8298-8301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adhesion and topography of dry surfaces treated with polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) and multilayers (PEMs) of PAH/PAA or CPAM/silica nanoparticles were studied using AFM adhesion mapping. PEMs gave higher adhesion than did PECs for the PAH/PAA system, but adhesion did not differ significantly between PEMs and PECs for the CPAM/silica system. The latter system displayed multiple release patterns, interpreted as disentanglements and tentatively ascribed to nanoparticle presence. AFM adhesion mapping is valuable for analysing PEC and PEM. The measurements should, however, be combined with separate force measurements for a more complete picture of the adhesion.

  • 11.
    Asta, Nadia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Reid, Michael S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. RISE Research Institute of Sweden, SE-114 86 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    The Use of Model Cellulose Materials for Studying Molecular Interactions at Cellulose Interfaces2023In: ACS Macro Letters, E-ISSN 2161-1653, Vol. 12, no 11, p. 1530-1535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite extensive research on biobased and fiber-basedmaterials, fundamental questions regarding the molecular processesgoverning fiber−fiber interactions remain unanswered. In this study, weintroduce a method to examine and clarify molecular interactions withinfiber−fiber joints using precisely characterized model materials, i.e.,regenerated cellulose gel beads with nanometer-smooth surfaces. Byphysically modifying these materials and drying them together to createmodel joints, we can investigate the mechanisms responsible for joiningcellulose surfaces and how this affects adhesion in both dry and wet statesthrough precise separation measurements. The findings reveal a subtlebalance in the joint formation, influencing the development ofnanometer-sized structures at the contact zone and likely inducingbuilt-in stresses in the interphase. This research illustrates how model materials can be tailored to control interactions betweencellulose-rich surfaces, laying the groundwork for future high-resolution studies aimed at creating stiff, ductile, and/or tough jointsbetween cellulose surfaces and to allow for the design of high-performance biobased materials.

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  • 12. Attard, Phil
    et al.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface Chemistry. Ytkemiska Institutet, Sweden.
    Rutland, Mark W.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface Chemistry. Ytkemiska Institutet, Sweden.
    Thermal calibration of photodiode sensitivity for atomic force microscopy2006In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 77, no 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The photodiode sensitivity in the atomic force microscope is calibrated by relating the voltage noise to the thermal fluctuations of the cantilever angle. The method accounts for the ratio of the thermal fluctuations measured in the fundamental vibration mode to the total, and also for the tilt and extended tip of the cantilever. The method is noncontact and is suitable for soft or deformable surfaces where the constant compliance method cannot be used. For hard surfaces, the method can also be used to calibrate the cantilever spring constant.

  • 13.
    B. Erdal, Nejla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Adolfsson, Karin H.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Green Strategy to Reduced Nanographene Oxide through Microwave Assisted Transformation of Cellulose2018In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, E-ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 1245-1255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A green strategy for fabrication of biobased reduced nanographene oxide (r-nGO) was developed. Cellulose derived nanographene oxide (nGO) type carbon nanodots were reduced by microwave assisted hydrothermal treatment with superheated water alone or in the presence of caffeic acid (CA), a green reducing agent. The carbon nanodots, r-nGO and r-nGO-CA, obtained through the two different reaction routes without or with the added reducing agent, were characterized by multiple analytical techniques including FTIR, XPS, Raman, XRD, TGA, TEM, AFM, UV-vis, and DLS to confirm and evaluate the efficiency of the reduction reactions. A significant decrease in oxygen content accompanied by increased number of sp2 hybridized functional groups was confirmed in both cases. The synergistic effect of superheated water and reducing agent resulted in the highest C/O ratio and thermal stability, which also supported a more efficient reduction. Interesting optical properties were detected by fluorescence spectroscopy where nGO, r-nGO, and r-nGO-CA all displayed excitation dependent fluorescence behavior. r-nGO-CA and its precursor nGO were evaluated toward osteoblastic cells MG-63 and exhibited nontoxic behavior up to 200 μg mL-1, which gives promise for utilization in biomedical applications.

  • 14.
    Banerjee, Indradumna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Salih, Tagrid
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Ramachandraiah, Harisha
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Erlandsson, J.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Petterson, T.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Silva, AC
    Karlsson, M
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    LDH based neonatal diagnostics on a low-cost slipdisc based sample preparation platform.2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION

    Slipdisc is developed as a sample preparation platform based on slipchip technology [1], using a handwinded clockwork mechanism allowing sample processing from one spot to another with defined precision without the need for sophisticated tools or alignment (Fig.1). An ordinary smartphone or camera can be used to image and analyse the results making it an ideal tool for resource limited settings. Here, we demonstrate a bioassay for detecting LDH (Fig.2), a crucial enzyme found in all living cells which leaks out when the cellular membrane is damaged. This makes LDH a biomarker for several medical conditions in newborns, such as Ozkiraz-13, necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), and Asphyxia.

    EXPERIMENTAL

    For assembling the slipdisc optically transparent, robust and disposable CD like polycarbonate discs were used with superhydrophobic coating on all except the embedded microfluidic channels. For the LDH assay, heparinized plasma samples were spiked with 7 different concentrations of the LDH enzyme (Lee Biosolutions, USA). These concentrations ranged from clinically normal to abnormal concentrations and used to construct a standard curve for LDH enzyme.

    RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

    The ability of the SlipDisc to quantify LDH enzyme levels from plasma samples was evaluated (Fig.3). Using 7 different concentrations, a standard curve with clinically relevant LDH concentrations was obtained (Fig4). Image and data analyses, including linear regression and Pearson’s correlation, were completed using Image processing tool in Matlab.

    CONCLUSION

    We demonstrate a low-cost neonatal diagnostics platform for the detection of LDH from plasma using a novel SlipDisc platform. The SlipDisc can further be modified to separate plasma from whole blood samples in order to fully integrate the assay. Its simple operation and smartphone based detection capabilities make it an ideal device for point-of-care neonatal diagnostics.

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  • 15.
    Banerjee, Indradumna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Salih, Tagrid
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Ramachandraiah, Harisha
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Araújo, A. C.
    Karlsson, M.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Slipdisc: A versatile sample preparation platform for point of care diagnostics2017In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 7, no 56, p. 35048-35054Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report a microfluidic sample preparation platform called "Slipdisc" based on slipchip technology. Slipdisc is a rotational slipchip that uses a unique hand-wound clockwork mechanism for precise movement of specially fabricated polycarbonate discs. In operation, the microchannels and microchambers carved on the closely aligned microfluidic discs convert from continuous filled paths to defined compartments using the slip movement. The clockwork mechanism introduced here is characterised by a food dye experiment and a conventional HRP TMB reaction before measuring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enzyme levels, which is a crucial biomarker for neonatal diagnostics. The colorimetry based detection of LDH was performed with an unmodified camera and an image analysis procedure based on normalising images and observing changes in red channel intensity. The analysis showed a close to unity coefficient of determination (R2 = 0.96) in detecting the LDH concentration when compared with a standard Chemical Analyser, demonstrating the excellent performance of the slipdisc platform with colorimetric detection. The versatile point of care sample preparation platform should ideally be suited for a multitude of applications at resource-limited settings.

  • 16.
    Belioka, Maria-Paraskeui
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Reid, Michael S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Exploration of surface cleaning and surface interactions via atomic force microscopy2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henschen, Jonatan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Polyelectrolyte multilayers on differently charged cellulose surfaces2016In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 251Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Influence of Surface Charge Density and Morphology on the Formation of Polyelectrolyte Multilayers on Smooth Charged Cellulose Surfaces2017In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 968-979Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To clarify the importance of the surface charge for the formation of polyelectrolyte multilayers, layer-by-layer (LbL) assemblies of polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (pDADMAC) and polystyrenesulfonate (PSS) have been investigated on cellulose films with different carboxylic acid contents (20, 350, 870, and 1200 μmol/g) regenerated from oxidized cellulose. The wet cellulose films were thoroughly characterized prior to multilayer deposition using quantitative nanomechanical mapping (QNM), which showed that the mechanical properties were greatly affected by the degree of oxidation of the cellulose. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force measurements were used to determine the surface potential of the cellulose films by fitting the force data to the DLVO theory. With the exception of the 1200 μmol/g film, the force measurements showed a second-order polynomial increase in surface potential with increasing degree of oxidation. The low surface potential for the 1200 μmol/g film was attributed to the low degree of regeneration of the cellulose film in aqueous media due to increasing solubility with increasing charge. The multilayer formation was characterized using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and stagnation-point adsorption reflectometry (SPAR). Extensive deswelling was observed for the charged films when pDADMAC was adsorbed due to the reduced osmotic pressure when ions inside the film were released, and the 1:1 charge compensation showed that all the charges in the films were reached by the pDADMAC. The multilayer formation was not significantly affected by the charge density above 350 μmol/g due to interlayer repulsions, but it was strongly affected by the salt concentration during the layer build-up.

  • 19.
    Bruce, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Javakhishvili, Irakli
    Technical University of Denmark.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Hvilsted, Søren
    Technical University of Denmark.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Preparation and evaluation of well-defined di- and triblock copolymers based on poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] and poly(ε-caprolactone)2014In: ACS National Meeting, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, di- and triblock copolymers based on poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) have been prepared. The PDMAEMA length was kept constant for both di- and triblock copolymers, while in the diblock copolymers the PCL length was varied in three different lengths, yielding three separate block copolymers. For the triblock blockcopolymers, on the other hand, also the PCL blocks were of the same length yielding one ABA- and one BAB-type block copolymer. In the next step, the PDMAEMA-part was quaternized to yield polyelectrolytes with either one or two charged block(s). In the final step, difference in adsorption behavior onto a negatively charged cellulose surface and subsequent alteration of surface properties was investigated. Overall, the polymers were evaluated in solid state, in solution, in water dispersion, and on cellulose surfaces with techniques including differential scanning calorimetry, size exclusion chromatography, dynamic light scattering and quartz crystal microbalance.

  • 20.
    Bruce, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Physical Tuning of Cellulose-Polymer Interactions Utilizing Cationic Block Copolymers Based on PCL and Quaternized PDMAEMA2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the aim was to prepare and evaluate a block copolymer that can be used as a compatabilizer in cellulose fiber-reinforced biocomposites. It as an amphiphilic block copolymer consisting of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), made with  ring-opening polymerization (ROP), and a shorter segment of poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) that was synthesized with atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The PDMAEMA-part was made in one single length, while the PCL-part was varied in three different lengths; in total were three block copolymers prepared. In the last step of the synthesis, the PDMAEMA-part was quaternized that turns it into a cationically charged chain – a polyelectrolyte. The block copolymers were then able to form cationic micelles in water, from where they can adsorb, under mild conditions, to anionic surfaces such as silicon oxide and cellulose-model surfaces. This provides the surface with a more hydrophobic character shown with contact angle measurements. Finally, with atomic force microscopy (AFM) force measurements, it was demonstrated that there is a clear entanglement behavior obtained between the block copolymers and a PCL surface at about 60 °C, which is of importance for the information regarding the adhesive interface in a future biocomposite.

  • 21.
    Bruce, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Larsson, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Preparation and evaluation of a block copolymer compatibilizer for biocomposite applications2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the concept of using a free polymer as a compatibilzer in biocomposite applications has been evaluated with focus on the polymer poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), commonly used in conventional grafting onto/from cellulose. A block copolymer consisting of PCL and a shorter segment of poly(di(methylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) was made combining ring-opening polymerization (ROP) and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The length of the PDMAEMA-part was kept constant, and the PCL-part was varied in three different lengths, yielding three separate block copolymers. As a final step, the PDMAEMA-part was quaternized, which resulted in cationically charged chains –polyelectrolytes. The charged part could then be used as an electrostatic linker allowing the PDMAEMA-PCL copolymer to be adsorbed onto negatively charged cellulose model surfaces. Finally, these cellulose model surfaces were evaluated regarding for example amount of polymer adsorbed and hydrophobic character, investigated with techniques such as quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and contact angle measurements.

  • 22.
    Chen, Chao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Enrico, Alessandro
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ek, Monica
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Herland, Anna
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems. Swedish Medical Nanoscience Center, Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, 17177, Sweden.
    Niklaus, Frank
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Bactericidal surfaces prepared by femtosecond laser patterning andlayer-by-layer polyelectrolyte coating2020In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 575, p. 286-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antimicrobial surfaces are important in medical, clinical, and industrial applications, where bacterial infection and biofouling may constitute a serious threat to human health. Conventional approaches against bacteria involve coating the surface with antibiotics, cytotoxic polymers, or metal particles. However, these types of functionalization have a limited lifetime and pose concerns in terms of leaching and degradation of the coating. Thus, there is a great interest in developing long-lasting and non-leaching bactericidal surfaces. To obtain a bactericidal surface, we combine micro and nanoscale patterning of borosilicate glass surfaces by ultrashort pulsed laser irradiation and a non-leaching layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte modification of the surface. The combination of surface structure and surface charge results in an enhanced bactericidal effect against both Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative Escherichia coli bacteria. The laser patterning and the layer-by-layer modification are environmentally friendly processes that are applicable to a wide variety of materials, which makes this method uniquely suited for fundamental studies of bacteria-surface interactions and paves the way for its applications in a variety of fields, such as in hygiene products and medical devices.

  • 23.
    Chen, Chao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Illergård, Josefin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Ek, Monica
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Influence of Cellulose Charge on Bacteria Adhesion and Viability to PVAm/CNF/PVAm-Modified Cellulose Model Surfaces2019In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A contact-active antibacterial approach based on the physical adsorption of a cationic polyelectrolyte onto the surface of a cellulose material is today regarded as an environment-friendly way of creating antibacterial surfaces and materials. In this approach, the electrostatic charge of the treated surfaces is considered to be an important factor for the level of bacteria adsorption and deactivation/killing of the bacteria. In order to clarify the influence of surface charge density of the cellulose on bacteria adsorption as well as on their viability, bacteria were adsorbed onto cellulose model surfaces, which were modified by physically adsorbed cationic polyelectrolytes to create surfaces with different positive charge densities. The surface charge was altered by the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of cationic polyvinylamine (PVAm)/anionic cellulose nanofibril/PVAm onto the initially differently charged cellulose model surfaces. After exposing the LbL-treated surfaces to Escherichia coli in aqueous media, a positive correlation was found between the adsorption of bacteria as well as the ratio of nonviable/viable bacteria and the surface charge of the LbL-modified cellulose. By careful colloidal probe atomic force microscopy measurements, it was estimated, due to the difference in surface charges, that interaction forces at least 50 nN between the treated surfaces and a bacterium could be achieved for the surfaces with the highest surface charge, and it is suggested that these considerable interaction forces are sufficient to disrupt the bacterial cell wall and hence kill the bacteria.

  • 24.
    Claesson, Per M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface Chemistry.
    Naderi, A.
    Iruthayaraj, J.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface Chemistry.
    Vareikis, A.
    Makuska, R.
    Interfacial properties of bottle-brush polyelectrolytes2007In: PROCEEDINGS OF BALTIC POLYMER SYMPOSIUM 2007 / [ed] Makuska, R., Vilnius: VILNIUS UNIV. , 2007, p. 77-81Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is focused on interfacial properties of bottle brush polyelectrolytes, where side-chains are attached along a polymer backbone. This class of polymer has been much less studied than block copolymers, which is particularly true for bottle brush polyelectrolytes with a high graft density. We have explored how the graft density and charge density of such polymers affect surface properties, as well as some bulk properties. The adsorption of this class of polymer onto negatively charged silica and mica surfaces has been determined. On mica adsorption is driven by electrostatic forces whereas on silica both electrostatic forces and interactions between silica and ethylene oxide chains drive the adsorption. On silica the adsorbed amount is very sensitive to solution ionic strength and pH. We also report on surface interactions and frictional forces obtained between surfaces coated with bottle brush polyelectrolytes.

  • 25.
    Colson, Jerome
    et al.
    Univ Nat Resources & Life Sci Vienna, Dept Mat Sci & Proc Engn, Inst Wood Technol & Renewable Mat, Konrad Lorenz Str 24, A-3430 Tulin, Austria..
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Asaadi, Shirin
    Aalto Univ, Sch Chem Engn, Dept Bioprod & Biosyst, Vuorimiehentie 1, Espoo 02150, Finland..
    Sixta, Herbert
    Aalto Univ, Sch Chem Engn, Dept Bioprod & Biosyst, Vuorimiehentie 1, Espoo 02150, Finland..
    Nypelo, Tiina
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Chem & Chem Technol, Kemigarden 4, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Mautner, Andreas
    Univ Vienna, Fac Chem, Inst Mat Chem & Res, Wahringer Str 42, A-1090 Vienna, Austria..
    Konnerth, Johannes
    Univ Nat Resources & Life Sci Vienna, Dept Mat Sci & Proc Engn, Inst Wood Technol & Renewable Mat, Konrad Lorenz Str 24, A-3430 Tulin, Austria..
    Adhesion properties of regenerated lignocellulosic fibres towards poly (lactic acid) microspheres assessed by colloidal probe technique2018In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 532, p. 819-829Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the field of polymer reinforcement, it is important to understand the interactions involved between the polymer matrix and the reinforcing component. This paper is a contribution to the fundamental understanding of the adhesion mechanisms involved in natural fibre reinforced composites. We report on the use of the colloidal probe technique for the assessment of the adhesion behaviour between poly(lactic acid) microspheres and embedded cross-sections of regenerated lignocellulosic fibres. These fibres consisted of tailored mixtures of cellulose, lignin and xylan, the amount of which was determined beforehand. The influence of the chemical composition of the fibres on the adhesion behaviour was studied in ambient air and in dry atmosphere. In ambient air, capillary forces resulted in larger adhesion between the sphere and the fibres. Changing the ambient medium to a dry nitrogen atmosphere allowed reducing the capillary forces, leading to a drop in the adhesion forces. Differences between fibres of distinct chemical compositions could be measured only on freshly cut surfaces. Moreover, the surface energy of the fibres was assessed by inverse gas chromatography. Compared to fibres containing solely cellulose, the presence of lignin and/or hemicellulose led to higher adhesion and lower surface energy, suggesting that these chemicals could serve as natural coupling agents between hydrophobic and hydrophilic components.

  • 26.
    Dedinaite, Andra
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface Chemistry.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Mohanty, Biswaranjan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Claesson, Per M
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface Chemistry.
    Lubrication by organized soft matter2010In: SOFT MATTER, ISSN 1744-683X, Vol. 6, no 7, p. 1520-1526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The AFM-colloidal probe technique has been used to explore surface interactions and friction forces between polyelectrolyte-coated surfaces immersed in aqueous solutions in the absence and presence of surfactant. It is found that the nature of the load bearing forces is decisive for the lubricating properties of the layers. Low frictional forces are obtained when the load is carried by a force that allows the interfacial layer to have a high fluidity, whereas attractive surface forces most often increase the friction. Highly charged polyelectrolytes and oppositely charged surfactants associate in bulk solution to form complexes with a well-defined internal structure. At the surface, similarly structured polyelectrolyte-surfactant layers are spontaneously formed. Such layers have a high load bearing capacity, and the friction coefficient is very low as long as the integrity of the layer remains intact. Interestingly, when the load is increased step-wise the friction force as a function of load displays some sharp peaks, which are identified as being due to structural rearrangements in the polyelectrolyte-surfactant layer. On unloading very low frictional forces are obtained despite the presence of an adhesion between the layers. To maintain the favorable lubricating properties it is essential to have surfactants present in solution, whereas, after the initial adsorption step, there is no need to have the polyelectrolyte present in the bulk. The reason for this is the essentially irreversible adsorption of the polyelectrolyte.

  • 27. Duan, S.
    et al.
    Liu, F.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Creighton, C.
    Asp, L.
    Transverse modulus measurement of carbon fibre by atomice force microscope and nanoindentation2019In: ICCM International Conferences on Composite Materials, International Committee on Composite Materials , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon fibre reinforced polymer composite has been widely used in structural component due to lower and not well studied because of the extre modulus was measured by nano-scale indentation tests, which were performed on fabricated flat surfaces, using both atomic force microscopy and nano-indentation. The surface damage induced by the high energy ion beam was also assessed. 

  • 28.
    Duan, Shanghong
    et al.
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Ind & Mat Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Liu, Fang
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Ind & Mat Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Creighton, Claudia
    Deakin Univ, Inst Frontier Mat, Geelong, Vic, Australia..
    Asp, Leif E.
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Ind & Mat Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Determination of transverse and shear moduli of single carbon fibres2020In: Carbon, ISSN 0008-6223, E-ISSN 1873-3891, Vol. 158, p. 772-782Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon fibres are extensively used for their high specific mechanical properties. Exploiting their high axial stiffness and strength, they are employed to reinforce polymer matrix materials in advanced composites. However, carbon fibres are not isotropic. Data of the elastic properties in the other directions of the fibres are still largely unknown. Furthermore, standardised methods to characterise these properties are lacking. In the present work, we propose a methodology to determine the transverse and shear moduli of single carbon fibres. An experimental procedure is developed to fabricate high-quality, flat fibre cross-sections in both longitudinal and transverse directions using Focused Ion Beam, which gives full control of the specimen geometry. Indentation modulus on those surfaces are obtained using both Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and nanoindentation tests. Hysteresis was found to occur in the nanoindentation tests. The hysteresis response was due to nano-buckling and reversible shear deformation of the carbon crystals. For this reason, indentation tests using AFM is recommended. From the AFM indentation tests the transverse and shear moduli of three different carbon fibres (IMS65, T800 and M60J) are successfully determined.

  • 29.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ingverud, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Granberg, H.
    Larsson, Per A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    On the mechanism behind freezing-induced chemical crosslinking in ice-templated cellulose nanofibril aerogels2018In: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, ISSN 2050-7488, Vol. 6, no 40, p. 19371-19380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The underlying mechanism related to freezing-induced crosslinking of aldehyde-containing cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) has been investigated, and the critical parameters behind this process have been identified. The aldehydes introduced by periodate oxidation allows for formation of hemiacetal bonds between the CNFs provided the fibrils are in sufficiently close contact before the water is removed. This is achieved during the freezing process where the cellulose components are initially separated, and the growth of ice crystals forces the CNFs to come into contact in the thin lamellae between the ice crystals. The crosslinked 3-D structure of the CNFs can subsequently be dried under ambient conditions after solvent exchange and still maintain a remarkably low density of 35 kg m-3, i.e. a porosity greater than 98%. A lower critical amount of aldehydes, 0.6 mmol g-1, was found necessary in order to generate a crosslinked 3-D CNF structure of sufficient strength not to collapse during the ambient drying. The chemical stability of the 3-D structure can be further enhanced by converting the hemiacetals to acetals by treatment with an alcohol under acidic conditions.

  • 30.
    Fallqvist, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.).
    Fielden, Matthew
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Nordgren, Niklas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Kroon, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.), Solid Mechanics (Div.).
    Gad, Annica
    Karolinska Institutet, MTC.
    Experimental and computational assessment of F-actin influence in regulating cellular stiffness and relaxation behaviour of fibroblasts2016In: Journal of The Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials, ISSN 1751-6161, E-ISSN 1878-0180, Vol. 59, p. 168-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In biomechanics, a complete understanding of the structures and mechanisms that regulate cellular stiffness at a molecular level remain elusive. In this paper, we have elucidated the role of filamentous actin (F-actin) in regulating elastic and viscous properties of the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Specifically, we performed colloidal-probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) on BjhTERT fibroblast cells incubated with Latrunculin B (LatB), which results in depolymerisation of F-actin, or DMSO control. We found that the treatment with LatB not only reduced cellular stiffness, but also greatly increased the relaxation rate for the cytoplasm in the peripheral region and in the vicinity of the nucleus. We thus conclude that F-actin is a major determinant in not only providing elastic stiffness to the cell, but also in regulating its viscous behaviour. To further investigate the interdependence of different cytoskeletal networks and cell shape, we provided a computational model in a finite element framework. The computational model is based on a split strain energy function of separate cellular constituents, here assumed to be cytoskeletal components, for which a composite strain energy function was defined. We found a significant influence of cell geometry on the predicted mechanical response. Importantly, the relaxation behaviour of the cell can be characterised by a material model with two time constants that have previously been found to predict mechanical behaviour of actin and intermediate filament networks. By merely tuning two effective stiffness parameters, the model predicts experimental results in cells with a partly depolymerised actin cytoskeleton as well as in untreated control. This indicates that actin and intermediate filament networks are instrumental in providing elastic stiffness in response to applied forces, as well as governing the relaxation behaviour over shorter and longer time-scales, respectively.

  • 31.
    Feldötö, Zsombor
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface Chemistry.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface Chemistry.
    Dédinaité, Andra
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface Chemistry.
    Mucin-electrolyte interactions at the solid-liquid interface probed by QCM-D2008In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 24, no 7, p. 3348-3357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interaction between mucin and ions has been investigated by employing the quartz crystal microbalance technique with measurement of energy dissipation. The study was partially aimed at understanding the adsorption of mucin on surfaces with different chemistry, and for this purpose, surfaces exposing COOH, OH, and CH3 groups were prepared. Mucin adsorbed to all three types of functionalized gold surfaces. Adsorption to the hydrophobic surface and to the charged hydrophilic surface (COOH) occured with high affinity despite the fact that in the latter case both mucin and the surface were negatively charged. On the uncharged hydrophilic surface exposing OH groups, the adsorption of mucin was very low. Another aim was to elucidate conformational changes induced by electrolytes on mucin layers adsorbed on hydrophobic surfaces from 30 mM NaNO3. To this end, we investigated the effect of three electrolytes with increasing cation valance: NaCl, CaCl2, and LaCl3. At low NaCl concentrations, the preadsorbed layer expands, whereas at higher concentrations of NaCl the layer becomes more compact. This swelling/compacting of the mucin layer is fully reversible for NaCl. When the mucin layer instead is exposed to CaCl2 or LaCl3, compaction is observed at I mM. For CaCl2, this process is only partially reversible, and for LaCl3, the changes are irreversible within the time frame of the experiment. Finally, mucin interaction with the DTAB cationic surfactant in an aqueous solution of different electrolytes was evaluated with turbidimetry measurements. It is concluded that the electrolytes used in this work screen the association between mucin and DTAB and that the effect increases with increasing cation valency.

  • 32.
    Feng, Zhaoxuan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hassanzadeh, Salman
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE).
    Multifunctional cancer-targeting strategy for encapsulating doxorubicin by folate-onjugated and quercetin-anchored pluronic mixed micelle systems2016In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 251Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 33. Gamstedt, E. Kristofer
    et al.
    Sandell, Robert
    Berthold, Fredrik
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nordgren, Niklas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Characterization of interfacial stress transfer ability of particulate cellulose composite materials2011In: Mechanics of materials, ISSN 0167-6636, E-ISSN 1872-7743, Vol. 43, no 11, p. 693-704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Composites with cellulose reinforcements are steadily gaining increased use. The stress transfer ability between reinforcement and polymer matrix has a strong influence on mechanical properties like strength and fracture toughness. This work presents a method to assess the stress transfer ability between cellulose and polymer matrix from a model material with cellulose spheres embedded in a polymer matrix. Such a material show smaller variability compared with composites based on natural cellulose fibres, and is less cumbersome than single fibre tests with regard to interfacial characterization. Measured elastic moduli of particulate composites is compared with predicted values from a micromechanical model based on a composite sphere assembly in a self-consistent scheme with only a spring constant of an imperfect interface as fitting parameter expressed in Pa/m. This interface parameter is identified through inverse modelling and used to quantify stress-transfer ability of cellulose/polylactide and cellulose/polystyrene composite interfaces. A higher degree of interfacial interaction was found for the former. This ranking was corroborated by adhesive force measurements using a micrometre sized cellulose sphere attached to the end of a cantilever in an atomic force microscope. With the model microstructure of a cellulose-sphere composite, an interfacial efficiency parameter can be backed out from stiffness measurements to be used in e.g. ranking of different fibre surface treatments and choice of matrix in the development of stronger natural-fibre composites.

  • 34. Grygiel, Konrad
    et al.
    Wicklein, Bernd
    Zhao, Qiang
    Eder, Michaela
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Bergstroem, Lennart
    Antonietti, Markus
    Yuan, Jiayin
    Omnidispersible poly(ionic liquid)-functionalized cellulose nanofibrils: surface grafting and polymer membrane reinforcement2014In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 50, no 83, p. 12486-12489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report a facile one-step route to graft poly(ionic liquid)s (PILs) onto cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs). The dispersibility of the PIL-functionalized CNFs in water and various organic solvents could be tuned by the choice of the PIL-binding anion. We demonstrate that such omnidispersible PIL@CNF hybrids can be used to reinforce porous poly(ionic liquid) membranes.

  • 35.
    Gustafsson, Emil
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Johansson, Erik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Direct adhesive measurements between wood biopolymer model surfaces2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Gustafsson, Emil
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Johansson, Erik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Direct Adhesive Measurements between Wood Biopolyrner Model Surfaces2012In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 13, no 10, p. 3046-3053Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the first time the dry adhesion was measured for an all-wood biopolymer system using Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) contact mechanics. The polydimethylsiloxane hemisphere was successfully surface-modified with a Cellulose I model surface using layer-by-layer assembly of nanofibrillated cellulose and polyethyleneimine. Flat surfaces of cellulose were equally prepared on silicon dioxide substrates, and model surfaces of glucomannan and lignin were prepared on silicon dioxide using spin-coating. The measured work of adhesion on loading and the adhesion hysteresis was found to be very similar between cellulose and all three wood polymers, suggesting that the interaction between these biopolymers do not differ greatly. Surface energy calculations from contact angle measurements indicated similar dispersive surface energy components for the model surfaces. The dispersive component was dominating the surface energy for all surfaces. The JKR work of adhesion was lower than that calculated from contact angle measurements, which partially can be ascribed to surface roughness of the model surfaces and overestimation of the surface energies from contact angle determinations.

  • 37.
    Gustafsson, Emil
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Marais, Andrew
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Johansson, Erik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    The use of thin, tailored Layer-by-Layer (LbL) films to improve the mechanical properties of fibrous networks2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Hajian, Alireza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH.
    Lindström, Stefan B.
    Linköping University.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH.
    Hamedi, Mahiar M.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH.
    Understanding the Dispersive Action of Nanocellulose for Carbon Nanomaterials2017In: Nano letters (Print), ISSN 1530-6984, E-ISSN 1530-6992, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 1439-1447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work aims at understanding the excellent ability of nanocelluloses to disperse carbon nanomaterials (CNs) in aqueous media to form long-term stable colloidal dispersions without the need for chemical functionalization of the CNs or the use of surfactant. These dispersions are useful for composites with high CN content when seeking water-based, efficient, and green pathways for their preparation. To establish a comprehensive understanding of such dispersion mechanism, colloidal characterization of the dispersions has been combined with surface adhesion measurements using colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) in aqueous media. AFM results based on model surfaces of graphene and nanocellulose further suggest that there is an association between the nanocellulose and the CN. This association is caused by fluctuations of the counterions on the surface of the nanocellulose inducing dipoles in the sp2carbon lattice surface of the CNs. Furthermore, the charges on the nanocellulose will induce an electrostatic stabilization of the nanocellulose–CN complexes that prevents aggregation. On the basis of this understanding, nanocelluloses with high surface charge density were used to disperse and stabilize carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and reduced graphene oxide particles in water, so that further increases in the dispersion limit of CNTs could be obtained. The dispersion limit reached the value of 75 wt % CNTs and resulted in high electrical conductivity (515 S/cm) and high modulus (14 GPa) of the CNT composite nanopapers.

  • 39. Hassanzadeh, Salman
    et al.
    Feng, Zhaoxuan
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    A proof-of-concept for folate-conjugated and quercetin-anchored pluronic mixed micelles as molecularly modulated polymeric carriers for doxorubicin2015In: Polymer, ISSN 0032-3861, E-ISSN 1873-2291, Vol. 74, p. 193-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pluronic, F127 (PEG-PPO-PEG, Mn = 12,500 g/mol) and reverse pluronic, 10R5 (PPO-PEG-PPO, Mn = 2000 g/mol) were molecularly modulated to reach multifunctional mixed micelle systems aiming to overcome some of the inherent weaknesses of pluronic based drug delivery systems. Targeting function was introduced by covalent attachment of folic acid to F127 (F127-FA), while quercetin was anchored to 10R5 (P-Q). The successful syntheses were evidenced by H-1 NMR, FTIR, DSC and UV-Vis. The proof-of-concept for the mixed micelles prepared from the drug anchored pluronics was demonstrated through reduced CMCs, slower release rates and increased Doxorubicin (DOX) encapsulation capacity from similar to 19% to similar to 43%. Quercetin therefore boosted the interactions of DOX with the hydrophobic core of the micelles. This was further evidenced by colloidal probe AFM which demonstrated almost doubled adhesion forces between the DOX coated probe and the quercetin modified pluronic as compared to the plain pluronic. The pre-biological essay of the DOX-modulated mixed micelle demonstrates promising properties. In addition quercetin has previously been proposed as combinatory drug to DOX enhancing its therapeutic function and reducing the side effects to normal cells.

  • 40.
    Hellwig, Johannes
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Karlsson, Rose Marie Pernilla
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Measuring elasticity of wet cellulose beads with an AFM colloidal probe using a linearized DMT model2017In: Analytical Methods, ISSN 1759-9660, E-ISSN 1759-9679, Vol. 9, no 27, p. 4019-4022Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanical properties of wet cellulose are investigated using an atomic force microscope AFM and calculated using a linearized DMT model. Measurements were performed using a model system of gel beads made of cellulose with different charge densities, which show a high impact on the mechanical properties of the cellulose in wet state.

  • 41.
    Hellwig, Johannes
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    López Durán, Veronica
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Measuring elasticity of wet cellulose fibres with AFM using indentation and a linearized Hertz model2018In: Analytical Methods, ISSN 1759-9660, E-ISSN 1759-9679, Vol. 10, no 31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanical properties of different pulp fibres in liquid were measured using an atomic force microscope. Specifically a custom-made sample holder was used to indent the fibre surface, without causing any motion, and the Young's modulus was calculated from the indentation using a linearized Hertz model.

  • 42.
    Holmboe, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Nuclear Chemistry.
    Wold, Susanna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Nuclear Chemistry.
    Petterson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Effects of the injection grout Silica sol on Bentonite2011In: Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, ISSN 1474-7065, E-ISSN 1873-5193, Vol. 36, no 17/18, p. 1580-1589Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Silica sol, i.e., colloidal SiO2, may be used as a low-pH injection grout for very fine fractures in the construction of deep geological repositories for radioactive waste in Sweden and in Finland. If the bentonite barrier encounters SiO2-colloid particles under conditions favorable for aggregation, there is concern that it will modify the bentonite barrier at the bentonite/bedrock interface. In this study qualitative experiments were performed with mixed dispersions of SiO2-colloids and bentonite or homo-ionic Na/Ca-montmorillonite. Samples were prepared at different colloid concentrations and treated under various conditions such as low and high ionic strength (0.3 M NaCl), as well as dehydration and redispersing. Free swelling and settling experiments were performed in order to qualitatively compare the conditions in which SiO2-colloids affect the bulk/macro properties of bentonite. In order to study specific SiO2-colloid/montmorillonite interactions and preferred type of initial aggregation, dilute dispersions of homo-ionic montmorillonite dispersions mixed with varying concentrations of SiO2-colloids were prepared and selected samples were characterized by PCS, SEM/EDS, AFM and PXRD. The results from this study show that bentonite and montmorillonite particles can be modified by SiO2-colloids when mixed in comparable amounts, due to dehydration or high ionic strength. Some indications for increased colloidal stability for the SiO2-colloid modified clay particles were also found. From the AFM investigation it was found that initial attachment of the SiO2-colloids in Na+ dominated samples seemed to occur on the edges of the montmorillonite layers. In Ca2+ dominated samples not subjected to excess NaCl, SiO2-colloid sorption onto the faces of the montmorillonite layers was also found. In all, contact between the bentonite barrier and ungelled Silica sol should preferably be avoided.

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  • 43.
    Jiang, Kun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, Centres, Center for the Advancement of Integrated Medical and Engineering Sciences, AIMES.
    Wen, Xueyu
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Crouzier, Thomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, Centres, Center for the Advancement of Integrated Medical and Engineering Sciences, AIMES.
    Engineering Surfaces with Immune Modulating Properties of Mucin Hydrogels2022In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 14, no 35, p. 39727-39735Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrogels of cross-linked mucin glycoproteins (Muc-gel) have shown strong immune-modulating properties toward macrophages in vitro, which are translated in vivo by the dampening of the foreign body response to implantation in mice. Beyond mucin hydrogels, other biomaterials such as sensors, electrodes, and other long-term implants would also benefit from such immune-modulating properties. In this work, we aimed to transfer the bioactivity observed for three-dimensional Muc-gels to the surface of two model materials by immobilizing mucin into thin films (Muc-film) using covalent layer-by-layer assembly. We tested how the surface immobilization of mucins affects macrophage responses compared to Muc-gels. We showed that Muc-films on soft polyacrylamide gels mimic Muc-gel in their modulation of macrophage responses with activated gene expression of inflammatory cytokines on day 1 and then dampening them on day 3. Also, the markers of polarized macrophages, M1 and M2, were expressed at the same level for macrophages on Muc-film-coated soft polyacrylamide gels and Muc-gel. In contrast, Muc-film-coated hard polystyrene led to a different macrophage response compared to Muc-gel, having no activated expression of inflammatory cytokines and a different M1 marker expression. This suggested that the substrate mechanical properties and mucin molecular configuration determined by substrate-mucin interactions affect mucin immune-modulating properties. We conclude that mucin immune-modulating properties can be transferred to materials by mucin surface immobilization but will be dependent on the substrate chemical and mechanical properties. 

  • 44.
    Jiang, Kun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. AIMES - Center for the Advancement of Integrated Medical and Engineering Sciences at Karolinska Institutet and KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wen, Xueyu
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Crouzier, Thomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. AIMES - Center for the Advancement of Integrated Medical and Engineering Sciences at Karolinska Institutet and KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Engineering surfaces with the immune modulating properties of mucin hydrogelsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Karabulut, Erdem
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Ankerfors, Mikael
    Material Processes, Innventia AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Adhesive Layer-by-Layer Films of Carboxymethylated Cellulose Nanofibril Dopamine Covalent Bioconjugates Inspired by Marine Mussel Threads2012In: ACS Nano, ISSN 1936-0851, E-ISSN 1936-086X, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 4731-4739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The preparation of multifunctional films and coatings from sustainable, low-cost raw materials has attracted considerable interest during the past decade. In this respect, cellulose-based products possess great promise due not only to the availability of large amounts of cellulose in nature but also to the new classes of nanosized and well-characterized building blocks of cellulose being prepared from trees or annual plants. However, to fully utilize the inherent properties of these nanomaterials, facile and also sustainable preparation routes are needed. In this work, bioinspired hybrid conjugates of carboxymethylated cellulose nanofibrils (CNFC) and dopamine (DOPA) have been prepared and layer-by-layer (LbL) films of these modified nanofibrils have been built up in combination with a branched polyelectrolyte, polyethyleneimine (PEI), to obtain robust, adhesive, and wet-stable nanocoatings on solid surfaces. It is shown that the chemical functionalization of CNFCs with DOPA molecules alters their conventional properties both in liquid dispersion and at the interface and also influences the LbL. film formation by reducing the electrostatic interaction. Although the CNFC-DOPA conjugates show a lower colloidal stability in aqueous dispersions due to charge suppression, it was possible to prepare the LbL films through the consecutive deposition of the building blocks. Adhesive forces between muttilayer films prepared using chemically functionalized CNFCs and a silica probe are much stronger in the presence of Fe3+ than those between a multilayer film prepared from unmodified nanofibrils and a silica probe. The present work demonstrates a facile way to prepare chemically functionalized cellulose nanofibrils whereby more extended applications can produce novel cellulose-based materials with different functionalities.

  • 46.
    Karlsson, Pernilla Rose-Marie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Swelling of Cellulose-Based Fibrillar and Polymeric Networks Driven by Ion-Induced Osmotic Pressure2020In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 36, no 41, p. 12261-12271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose-based model materials in the form of fibrillar networks and macromolecular hydrogels were used to investigate the ion-induced swelling in relation to the elasticity and structure of the network. Both networks were charged by the introduction of carboxyl groups onto the cellulose surface, and the dimensions of the networks in aqueous solution were measured as a function of pH. The use of cellulose-model materials that contained either noncrystalline cellulose or cellulose I fibrils made it possible to model the effect of the ion-induced osmotic pressure of a delignified wood fiber wall. The noncrystalline hydrogels represented the noncrystalline domains of the fiber wall and the fibrillar network represented the supramolecular network of cellulose I fibrils of the fiber wall. The experimental results were compared to swelling potentials computed using the Donnan theory, and it was found that the ion-induced water uptake within the cellulose networks followed the theoretical predictions to a large extent. However, fibrillar networks were found to plastically deform upon swelling and deviated from the ideal Donnan theory for polyelectrolyte gel networks. Upon addition of salt to the aqueous phase surrounding the cellulose materials, both hydrogels and fibrillar networks deviated from the Donnan theory predictions, suggesting that structural differences between the networks impact their swelling.

  • 47.
    Karlsson, Rose-Marie Pernilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. RISE Bioeconomy.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Elasticity and Ion-Induced Swelling of Cellulose Fibrillar Networks and GelsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Karlsson, Rose-Marie Pernilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. RISE Bioecon, Box 5604, S-11486 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Yu, Shun
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Pendergraph, Samuel Allen
    RISE Bioecon, Box 5604, S-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hellwig, Johannes
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Carbohydrate gel beads as model probes for quantifying non-ionic and ionic contributions behind the swelling of delignified plant fibers2018In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 519, p. 119-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Macroscopic beads of water-based gels consisting of uncharged and partially charged beta-(1,4)-D-glucan polymers were developed to be used as a novel model material for studying the water induced swelling of the delignified plant fiber walls. The gel beads were prepared by drop-wise precipitation of solutions of dissolving grade fibers carboxymethylated to different degrees. The internal structure was analyzed using Solid State Cross-Polarization Magic Angle Spinning Carbon-13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Small Angle X-ray Scattering showing that the internal structure could be considered a homogeneous, non-crystalline and molecularly dispersed polymer network. When beads with different charge densities were equilibrated with aqueous solutions of different ionic strengths and/or pH, the change in water uptake followed the trends expected for weak polyelectrolyte gels and the trends found for cellulose-rich fibers. When dried and subsequently immersed in water the beads also showed an irreversible loss of swelling depending on the charge and type of counter-ion which is commonly also found for cellulose-rich fibers. Taken all these results together it is clear that the model cellulose-based beads constitute an excellent tool for studying the fundamentals of swelling of cellulose rich plant fibers, aiding in the elucidation of the different molecular and supramolecular contributions to the swelling.

  • 49.
    Kaufman, E. D.
    et al.
    Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State UniVersity, Raleigh, North Carolina.
    Belyea, J.
    Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State UniVersity, Raleigh, North Carolina.
    Johnson, M. C.
    Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State UniVersity, Raleigh, North Carolina.
    Nicholson, Z. M.
    Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State UniVersity, Raleigh, North Carolina.
    Ricks, J. L.
    Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State UniVersity, Raleigh, North Carolina.
    Shah, P. K.
    Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State UniVersity, Raleigh, North Carolina.
    Bayless, M.
    Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State UniVersity, Raleigh, North Carolina.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface Chemistry.
    Feldötö, Zsombor
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface Chemistry.
    Blomberg, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface Chemistry.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface Chemistry.
    Franzen, S.
    Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State UniVersity, Raleigh, North Carolina.
    Probing Protein Adsorption onto Mercaptoundecanoic Acid Stabilized Gold Nanoparticles and Surfaces by Quartz Crystal Microbalance and ζ-Potential Measurements2007In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 23, no 11, p. 6053-6062Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adsorption characteristics of three proteins [bovine serum albumin (BSA), myoglobin (Mb), and cytochrome c (CytC)] onto self-assembled monolayers of mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) on both gold nanoparticles (AuNP) and gold surfaces (Au) are described. The combination of quartz crystal microbalance measurements with dissipation (QCM-D) and pH titrations of the zeta-potential provide information on layer structure, surface coverage, and potential. All three proteins formed adsorption layers consisting of an irreversibly adsorbed fraction and a reversibly adsorbed fraction. BSA showed the highest affinity for the MUA/Au, forming an irreversibly adsorbed rigid monolayer with a side-down orientation and packing close to that expected in the jamming limit. In addition, BSA showed a large change in the adsorbed mass due to reversibly bound protein. The data indicate that the irreversibly adsorbed fraction of CytC is a monolayer structure, whereas the irreversibly adsorbed Mb is present in form of a bilayer. The observation of stable BSA complexes on MUA/AuNPs at the isoelectric point by zeta-potential measurements demonstrates that BSA can sterically stabilize MUA/AuNP. On the other hand, MUA/AuNP coated with either Mb or CytC formed a reversible flocculated state at the isoelectric point. The colloidal stability differences may be correlated with weaker binding in the reversibly bound overlayer in the case of Mb and CytC as compared to BSA.

  • 50.
    Kumar, Tharagan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Soares, Ruben R. G.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ali Dholey, Leyla
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ramachandraiah, Harisha
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Abbasi Aval, Negar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Aljadi, Zenib
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Inst, AIMES Ctr Adv Integrated Med & Engn Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Multi-layer assembly of cellulose nanofibrils in a microfluidic device for the selective capture and release of viable tumor cells from whole blood2020In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 12, no 42, p. 21788-21797Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to reports by the World Health Organization (WHO), cancer-related deaths reached almost 10 million in 2018. Nearly 65% of these deaths occurred in low- to middle-income countries, a trend that is bound to increase since cancer diagnostics are not currently considered a priority in resource-limited settings (RLS). Thus, cost-effective and specific cancer screening and diagnostics tools are in high demand, particularly in RLS. The selective isolation and up-concentration of rare cells while maintaining cell viability and preventing phenotypic changes is a powerful tool to allow accurate and sensitive downstream analysis. Here, multi-layer cellulose nanofibril-based coatings functionalized with anti-EpCAM antibodies on the surface of disposable microfluidic devices were optimized for specific capture of target cells, followed by efficient release without significant adverse effects. HCT 116 colon cancer cells were captured in a single step with >97% efficiency at 41.25 mu L min(-1) and, when spiked in whole blood, an average enrichment factor of similar to 200-fold relative to white blood cells was achieved. The release of cells was performed by enzymatic digestion of the cellulose nanofibrils which had a negligible impact on cell viability. In particular, >80% of the cells were recovered with at least 97% viability in less than 30 min. Such performance paves the way to expand and improve clinical diagnostic applications by simplifying the isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and other rare cells directly from whole blood.

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